Rheinmetall APE

     Notes: This is an engineer reconnaissance vehicle that was built for the German Army, based on a shortened version of the Fuchs.  APE stands for Amphibishche Pionererkundungs, or Amphibious Engineer Reconnaissance Vehicle. In practice, only a few were built for German service due to budgetary restraints.

The APE carries a combat engineer team and its equipment, and is used for route reconnaissance and carrying engineer teams to clear obstacles.  The APE is basically a smaller version of the TPz-1 Fuchs; it is essentially a 4x4 version of the 6x6 Fuchs.  The vehicle has large doors in the rear for the team, doors in either side of the cab, and three hatches in the roof of the passenger compartment.   There is a light mount by one of these hatches for a 20mm long-barreled autocannon; this cannon can be used for local defense, but is more commonly used to detonate explosive charges and mines found in its work, and to saw down trees with a few well-placed shots. There are six smoke grenade launchers on each side of the front of the vehicle. This autocannon and cupola are on the left front side; the driver is on the right front. The gunner stands on the seat to fire the autocannon. Other crew is in the rear, and there is a break in the front seats to allow a connection between the back and front.  Two vision ports are found on each side.

     The APE is a route reconnaissance vehicle on steroids-- with its equipment and a digital radio link (on all radios) to higher HQ, the APE can generate enough information to produce maps of its round and surroundings, and clear some minor obstructions. To accomplish its work, the roof is studded with sensor and mapping aerials, from chemical meters to laser rangefinders.  It has a complete NBC overpressure suite and the crew is capable of missions lasting two weeks or more. Information storage is copious and resistant to EMP, and is of the solid-state digital type.  (Earlier versions had a battery of VCRs.) Water help keep the vehicle afloat despite punctures of the shell.  The hull has sensors to measure the precise depth of water and water velocity, including sonar. It can estimate ground conditions and shore slopes and conditions. Its water bilge bumps can keep the vehicle afloat even after the vehicle is penetrated by enemy fire. The tires have central tire pressure regulation, are run-flat, and puncture resistant. Power is provided by a Mercedes-Benz OM-402A Diesel developing 320 horsepower.  The engine and transmission are identical to that of the Fuchs. Swimming propulsion is by two waterjets. Versions used today have a GPS and BMS.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$4,429,662

D, A

2 tons

14.5 tons

4

32

Passive IR (D), 2x Advanced Image Intensification (Crew), Advanced Image Intensification (C, G), Thermal Imager (G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

215/83

59/23/6

375

113

Stnd

W(4)

HF6  HS3  HR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

20mm Rh-202

500x20mm

 

Krupp-MAN Leguan Bridgelayer

     Notes:  This bridging vehicle is based on a heavy MAN truck chassis.  It is used by about a dozen countries, but built in Germany.  The vehicle is modified, with the cab in a lower-slung position, and the bridge occupying the area over the cab and the entire cargo area.  The bridge is 26 meters long and weighs 10 tons; it is MLC 70 and can effectively span 26 meters at an angle of incidence of 10 degrees up or down.  It is made of aluminum alloy, and is essentially the same bridge as on the PSB-1 AVLB. Eight minutes are required to lay the bridge or recover it.  No preparation of the bridging site is needed. The bridge is a mirror image and can be laid and recovered upside down or right-side up, as there is little difference between top and bottom. The bridge is a sliding bridge and has no high profile like the laying of a scissors bridge. The crew does not need to leave the vehicle to lay or recover the bridge. A moveable suspension helps with laying the bridge.

     The truck chassis is a MAN OAF 36.422 VFAE.  The crew sits in the cab at the front of the vehicle, behind large ballistic glass windows and others on each side, of the forward bridgelaying mechanism, giving them a good view of bridge deployment operations.  Their cab is climate-controlled and has NBC overpressure.  One crewmember is in the left side of the mechanism, with his bridgelaying equipment.  The driver is in the right sponson.  A third person could be fit in the right cab if necessary. The do not have overhead hatches, but there are hatches on each side of the cab.  Armament is limited to the crew's personal weapons.  The engine is a MAN D 2866LD/422 turbocharged diesel developing 412 horsepower; the transmission is automatic, but only has two forward gears.  Night vision is limited to NODs, but these are not included in the price. On each side of the bumper are a cluster of three smoke grenade launchers. Suspension is 8x8.

