PSD VPV

     Notes:  This Czech vehicle is used for support of BMP-series, BRDM-series, and BTR-series vehicles, and other vehicles with weights up to 15 tons.  It has an unofficial designation of BREM-4. It is based on the BVP-2 chassis (the Czech and Slovakian version of the BMP-2), and is very similar in layout and equipment carried to the Russian BREM-2.  The crane is operated by the commander, there is a mechanic that has controls over the winches, and the driver, who is also a mechanic.  Production began in 1984 and 363 VPVs were built.

     The turret is removed and replaced with a cable drum and a hatch to access the winch and crew compartment.  The winch can pull 17 tons, or more with the use of return pulleys; this winch has 120 meters of cable.  The VPV has a dozer blade that is lowered to brace the vehicle in winching and craning operations.  The VPV has a crane mounted at the right rear of the vehicle that can lift 6.5 tons and has a reach of 4.5 meters.  The vehicle is equipped with full tool sets for work on tracked and wheeled vehicles, as well as a tow bar, welding set and cutting tools, a hydraulic jack, and an air compressor. The cargo platform in the rear has a capacity of 1.5 tons. The VPV carries a small computer that has repair and recovery solutions.

     The driver is on the front left, with three vision blocks to the front, with the two end vision blocks turned slightly to the outside.  The front block has a night channel.  The commander is to his left, with the same vision block arrangement, except that there is also a vision block to each side.  However, the commander and driverís positions use primarily the two large windows to the front, and smaller windows to the side.  All are bullet-resistant.  The windows may be protected by an armored shutter, at which point the commander and gunner see through the vision blocks. They have no overhead hatches; instead, they enter and exit through the rear doors.  The remaining mechanic also acts as a gunner; he is equipped with a heavy machinegun is a small-BTR-80-like turret.  The gunner also has night vision through his gunsight, and the machinegun has a collimator-type sight. The gunner enters and leaves through the rear doors; there are no roof hatches except the gunnerís. The gunner is also the crane operator. The crew is protected via an NBC Overpressure system, with a vehicular NBC backup, and has a GLONASS receiver and a mapping computer (it is not a full BMS).  The compartments of the VPV include the powerpack compartment, crew compartment, and the repair and cargo compartment.  Each has an automatic fire detection/suppression system.  Protection is topped off by 4 clusters of four smoke grenade launchers at the space between the glacis and front windows. The VPV is wider than the BVP-2, giving the crew more room to work; an extension tent normally kept above the rear doors can be erected. It is two meters long and gives the crew more room to work.  The VPV also carries a small folding trestle table.

     The engine is a UTD-20/3 multifuel developing 300 horsepower, and the transmission is manual. Fuel capacity has been increased to power all the various mechanized tools.

     The VPV retains the amphibious capability of the BVP-2, but will swamp if waves more than 100mm or currents over 1.2 meters per second are encountered.  Czech forces use the VPV, as does Hungary (where it is known as the BMP-2VPV); a few are also used by Russia to supplement their BREM-2s.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$769,144

D, G, AvG, A

3 tons

14.3 tons

3

11

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (C, G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

148/103

41/29/4

480

111

CiH

T2

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

PKT (G)

2000x7.62mm

 

ZTS VT-72B

     Notes:  Also known as the BRAM-72B, the VT-72B is a recovery vehicle based on the T-72 chassis, built by Slovakia.  It is very similar to the BREM-1 in many respects; visually, the biggest difference is that the VT-72B's crane is on the right side of the superstructure instead of the left.  The VT-72C is a version designed specifically for the Indian Army, and has a more powerful engine and a revised interior arrangement and a BMS. First deliveries began in 1999. The VT-72 series has a secondary role as a mine plow, and a tertiary role of digging large fighting positions. The Czech Republic and Slovakia use the VT-72B in place of the BREM-1; the vehicle is also used by India in a modified form. 

