GDLS UK Ajax

     Notes: The Ajax is both the designation for the class of vehicles to which the Ajax belongs and the designation of a specific vehicle, a reconnaissance/scout vehicle. The Ajax entered service with the British Army in 2017 and is still undergoing familiarization with the troops and units who are integrating it into their units.  Units equipped with the Ajax are expected to be ready for deployment by 2020. The Ajax was formerly known, during development, as the Scout Specialist Vehicle.  The roots of what would become the Ajax began in the early 1990s and the FRES (Future Rapid Effects Vehicle), which was also to have been a family of related vehicles, but did not bear fruit except in a general way.  The Ajax is based on General Dynamics Land Systemsí ASCOD 2 Common Base Platform, which is also a family of vehicles, and it beat out another family of vehicles developed from BAE/Hagglundsí CV-9040. The Ajax family will replace the CVR(T) range of vehicles currently in service with the British Army.

     The Ajax has a wide turret ring and large turret basket, making it much more flexible and roomy than most AFVs.

     The Ajax is equipped with a state-of-the-art ISTAR package linked to its radios, computers, location and mapping system (based on GPS) and the British T-BMS system.  The ISTAR system uses several high-density solid-state hard drives which can store an estimated 12 TB of data and burst-transmit it to other friendly vehicles and higher HQ. The Ajax is generally connected to higher headquarters and other Internet capable vehicles via 20 Gbit intelligent open architecture system, which gives high speed internet connectivity as well as allowing for easy upgrading.  This Internet system is the primary method by which the Ajax transmits information to higher headquarters.  It uses the BOWMAN C4I system, which is a system which integrates HF, VHF, and UHF radios used by the Ajax, communicates with dismounted soldiers and other vehicles, and used encrypted frequency-hopping radios.  (This will be replaced with the MORPHEUS C4I system in the future.) The Ajax has a feature which is still relatively rare on AFVs: an acoustic shot detection system (actually, three total).  All crewmembers have an LCD screen, and have 100% access to all information the sensors find around them, BMS data, and vehicle state data.  The Ajax has a limited weather reconnaissance function, able to measure wind, barometric pressure, and general weather conditions. 

     Armor is of course classified, but rumors say that the Ajax is able to stop hits from 35mm autocannons from the front, 20mm autocannons from the sides, and 14.5mm rounds from the rear. The turret is said to have similar levels of protection, or perhaps slightly less.  Rumors also state that the armor is a combination of RHA, spaced armor, and composite armor in some strategic shots.  Iíll admit Iím not fond of rumor mills, but Iíll stat this in below. There are armored track skirts and an obvious piece of added armor on the upper sides of the vehicle.  Photos indicate that the Ajax is usually clad in radar and IR-reflective /absorbent camouflage-net-like form-fitting sheets, and the engine has IR suppression.  These two give the Ajax Stealth 1 and IR Stealth 2.  The floor armor is said to be very thick and includes spaced armor, able to take the blast of a 10-kilogram antiarmor mine. The tracks have unspecified resistance to mines, and are stronger than standard tracks. The Ajax can mount ERA or NERA on the glacis, hull sides, turret front, and turret sides.  The armor is also modular; when more advanced armor is available or the armor is damaged, the old armor can be easily removed and replaced.  The Ajax can also be equipped with cage armor; the Ajax is set up for this, but it is anticipated that it is only a contingency, since equipping the Ajax with cage armor would negate the Ajaxís Stealth rating.

     The Ajax has a crew of three: the driver, gunner/intelligence specialist, and the commander/intelligence specialist.  The driver is in the front left of the hull behind the glacis, while the gunner is normally stationed down in the turret, and the commander down inside or standing in his hatch on the turret right.  The gunner also has a hatch on the top turret right, but once the mission starts, he rarely uses it, staying inside with his sensor suite.  The gunner is the primary intelligence specialist, while the commander is generally on the lookout for hazards and enemy units, but also evaluates and gathers some intelligence data.  The commander is also responsible for monitoring the BMS and vehicle state computer.  The driver primarily uses his LCD for navigation and to monitor fuel state, speed, terrain, etc.  However, each crewmember may access 100% of the systems data. The crew has an air conditioner with NBC filters, NBC overpressure, and a passive APS.  The passive RWSís decoy smoke is in addition to two clusters of four smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret, which are electrically-fired by any crewmember as necessary.  As with almost all British vehicles, the Ajax has a ration/water heater; it also has a 30-liter chilled drinking water tank.

