Morozov BAT-2

     Notes:  The BAT-2 is a combat engineer vehicle used by Russian and Pact forces.  The vehicle is based on a T-64 chassis, and has a large V-shaped dozer blade mounted at the front, used primarily as a mine plow. It is a little wider than the width of the vehicle, and has a variable bow to the “V” shape; the plow can actually be pulled into a dozer shape. In mine plow shape, the blade is 4.2 meters wide, while in dozer configuration, it is 4.5 meters wide. The mine plow may be lifted to 90 degrees, entirely clear of the front. At the rear is a soil ripping blade, which may be lowered or raised, and is the width of the vehicle. The BAT-2 has a crane with a capacity of 2 tons that may reach out 7.3 meters from the vehicle, and may be fitted with pincer-type tools, an auger, and a bucket.  Mounted on the same platform as the crane is a 25-ton capacity winch with 100 meters of cable.  The BAT-2 has a cab up front with large bullet-resistant windows on the front and sides, and it contains the driver on the left and commander on the right.  In the rear section is an entire combat engineer squad; they have bullet-resistant windows on either side of the front of their compartment. The vehicle is protected by an NBC Overpressure system.

     The BAT-2 is equipped with a V-64-5 710 horsepower turbocharged diesel. This engine is derived from the one on the T-72.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$698,604

D, G, AvG, A

6 tons

39.7 tons

2+8

27

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

130/91

38/27

1000

262

Stnd

T6

HF8  HS3 HR3

 

Uralvagonzavod BREM-1 ARRV

     Notes:  This is an ARRV (Armored Repair and Recovery Vehicle) based on the T-72A.  The basic BREM-1 is designed to support the T-72, T-64, and T-80. Though the Soviets reported it as entering service in 1975, other official sources state that is did not enter full production until 1984.  In either case, 342 were built by 1990 when production stopped.  Besides Russia, the BREM-1 is used by various African nations, India, Venezuela, and several former Soviet Republics.  Most these are the improved BREM-1M, designed to support the T-90S tanks that many of these countries also field. It’s main role is to recover damaged or stuck or overturned tanks and IFVs from the battlefield, and its armor suite helps in this regard, as it is meant to work on the front lines.

 

BREM-1

     The turret of the T-72A has been removed and replaced with a raised superstructure.  The main vehicular repair tool is a 4.4-meter crane, able to lift 19 tons at 2.2 meters and 3 tons at its maximum reach of 4.4 meters. It can be used to help recover stuck or overturned vehicles, but it’s main role is to lift turrets clear of a tank for repair and to acts as a jack to facilitate roadwheel, suspension, and track repairs (though the BREM-1 also carries two hydraulic jacks). The BREM-1 may move if the crane is lifting no more than 3 tons, but the suspension locks if the BREM-1 tries to move with more than 3 tons on the crane.  The main winch has a base pull of 25 tons, but this may be doubled with block and tackle, or quadruple that with double blocks and tackle.  The cable is 200 meters.  An auxiliary winch can pull 530 kg, with 425 meters of cable.  The BREM-1 can tow vehicles of up to 50 tons, at a Tr Mov of 48/33.  The dozer blade is primarily used to brace the BREM-1 when using the crane or winches, but can also be used to clear obstacles and dig fighting positions.  It is 3.1 meters wide.

     The BREM-1 has a full complement of tools, including all basic types of tools, an arc welder, and an air compressor.  On the roof is a flat area large enough for a full tank powerplant or 1.5 tons.  A selection of spare parts, including several roadwheels and track sections, are carried. A 5kW APU is carried to power the equipment without turning on the engine.

     The driver is on the front left, with the commander on the front right.  The crane operator is on the top of the superstructure in a cupola with all-around vision blocks.  A fourth mechanic can be carried inside the vehicle as necessary.

     The engine is a V-46 780-horsepower turbocharged diesel engine developing 780 horsepower, with an automatic transmission.

 

BREM-1M

     The BREM-1M is the same base vehicle, but is more powerful to support the T-90S tank.  The main improvement is the use of a V-92S2 engine, developing 1000 horsepower.  The crane is improved to be able to lift a base weight of 28 tons at 2.2 meters or 4.4 tons at 4.4 meters.  The BREM-1M is BMS-compatible, as well as having a GPS and a small computer with repair solutions.  Other details are as per the BREM-1.

 

Vehicles

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

BREM-1

$1,317,201

D, A

2 tons

41 tons

3+1

27

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

BREM-1M

$2,174,544

D, A

1.6 tons

41.8 tons

3+1

29

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicles

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor**

BREM-1

137/96

38/27

1000+400

289

Stnd

T6

HF140Cp*  HS22Sp  HR12**

BREM-1M

165/115

46/32

1000+400

371

Stnd

T6

HF140Cp*  HS22Sp  HR12**

 

Vehicles

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

BREM-1/1M

None

None

NSVT (C)

840x12.7mm

**Roof AV is 8; Floor AV is 8Sp.

 

Kurganmashzavod BREM-2

     Notes:  This is a recovery vehicle based on the BMP-1, in the same way that the BREM-1 is based on the T-72.  It is intended for recovery and repair of the BMP-series of infantry fighting vehicles.  It saw first service in 1982.  Some BMP-1s were also converted to BREM-2s, starting in 1986.

     The turret of the BMP-1 is replaced with an armored plate, and the rear of the vehicle is fitted with a load-carrying platform able to carry a BMP powerpack or something of equivalent weight (1.5 tons). The upper hull mounts a crane with a capacity of 1.5 tons. An auxiliary crane may be mounted to increase this weight to 7 tons, though this crane may not work on its own. The interior of the vehicle houses a 6.5-ton capacity winch, which may be lead out the sides or front or rear.  It’s pulling capacity may be raised to 19.5 tons with two sets of snatch blocks.  Various recovery tools are placed in stowage positions at various locations on the hull roof and sides, including a tow bar, 200 meters of rope, basic, tracked vehicle, small arms, and heavy ordinance tools, and excavating tools.  In addition, a hydraulic jack, arc welder, and air compressor is carried, along with a selection of spare parts. The front of the vehicle has a large dozer blade which is used to brace the BREM-2 in recovery operations and when using the crane.  Russia and other Pact forces use the BREM-2.

     There are 12 smoke grenade launchers on the BREM-2, in two clusters.  One of these clusters is a standard 902V Tuchna smoke grenade cluster, while the second cluster is a TDA thermal grenade launcher.  The layout leaves the driver in his standard position on the front left.  The commander is in the front, slightly offset to the right; he has a pintle-mounted machinegun. The other crewmembers are in seats in the hull; the firing ports of the BMP-1 have been deleted, but the vision blocks are retained.  The rear doors, with their fuel tanks, were also retained, and like the BMP-1, their crews often fill them with water or sand to stop rear hits from setting them on fire. The BREM-2 carries a lightweight folding table and a tent to extend the work area at the rear of it. Later, the sideskirts/mudflaps of the BMP-2 were added, making it more stable when swimming.  The crew is protected by an NBC Overpressure system.

     The engine is inherited from the BMP-1, and is a UTD-20 multifuel developing 300 horsepower.  The BREM-2 also inherits the BMP-1’s manual transmission, and its torsion-bar suspension with shocks on the first and last roadwheels.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$488,738

D, G, AvG, A

2 tons

13.6 tons

4

8

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

154/108

43/30/5

460

89

Stnd

T3

HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Omsk BREM-80U

     Notes:  The intent of the BREM-80U is to replace the BREM-1 with a much improved recovery vehicle based on the T-80U tank chassis. It’s specific design role was to provide a recovery vehicle for the T-80 series, though it has a secondary role of recovering other tanks and some smaller vehicles. It was designed in the late 1980s, but did not enter service until 1998.  The advent of the T-80, with its gas turbine engine, introduced complexities in recovery and repair efforts that it was felt only a new ARV could address.  The BREM-80U has its own deficiencies (including its faulty gas turbine engine) and many feel that the need would be better met by a set of improvements to the BREM-1.  The need for the BREM-80 was made more acute by the introduction of the T-80 series onto the international market.  Many say that while the BREM-80U is an important step, and will do as a stopgap, it cannot meet the needs for which it was designed and may soon have to be upgraded or replaced.  The only export customer so far is Cyprus, who also run a number of T-80Us. It should be noted that the BREM-80U received only low-rate production orders, and never entered full production.