 

The VT-72B

     The T-72's turret is removed and replaced with an armored, raised superstructure.  The crane, on the front right and folding along the right side, can lift 19 tons and has a reach of 7.6 meters, though beyond 2.24 meters, lifting capacity is reduced to 18 tons. There is a load platform on the rear of the superstructure that can carry a load of 4 tons.  The winch is located in the center of the vehicle, has 200 meters of 29-millimeter cable and can pull 40 tons without snatch blocks; the actual drum is in front of the engine. There is also a secondary winch that can pull 2.5 tons and has 400 meters of 6.3-millimeter cable. Its full width dozer blade located at the front of the vehicle can brace the vehicle.  The dozer blade is normally kept straight, but can also bend in the middle for use as a mine plow. The dozer is also used to dig defensive positions for itself and other vehicles.  There is also a rack at the rear of the vehicle for fuel and POL drums and jerry cans; up to 200 liters of various substances may be carried in this rack, and the VT-72B has three pumps which can be attached to the drums or cans to pump their contents as necessary.  Two grease guns are also provided.   The VT-72B carries a 5kW generator for use with power tools or the welding equipment and air compressor (both issued with the vehicle).  Other equipment also includes tools appropriate for working on tanks, like excavating tools, a hydraulic jack and a tow bar.

     The driver is on front left at the top of the superstructure (and raised significantly from the driver's position on the T-72). The commander is to his left and the machinegun is equipped with a cupola with all-around vision blocks and a night channel for the front block.  The weapon is in a cradle and has a collimator sight. It can be aimed and fired from within the vehicle. The commander normally controls the plow, the winches, and the crane, though in practice one or more are controlled by a control box outside the vehicle on a 7.6-meter cable. The other three crewmen are inside the center of the hull; all crewmembers are mechanics, and one is often specifically a turret mechanic. The third crewmember normally operates the crane through a large hatch on the center right roof. The VT-72B has an NBC Overpressure system and a GPS with a mapping computer. There is also a small computer that has the manuals with recovery and repair suggestions. The VT-72B also carries two dismount-versions of the PKM, and an RPG-7 with six rounds. There is an NBC Overpressure system for the crew, with a vehicular NBC backup.  There are no smoke grenade launchers, but the VT-72B can inject diesel fuel (but not alcohol) into its exhaust to create a smoke screen.

 

The VT-72C

     The VT-72C has a Polish S-12U turbocharged diesel.  This engine develops 850 horsepower, and a decent amount of torque. This new engine needed a new transmission, cooling system, radiator and fan, and gear boxes. Tools carried now include a welding and cutting set. The interior is rearranged and revised to create 15% more usable room inside the working compartment; instead of increasing crew comfort, however, the extra room is taken up with spare parts and a BMS and GPS, with the extra radios needed for that system.  The new engine is smaller, so there is a space next to the driver for personal gear.  There are three thermal insulated (essentially large thermoses), with each containing 80 liters of drinking water.  There is also a ration heater and water heater.

 

The VT-72M4 CZ          

     The VT-72M4 CZ was originally a Czech project, but they ran into budgetary problems and Slovakia had some money from NATO to upgrade their military vehicles, so they took over the project from the Czechs.  The project was begun in the Czech Republic in 1999, though its development was slow, and development stopped in 2004 for about five years. The T-72M4 CZ is in limited use by Slovakia and the Czech Republic, but is being actively shopped internationally, and India is reportedly interested.

