Browning BDA9/BDAO

     Notes: These pistols were at first sold only in the US, and not marketed in Europe until many years after they were introduced in the US in 1978.  The operation is a clever modification of John Browning’s action used on the M1911 and High Power, using the High-Power unlocking procedure and combining it with a short-recoil system and using machined in rails and locking lugs. The BDA has an ambidextrous safety/uncocking lever. 

     There are several variants of the BDA9 built: the BDA9S with a 4.5-inch barrel, the BDA9M with a 3.75-inch barrel, the BDA9C, also with a 3.75” barrel but with a smaller grip and single-stack magazine, and the BDAO, a double-action-only version of the BDA9S.  (The BDAO was not introduced until 1995.)  There is also a rare weapon, the BDAOc, which is a compact version of the BDAO that was produced in very small numbers for less than a year.

     The DA140 is a predecessor of the BDA that was only moderately successful, even in the US (it’s target market).  It is similar to the BDA9S, but is chambered in .380 ACP, and has a smaller ejection port. The DA140 has a light aluminum frame instead of a steel frame. It was meant to replace the M1910, though it is quite a bit larger than that weapon.

     The BDA380 is a smaller version of the Hi-Power. It was designed primarily for police and civilian use.  Most of these weapons were made in .380 ACP caliber, but some were also built in .32 ACP, intended primarily for females.

     The BDA is closely related to the SiG-Sauer P220, made with partnership with SiG, to the extent that some US import versions were marked “SiG-Sauer P220.”

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The BDAO is a very rare weapon.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BDA9S

9mm Parabellum

0.87 kg

9, 14

$243

BDA38S

.38 Super

0.87 kg

9, 14

$338

BDA45S

.45 ACP

0.95 kg

7

$399

BDA9M

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

14

$235

BDA9C

9mm Parabellum

0.54 kg

7

$214

BDAO

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

14

$244

BDAOc

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

14

$235

DA140

.380 ACP

0.74 kg

14

$228

BDA380

.380 ACP

0.65 kg

12

$117

BDA380

.32 ACP

0.56 kg

13

$97

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BDA9S

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

BDA38S

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

9

BDA45S

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

BDA9M

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

BDA9C

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

BDAO

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

BDAOc

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

DA140

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

BDA380 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

BDA380 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

Browning BDM

     Notes: The BDM was the culmination of a long series of attempts by FN to supplement (and possibly one day, replace) the HP35 series of pistols with a more modern series of pistols.  The BDM was actually conceived, designed, and is built by FN-USA in their Utah facility, and was introduced in 1991.  The HP35 is a very hard act to follow, but the BDM is slowly gaining popularity.  The BDM was completely a product of the Browning side of the FN-Herstal house; it was designed and developed in their US facilities and had no input from the rest of FN. This is because the Browning people at the time felt like every FN pistol was becoming too exotic or just another HP35 iteration – and they wanted something fresh. They canvassed shooters, military, police officers, and competition shooters, for their ideas of a good pistol. Though the BDM was introduced in 1991, it was rapidly taken back off the market; one of the BDM’s first customers was the US Secret Service, and they quickly discovered that when using the +P+ ammunition customarily used by their agents, parts wore out and broke in short order.  FN withdrew the BDM to beef up the parts; it took almost a year before the BDM was once again ready (and it cost FN the Secret Service order), but it resulted in a far stronger pistol.

     The BDM features an interesting fire mechanism: a rotating lever on the left side of the slide allows the shooter to choose between traditional double-action operation or double-action-only operation (hence BDM, or “Browning Double-Mode).  The shooter can also manually thumb-cock it, giving him a single-action shot. (Of course, the BDM resets to DA or DAO mode.) This ability to be thumb-cocked also gives the shooter to try a cartridge that did not go off again. The BDM changes from DA to DAO mode by turning a screw on the left side of the slide with a screwdriver built into the floorplate of the magazine. The BDM is a very streamlined design despite the high magazine capacity, and is built primarily of strong, yet lightweight steel alloy that also makes the BDM light in weight despite its structural strength.  The grip is of one-piece polymer with excellent checkering patterns on the sides, frontstrap, and backstrap, ensuring a secure grip; this idea was taken from the Russian Makarov.  The BDM uses a 4.73-inch barrel, with fixed 3-dot-type sights similar to the Novak combat sights used by Smith & Wesson for some of its pistols, and the rear sight has protective ears.  The rear sight is adjustable. The magazine well is beveled to aid in reloading, and the magazine release is partially shielded by a raised thumbrest to help prevent accidental magazine releases.  Though it is unusual for a modern pistol, the BDM has a lanyard loop at the bottom of the grip near the bottom.  Parts are stamped out of investment casting, an idea pioneered by Ruger.