     Armament is surprisingly heavy for a reconnaissance vehicle, and advanced: the Ajax is armed with a CTAI 40mm CT40 autocannon, using case-telescoped ammunition which is lighter and more compact than standard 40mm ammunition, allowing for more ammunition onboard.  (A 45mm standard-ammo autocannon was tested, but dropped in favor of the high-powered CTAI gun.) The gunís sensors can automatically find the most threatening targets, and at a command from the gunner, automatically lay the gun on the selected target.  The 40mm CTAS is also able to engage helicopters, low-flying aircraft, and UAVs. The coaxial machinegun is an L94A1 7.62mm weapon.  Ammunition is stored outside of the crew compartment in the turret bustle, except for ready-use ammunition (usually about 100 rounds of 40mm ammunition and 300 rounds of 7.62mm ammunition). The primary fire control system is Thalesí ORION system, which combines all sights, vision equipment, and fire control equipment into an integrated whole. If desired, a Kongsberg RWS may be mounted on the turret ahead of the gunnerís hatch; this RWS is projected to be armed with an M2HB heavy machinegun.  The RWS can be controlled by the commander or gunner. The commanderís station is equipped with a CITS, a reticle to aid in controlling artillery and air strikes, a reticle for the RWS (which may not be used if the Ajax is not equipped with an RWS), and a long-range laser designator with a range of 10,000 meters.

     The Ajax is powered by a German MTU V8 199 TE21 turbocharged diesel with a heat-dampened exhaust, developing 805 horsepower.  This is coupled to an automatic transmission, and the Ajax has power steering and power brakes.  It is also capable of pivot steering.  The Ajax has a 12kW APU for powering systems while on silent watch. The APU is diesel powered, using fuel from the vehicleís fuel tanks, and also having a heat-dampened exhaust and otherwise under the vehicleís armor, giving it protection and making it very quiet. An interesting fact (common to the entire Ajax family) is that it is capable of towing 62 tons, though if towing this much weight, fuel consumption is quadrupled.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Ajax

$1,796,004

D, A

989 kg

42 tons

3

27

2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), 3xLong-Range Day/Night CCD Cameras (D, G, C), Backup Camera (D)

Shielded

Ajax w/RWS

$1,814,422

D, A

989 kg

42.5 tons

3

29

2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), 2nd Gen Thermal Imaging (RWS, Image Intensification (RWS) 3xLong-Range Day/Night CCD Cameras (D, G, C), Backup Camera (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor**

Ajax

137/96

38/27

900

298

Trtd

T5

TF 31Cp  TS22Cp  TR13   HF40Cp  HS27Sp  HR 17

Ajax w/RWS

136/96

38/26

900

298

Trtd

T5

TF 31Cp  TS22Cp  TR13   HF40Cp  HS27Sp  HR 17

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Ajax

+5

Good

40mm CTAI CT40 Autocannon, L94A1

500x40mm, 2000x7.62mm

Ajax w/RWS

+5*

Good

40mm CTAI CT40 Autocannon, L94A1, M2HB (RWS)

500x40mm, 3000x7.62mm, 1000x.50

*The RWS has a +4 Fire Control rating.

**Floor AV is 10Sp.   

 

FV-101 Scorpion

     Notes: Officially named the CVR-T (Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance Ė Tracked) by the British military, the Scorpion (also known as the Scorpion-76 to distinguish it from later 90mm-armed versions) is a light tank and scout vehicle developed to replace the Saladin armored car.  The first versions appeared in British ranks in 1972, and by 1987 over 3500 were built for the British Army and for export.  Most British Scorpions were replaced by the later Scimitar and Sabre, and the Scorpions sold to other countries (especially the turrets, which could be mounted on many different vehicles), but remaining stocks in England were recalled quickly when the war started.  Most British and Australian Scorpions have diesel instead of gasoline engines, but most export versions still have the original engine.  There is a hatch on the front left deck for the driver and two hatches on the turret deck for the commander and gunner.  Commanderís weapons are not fitted by default, but many such field modifications were carried out during the war.   The Scorpion requires a flotation screen to be raised to be amphibious; this takes about 5 minutes.