     The BREM-80U is generally similar in layout to the BREM-1, but is greatly improved. The turret of the T-80U is removed and replaced by a raised superstructure.  There are several external stowage boxes on the sides, and roof of the vehicle. (Though the stowage boxes are not armored, the vehicle underneath is.) Mounted on the front left of the BREM-80U is its crane; it has a capacity of 18 tons, or 30 tons with snatch blocks.  Those 18 tons are easily enough to lift out the T-80Us powerpack or lift its turret, but it should be noted that the typical Western tank-based ARV has almost double this lifting power (without snatch blocks). The rear deck can carry the T-80’s powerpack or other large cargoes.  It can rotate 240 degrees.  The main winch can pull 35 tons bare, though with sufficient block and tackle this can be increased to 140 tons.  (Again, note the superior winching power of Western vehicles.)  The main winch has 120 meters of cable; an auxiliary winch can pull 3.5 tons and has 320 meters of cable.  The BREM-80U can easily tow a T-80-series tank, as well as similarly-sized or smaller vehicles.  Tools include basic, tracked vehicle, small arms, heavy ordnance, electrical, and electronic tools; also included are two sets of pioneer tools.  The BREM-80U also has an arc welder, air compressor, a tow bar, and two hydraulic jacks.  A selection of spare parts is carried, usually in the outer lockers or attached directly to the hull.  The BREM-80U has a front-mounted dozer blade to brace the vehicle when using the crane or winching; a bracing leg can also be lowered at the rear. The BREM-80U has a 60kW APU to allow for most operations, including crane and winch operations, without having the engine on.

     The driver of the BREM-80U, due to the position of the crane, is moved to the top center of the vehicle, with three vision blocks to the front, one of which has a night channel.  The commander is behind him on a raised, rotatable cupola with a machinegun that may be aimed and fired from within the vehicle with the hatch closed.  The mount has a modicum of stabilization, and the front vision block of the cupola has a night channel. On the front left side of the vehicle is a cluster of six smoke grenade launchers.  The rest of the crew normally consists of two other members with seats in the hull, though there is a seat for a fifth crewmember if required.  The vehicle is protected with a fire detection and suppression system, and an NBC Overpressure system.  The vehicle also has air conditioning and heating.  A small computer with repair and recovery solutions is mounted inside the hull on the left side.  The vehicle is equipped with GPS or GLONASS, depending on the wishes of the buyer.

     The BREM-80U is powered by the GTD-1250 gas turbine engine, developing 1250 horsepower. The engine is known to be difficult to maintain and has high fuel consumption; while the intervals between routine servicing is longer, when it has a problem, it’s usually a big one.  The BREM-80U is equipped with a deep wading kit that takes 15 minutes to install; this allows wading (but not swimming) up to 5 meters depth.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,038,199

D, G, JP, AvG, A

4.5 tons

45 tons

4+1

31

WL/IR Spotlight (C), Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

186/130

52/36

1100

535

Stnd

T6

HF152Cp  HS21Sp  HR14

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

NSVT (C)

800x12.7mm

 

Kurganmashzavod BREM-L Berglianka

     Notes:  The BREM-L is an ARV (Armored Repair Vehicle) based on the BMP-3 chassis. It is specifically designed to take care of the BMP-3, but also has a role in taking care of other members of the BMP series.  Unlike most vehicles in Russian service, the BREM-L was exported first, to several Mediterranean, South American, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian countries. After that, full-rate production began for the Russian Army. It is based on the BMP-3 chassis and engine, and so has decent armor protection, speed, and agility.  It is regarded as one of the world’s best light ARVs.

     In the BREM-L, the BMP-3 turret is removed and replaced with a small armored cupola on the center right of the vehicle, mounting a PKT machinegun.  The left side of the roof has a crane that can lift 6 tons, or 12 tons if a pulley block is installed first; this is to the left and rear of the commander.  This crane can lift the BMP-3’s entire power pack, the turret, or, with a little work, the passenger compartment of the BMP-3.  The crane is capable of 360-degree slewing, and a reach of 4.852 meters. The BREM-L can move slowly (no more than Com Mov 5) with a load on the crane. The vehicle's winch has a 20-ton capacity, or 40 tons if a pulley block is installed first, or up to 80 tons with two such blocks.  It has 100 meters of cable. Usually, when the winch is used, a dozer blade mounted at the front of the vehicle is first lowered; this can also be used for obstacle clearance and for general preparation of fighting positions.  The blade is slightly wider than the front of the BREM-L.  There is a load area on the rear hull roof for carrying large stores such as BMP engines and transmissions.  Towing is up to 30 tons; however, at 20 tons, Tr Mov and Com Mov are halved. The BREM-L is equipped with two pulley blocks, a tow bar, various lengths of rope and cable, and basic tools, tracked vehicle tools, small arms tools, and heavy ordinance tools.  It has welding sets for steel and aluminum.  It has an air compressor, and a hydraulic jack, and a selection of spare parts. These are normally carried in external lockers or on the hull of the BREM-L.  A 20kW APU is carried to run the vehicle while the engine is turned off.

     The BREM-L may swim with a little preparation.  If the vehicle being towed can also swim, the BREM-L may swim while towing the stricken vehicle.  The engine of the BREM-L is the BMP-3’s UTD-29M turbocharged multifuel developing 500 horsepower, along with an automatic transmission. To the left of the commander is a bank of four smoke grenade launchers.

     As stated, the commander is on a raised cupola with all-around vision blocks.  His center front block has a night channel.  He is armed with a machinegun which can be aimed and fired from within the vehicle.  Behind the commander is a spotlight on a mast, along with a CCTV day/night camera; this may be rotated by any crewmember needing it, except from the driver’s position. The driver is on the front left; he has vision blocks to the front.  The center block is a wide-angle block and has a night channel. Normally, there is only one other crewmember, seated in the hull; however, the BREM-L may carry two other crewmembers if the need arises. The large doors in the rear of the BMP-3 are deleted, but there is one smaller hatch.  This does not have a firing port, but does have a vision block.  Other vision blocks have been retained, but not the firing ports. The crew has air conditioning and heating and an NBC Overpressure system, as well as a fire detection and suppression system.  They have a small computer loaded with manuals pertaining to its roles.

     The BREM-L has a tertiary role: reconnaissance.  In this role, the BREM-L uses its internal BMS and GLONASS to spot enemy groups and positions and relay them to higher units.  It is also equipped with FLIR, a laser rangefinder, and a laser designator.

The gun

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,409,418

D, G, AvG, A

3.3 tons

18.7 tons

3+2

11

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), FLIR (C), WL Spotlight (G), Day/Night CCTV (G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

180/126

50/35/10

460

185

Stnd

T3

HF9  HS5  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Basic

PKTM (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Volgograd JSC BREhM-D

     Notes: The BREhM-D is based on the BTR-D and is meant to service and recover the BMD series of IFVs.  The BREhM-D entered service in the late 1990s, and is currently in service with Russia and most of the former Soviet Republics that inherited part or all of the BMD-1 and BMD-2 forces in their countries.  It is a very light ARV, with construction very similar to the BTR-D and BMD-1’s chassis’.

     The BREhM-D uses an A-frame crane that can rotate through 150 degrees, enabling it to reach over the front or rear of the vehicle.  It has a reach of 3 meters in either direction.  Its base capacity is 1.5 tons, but this may be doubled, quadrupled, or octupled depending on how many times the cable is run through the pulley and the top of the vehicle.  The crane rests over the rear of the vehicle and is locked down in a retaining frame for traveling or parachute drops.  The crane is powered through the BREhM-D’s vehicular hydraulic system, though it can be powered by a hand pump if the engine is switched off.  The crane is controlled by the vehicle commander.  The BREhM-D’s winch is capable of a single pull of 3.5 tons, though again this may be doubled or greater through the use of successive snatch blocks, to a maximum pull of 10.5 tons.  The cable is 100 meters long and runs through several internal rubber rollers in a framework inside the vehicle, ultimately unrolling from a reel inside the front of the vehicle.  The dozer blade is used to brace the vehicle during crane and winch operations; the blade has no actual mechanism and is deployed by one man lifting or lowering on each side of the blade to the ground position, travel position, or obstacle-dozing position.  The blade cannot be used to dig fighting positions.  Instead of a towbar, the BREhM-D has twin telescoping towbars with internal shock absorbers, and powered by vehicle hydraulic power.  Other tools include basic, power, electrical, electronic, tracked vehicle, small arms, and heavy ordnance tools.  It also carries a welding set powered by the vehicle’s electrical system (the engine must be on, as the welding set would otherwise drain the batteries almost immediately), and an air compressor.  It does not carry a hydraulic jack; the crane is used for this purpose instead.  A set of pioneer tools is carried, along with several ropes, cables, and snatch blocks, and a selection or spare parts.