    The BDM is noted for its slim profile, which is smaller than almost all pistols of its class, and fits small-to-medium hands. The standard finish is matte black, a version with a chrome-finished frame and slide was also introduced in 1997.  About the same time, a version called the BDM Practical was added to the line; this version is for the most part the same as the standard BDM, but has Pachmayr Signature rubber ergonomic grips and an adjustable rear sight.  A little later, two more versions were also added: the BDMD, which adds a decocker, and the BDMDAO, which uses only DAO (double-action-only) operation and therefore does not have the selection lever.  For game purposes, all of these are identical to the standard BDM.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Only the standard BDM exists as a factory-built weapon in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BDM

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

15

$245

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BDM

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Browning Black Label Medallion

     Notes: A Black Label Medallion may be thought of as a BDA380 brought up to date – both are based on the 1911 (the Medallion more so), though the Medallion is more compact despite the M1911 styling, especially in the grip, which accommodates only a single-stack magazine..  It is noted in Handguns magazine that the Black Label Medallion is a 1911 in .380, not a shrunken 1911, but one designed for .380. The two-toned finish is striking, with a black frame and barrel and stainless slide, with black-striped grips at the rear, black-lined serial number and markings, and black hammer, trigger and sights.  (The trigger is also skeletonized., and made of alloy) The grip plates are of handsome rosewood, checkered, with a Browning stylized gold emblem in the missile. The grips and mainspring housing are flat, with a bump for positive engagement for the grip safety.

     The Medallion Pro comes in several versions.  The Pro Compact is a commander-sized weapon with a 4.25-inch barrel.  Underneath the finish is a slide of stainless steel, and underneath the black barrel is stainless steel. The frame is of composite material. Variants of the Pro Compact include having G10 grips, Laminate grips, with dovetailed front and rear sights and able to mount even scope rings, 3-dot night sights, adjustable rear sight, mounting holes for Weaver or Picatinny Rails, above the slide and below the dust cover, and different finishes,

     The Medallion comes with an all-matte-black finish, but features similar to a stock Medallion Pro. The barrel, however, is 3.675 inches. The grips are black checkered rubber.

     A Special Pro Subcompact has a slightly shorter barrel at 3.33 inches, and one only slightly longer at 3.58 inches. It has the same base finish of the Medallion Pro.

     All Medallions have the same options as the Medallion Pro. IRL, the Medallion is much less expensive than the Medallion Pro, regardless of barrel length of the Medallion Pro.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Medallion

.380 ADP

0.48 kg

8

$219

Medallion w/Rail

.380 ADP

0.49 kg

8

$222

Medallion Pro (4.25” Barrel)

.380 ADP

0.51 kg

8

$225

Medallion Pro (4.25” Barrel) w/Rail

.380 ADP

0.52 kg

8

$227

Medallion Pro (3.33” Barrel)

.380 ADP

0.46 kg

8

$215

Medallion Pro (3.33” Barrel) w/Rail

.380 ADP

0.47 kg

8

$217

Medallion Pro (3.58” Barrel)

.380 ADP

0.47 kg

8

$218

Medallion Pro (3.58” Barrel) w/Rail

.380 ADP

0.48 kg

8

$221

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Medallion

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

Medallion Pro (4.25” Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

11

Medallion Pro (3.33” Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

8

Medallion Pro (3.58” Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

9

 