     The Czechs used used the chassis from a Czech T-72M4 CZ tank as a base, and developed the VT-72M4 CZ.  The VT-72M4 CZ reduces the crew to two, with a third seat available if another mechanic is needed for a mission.  It is a larger and heavier vehicle, carrying more spare parts, computer gear, a BMS and GLONASS with a mapping computer, and tools.  The VT-72M4 CZ has two clusters of five thermal smoke grenade launchers on the left side of the superstructure, able to block IR and thermal imaging as well as image intensification and lasers.  It has a primary winch with a capacity of 31 tons, and up to 93 tons with snatch blocks, with 200 meters of useable cable. The secondary winch can pull 1.02 tons with 400 meters of useable cable.  The crane has a capacity of 19 tons, and has a reach of five meters with a traverse of 280 degrees.  The crane and winch can also be controlled through a remote control, though it is wireless and has a range of about 8 meters. Also available is a dozer blade on the front which can be used to brace the vehicle or dig at the rate of 126 cubic meters per hour.

     The VT-72M4 CZ has updated versions of the VT-72Bís tool set, but also include an air compressor, a chainsaw, a large hand circular saw, and a welding set. A work table and small shelter can be folded out from the rear. The tool sets are more compact than the earlier ones and fit into a smaller space.  Eight fire extinguishers are also carried.   The vehicle has the three insulated drinking water containers, ration heater, and water heater of the VT-72C.  An updated 5kW APU is carried, more compact and reliable than the one on the VT-72B. The rear of the superstructure is a pad for the carrying of a T-72 powerpack or other large cargo, and can carry up to four tons. The engine of the VT-72M4 CZ is larger than that of the VT-72C, so the space next to the driver is about half as large and used to carry portions of the GPS and BMS.  The interior is likewise rearranged and revised, and as the VT-72M4 CZ carries a maximum of three crewmembers, there is a lot more room for tools, spare parts, and even personal equipment, as well as the new equipment required by the BMS and GLONASS, as well as a small computer to help the crew with recovery and repair situations. 

     The driver and commander have advanced vision equipment, including image intensification to the front and rear, and color CCTV to the front and rear.  The commanderís equipment also allows him to aim and fire his machinegun when buttoned up. NBC overpressure protection is provided, as well as a heater and air conditioner.  The powerpack has been replaced by one with a British-made CV-12 1000-horsepower supercharged diesel engine and US-made Allison XTG-411-6 fully automatic transmission.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

VT-72B

$1,242,245

D, A

8 tons

46.5 tons

5

31

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

VT-72C

$1,769,185

D. A

8 tons

46.7 tons

6

31

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

VT-72M4 CZ

$1,932,919

D, A

8 tons

51.5 tons

2+1

36

Passive IR (C), Image Intensification (Dx2, Cx2)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

VT-72B

125/87

35/24

1000+400

290

Stnd

T6

HF120Cp  HS18Sp  HR8

VT-72C

132/93

37/26

1000+400

314

Stnd

T6

HF120Cp  HS18Sp  HR8

VT-72M4 CZ

139/97

39/27

1000+400

371

Stnd

T6

HF 129Cp  HS17Sp  HR 12*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

VT-72B/C

+1

Basic

NSV (C)

500x12.7mm

VT-72M4 CZ

+1

Fair

NSV (C)

960x12.7mm

*Belly armor for the VT-72M4 is 7. The bracing blade may contribute to frontal armor; where is contributes depends upon how the blade is raised.  The blade, when it contributes, has an AV of 6Sp.

 

ZTS MT-72 AVLB

     Notes: As the Slovakians locally produce the T-72, it was natural for them to choose it as a base for an AVLB.  They chose the Czech T-72M4 CZ as a base chassis. The MT-72 is thusfar used only by Slovakia and the Czech Republic, though it is available for export sales. 

     The bridge designed for the MT-72 spans 20 meters; if necessary, two bridges may be laid on top of each other to span 34 meters.  The bridge weighs 4 tons and can support 50 tons.  If necessary, the MT-72 can use the bridge of the MT-55A designed by the Czech Republic (which is also used by Slovakia). The MT-55A bridge spans 18 tons and two can be laid together to span 30 meters. Laying the bridge takes 3 minutes, while recovering it takes 5 minutes.  The bridge is a scissors-type bridge.  It can be laid at an angle of plus or minus 50 degrees and a side slope of 6 degrees to either side.  The surface is textured to provide a better gripping surface. The total width is 3.3 meters, but this is split into two trackways of 1.1 meters, with a space in the middle.  If necessary (usually for camouflage) the bridge can be laid below the surface of water up to 4.2 meters deep, this can also be used when the surface that needs to be spanned is lower than the MT-72.  This, however, takes twice as long.