     The commander/crane operator has a cupola on the front right; this cupola is manually-rotating and has all around vision blocks.  It is armed, usually with a PKT, AGS-17, or AGS-30.  The commander has an elevated periscope and a spotlight on a mast. A crewmember is seated to the right of the driver; he may fire a PKMS machinegun, though this is mounted in the bow ahead of the gunner and has no more than 15 degrees of traverse and elevation.  The driver is on the front left.  The three firing ports on each side of the BTR-D are retained on the BREhM-D, though not normally manned.  Crewmembers exit and enter through the various hatches on the roof; there is no rear hatch and the engine is in the back.  The crew has a heater and a collective NBC system to plug their protective masks into.

     The engine is that of the BTR-D, a Type 5D20-240 diesel engine, developing 240 horsepower.  The transmission is automatic. The suspension is specially-designed for the BREhM-D’s role; it is a variable-height hydropneumatic suspension that allows the BREhM-D to “squat” when being carried in aircraft and being airdropped.  The roadwheels are likewise small, and the tracks are a mere 230mm wide.  A side-effect of this suspension appears to be a relatively decent ride.  The BREhM-D is amphibious with a little preparation – a trim vane must be erected, bilge pumps turned on, and a periscope must be inserted into a socket and extended by the driver.  The bilge pump has a manual backup. This preparation takes 10 minutes.  Propulsion in the water is by hydrojets. The hydrojets have shutters which allow for surprising maneuverability when swimming – the BREhM-D can turn a complete circle in place while floating.  This is aided by the hydrojets’ being able to suck in water as well as expel it.  The BREhM-D can tow another vehicle while swimming if that vehicle is also amphibious.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$381,228

D, A

2 tons

8 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

198/139

55/39/8

300

89

Stnd

T4

HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT, AGS-17, or AGS-30 (C), PKTS (Bow)

2000x7.62mm, or 1000x7.62mm and 254x30mm

 

Volgograd JSC RKhM-5 Povozka

     Notes: The RKhM-5 is based on the BTR-D chassis and is designed to provide NBC reconnaissance to Russian Airborne troops, and to a lesser extent, Naval Infantrymen.  It entered very limited service (3 vehicles) in March 2012, and the Russian Army began testing these first examples in 2011.  Acquisition has been hampered by budgetary problems, and it is still in a low LRIP at this time.  It is used only by Russia at this time, but is available for export, but no such orders have been made.

    The NBC suite is almost the same at that of the RKhM-4-01 (see Russian Wheeled Engineer Vehicles), but it does not carry as many flags, and if airdropped the flag dispensers have to be mounted after it reaches the ground. (They are secured to the same pallet as the RKhM-5, but they would be ripped off in the slipstream if dropped connected to the vehicle). It also carries a smaller crew of specialists, and the NBC instruments are more advanced (for the most part, the same as the RKhM-4-01 for game purposes). The RKhM-5 has a Geiger counter, two dosimeters, an automatic chemical contamination alarm, devices for determining what agent is causing chemical contamination, and devices to analyze general weather conditions, especially wind direction and speed.  Gamma, beta, and alpha radiation can be detected and analyzed from within the vehicle.  The RKhM-5 has special arms on one side of the vehicle to take samples and bring them into a special compartment for analysis. The RKhM-5 can detect most types of chemical contamination used or stockpiled today. The arm is dexterous enough (assuming the operator is dexterous enough) to take in leaves, earth, and reach up to two meters into a tree or other surface to take materials for analysis.  The RKhM-5 can also take air samples and analyze them. It can also detect some types of biological contamination, such as bacteria and food poisoning. On the rear and sides of the RKhM-5 are three warning flag dispensers, each with 30 flags.  They can be deployed from within the vehicle or set to deploy automatically at a certain interval, and come in different colors to denote radiation and chemical contamination. The RKhM-5 has an eight-barreled signal flare launcher, which may be manually triggered or set to fire automatically upon detecting chemical or radiological contamination.  The RKhM-5 has a meteorological set, detecting wind speed and direction, humidity, and temperature. The RKhM-5 carries a complete set of reloads for the flare launcher.  The RKhM-5 has GPS navigation and a small computer to act as a mapping module, advise the commander of the proper routes, and convert areas to map coordinates. The RKhM-5 also conducts general route reconnaissance, and can note condition of roads, bridges, and areas of high water and put them on the map. The RKhM-5 has several short-range and long-range radios, which are data-capable, and is equipped with a BMS.

     The RKhM-5 has more advanced armor than the rest of the BMD series.  It is spaced on the front and the body of the vehicle is made from alternating steel and aluminum plates.

     The driver is on the front center, and the driver also mans an RPKS-74 automatic rifle.  The RPKS-74 can be removed and used as a dismounted weapon, but doing so reportedly requires a contortionist to accomplish. The mount gives its weapon about 30 degrees of traverse and elevation and 10 degrees of depression.  The commander is on the front right, and has a manually-rotating cupola with all-around vision blocks.  Both have night vision.   The driver has an overhead hatch, and has three vision blocks to the front. The commander is armed with a machinegun on a pintle mount connected to the cupola. The three firing ports on each side of the vehicle are retained. Three NBC specialists are in the center crew compartment of the RKhM-5, along with scads of instruments, radios, and a computer; the crew compartment is a bit cramped, and the specialists cannot stand all the way up; they normally use most of their instruments while seated or crouching.  They have two hatches on the center deck.

     The engine used on the RKhM-5 is a 2V-06-2 450-horsepower supercharged diesel, coupled to an automatic transmission.  This gives it excellent speed, needed when conducting reconnaissance missions possibly behind enemy lines. The suspension type is the same – a hydropneumatic variable-height suspension, but the height adjustment capability is different (130-530mm, versus 100-450mm for the BMD-1 and BMD-2).  The roadwheels are small, and the tracks are a mere 230mm wide.  A side-effect of this suspension appears to be a relatively decent ride.  Preparation for amphibious operations and amphibious performance is largely the same as the BMD-1 and BMD-2. RKhM-5 is amphibious with a little preparation – a trim vane must be erected, a periscope must be inserted into a socket and extended by the driver, and bilge pumps turned on.  The bilge pump has a manual backup. This preparation takes 10 minutes.  Propulsion in the water is by hydrojets. The hydrojets have shutters which allow for surprising maneuverability when swimming – the RKhM-5 can turn a complete circle in place while floating.  This is aided by the hydrojets’ being able to suck in water as well as expel it. 

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,259,430

D, A

500 kg

13.2 tons

5

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

222/155

62/43/13

300

167

Stnd

T4

HF11Sp  HS7  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT (C), RPKS-74 (D)

2000x7.62mm, 2160x5.45mm

 

 

ZTS BTS-1

     Notes:  The BTS-1 is one of the Soviet Union's first post-war armored recovery vehicle designs.  The first version, the BTS-1, is a rather primitive design with very limited capabilities.  It entered service in the early 1950s.  The BTS-1 underwent a long series of upgrading and refurbishment throughout its career, both in Soviet service and in the services of the many countries it was used by.  The BTS-1 did establish the basic form of tank-based ARVs.

 

BTS-1

     The BTS-1 established for basic form for tank-based ARVs: the turret removed and replaced by a raised superstructure.  In the BTS-1, only the front of the vehicle is a raised superstructure; the rear has eight large stowage boxes to carry its equipment, personal equipment, and spare parts.  There is no flat platform, and the BTS-1 cannot carry a powerpack on top.  If it needs to bring an engine and/or transmission, it usually does this with a trailer.  The BTS-1 has a light crane with a bare lift capacity of 1 ton, though by increasing cable runs between the pulley and the rear of the vehicle, up to 4 tons may be lifted.  The BTS-1 is hampered in recovery efforts by its lack of a winch; it is limited to hooking rope or cable onto the vehicle to be recovered and pulling with the BTS-1 itself.  It has a dozer blade in the rear to brace itself during crane operations.  Equipment carried includes most basic toolsets, an air compressor, and a hydraulic jack, along with a large selection of spare parts.  Also carried is several ropes, cables of various thicknesses, snatch blocks, and a chain saw.