Browning Buck Mark

     Notes: These are high-quality sporting pistols for plinking, target shooting, and the hunting of small animals (varmints).  They are sturdily-built and designed for outdoor use.  Despite this, the Buck Mark was originally introduced in 1985 as an economy version of the Challenger III (see below), and the original Buck Mark Standard had plastic grips and a square-section bull barrel for ease of manufacture. The Standard is the base weapon; it come in a variety of barrel lengths, but the standard length of 5.5” is shown below.  The Standard’s rear sight is adjustable, but this requires the use of a rather tiny-headed Allen wrench. The Varmint is has no iron sights, a scope rail (a telescopic sight is included in the cost of the weapon), a wooden forend which may be removed as desired, and a bull 9.875-inch barrel.  The Bullseye was introduced in 1996; it has an adjustable trigger and an adjustable rear sight, and a 7.25-inch barrel interchangeable with other Buck Mark barrels.  The Buck Mark Micro Standard is the smallest and lightest member of the Buck Mark series, with a 4-inch barrel. The Buck Mark Target has a barrel similar to the Silhouette, but has a serrated sighting rib atop the barrel and improved adjustable sights, and both the front and rear sights are adjustable.

     Several models of the Buck Mark are identical to other Buck Marks for game purposes.  The Target is a Standard with improved adjustable sights, a sighting rib, and a few minor cosmetic changes. The Buck Mark Plus is a luxury Buck Mark Standard; it has hardwood grips. The Buck Mark Camper is sort of a no-frills version of the Standard for the most part, but has a more weatherproof finish (either matte blue or nickel-plated), adjustable 3-dot sights, and molded composite grips. The Gold is similar, but has a full sighting rib and a gold-plated frame. The Buck Mark Gold Target is identical to the Buck Mark Gold for game purposes, but the rear sight is a micrometer sight and the front sight is hooded.  The Buck Mark Standard Nickel is also similar, but has a nickel-plated frame. The Buck Mark Nickel Target is the same as the Target, but has a nickel-plated frame. The Buck Mark Blue Target is similar to the Target, and has an adjustable sight, a sectional sighting rib, a micrometer rear sight, and a hooded front sight (and of course, a blued finish, with walnut grips). The Buck Mark Field is almost identical to the Buck Mark Blue Target, but the rear sight is a normal adjustable one and the front sight is not hooded, and it is deep blued. The Micro Standard Plus is a Micro Standard with shaped wood grips.

     The Buck Mark Silhouette has high-profile adjustable rear and front sights, a wooden forestock and 9.875-inch bull barrel.  The Silhouette Unlimited is essentially the same, except for its huge 14-inch bull barrel; it’s virtually a stockless carbine.      

     Twilight/Merc 2000 Notes: These weapons could sometimes be found in military and government use modified with silencers (especially the Standard and Micro Standard), but this was a rare modification.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Buck Mark Bullseye

.22 Long Rifle

1 kg

10

$152

Buck Mark Gold

.22 Long Rifle

1.03 kg

10

$135

Buck Mark Micro Standard

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$120

Buck Mark Standard

.22 Long Rifle

1.02 kg

10

$136

Buck Mark Silhouette

.22 Long Rifle

1.5 kg

10

$182

Buck Mark Target

.22 Long Rifle

1.03 kg

10

$120

Buck Mark Unlimited Silhouette

.22 Long Rifle

1.81 kg

10

$224

Buck Mark Varmint

.22 Long Rifle

1.36 kg

10

$354

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Buck Mark Bullseye

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Buck Mark Gold

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Buck Mark Micro Standard

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Buck Mark Standard

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Buck Mark Silhouette

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

18

Buck Mark Target

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Buck Mark Unlimited Silhouette

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

25

Buck Mark Varmint

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

18

 

Browning Hi-Power HP35

     Notes: First produced in 1935, the Hi-Power (also known, particularly in Europe, as the GP35 – Grande Puissance, which is French for High Power) became not only one of the most common pistols ever made, but one of the most imitated.  John Browning was quite a rich man due to his numerous patents on earlier weapon designs and concepts, but he was never interested in manufacturing his own weapons, preferring to sell or license the patents to other companies (which was more lucrative than actually building the weapons in any factory he might have to set up).  He found a willing partner in FN of Belgium, and also sold some of the workings of the HP35 to others.  The HP35 had a slow start, but by World War 2 it was already one of the most popular military, police, and civilian pistols available.  Licensed and unlicensed production is still taking place all over the world, and has been since World War 2 when Belgian FN facilities were taken over by the Nazis and primary production of FN weapons moved to the Inglis factory in Canada for the duration of the war.  The HP35 has become one of the longest-production firearms in history.