     The Scorpion-90 is the standard FV-101 Scorpion light tank, but with a 90mm Cockerill gun instead of the standard 76mm Cockerill.  These vehicles were normally built with a diesel engine instead of the normal gasoline engine.  They were built primarily for export, and Malaysia, Nigeria, Venezuela, and a few other countries ordered this variant. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: They were in official service with 15 countries by the time of the Twilight War; one unusual user was the US Army and Marines, who ordered about 40 of them before the war for evaluation purposes, then put them to use during the war with about 12 going to the Marines and the other 28 going to the US Armyís 9th Infantry Division.

     An unusual customer for the Scorpion-90 was the US Marines, who had a number of them on loan from Britain before the Twilight War for evaluation as a fire support vehicle; when the Marines were deployed to Norway, they bought the test vehicles and ordered a few more for use in that campaign. 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Scorpion-76 (Gas)

$144,902

G, A

300 kg

8.07 tons

3

5

Passive IR

Enclosed

Scorpion-76 (Diesel)

$144,937

D, A

300 kg

8.1 tons

3

5

Passive IR

Enclosed

Scorpion-90 (Gas)

$155,189

G, A

300 kg

8.72 tons

3

5

Passive IR

Enclosed

Scorpion-90 (Diesel)

$155,224

D, A

300 kg

8.76 tons

3

5

Passive IR

Enclosed

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Scorpion-76 (Gas)

143/100

33/23/4

423

130

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

Scorpion-76 (Diesel)

149/104

35/24/4

423

68

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

Scorpion-90 (Gas)

134/94

31/22/3

391

130

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

Scorpion-90 (Diesel)

148/104

34/24/4

391

73

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Scorpion-76 (Both)

+2

Fair

76mm Cockerill Gun, EX-34

40x76mm, 3000x7.62mm

Scorpion-90 (Both)

+2

Fair

90mm Cockerill Gun, EX-34

33x90mm, 3000x7.62mm

 

FV-107 Scimitar

     Notes: This is basically a Scorpion with a slightly different turret mounting a 30mm Rarden autocannon instead of the 76mm gun.  Other than being slightly lighter than the Scorpion and having a smoother-riding suspension and better night vision suite, the Scimitar is identical to the Scorpion.  Most British versions are diesel powered, but most export versions are gasoline powered.

     The Sabre is a Scorpion light tank fitted with the turret of the Fox armored car, along with some upgrades in engine, transmission, smoke grenade launchers, and stowage.  This was done to save money on the introduction of a new reconnaissance vehicle. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: 104 Sabre conversions were carried out before the Twilight War, but few were carried out after the war began as it was felt, as many vehicles would be needed as possible.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Scimitar (Gas)

$213.913

G, A

300 kg

7.8 tons

3

4

Passive IR, Image Intensification

Enclosed

Scimitar (Diesel)

$213,948

D, A

300 kg

7.84 tons

3

4

Passive IR, Image Intensification

Enclosed

Sabre

$294,033

D, A

300 kg

8.03 tons

3

5

Passive IR, Image Intensification, Thermal Imaging

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Scimitar (Gas)

87/61

20/14/2

423

65

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

Scimitar (Diesel)

94/66

22/15/2

423

36

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

Sabre

107/75

25/18/3

423

42

Trtd

T3

TF5  TS4  TR4  HF6  HS3  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Scimitar (Both)

+2

Fair

30mm Rarden, EX-34

165x30mm, 3000x7.62mm

Sabre

+3

Good

30mm Rarden, EX-34

200x30mm, 3000x7.62mm

 

FV-432 Radar Vehicle

     Notes: This is an FV-432 armored personnel carrier fitted with a counterbattery/ground surveillance radar set.  The radar has a ground surveillance range of 10 km and a counterbattery range of 20 km.  The radar and the associated takes up almost the entire passenger area of the vehicle, and there is no room for passengers. 

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$295,186

G, D, A

300 kg

19.3 tons

4

13

Radar

Enclosed

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

92/64

21/15

454

70

Trtd

T2

TF2  TS2  TR2  HF6  HS4  HR3

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

1600x7.62mm