     Notes: The driver is on the front left, and the commander is on a manually-rotating raised cupola armed with a weapon.  The third crewmember is the crane operator; he has a hatch on the center left, and his seat faces to the rear.  Up to two other mechanics may be carried in the hull.

     The Finnish version of the BTS-1, which they designated the BTS-2, is equipped with a winch capable of a basic lift of 12 tons.  It is otherwise like the BTS-1.

     The engine of the BTS-1 is the same as early T-54s: a 500-horsepower diesel V-54 engine.

 

BTS-1M

     This was an attempt to replace the BTR-1 with a vehicle capable of providing real support to T-54, T-55, and other vehicles.  In the center rear deck is a flat space surrounded by drop sides.  The BTS-1M has a more powerful V-55 580-horsepower engine, and a more capable crane of 20 tons (but still no winch). The superstructure is extended to the rear, and the stowage boxes are moved to the sides and the roof.

 

BTS-2

     The BTS-2 is different largely in that is based on the T-55 hull rather than the T-54.  It also adds a winch with a basic pulling force of 30 tons.  The cargo capacity is greater than either iteration of the BTS-1. 

 

BTS-4

     The BTS-4 is similar to the BTS-2, but it carries a long snorkel device to allow it to crawl along the bottom of bodies of water up to 8 meters deep.  The entire vehicle is watertight because of this, but it cannot actually swim.  Mounting the snorkel takes 20 minutes.  The snorkel connects to the commander’s hatch and there is a platform at the top for the commander to stand on.  On the outside of the snorkel is a ladder to allow the commander to climb to the top. Mounting the snorkel is a three-man job.  Removing the snorkel is also a 3-man job, and takes 10 minutes to dismount the snorkel.  At this point, the snorkel may be left behind, or 4 more minutes may be taken to lock is back down on top of the vehicle.  It locks down just left of center. After the snorkel operation, the commander’s machinegun must be tilted down to empty the barrel of water.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

BTS-1

$521,801

D, A

1 ton

36 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-2 (Finnish)

$586,408

D, A

1 ton

36.03 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-1M

$633,770

D, A

1.5 tons

34 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-2

$647,756

D, A

3 tons

32 tons

3+2

17

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-4

 

D, A

3 tons

32.14 tons

3+2

18

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

BTS-1

108/76

30/21

812

149

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-2 (Finnish)

108/76

30/21

812

149

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-1M

126/88

35/25

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-2

132/93

37/26

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF60  HS12  HR6

BTS-4

132/92

37/26

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF60  HS12  HR6

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

(All)

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Rubisovsk RM-G

     Notes: Called by the Russians the Repair Tracked Vehicle or RTV, this vehicle is in service only with the Russian Army, and has not been offered for export sales.  Though specifically-designed to service the BMP series, the RM-G is capable of performing repairs on a wide variety of vehicles to one degree or another.

     The RM-G is built on the chassis of the BMP-1, though it is modified almost beyond recognition.  The turret is removed; the rear has a raised superstructure, and the platform for carrying powerpacks or large cargoes is on top of this superstructure. It is designed for repair, and features a complete toolkit composed of all types of tools as well as pioneer tools.  The RM-G also has a welding set, air compressor, hydraulic jack, a hand-held circular cutter, and a slave cable.  The RM-G has space for one ton of spare parts, including several roadwheels and track sections. The RM-G has a crane with a capacity of 3 tons and a range of 228 degrees, and a reach of 4.01 meters.  It is mounted to the left side of the turret. The RM-G is a repair vehicle, not a recovery vehicle, and does not have a winch for recovery.

     The driver is on the front left, with the commander to the rear of him in a small turret (bigger than a cupola, but otherwise the same).  The turret does not actually mount a weapon; the weapon is on a mount on the turret ring, Atop this turret is a hatch. The vehicle’s weapon can be aimed and fired from inside the vehicle. The driver has one wide angle vision block to the front and two more to the front and two others looking left.  The commander’s turret is ringed with vision blocks.  The driver’s middle block has a night vision channel, as does the front block and gunsight on the commander’s cupola.  Two other mechanics are seated in the hull behind the commander’s turret; one of these has a position behind the commander with a simple hatch, and he operates the crane.  The crew is protected by NBC Overpressure with a collective NBC backup, and a heater.  The RM-G retains the BMP-1’s rear doors and firing ports.

     The RM-G has the BMP-1’s engine and transmission, and so has torsion bar suspension with shocks on the first and rear roadwheels.  The engine is a UTD-20 diesel developing 300 horsepower.  As it is amphibious, it is cable of performing repair while swimming, though the crane is not useable when swimming.6.736

     Most RM-Gs are based on the BMP-1 chassis; however, newer conversions have been based on the BMP-2 chassis.  This variant is nearly identical for game purposes, but does have some differences.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

RM-G

$399,701

D, A

500 kg

13.8 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

RM-GM

$401,501

D, A

500 kg

14.38 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

RM-G

155/109

43/30/4

462

111

CiH

T6

TF10  TS6  TS6  HF8  HS4  HR4

RM-GM

150/105

42/29/4

462

113

CiH

T6

TF11  TS7  TR6  HF9  HS5  HR4

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

RM-G/GM

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

 

OKB-520 IMR

     Notes: This predecessor of the IMR-2MA was first seen in 1973.  It is based on the chassis of a T-55. The IMR is no longer being used by Russian regular or reserve units or Eastern European countries, but still equips some Russian Mobilization-Only units.  In addition, it is being used in regular or reserve units by China, several Middle Eastern nations, and some African countries.  The IMR is a CEV, but has a secondary role as an NBC reconnaissance vehicle.

     In the IMR, the turret of the T-55 is removed and replaced by large crane In the IMR, the T-55 turret is removed and replaced with the crane turntable (in the center of the vehicle) and other combat engineer equipment.  The crane is telescoping and is normally carried back on the center, telescoped fully in. The crane head may be equipped with a standard lifting head, or other accessories, including a pincer for grabbing, a bucket, or an auger.  The pincer can be used for clearing obstacles and ripping down items such as trees and building supports. The front of the IRM has a dozer blade for digging fighting positions, clearing obstacles, or other work.  The IRM normally carries an assortment of tools, including basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, and air compressor, and a welding and cutting set. The crane can turn through 360 degrees and has a capacity of 2 tons.  The IMR has a winch with a basic pulling capacity of 20 tons, and the cable goes out through the front.  In front is a large mine plow that can also be used to brace the vehicle during crane operations.  The blade also has teeth to rip up roads and asphalt, and concrete surfaces.  The crane has variable geometry and can be pulled almost straight to aid when digging fighting positions or when the crane arm is being operated.  The blade may also be used with the teeth removed and used to construct dirt roads, at the rate 8 kilometers per hour.  It can be used to smooth over existing roads and fill trenches, or dig fighting positions.

     The commander and driver both have raised cupolas; the commander’s is manually-rotating, while the driver’s is non-rotating.  The commander’s cupola has all-around vision blocks and a night vision device, as well as a rotating periscope.  The driver has vision blocks to his front and both sides; the center front vision block may be removed and replaced with a night vision block.  The commander operates all of the external tools, including the crane and its accessories.  The driver operates the winch, with the commander (out of the vehicle paying out the cable); he also operates the mine plow.  Inside the IMR, the crew has the protection of NBC Overpressure, as well as an automatic fire detection suppression system.  The commander has a rotating spotlight for use when operating the arm or clearing obstacles. The IMR also carries 20 kilograms of C4 and the equivalent of an engineer’s demo kit.