     In the 1950s, until the 1960s, HP35’s were produced with an aluminum alloy frame.  These were at first aimed at the commercial market, but did not prove successful in that market.  However, the Osterrichsche Landes Gendarmerie (Austrian State Police) adopted the aluminum alloy frame version as their standard service pistol in the 1960s, which they used until replaced by the Glock 17 in the early 1980s.

     The operation was so innovative that most of the pistols designed after it had the same operation of a derivative of it. The HP35’s double-stack high-capacity magazine was especially innovative for its time.  Despite the high-capacity magazine, the HP35 has a slim, comfortable grip (some say the best-designed factory grip in the world).  The standard barrel length is 4.7 inches.  The trigger mechanism, however, is a bit complex, not only hindering the work of armorers and gunsmiths but also giving the HP35 a bit of a stiff trigger pull.  Until the mid-1990s, HP35s had sights that were quite small and difficult to line up, and this problem persists on many foreign-built versions (licensed and unlicensed).  Luckily, the HP35 is one of those pistols that possess good natural pointing qualities – no doubt John Browning’s influence.  When the magazine release is pushed, the magazine does not simply fall out; it pops out a bit and the shooter must remove it from the weapon.  This can be a two-edged sword – magazines are not easily lost, but it often presents a problem in military use.  Virtually all HP35s are chambered for 9mm Parabellum, the HP35 was also made in a 7.65mm Parabellum version (primarily for sale to civilians in countries where the use of “military” cartridges is forbidden to civilians).  A variant called the HP35/40 was introduced in 1994, chambered for .40 Smith & Wesson, with an adjustable rear sight and a barrel extended to 5 inches to allow the cartridge to function better.  Over the years, several companies have also made kits to convert the HP35 to fire other cartridges, with .22 Long Rifle and .41 Action Express being the most common of these. (“Generic” figures for these conversions are presented below.)

     The Competition model is the same weapon, but with 6-inch barrel as opposed to a 4.7-inch barrel of the standard HP35; it also has adjustable sights and usually a better finish.  The Mark 2 is a version produced using more modern methods and materials; it has anatomical grip plates, better sights, and an antiglare finish.  (The Chinese make a version of the Mark 2, known as the Type 88SP.)  The Mark 3 is a Mark 2 built stronger and with even newer production methods; the rear sight may be removed and replaced with an adjustable sight.  The Hi-Power Practical is a new version of the Mark 3 introduced in 1993; it has Pachmayr Signature rubber grips, and has a light nickel alloy frame and steel slide.  It is also slightly smaller than the standard Hi-Power Mark 3.  The 75th Anniversary Model is somewhat smaller with a barrel of 4.625 inches, and has polished black nitride finish with gold-inlaid engraving.

     One more version of the Hi-Power bears mentioning: the John Inglis version.  By World War 2, several friendly countries (though the countries may be occupied, there were in many cases “free forces” that consisted of cadres and small numbers of troops of the occupied nations in England or Canada) faced the fact that the source of the most advanced pistol of the time, the HP35, was in occupied Belgium.  A Canadian gunmaker (mostly of shotguns and rimfire rifles) named John Inglis announced that he could take on a decent amount of HP35 manufacturing.  These “Canadian Hi-Powers” were used to equip Canada, Britain (to an extent; Britain was also building it’s own copies of foreign weapons) and the Greeks, as well as the SAS and OSS.  There are some minor weight and barrel-length differences (4.65 inches), but were otherwise almost total Hi-Power copies, and use the same firing line on the chart as an HP35.