     The MT-72 cannot swim, but with a special adapter, can ford up to 4.2 meters.  Smoke grenade launchers are not normally mounted, but the MT-72 can inject diesel fuel into its exhaust to create a thick, oily smoke screen.  The T-72M4 CZ is also about a third of a meter longer than the T-72; the powerpack remains the V-64-4Turbochaged diesel developing 840 horsepower and an automatic transmission. This enables it to keep up with assaulting troops.

     The commander and driver are in the center of the vehicle, with the driver ahead of the commander/bridgelayer.  They have a more comprehensive night vision suite than most engineer vehicles, inherited partially from the T-72M4 CZ. The commander is not, however, armed with a vehicular weapon, though he typically has his assault rifle or submachinegun outside of the vehicle and a couple of fragmentation grenades handy for local defense.  The commander also typically carries night vision goggles to allow him to supervise deployment of the bridge at night using a remote control connected to the vehicle with an 8-meter cable from outside of the vehicle.  The MT-72 has an NBC Overpressure system, an automatic fire detection/suppression system, and a BMS with GLONASS and a mapping computer, along with extra radios.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,123,924

D, A

400 kg

41.5 tons

2

38

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), WL/IR Searchlight

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor**

143/100

40/28

1000+400

210

CiH

T6

TF6  TS6  TR6  HF129Cp  HS17Sp  HR 12

*The configuration of CiH is when the bridge is on top of the vehicle, and if hit, no crew hits are possible (they are ignored).

**Floor AV is 8Sp.

 

PSD VPV

     Notes:  This Czech vehicle is used for support of BMP-series, BRDM-series, and BTR-series vehicles, and other vehicles with weights up to 15 tons.  It has an unofficial designation of BREM-4. It is based on the BVP-2 chassis (the Czech and Slovakian version of the BMP-2), and is very similar in layout and equipment carried to the Russian BREM-2.  The crane is operated by the commander, there is a mechanic that has controls over the winches, and the driver, who is also a mechanic.  Production began in 1984 and 363 VPVs were built.

     The turret is removed and replaced with a cable drum and a hatch to access the winch and crew compartment.  The winch can pull 17 tons, or more with the use of return pulleys; this winch has 120 meters of cable.  The VPV has a dozer blade that is lowered to brace the vehicle in winching and craning operations.  The VPV has a crane mounted at the right rear of the vehicle that can lift 6.5 tons and has a reach of 4.5 meters.  The vehicle is equipped with full tool sets for work on tracked and wheeled vehicles, as well as a tow bar, welding set and cutting tools, a hydraulic jack, and an air compressor. The cargo platform in the rear has a capacity of 1.5 tons. The VPV carries a small computer that has repair and recovery solutions.

     The driver is on the front left, with three vision blocks to the front, with the two end vision blocks turned slightly to the outside.  The front block has a night channel.  The commander is to his left, with the same vision block arrangement, except that there is also a vision block to each side.  However, the commander and driverís positions use primarily the two large windows to the front, and smaller windows to the side.  All are bullet-resistant.  The windows may be protected by an armored shutter, at which point the commander and gunner see through the vision blocks. They have no overhead hatches; instead, they enter and exit through the rear doors.  The remaining mechanic also acts as a gunner; he is equipped with a heavy machinegun is a small-BTR-80-like turret.  The gunner also has night vision through his gunsight, and the machinegun has a collimator-type sight. The gunner enters and leaves through the rear doors; there are no roof hatches except the gunnerís. The gunner is also the crane operator. The crew is protected via an NBC Overpressure system, with a vehicular NBC backup, and has a GLONASS receiver and a mapping computer (it is not a full BMS).  The compartments of the VPV include the powerpack compartment, crew compartment, and the repair and cargo compartment.  Each has an automatic fire detection/suppression system.  Protection is topped off by 4 clusters of four smoke grenade launchers at the space between the glacis and front windows. The VPV is wider than the BVP-2, giving the crew more room to work; an extension tent normally kept above the rear doors can be erected. It is two meters long and gives the crew more room to work.  The VPV also carries a small folding trestle table.