     The IMR, being based on the T-55, uses a V-55 580-horsepower diesel, modified to produce high torque. It has a manual transmission.  The IMR can be hermetically sealed, allowing fording in water of up to 5 meters.   On each side of the vehicle are banks of 4 smoke grenade launchers.  The IMR can also produce a thick, oily smokescreen by injecting diesel into its exhaust. The IMR has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: During the Twilight War the IMR was still being used by many second-line Warsaw pact countries, China, several Middle Eastern nations, and some African countries. 

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$839,014

D, A

2 tons

37.5 tons

2

24

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Searchlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

117/82

33/23

812+380

173

Stnd

T6

HF67  HS16  HR8**

 

Uralvagonzavod IMR-2

     Notes:  This is a more advanced Russian combat engineer vehicle than the IMR, being based on a T-72 chassis.  That said, the IMR and IMR-2 are similar designs, except for their chassis. They entered service in 1982, and had replaced most of the IMRs in Russian, Czech, and Polish service by 1987.  The IMR-2 saw some action in Chechnya and was also used to help bury the breached reactor at Chernobyl, due to its high protection against radiation. 

     The turret of the T-72 has been replaced by a large turntable/small turret, from which is controlled the crane.  The crane is locked to the rear during traveling. The crane can be traversed through 360 degrees and has a capacity of 2 tons at a reach of 8.15 meters.  The crane may use several heads, including a lifting hook, pincer claws, and an auger.  The front of the IMR-2 has a V-shaped mine plow that is armored against mines and is 1 meter high and 3.38 meters wide.  It has a variable geometry; angle grading as well as straight plowing is possible with this blade.  The front of the blade also had an extendible probe that is used to send radio signals to trigger the fuses on mines, explosive shells, and other such hazards.  It is 65% likely to detonate any such device it encounters if the fuse is a contact, tilt rod, or radio type.  When not in use, the plough is raised completely upwards to the 90-degree position. The IMR-2 carries a wide assortment of tools, including basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, and air compressor, and a welding and cutting set. The IMR-2 series does not have a winch.

     The crew consists of a driver and commander/crane operator; the driver is in the center front and the commander is in the small space in front of the crane.  (It really is cramped.) He has a pintle-mounted weapon to his front, but he is not on a cupola, though he does have a wide-angle vision block on each side of him, and his seat rotates.  They are protected by an NBC Overpressure system and an automatic fire detection and suppression system.  The driver and commander’s positions connect through a small tunnel, and there is also a space to keep personal gear, branching off this tunnel.

     The IMR-2 uses a V-84-1 turbocharged diesel engine developing 840 horsepower, modified to produce high torque, and is controlled by an automatic transmission.  With preparation, the IMR-2 may ford up to 5 meters. On each side of the vehicle are banks of 4 smoke grenade launchers.  At the rear of the vehicle are a pair of MICLIC launchers for minefield breaching.

     There were several variants produced over the years.  The IMR-2M1 is identical, except for a difference in weight and speed caused by the removal of the MICLIC launchers; the hydraulic system is also more protected and has a backup system.  The IMR-2M2 is designed for NBC reconnaissance as well as normal combat engineer jobs. The IMR-2M2 has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR-2M2 has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.  It adds to the tool set for the crane arm with a more useful bucket.  The commander’s machinegun, however, is removed; the small quarters never really allowed it to be used effectively in battle; for the commander, small arms are more easily used.  It also does not have the MICLIC launchers.  It does, however, have extra mine protection in the form of extra armor plate for the floor. It entered service in 1990, as did the IMR-2M1.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

IMR-2

$1,286,732

D, A

1.5 tons

44.3 tons

2

28

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

IMR-2M1

$908,965

D, A

1.5 tons

43.28 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

IMR-2M2

$1,295,678

D, A

1.5 tons

44.28 tons

2

29

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor**

IMR-2

139/97

39/27

1000+400

310

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

IMR-2M1

142/99

39/28

1000+400

296

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

IMR-2M2

142/99

39/27

1000+400

296

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

IMR-2/2M1

None

None

NSVT (C)

500x12.7mm, 20 kg C4, Engineer Demo Chest

 

Uralvagonzavod IMR-3

     Notes:  This is the Russians' newest combat engineer vehicle, based on the chassis of the T-90 tank.  It was in LRIP as early as 1991, but full production did not occur until 1999. It is also known as the IMR-2MA, IMR-2A and IMR-3MA. Its primary job is to clear obstacles, smooth damaged roadways, and clear rubble from urban areas.  This vehicle is only in Russian service, and has seen action in Chechnya and Ukraine.  The IMR-3 has always been a limited-production vehicle.

     As is usual for these converted tanks, the turret is removed; in its place is the turntable for the jib and the commander’s turret.  The dozer blade can smooth a road of about 6 km by the width of the vehicle in one hour, depending on the degree of difficulty of the obstacles, or clear earthwork at a rate of 300 cubic meters per hour, or loose rubble at a rate of about 400 cubic meters an hour.  The dozer blade is also almost mine proof for purposes of clearing mines.  It uses a lighter dozer blade (though just as strong) called the KMT-3R.  This blade is described by many sources as “massive” or “huge.”  It comes in two wings, which may be operated individually, allowing for a greater variety of obstacle-clearing scenarios.  It is usually used in a V-shape, as a mine plow; it can be used straight, though, for bulldozing.  Even through asphalt or concrete, the blade can dig 450 centimeters per pass. The front of both wings also had an extendible probe that is used to send radio signals to trigger the fuses on mines, explosive shells, and other such hazards.  It is 85% likely to detonate any such device it encounters if the fuse is a contact, tilt rod, or radio type.  This type of detonation does not damage the plow. 

     The IRM-2MA has a crane with a capacity of 3 tons, a main winch with a capacity of 35 tons and 100 meters of cable, and a secondary winch with a capacity of 15 tons and 120 meters of cable.  Normal tools carried include basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, an air compressor, and a welding and cutting set.  The jib is designed to use three tools; an auger, a lifting hook, and a combination excavator bucket/pincers.  However, replacing tool heads is a long process, requiring 15 minutes and the crew to leave the vehicle and work with tools to accomplish the task.  (For some reason, the Russians chose not to use the snap-in tools they used on early versions of the IMR.) For this reason, the head normally used, the bucket/pincers, is almost always mounted. The arm is mounted on the left side of the vehicle, about one-third of the way back, next to the turret.  It has a reach of 8 meters and has a swing of 360 degrees.

     There are two crewmembers.  The driver is in the front center; he is in the front center and has three large windows to the front, with the sides angled to the left and right sides.  The windows may have armored shutters lowered over them, in which case the driver sees through vision blocks above the windows.  One has a day/night channel.  The driver has an overhead hatch, but getting into it past all the plow machinery is a little difficult.  The commander has a conical-shaped small turret, which has a cupola at the top with all-around vision blocks and a night channel on the front block.  The cupola is manually rotatable.  Between the commander and driver is a small tunnel which connects the two positions, along with a space to put personal items.  The commander’s machinegun can be aimed and fired from under armor. The driver’s and commander’s position are much more roomy than on an IMR-2.

     The IMR-3 has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR-3 has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.  There is a 5kW generator to power the tools, winches, and crane when the engine is off.  The engine is the same as the early versions of the T-90 – a V-84MS 840-horsepower turbocharged diesel.  The armor level is also the same.  IMR-3s in service with the Russian Army have a BMS and GLONASS.  The crew is protected by an NBC Overpressure system and a fire detection/suppression system.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This vehicle is extremely rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline, with perhaps 12 having been built before the start of the War.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$2,091,070

D, G, AvG, A

2.5 tons

47.4 tons

2

19

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), Thermal Imaging (C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

132/93

37/26

1200

311

CiH

T6

TF50Cp  TS30Sp  TR16  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Basic

Kord (C)

1050x12.7mm, 20 kg C4, Engineer Demo Chest

 

Kurganmashzavod IRM Zhuk

     Notes:  This vehicle is described by the Russians as an "Engineer Reconnaissance Vehicle,” and is based on a lengthened BMP-1 chassis (seven roadwheels instead of six).  Used only by the Russians, the IRM’s job is to conduct route reconnaissance, checking the conditions or roads, trails, bridges, and fording sites.  It is also used to detect mines and minefields.  It has a secondary role as an artillery observer vehicle, and can also detect radiation and chemical contamination.  A tertiary role is electronic intrusion to listen into enemy radio networks.