     The Leguan Bridgelayer can also be used to lay ferries, as the bridges are buoyant enough to float with an MLC-50 load.  Up to 42-meter ferries can be assembled.  This vehicle has GPS and a BMS.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$2,556,778

D, A

400 kg

35.6 tons

2

25

Headlights

Open

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

194/76

55/21

400

145

CiH

W(4)

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF2  HS2  HR2

 

EWK M-2

     Notes:  Similar in concept to the French PAA DCAN, this is a German (originally West German) amphibious ferry and bridging system. It is also used by about half a dozen countries, and sold on the open market to civilians.  (One was recently sold on the US TV Show Pawn Stars.) The prototype was the M-2A; the M-2B was the first production version, built for Britain and later (West) Germany.  They were later upgraded to the M-2D variant. The M-2C was designed exclusively for the use of Singapore, and uses a slightly more powerful and easier to maintain engine (Identical for game purposes). The M-2D is modified to MLC-70, or MLC-92 when being used as a ferry.  The M-2 can also be used by lining them up and a trackway placed above them; in this mode, bridges are limited in length only by the number of vehicles available.  The M-2 is no longer offered for sale; it has been replaced in construction by the M-3.

     To use in water, several rubber bladders are inflated by engine gases.  When used in this mode, the vehicles form an MLC-70 class trackway is only one vehicle of that size drives across at once; otherwise, the standard trackway is MLC-50. Engine for most versions is Deutz Model F 8 L 714a Diesel developing 180 horsepower; the M-2C has a Deutz Model F 8 l 413 F Diesel engine, which IRL was less expensive at the time.  Most construction is of high-quality alloys.  Maneuvering in water is done with steerable hydrojets, and there are two anchors to help keep the M-2 still once it is in position. The M-2 has crew heating, air conditioning, and NBC overpressure.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,339,883

D, A

500 kg

22 tons

4

30

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

124/48

35/14/4

1200

63

CiH

W(2)

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF2  HS2  HR2

 

EWK M-3

     Notes: A highly upgraded version of the M-2 designed to address the shortcomings of the M-2, the most obvious of which was the weak horsepower-to-weight ratio.  It was first designed at the behest of the German Army, then Britain jumped on board and participated in the field trials. LRIP began in 1996, and full production began in 1999. Taiwan placed an order for 22 in 1997, and these were delivered in 2002.  It is still offered on the international market.

     Some features from the M-2 have been deleted, but most have been upgraded. Like the M-2, flotation is by inflated rubber flotation bags, though they are larger on the M-3.  The M-3 has a full MLC of 70.  If functioning as ferry, it can operate at MLC 90, but it cannot carry such a vehicle on land. Deploying the M-3 for full riverine operations takes 20 minutes.  The engine is KHD BF 8 L LC 338-horsepower engine.  For amphibious mobility, there are hydrojets on the front and rear and they can rotate 360 degrees. Alternatively, eight M-3s may be deployed end to end to produce one span 100 meters in length. M-3s in NATO service have a BMS and GPS system.  The vehicle has air conditioning, heating, and NBC Overpressure for the cab.

     The crew has a door on either side of the cab; there is a large windshield made of ballistic glass.  The crew has climate controls and NBC overpressure.  The transmission can raise and lower as needed, and the M-3 also has central tire pressure regulation.

     Taiwan and Singapore use an upgraded version known as the M-3G.  This has a more armored cabin, stronger 372-horsepower engine, and a special tropical kit.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

M-3

$2,259,332

D, A

500 kg

25.3 tons

3

16

Headlights

Shielded

M-3G

$672,746

D, A

500 kg

25.36 tons

3

16

Headlights

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

M-3

167/65

46/18/5

1200

123

CiH

W(2)

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF2  HS2  HR2

M-3G

173/67

48/18/5

1200

135

CiH

W(3)

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF5  HS4  HR2*

* Belly armor for the M-3G is 6Sp.