     Another version that bears mentioning was introduced in 2013, and was a product of Browning/FN and Crimson Trace.  A pre-zeroed LaserGrip was added to the top of the grip plate (which was also modified).  This, though pre-zeroed, could still be adjusted by a shooter, or taken back to factory settings.  For game purposes, it is equivalent to a High Power Mk 3, except for the cost of the laser (in game terms).

     Powder River Precision in the US has produced a custom version of the Hi-Power, based on the Mark 3 version.  Their Hi-Power is finished in matte black, except for the screws, hex nuts, and controls, which are gloss blued.  The pistol is completely dehorned, including the sights and hammer.  The front sight has been replaced with a dovetailed serrated face, while the rear sight is a Heinie Lo-Mount sight.  The front of the pistol is as flat-faced as possible for those who practice sight-cocking.  The barrel has been replaced with a hand-fitted Bar-Sto barrel, which is the same 4.7 inches long.  The trigger is a widened C&S components, with a pull weight of just over 5.5 pounds. (It still has the touch of creepiness inherent to all Hi-Powers; creepiness cannot totally be removed from the Hi-Power due to the design, but PRP removes it as much as possible.)  The gripframe is stippled for a surer grip.  A loop hammer and an extended beavertail has been added to cure the hammer bite associated with Hi-Powers.

     At the end of the year 2017, Browning once again stopped producing the Hi-Power in most of its iterations, though the Mark 2, Mark 3, Practical, and the 75th Anniversary Model remain in production (limited production, in the case of the Anniversary Model).  Of course, the Crimson Trace and Puwder River versions, being built or modified by different companies, remained in their limited production. Despite the stoppage of production, there are enough Hi=Powers in circulation that finding one on the open market should present little problem, though RL prices will probably increase.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HP35

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

13

$245

HP35 (Aluminum Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.65 kg

13

$246

HP35 Competition

9mm Parabellum

0.99 kg

13

$258

Hi-Power Mark 2

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

13

$245

Hi-Power Mark 3

9mm Parabellum

0.93 kg

13

$245

Hi-Power Practical

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

13

$248

HP35/40

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.06 kg

10

$321

HP35 Rimfire Conversion

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$126

HP35 .41 AE Conversion

.41 Action Express

1.09 kg

10

$335

HP35 75th Anniversary Model

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

13

$244

Browning/John Inglis M1935

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

13

$245

Browning/Crimson Trace High Power

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

13

$645

Powder River Precision HP35 Mk 3

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

13

$247

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

HP35/75th Anniversary Model

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

HP25 (Aluminum Alloy)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

HP35 Competition

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

Hi-Power Mark 2

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Hi-Power Mark 3

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Hi-Power Practical

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

HP35/40

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

Rimfire Conversion

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

.41 AE Conversion

SA

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

Powder River Precision HP35 Mk 3

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Browning/FN HP-DA

     Notes: Though its HP35 ancestry is obvious, FN is quite loath to emphasize any connection between the HP35 and HP-DA, without offering any sort of explanation for this.  Nonetheless, most experts acknowledge that the HP-DA is an improved, double-action variant of the Hi-Power, with a somewhat greater magazine capacity.  The trigger guard is larger for use with gloves, and the trigger guard is also squared with a finger rest.  The grips are wraParound plastic moldings instead of simple grip plates.  The trigger is slightly forward of the trigger of the HP35, necessitated by the double-action operation.  The length of draw and the pull are said to be a bit more than necessary.  The finish is designed to stop corrosion and not for looks. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HP-DA

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

10, 14, 15

$245

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

HP-DA

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Browning International

     Notes: This match pistol was introduced in 1980.  It was manufactured in Morgan, Utah and Montreal, Canada and not in Belgium.  It has an anatomical walnut grip with an adjustable hand rest, multiple safeties, a gold-plated trigger, and an adjustable rear sight.  A similar model, the Browning M150, is almost identical, but does not have the adjustable hand rest.  The International was removed from production in 1985, replaced by the Buck Mark series.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

International

.22 Long Rifle

1.33 kg

10

 

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

International

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

11

 