     The IRM is fully amphibious, and may operate fully submerged along the bottom of a body of water with the aid of a 10-meter snorkel.  The IRM does this with small ballast tanks, a trim vane, and some sandbags in the hull. The IRM can also swim, using two propellers at the rear to propel itself and maneuver. The IRM is also equipped with two mine detectors on booms, a sensor for determining the load-bearing capacities of a piece of terrain, devices to determine water depth, surf action, terrain angles, and the thickness of ice.  The vehicle is also equipped with a laser rangefinder/designator, an artillery aiming circle, and two radios with a range of 20 kilometers in addition to the normal vehicle complement.  The IRM is equipped with a rocket-powered grapple for self-recovery, even under enemy fire.  At the rear is a bank of 12 solid rockets to assist in this recovery if necessary.  The IRM may generate a smoke screen by injecting diesel fuel into its exhaust. Other tools consist of the vehicle’s basic and tracked vehicle tools, a chainsaw, and an air compressor.

     The IRM is equipped with sensors for detecting the amount or type of chemical contamination, and the amount and type of radioactive contamination.  To aid in this, the IRM is equipped with a small arm that allows the crew to snag a piece of vegetation or some other interesting piece of debris. The arm is long enough to reach the ground and into the low branches of a tree.  These are then brought into a special container in the vehicle’s wall for analysis.

     The IRM carries a crew of six; of these, one is the driver and another is the commander, who is in a small turret armed only with a medium machinegun.  The other crewmembers are specialists who each have their own duties in the vehicle. The turret is in the center left of the vehicle; the driver is on the front left.  Naturally, the IRM has NBC Overpressure protection; it also has an automatic fire detection/suppression system, and unusually for a Russian vehicle, air conditioning and heating. There are four MOPP suits and masks for every crewmember, as well as extra filters for the masks. The specialists have CCTV cameras on the center roof and rear roof connected to a monitor on one side of the IRM, as well as an internal computer to aid in their analyses. The commander and driver navigate with a mapping computer module and inertial navigation. Digital information may be sent back to higher HQ up to 300 kilometers away, though using this much range requires the extension of a long-range antenna.

     The IRM may use BMP-1 appliqué armor on the hull, but not on the turret, which is more akin to a BTR-80’s turret than a BMP-1’s turret. It may also mount lugs for ERA, over the appliqué armor.

     Being a BMP-1 variant, the IRM has a 300-horsepower UTD-20 diesel engine, with a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bar, with shocks on the first and fifth roadwheels.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,106,952

D, A

1 ton

17.2 tons

2+4

10

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), FLIR (C), 4xDay/Night CCTV

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

131/92

36/25/8

600

89

CiH

T3

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT

2000x7.62mm, 15 kg C4, Engineer Demo Kit.

 

Chelyabinsk MTP Technical Support Vehicle

     Notes:  Russia and Pact forces used this armored repair and recovery vehicle.  Though it has long been out of service in Russian and Pact units, it is still being used by several Third-World nations, and some Mobilization-Only Russian units are equipped with them. It is based on the closed-top version of the BTR-50, and is used to support armored personnel carriers such as the BTR-series and BMP-series. It was used by virtually all countries who used the BTR-50 or early versions of the BMP or BTR series, though most MTPs are long out of service in the world, except in the Third World and some Russian Mobilization-Only units.  Most were out service by the early 1970s. Museums are more interested in the actual BTR-50 though some are used as OPFOR vehicles when they are still running.  They are old, and parts for them are difficult to find, and most ended up as range targets.

     The chassis of the MTP is, for the most part, the same as the BTR-50PK, differing only in minor details.  The upper hull, however, differs greatly from the BTR-50PK, as the raised superstructure of the BTR-50PK extends all the way back on the MTP, and is tall enough for crewmembers to stand within it.  This allows for ample space for work and carrying of personal gear and spare parts and some tools.  Other tools and spare parts are kept in boxes on the sides and rear of the MTP. There is space on the rear deck for carrying a power pack or other large spares. Recovery equipment carried includes anchors, tow bars and cables, block and tackle, oil and fuel pumps, a 5kW APU, a complete welding set, an air compressor, and a set of tools appropriate for working on wheeled and tracked vehicles.  Ample room is provided for spare parts, and the MTP also has a crane with a capacity of 1.5 tons and a reach of 2.85 meters, and a winch with a capacity of 8 tons (15 tons with block and tackle installed) and 60 meters of cable.

     The MTP has a raised superstructure with hatches for the crew and commander in it.  The driver's hatch is in the normal place, and there are two doors in the rear. Above which is kept an extension tent to increase the available covered room for work.  A folding trestle table is carried on the outside for use in these circumstances.  There is a firing port in each side of the crew compartment and in one of the rear doors that can take an AK-series assault rifle or the PK machine gun. The commander’s position is a simple hatch with a pintle-mounted weapon.  He can also bring out an RPG-7 from a rack near his position. Three other mechanics have seats in the hull.  The vehicle has no heater or air conditioner and does not even have a collective NBC system; the crew is reliant on their own MOPP gear and protective masks in case of chemical attack.  There is not even an automatic fire detection/suppression system – there are five fire extinguishers instead for the crew compartment, and one mounted by the engine.

     The MTP can carry bulk amounts of fuel or POL to units which are hard to reach on wheels.  This necessitates removing all but the base crew, and removing the internal lockers for tools and spare parts.

     As a derivative of the BTR-50PK, the MTP uses the same V-6B 240-horsepower diesel, with a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bars, with no shock absorbers.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$211,738

D, A

1.5 tons

15.5 tons

5

9

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

120/84

33/23/4

400

69

Stnd

T3

HF3  HS2  HR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PK, RPG-7 (C)

1250x7.62mm, 4x73mm

 

Kharkiv MTP-LB Technical Support Vehicle

     Notes:  Similar in concept to the MTB technical support vehicle listed above, this vehicle is based on the MT-LB chassis.  It was meant to be a new vehicle, replacing the MTP, and is designed to service the BMP and BTR-series of vehicles.  The MTP-LB does not appear to have been exported, nor was it built in large numbers.

     The basic form of the MT-LB is unchanged, except for the addition of a crane, winch, and platform on the rear deck for carrying engines and other large assemblies. The crane is driven by the winch (the winch and the crane cannot be used at the same time), and has a capacity of 1.5 tons.  The crane is an A-frame structure mounted on the front of the vehicle that has a reach of 4.2 meters.  The winch may be used by itself, in which case the capacity is 6.12 tons with 80 meters of cable.  There is a jack located on the front of the vehicle which may jack up to 15 tons.  (This jack must be moved to the cargo platform before amphibious operations can take place.)   Other equipment carried by the MTP-LB includes tow bars and tow cables, chock blocks, electric and gas welding and cutting gear, a vehicle decontamination kit, and a full range of tools, including a welding set/cutter, air compressor, and tow bar.

     The MTP-LB is amphibious, and can make amphibious recoveries (with the MTP-LB partially in the water, not full swimming) as well as land recoveries.  The MTP-LB may tow a vehicle over water, if the vehicle can also swim or ford to depths of no more than 5 meters.  (It would be a very slow tow.)

     The MT-LBs commander’s cupola has been removed and replace with a simple hatch and four vision blocks.  And there are crew hatches on the roof between this area and the cargo platform; one is a position for operating the crane, with an elevated seat and four wide-angle vision blocks and a simple hatch.  There are also two doors on the rear of the vehicle.  The driver is in the front left; normally, no other persons are carried, but there are seats and space for two other mechanics.  The vehicle has NBC Overpressure and a heater. While most versions of this vehicle are armed with a PK, the Polish version of the MTP-LB is armed with an NSV heavy machinegun.

     The MTP-LB has the same engine as the MT-LB: A YaMZ-238 240-horsepower diesel.  This is coupled to a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bar, with no shocks.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$305,608

D, A

2 tons

12.3 tons

2+2

11

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

143/100

40/28/4

450

71

Stnd

T3

HF5  HS2  HR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PK (C) or NSV (C)

2500x7.62mm, or 1500x12.7mm

 

Omsk MTU-20

     Notes:  This is a tracked bridging vehicle based on a T-55 chassis. Russian and Pact forces rarely use the MTU-20, but the MTU-20 is used by Afghanistan, Egypt, Finland, India, Israel, Nigeria, and Syria. Israel uses captured versions.