     The engine is a UTD-20/3 multifuel developing 300 horsepower, and the transmission is manual. Fuel capacity has been increased to power all the various mechanized tools.

     The VPV retains the amphibious capability of the BVP-2, but will swamp if waves more than 100mm or currents over 1.2 meters per second are encountered.  Czech forces use the VPV, as does Hungary (where it is known as the BMP-2VPV); a few are also used by Russia to supplement their BREM-2s.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$769,144

D, G, AvG, A

3 tons

14.3 tons

3

11

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (C, G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

148/103

41/29/4

480

111

CiH

T2

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

PKT (G)

2000x7.62mm

 

ZTS VT-72B

     Notes:  Also known as the BRAM-72B, the VT-72B is a recovery vehicle based on the T-72 chassis, built by Slovakia.  It is very similar to the BREM-1 in many respects; visually, the biggest difference is that the VT-72B's crane is on the right side of the superstructure instead of the left.  The VT-72C is a version designed specifically for the Indian Army, and has a more powerful engine and a revised interior arrangement and a BMS. First deliveries began in 1999. The VT-72 series has a secondary role as a mine plow, and a tertiary role of digging large fighting positions. The Czech Republic and Slovakia use the VT-72B in place of the BREM-1; the vehicle is also used by India in a modified form. 

 

The VT-72B

     The T-72's turret is removed and replaced with an armored, raised superstructure.  The crane, on the front right and folding along the right side, can lift 19 tons and has a reach of 7.6 meters, though beyond 2.24 meters, lifting capacity is reduced to 18 tons. There is a load platform on the rear of the superstructure that can carry a load of 4 tons.  The winch is located in the center of the vehicle, has 200 meters of 29-millimeter cable and can pull 40 tons without snatch blocks; the actual drum is in front of the engine. There is also a secondary winch that can pull 2.5 tons and has 400 meters of 6.3-millimeter cable. Its full width dozer blade located at the front of the vehicle can brace the vehicle.  The dozer blade is normally kept straight, but can also bend in the middle for use as a mine plow. The dozer is also used to dig defensive positions for itself and other vehicles.  There is also a rack at the rear of the vehicle for fuel and POL drums and jerry cans; up to 200 liters of various substances may be carried in this rack, and the VT-72B has three pumps which can be attached to the drums or cans to pump their contents as necessary.  Two grease guns are also provided.   The VT-72B carries a 5kW generator for use with power tools or the welding equipment and air compressor (both issued with the vehicle).  Other equipment also includes tools appropriate for working on tanks, like excavating tools, a hydraulic jack and a tow bar.

     The driver is on front left at the top of the superstructure (and raised significantly from the driver's position on the T-72). The commander is to his left and the machinegun is equipped with a cupola with all-around vision blocks and a night channel for the front block.  The weapon is in a cradle and has a collimator sight. It can be aimed and fired from within the vehicle. The commander normally controls the plow, the winches, and the crane, though in practice one or more are controlled by a control box outside the vehicle on a 7.6-meter cable. The other three crewmen are inside the center of the hull; all crewmembers are mechanics, and one is often specifically a turret mechanic. The third crewmember normally operates the crane through a large hatch on the center right roof. The VT-72B has an NBC Overpressure system and a GPS with a mapping computer. There is also a small computer that has the manuals with recovery and repair suggestions. The VT-72B also carries two dismount-versions of the PKM, and an RPG-7 with six rounds. There is an NBC Overpressure system for the crew, with a vehicular NBC backup.  There are no smoke grenade launchers, but the VT-72B can inject diesel fuel (but not alcohol) into its exhaust to create a smoke screen.