Browning M1900

     Notes:  This was the first Browning automatic pistol to be made by FN, and started a long relationship between John Browning and Fabrique Nationale.  It is a pure recoil weapon, built to keep the number of parts required to a minimum.  Though the M1900 was produced in huge numbers, it was never officially adopted by any country’s military forces, though unofficially, it was used by Russia, Belgium, and the Netherlands.  In addition to the ones made by FN, vast amounts were built and sold by China without a license.  Despite it’s large scale use, the M1900 was thought of by many as a somewhat fragile pistol, primarily to its long barrel, slide, and dust cover, which stick out a long ways in front of the pistol.

     In the “Pistol Competition of the Century” which eventually produced the M1911, several companies designed variants of their pistols to fire .45 ACP.  Browning’s modified M1900 entry in .45 ACP (the M1905) was carefully made and strengthened – and the US Army broke it  just as fast as most of the other contestants’ pistols.  (It really was too fragile for such a powerful cartridge.) The single remaining Browning M1905 is now in FN’s pattern room.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M1900

.32 ACP

0.62 kg

7

$125

M1905

.45 ACP

1.45 kg

7

$231

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M1900

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

M1905

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

1m-

 

Browning M1903

     Notes:  This weapon is unusual because it uses blowback operation, which is usually not a good sort of operation with the calibers used for the M1903.  (John Browning made it work, though.)  The M1903 used a 5-inch barrel, longer than most automatic pistols of the day.  Finish was typically blued with molded plastic grip plates, and the sights are rather small, so small as to be almost unusable without considerable practice.  FN also produced an optional kit that included an extended 10-round magazine with an adapter for the attachment of a shoulder stock; these accessories are extremely rare today.  The .32 ACP version is likewise quite rare, as few were made in the first place.

     The Spanish handgun manufacturers at Eibar may possibly have made more copies of the M1903 than FN made real M1903s.  These copies ranged from superb to terrible in quality, and in addition, myriad variants of the M1903 were also made by the Spanish, typically without licenses, especially the copy known as the Ruby.  Actual M1903 production lasted from 1907-1928.  The M1903 is an accurate and tough weapon that was widely adopted throughout Europe, and large amounts are still in use to this day.  The M1903 is widely regarded as the weapon responsible for making the word “Browning” virtually synonymous with “automatic pistol.”

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M1903

.32 ACP

0.91 kg

7

$193

M1903

9mm Browning Long

1 kg

7

$258

Stock Kit

N/A

0.76 kg

10

$21

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M1903 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

With Stock

SA

1

Nil

3

2

Nil

15

M1903 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

With Stock

SA

1

Nil

3

2

Nil

18

 

Browning M1906

     Notes: This is a tiny single-action pocket pistol first designed for civilian self-defense.  It is a small weapon that, oddly enough, was not produced with serial numbers kept either stamped on the weapon or in company records.  More than a million of these pistols were produced.  In 1931, a simpler version of this weapon was produced as the Browning Baby; this version had no grip safety, and about half a million were made.  The Browning Baby was used as a more sophisticated counterpart to the US Liberator pistol during World War 2, dropped by parachute behind enemy lines in France.  The Baby Browning design was changed somewhat after World War 2; more modern materials. Including light alloy, and manufacturing methods made the pistol some 11 millimeters shorter and 140 grams lighter.  Unfortunately, the design was copied by a myriad of weapons makers, becoming one of those infamous “Saturday Night Specials” that punks and criminals are so fond of.  The M1906 and the Baby have a very strong recoil spring and hard trigger pull, usually making a two-handed grip necessary.