     The turret has been removed so the bridge span can lay flat on the deck area. The bridge can span 18 meters.  It weighs 6 tons and can support 50 tons, taking 5 minutes to deploy and 7 minutes to recover.  The bridge is a semi-cantilever bridge; the ends are deployed like a scissors bridge, and then the entire assembly is extended out horizontally. The bridge has a double treadway, with the treadways made of box-type aluminum girders. Two legs in the front are lowered into the ground as far as possible before bridgelaying or recovering takes place.

     The crew consists of a driver on the front left and the commander/bridge operator behind and to the right of him.  The commander has a rotating cupola with all-around vision blocks, and the crew need not crack their hatches to deploy the bridge.  The commander has a machinegun, but due to the bridge supports and machinery, shooting while the bridge is mounted is very difficult; especially, clear shots to the front of the vehicle are virtually impossible. The MTU-20 has NBC Overpressure protection.  Just behind each bumper is a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers.

     Two variants of the MTU-20 were made, each differing only in their engines.  The older version uses a W-2-54 diesel developing 520 horsepower.  The newer versions use a W-2-55 diesel developing 580 horsepower.  Both have manual transmissions.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-20 (Early)

$517,000

D, A

500 kg

34 tons

2

51

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

MTU-20 (Late)

$517,240

D, A

500 kg

34.04 tons

2

51

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-20 (Early)

118/83

33/23

960

153

CiH

T6

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF67  HS16  HR8

MTU-20 (Late)

128/90

36/25

960

171

CiH

T6

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF67  HS16  HR8

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

(Both)

None

None

DShK (C)

500x12.7mm

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

Uralvagonzavod MTU-72

     Notes:  This AVLB is based on the T-72B or T-72M1 chassis. (Some sources say that some MTU-72s were made using new-built T-72 chassis.)  The MTU-72 is used only by Russian and Pact forces.

     It uses a bridge similar in design, but much larger and heavier then, the bridge of the MTU-20 listed above.  This bridge can span a gap of 18 meters and support 50 tons.  By utilizing a second MTU-72’s bridge, a gap of 30 meters can be spanned. Three minutes are required to lay the bridge, and 8 minutes to recover it.  The bridge is of aluminum alloy construction and weighs 6.4 tons.  The bridge is extremely strong for such an item – it was made to withstand small arms fire and some artillery and rocket attacks. The bridge is laid in the same manner as that of the MTU-20 – the center portion is slid out, and then the ends are deployed. The MTU-72 carries a dozer blade at the front to clear obstacles to bridge laying or otherwise prepare bridging sites.  The MTU-72 uses the V-46-6 turbocharged diesel engine, developing 780 horsepower, unless it is T-72B-based; in this case, it has an 840-horsepower engine.  These versions are known as MTU-72Ms. It has an automatic transmission.

     The commander has a full, rotating cupola, but is not armed except for his small arms and some grenades.  He is in the center of the vehicle.  The driver is ahead of him, in the front center.  The crew has a heater and NBC Overpressure protection, as well as an automatic fire detection/suppression system.

     There is a similar vehicle in Czech service called the MT-72. It is essentially the same vehicle, but is heavier in weight even though the bridge is lighter. It is based on the Czech version of the base T-72, the T-72M3 CZ.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-72

$706,826

D, A

300 kg

40 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D, C)

Shielded

MTU-72M

$729,741

D, A

300 kg

41.1 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D, C)

Shielded

MT-72

$721,880

D, A

300 kg

41.5 tons

2

35

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-72

142/100

40/28

1000

288

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF138Cp  HS20Sp  HR12

MTU-72M

147/103

41/29

1000

310

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF148Cp  HS24Sp  HR12

MT-72

138/97

38/27

1000

299

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF129Cp  HS17Sp  HR12

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

Uralvagonzavod MTU-90

     Notes:  This is an AVLB based on the T-90 chassis.  It is being looked at by many of the same countries that use the T-90S export version of the T-90 tank.  The Russians meant to replace the MTU-72 with the MTU-90, but budgetary versions kept them from acquiring more than just a few, even though it was approved for service with the Russian Army in 1997.  So far, the MTU-90 is officially in LRIP, but it has received no production orders as of yet. 

     This bridge weighs 6.62 tons and can span a 23-meter obstacle, supporting a vehicle weighing 50 tons.  The bridge is easy to lay and recover, requiring only 2 minutes to lay and 2.5 minutes to recover.  The MTU-90 offers the same armor protection as the early T-90, and the chassis is in fact nearly identical to the early T-90.  It can also be fitted with appliqué armor, track skirts, and ERA.  The bridge is strong – similar in protection to the MTU-72.  It is laid by unfolding the rear section, lowering the two sections across the obstacle, and as this is done, the third section automatically swings into position. The crew need not open the hatches to lay or recover the bridge.  The crew has night vision channels to their vision blocks and the bridge can be lain and recovered at night, still without the crew opening the hatches.  The bridge is operationally compatible with the bridge on the truck-mounted TMM-6, though they are different chassis.

     The commander/bridge operator is in the center of the vehicle; he is in a manually-rotating cupola with the center front vision block being a wide-angle block that has a night vision channel.  The driver is in the center front.  The vehicle has air conditioning, heating, and an NBC Overpressure system, as well as an automatic fire detection/suppression system.  The commander’s cupola is not armed; the crew relies on their small arms and grenades for defense.  The MTU-90 has a BMS and GPS.

     The MTU-90 uses the same 840-horsepower turbocharged multifuel, coupled with an automatic transmission. It can use a deep wading kit allowing submerging up to 5 meters, but cannot actually swim. The wading kit takes 5 minutes to mount.

     The MTU-90M was designed to attract export customers; the Russian Army cannot afford them, even though they were accepted for service in 2013. Azerbaijan ordered an undisclosed number of MTU-90Ms in 2014, and they go into service as soon as they are received and readied. It uses a shorter bridge able to span 19 meters, but is an MLC-60 bridge.  The bridge is essentially like the standard MTU-90 bridge, but the center section is much shorter, as are the wings; they unfold in the same manner.  The MTU-90M is based on the T-90S chassis, but it is identical to the T-90 chassis for game purposes.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-90

$1,400,997

D, G, AvG, A

300 kg

45.5 tons

2

25

Passive IR (D), Image intensification (C)

Shielded

MTU-90M

$1,344,351

D, G, AvG, A

300 kg

45.3 tons

2

 

Passive IR (D), Image intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-90

136/95

38/27

1200

310

CiH

T6

TF20 TS20  TR20  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

MTU-90M

137/96

38/27

1200

309

CiH

T6

TF20 TS20  TR20  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

KVZ PMM-2

     Notes:  This Russian vehicle has the tracks and suspension of the T-64 tank, and upper chassis of the PTS-2 amphibious carrier; it also uses components of the MDK-5 trench-digger and the MT-T tracked transporter.  It is service only with Russia.  Production is now complete, but the assembly lines can resume at any time if necessary.

     The PMM-2 is used as a floating bridge, and may be used as either a bridge or ferry, or grounded at the bottom of a body of water.  The vehicle opens like a clamshell when being used. When used as a bridge or ferry, the PMM-2 can carry 42.5 tons, but it is unable to carry this weight on land.  Up to 10 PMM-2 vehicles can be latched together to form long bridges; each PMM-2 unit can bridge a gap 17 meters wide (or float vehicles that long).  This does not require anyone to leave the vehicles, but they must be maneuvered in such a way that the vehicles latch together. PMM-2s can operate in bodies of water with currents of up to 2 meters per second.  The PMM-2 uses retractable anchors and waterjets at the rear corners to maintain position if being used as a ferry or floating bridge. When the bridge is opened, it has a width of 20 meters; it can carry vehicles that wide, but practically only 17 meters are useful. Vehicles, troops, or cargo can be loaded via loading ramps which are 5 meters long and pull back into the platform for travel.  A similar ramp is at the front for unloading. The vehicle takes 10 minutes to ready for use as a ferry or bridge.