 

The VT-72C

     The VT-72C has a Polish S-12U turbocharged diesel.  This engine develops 850 horsepower, and a decent amount of torque. This new engine needed a new transmission, cooling system, radiator and fan, and gear boxes. Tools carried now include a welding and cutting set. The interior is rearranged and revised to create 15% more usable room inside the working compartment; instead of increasing crew comfort, however, the extra room is taken up with spare parts and a BMS and GPS, with the extra radios needed for that system.  The new engine is smaller, so there is a space next to the driver for personal gear.  There are three thermal insulated (essentially large thermoses), with each containing 80 liters of drinking water.  There is also a ration heater and water heater.

 

The VT-72M4 CZ          

     The VT-72M4 CZ was originally a Czech project, but they ran into budgetary problems and Slovakia had some money from NATO to upgrade their military vehicles, so they took over the project from the Czechs.  The project was begun in the Czech Republic in 1999, though its development was slow, and development stopped in 2004 for about five years. The T-72M4 CZ is in limited use by Slovakia and the Czech Republic, but is being actively shopped internationally, and India is reportedly interested.

     The Czechs used used the chassis from a Czech T-72M4 CZ tank as a base, and developed the VT-72M4 CZ.  The VT-72M4 CZ reduces the crew to two, with a third seat available if another mechanic is needed for a mission.  It is a larger and heavier vehicle, carrying more spare parts, computer gear, a BMS and GLONASS with a mapping computer, and tools.  The VT-72M4 CZ has two clusters of five thermal smoke grenade launchers on the left side of the superstructure, able to block IR and thermal imaging as well as image intensification and lasers.  It has a primary winch with a capacity of 31 tons, and up to 93 tons with snatch blocks, with 200 meters of useable cable. The secondary winch can pull 1.02 tons with 400 meters of useable cable.  The crane has a capacity of 19 tons, and has a reach of five meters with a traverse of 280 degrees.  The crane and winch can also be controlled through a remote control, though it is wireless and has a range of about 8 meters. Also available is a dozer blade on the front which can be used to brace the vehicle or dig at the rate of 126 cubic meters per hour.

     The VT-72M4 CZ has updated versions of the VT-72Bís tool set, but also include an air compressor, a chainsaw, a large hand circular saw, and a welding set. A work table and small shelter can be folded out from the rear. The tool sets are more compact than the earlier ones and fit into a smaller space.  Eight fire extinguishers are also carried.   The vehicle has the three insulated drinking water containers, ration heater, and water heater of the VT-72C.  An updated 5kW APU is carried, more compact and reliable than the one on the VT-72B. The rear of the superstructure is a pad for the carrying of a T-72 powerpack or other large cargo, and can carry up to four tons. The engine of the VT-72M4 CZ is larger than that of the VT-72C, so the space next to the driver is about half as large and used to carry portions of the GPS and BMS.  The interior is likewise rearranged and revised, and as the VT-72M4 CZ carries a maximum of three crewmembers, there is a lot more room for tools, spare parts, and even personal equipment, as well as the new equipment required by the BMS and GLONASS, as well as a small computer to help the crew with recovery and repair situations. 