     In 2007, the American firm of PSA, after overcoming numerous legal and political hurdles, began producing the Browning Baby again.  This is a reproduction of the pre-World War 2 Browning Baby, and all are made from billet stock.  Aluminum-frame and steel-frame versions are made; game-wise, they are identical to the pre- and post-World War 2 versions.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M1906

.25 ACP

0.35 kg

6

$82

Browning Baby

.25 ACP

0.35 kg

6

$82

Browning Baby (Post-WW2)

.25 ACP

0.21 kg

6

$82

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M1906

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

3

Browning Baby

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

3

Browning Baby (Post WW2)

SA

-1

Nil

0

7

Nil

3

 

 Browning M1910

     Notes: This turn-of-the-20th-century pistol is still in use by some former Belgian colonies in Africa.  The M1910 is sort of a modification of the M1903 and even earlier M1900 model; chamberings are different, the recoil spring is around the barrel instead of being around the guide rod below the barrel, and the barrel is only 3.5 inches long.  The M1910 pioneered developments in design later used in other Browning pistols and the Colt M1911; safety systems are similar to those of the original M1906 models.  Manufacture continued until 1954 (except for interruptions during World Was 1 and 2, and with assembly and sale from parts stores until the late 1960s), and was still carried by military and police officers in some African nations well into the 1990s; most M1910s are, however, collector’s items.

     The M1910/22 (or simply the M10/22) was originally produced at the request of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (changed to Yugoslavia in 1929) in 1922.  The Serbs were interested in a full-sized version of the M1910 with a larger magazine (though early production M1910/22s still used the 7-round magazines).  The barrel of the M1910/22 is a bit over 4.7 inches long, and the grip a little longer.  Oddly, the Serbs wanted the M1910/22 to be able to mount a bayonet, and FN obliged.  The M1910/22 was also built for the Dutch – without the silly bayonet fittings.  When FN was captured after the Nazis invaded Belgium in 1940, they forced FN to continue producing M1910/22s for Nazi use (called the P626(b) in .32 ACP and P641(b) in .380 ACP), and these were issued to Wehrmacht and some Nazi paramilitary and Home Guard formations.  These “Nazi” M1910/22s were built to relatively low standards that just got worse as the war continued.  After World War 2, production M1910/22 parts continued at their former quality until 1959, though complete pistols were assembled and sold as late as the 1970s.

     In the early 1970s, FN produced a modernized version of the M1910/22, named the M125.  This version was internally very similar to the M1910/22 (though built with more uPto-date manufacturing methods and tolerances); externally, the M125 used a squared one-piece slide instead of the rounded two-piece slide of the M1910/22.  The barrel length was a bit shorter at 4.5 inches, and the sights were the same as used on HP35 High-Power Sport Model – totally adjustable.  The M125 was produced only in .32 ACP, but used a larger magazine than the M1910/22.  Other additions included a grip safety and a magazine safety. Grip plates were typically of black polymer (with walnut being an option) and several finishes were available.  The M125 was built and sold at a low rate until the early 1980s.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M1910

.32 ACP

0.58 kg

7

$178

M1910

.380 ACP

0.58 kg

7

$216

M1910/22

.32 ACP

0.73 kg

8

$190

M1910/22

.380 ACP

0.73 kg

8

$229

M125

.32 ACP

0.74 kg

9

$188

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M1910 (.32 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

M1910 (.380 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

M1910/22 (.32 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

M1910/22 (.380 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

M125

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

Browning Nomad/de Tire

     Notes: This pistol, known as the Nomad in the US and the de Tire in Europe, was introduced in 1962 as a light plinking and recreational pistol.  There were two versions, a standard-length model with a 6.75-inch barrel and a compact version with a shorter 4.5-inch barrel.  They have light alloy frames.  Production stopped in 1975.

     About the same time, the Medalist was introduced, this was a target pistol version with a grip designed for a high hold on the weapon.  The barrel length is 6.75-inch inches, and almost the entire medium-heavy barrel is exposed. Above the barrel is a ventilated sighting rib, and the Medalist also has an adjustable V-notch rear sight and a blade front.  Left-handed grips are also available, and the standard Medalist’s grips have a brass deflector to protect left-handed shooters (and to an extent, right-handed shooters, as they too have brass deflectors).  The brass deflectors throw the spent shell up and over the head of the shooter, so that shooters in a firing line are not pelted with ejected brass.  The Medalist has no magazine safety, and the magazine release is at the heel of the grip, as was common among European pistols of the time.  Medalists have steel frames and slides. The barrel has dovetails to attach up three weights, though the weight of the pistol made this mostly unnecessary. The lack of a magazine safety allows individual rounds to be loaded into the breech and be fired; by pressing gently against the manual safety, the Medalist may be dry-fired.  A normal press against the manual safety safes the weapon completely.  Finish was normally deep blue with a gold-plated trigger. Four other versions of the Medalist were produced, with greater degrees of fancy woods, engraving, and inlays, and finishes, and are otherwise the same as the Medalist for game purposes.

     The International Medalist was similar to the Medalist, but was redesigned to fit in the International Shooting Union (ISU) rules.  Though there were many minor differences, such as removal of the barrel weight system, the primary difference was a reduction in barrel length to 5.875 inches.  Later versions had a grip platform to stabilize the firing hand.  The International Medalist is still being manufactured for Europe, though not have been exported to the US since 1980.

     The Challenger/Concours is the luxury version of the Nomad and de Tire; again, this version is known as the Challenger in the US and the Concours in Europe.  This version has a gold-plated trigger, a fine walnut anatomical grip, and an adjustable rear sight.  It also has a dry firing system, to prevent the damage to the firing pin that dry firing normally can do to a rimfire weapon. The Challenger, and Concours, are identical to the Nomad and de Tire for game purposes. Again, the Challenger/Concours came in two barrel lengths, 4.5 inches and 6.75 inches.  Both the Nomad and Challenger were manufactured from 1962-1974.

     A limited edition Challenger, the Challenger Renaissance, was produced for a short time in the mid-1960s.  It differed from the standard Challenger in having a satin nickel appearance to the barrel, hammer, frame, and trigger guard.  Another limited edition, the Gold Line Challenger, is largely blued but with gold-plated lines around the outside edges of the weapon.

     The Challenger II was the successor to the Challenger; it is largely the same as the Challenger except for the manufacturing methods.  It was introduced in 1976, built until 1982 in FN’s Salt Lake City facility, and was largely unknown in Europe.  It is mostly identical to the Nomad for game purposes, but is produced only in a 6.75-inch-barrel version, and has an alloy frame.  Finish is blued, with grips being of phenol-treated hardwood. The Challenger II has a light alloy frame. There were no special or deluxe versions made.

     The replacement for the Challenger II, the Challenger III, is virtually the same as the Challenger II, with the exception of the use of a 5.5-inch bull barrel or 6.75-inch tapered barrel for greater accuracy.  The 6.75” barrel version is called the Challenger III Sporter.  The Challenger III has a light alloy frame. It also has some changes in form that mark it as the predecessor of the Buck Mark series, which replaced the Challenger III in 1986. 

     The Browning Collector’s Association Edition Challenger is a special edition of the Challenger III, using the 5.5-inch bull barrel and otherwise differentiated by decoration and scrollwork. It is difficult to find nowdays, and can fetch a (real-world) high price. It is otherwise the same as the Challenger III for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Nomad

.22 Long Rifle

0.82 kg

10

$148

Nomad Compact

.22 Long Rifle

0.74 kg

10

$125

Medalist

.22 Long Rifle

1.3 kg

10

$148

International Medalist

.22 Long Rifle

1.26 kg

10

$139

Challenger II

.22 Long Rifle

0.82 kg

10

$147

Challenger III

.22 Long Rifle

0.79 kg

10

$136

Challenger III Sporter

.22 Long Rifle

0.83 kg

10

$148

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Nomad

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Nomad Compact

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Medalist

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

International Medalist

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Challenger II

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Challenger III

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Challenger III Sporter

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Browning Pro-9/40

     Notes: This is a polymer-frame pistol similar to the Glock.  The slide is squared similar to the SiG, however.  The controls are ambidextrous.  Stripping is safer than most pistols; most pistols require that the trigger be pulled before takedown, which can be disastrous if the firer does not clear the pistol first.  The Pro-9 and 40 may be stripped without pulling the trigger.  The Pro-9 and 40 also have a chamber loaded indicator. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Pro-9

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

10, 16

$238

Pro-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.84 kg

10

$312

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Pro-9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Pro-40

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10