     The driver and commander have advanced vision equipment, including image intensification to the front and rear, and color CCTV to the front and rear.  The commanderís equipment also allows him to aim and fire his machinegun when buttoned up. NBC overpressure protection is provided, as well as a heater and air conditioner.  The powerpack has been replaced by one with a British-made CV-12 1000-horsepower supercharged diesel engine and US-made Allison XTG-411-6 fully automatic transmission.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

VT-72B

$1,242,245

D, A

8 tons

46.5 tons

5

31

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

VT-72C

$1,769,185

D. A

8 tons

46.7 tons

6

31

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

VT-72M4 CZ

$1,932,919

D, A

8 tons

51.5 tons

2+1

36

Passive IR (C), Image Intensification (Dx2, Cx2)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

VT-72B

125/87

35/24

1000+400

290

Stnd

T6

HF120Cp  HS18Sp  HR8

VT-72C

132/93

37/26

1000+400

314

Stnd

T6

HF120Cp  HS18Sp  HR8

VT-72M4 CZ

139/97

39/27

1000+400

371

Stnd

T6

HF 129Cp  HS17Sp  HR 12*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

VT-72B/C

+1

Basic

NSV (C)

500x12.7mm

VT-72M4 CZ

+1

Fair

NSV (C)

960x12.7mm

*Belly armor for the VT-72M4 is 7. The bracing blade may contribute to frontal armor; where is contributes depends upon how the blade is raised.  The blade, when it contributes, has an AV of 6Sp.

 

ZTS MT-72 AVLB

     Notes: As the Slovakians locally produce the T-72, it was natural for them to choose it as a base for an AVLB.  They chose the Czech T-72M4 CZ as a base chassis. The MT-72 is thusfar used only by Slovakia and the Czech Republic, though it is available for export sales. 

     The bridge designed for the MT-72 spans 20 meters; if necessary, two bridges may be laid on top of each other to span 34 meters.  The bridge weighs 4 tons and can support 50 tons.  If necessary, the MT-72 can use the bridge of the MT-55A designed by the Czech Republic (which is also used by Slovakia). The MT-55A bridge spans 18 tons and two can be laid together to span 30 meters. Laying the bridge takes 3 minutes, while recovering it takes 5 minutes.  The bridge is a scissors-type bridge.  It can be laid at an angle of plus or minus 50 degrees and a side slope of 6 degrees to either side.  The surface is textured to provide a better gripping surface. The total width is 3.3 meters, but this is split into two trackways of 1.1 meters, with a space in the middle.  If necessary (usually for camouflage) the bridge can be laid below the surface of water up to 4.2 meters deep, this can also be used when the surface that needs to be spanned is lower than the MT-72.  This, however, takes twice as long.

     The MT-72 cannot swim, but with a special adapter, can ford up to 4.2 meters.  Smoke grenade launchers are not normally mounted, but the MT-72 can inject diesel fuel into its exhaust to create a thick, oily smoke screen.  The T-72M4 CZ is also about a third of a meter longer than the T-72; the powerpack remains the V-64-4Turbochaged diesel developing 840 horsepower and an automatic transmission. This enables it to keep up with assaulting troops.

     The commander and driver are in the center of the vehicle, with the driver ahead of the commander/bridgelayer.  They have a more comprehensive night vision suite than most engineer vehicles, inherited partially from the T-72M4 CZ. The commander is not, however, armed with a vehicular weapon, though he typically has his assault rifle or submachinegun outside of the vehicle and a couple of fragmentation grenades handy for local defense.  The commander also typically carries night vision goggles to allow him to supervise deployment of the bridge at night using a remote control connected to the vehicle with an 8-meter cable from outside of the vehicle.  The MT-72 has an NBC Overpressure system, an automatic fire detection/suppression system, and a BMS with GLONASS and a mapping computer, along with extra radios.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,123,924

D, A

400 kg

41.5 tons

2

38

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), WL/IR Searchlight

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor**

143/100

40/28

1000+400

210

CiH

T6

TF6  TS6  TR6  HF129Cp  HS17Sp  HR 12

*The configuration of CiH is when the bridge is on top of the vehicle, and if hit, no crew hits are possible (they are ignored).

**Floor AV is 8Sp.