     The cab is at the front, with large bullet-resistant windows to the front and sides.  They are watertight; in fact, the entire vehicle is watertight down to a depth of 3.6 meters. The cab carries 3: the driver, the commander, and the bridge/ferry operator.  The bridge/ferry operator is responsible for unfolding the sections above, and re-readying it for travel.  The other crewmembers are in the hull, and they monitor the integrity of the vehicle when the vehicle is submerged and ensure the engine and batteries operate properly. The PMM-2 is not armed.  The engine used is a variant of the T-64’s V-64-4 diesel engine, with 710 horsepower and turbocharging.  Transmission is automatic.  When submerged, the PMM-2 is powered by banks of batteries that are the equivalent of a 20kW generator, though they discharge in 1 hour and must be recharged or the vehicle recovered at that point.  The PMM-2 has an air conditioner, heating, and NBC Overpressure. The PMM-2 has inertial positioning, GPS, and a map computer.  The PMM-2 has an automatic fire detection/suppression system.

     The new version, the PMM-2M, has a load carrying capacity when used as a bridge or ferry of 85 tons.  However, the spotters have been removed and there are only three crewmembers. It is otherwise the same as the PMM-2 for game purposes.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

PMM-2

$908,232

D, A

500 kg

30 tons

5

21

Headlights

Enclosed

PMM-2M

$1,439,520

D, A

500 kg

29.86 tons

3

21

Headlights

Enclosed

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

PMM-2

165/115

46/32/8

1000

261

Stnd

T6

HF6  HS3  HR2

PMM-2M

166/116

46/32/8

1000

261

Stnd

T6

HF6  HS3  HR2

 

Morozov BAT-2

     Notes:  The BAT-2 is a combat engineer vehicle used by Russian and Pact forces.  The vehicle is based on a T-64 chassis, and has a large V-shaped dozer blade mounted at the front, used primarily as a mine plow. It is a little wider than the width of the vehicle, and has a variable bow to the “V” shape; the plow can actually be pulled into a dozer shape. In mine plow shape, the blade is 4.2 meters wide, while in dozer configuration, it is 4.5 meters wide. The mine plow may be lifted to 90 degrees, entirely clear of the front. At the rear is a soil ripping blade, which may be lowered or raised, and is the width of the vehicle. The BAT-2 has a crane with a capacity of 2 tons that may reach out 7.3 meters from the vehicle, and may be fitted with pincer-type tools, an auger, and a bucket.  Mounted on the same platform as the crane is a 25-ton capacity winch with 100 meters of cable.  The BAT-2 has a cab up front with large bullet-resistant windows on the front and sides, and it contains the driver on the left and commander on the right.  In the rear section is an entire combat engineer squad; they have bullet-resistant windows on either side of the front of their compartment. The vehicle is protected by an NBC Overpressure system.

     The BAT-2 is equipped with a V-64-5 710 horsepower turbocharged diesel. This engine is derived from the one on the T-72.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$698,604

D, G, AvG, A

6 tons

39.7 tons

2+8

27

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

130/91

38/27

1000

262

Stnd

T6

HF8  HS3 HR3

 

Uralvagonzavod BREM-1 ARRV

     Notes:  This is an ARRV (Armored Repair and Recovery Vehicle) based on the T-72A.  The basic BREM-1 is designed to support the T-72, T-64, and T-80. Though the Soviets reported it as entering service in 1975, other official sources state that is did not enter full production until 1984.  In either case, 342 were built by 1990 when production stopped.  Besides Russia, the BREM-1 is used by various African nations, India, Venezuela, and several former Soviet Republics.  Most these are the improved BREM-1M, designed to support the T-90S tanks that many of these countries also field. It’s main role is to recover damaged or stuck or overturned tanks and IFVs from the battlefield, and its armor suite helps in this regard, as it is meant to work on the front lines.

 

BREM-1

     The turret of the T-72A has been removed and replaced with a raised superstructure.  The main vehicular repair tool is a 4.4-meter crane, able to lift 19 tons at 2.2 meters and 3 tons at its maximum reach of 4.4 meters. It can be used to help recover stuck or overturned vehicles, but it’s main role is to lift turrets clear of a tank for repair and to acts as a jack to facilitate roadwheel, suspension, and track repairs (though the BREM-1 also carries two hydraulic jacks). The BREM-1 may move if the crane is lifting no more than 3 tons, but the suspension locks if the BREM-1 tries to move with more than 3 tons on the crane.  The main winch has a base pull of 25 tons, but this may be doubled with block and tackle, or quadruple that with double blocks and tackle.  The cable is 200 meters.  An auxiliary winch can pull 530 kg, with 425 meters of cable.  The BREM-1 can tow vehicles of up to 50 tons, at a Tr Mov of 48/33.  The dozer blade is primarily used to brace the BREM-1 when using the crane or winches, but can also be used to clear obstacles and dig fighting positions.  It is 3.1 meters wide.

     The BREM-1 has a full complement of tools, including all basic types of tools, an arc welder, and an air compressor.  On the roof is a flat area large enough for a full tank powerplant or 1.5 tons.  A selection of spare parts, including several roadwheels and track sections, are carried. A 5kW APU is carried to power the equipment without turning on the engine.

     The driver is on the front left, with the commander on the front right.  The crane operator is on the top of the superstructure in a cupola with all-around vision blocks.  A fourth mechanic can be carried inside the vehicle as necessary.

     The engine is a V-46 780-horsepower turbocharged diesel engine developing 780 horsepower, with an automatic transmission.

 

BREM-1M

     The BREM-1M is the same base vehicle, but is more powerful to support the T-90S tank.  The main improvement is the use of a V-92S2 engine, developing 1000 horsepower.  The crane is improved to be able to lift a base weight of 28 tons at 2.2 meters or 4.4 tons at 4.4 meters.  The BREM-1M is BMS-compatible, as well as having a GPS and a small computer with repair solutions.  Other details are as per the BREM-1.

 

Vehicles

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

BREM-1

$1,317,201

D, A

2 tons

41 tons

3+1

27

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

BREM-1M

$2,174,544

D, A

1.6 tons

41.8 tons

3+1

29

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicles

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor**

BREM-1

137/96

38/27

1000+400

289

Stnd

T6

HF140Cp*  HS22Sp  HR12**

BREM-1M

165/115

46/32

1000+400

371

Stnd

T6

HF140Cp*  HS22Sp  HR12**

 

Vehicles

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

BREM-1/1M

None

None

NSVT (C)

840x12.7mm

**Roof AV is 8; Floor AV is 8Sp.

 

Kurganmashzavod BREM-2

     Notes:  This is a recovery vehicle based on the BMP-1, in the same way that the BREM-1 is based on the T-72.  It is intended for recovery and repair of the BMP-series of infantry fighting vehicles.  It saw first service in 1982.  Some BMP-1s were also converted to BREM-2s, starting in 1986.

     The turret of the BMP-1 is replaced with an armored plate, and the rear of the vehicle is fitted with a load-carrying platform able to carry a BMP powerpack or something of equivalent weight (1.5 tons). The upper hull mounts a crane with a capacity of 1.5 tons. An auxiliary crane may be mounted to increase this weight to 7 tons, though this crane may not work on its own. The interior of the vehicle houses a 6.5-ton capacity winch, which may be lead out the sides or front or rear.  It’s pulling capacity may be raised to 19.5 tons with two sets of snatch blocks.  Various recovery tools are placed in stowage positions at various locations on the hull roof and sides, including a tow bar, 200 meters of rope, basic, tracked vehicle, small arms, and heavy ordinance tools, and excavating tools.  In addition, a hydraulic jack, arc welder, and air compressor is carried, along with a selection of spare parts. The front of the vehicle has a large dozer blade which is used to brace the BREM-2 in recovery operations and when using the crane.  Russia and other Pact forces use the BREM-2.

     There are 12 smoke grenade launchers on the BREM-2, in two clusters.  One of these clusters is a standard 902V Tuchna smoke grenade cluster, while the second cluster is a TDA thermal grenade launcher.  The layout leaves the driver in his standard position on the front left.  The commander is in the front, slightly offset to the right; he has a pintle-mounted machinegun. The other crewmembers are in seats in the hull; the firing ports of the BMP-1 have been deleted, but the vision blocks are retained.  The rear doors, with their fuel tanks, were also retained, and like the BMP-1, their crews often fill them with water or sand to stop rear hits from setting them on fire. The BREM-2 carries a lightweight folding table and a tent to extend the work area at the rear of it. Later, the sideskirts/mudflaps of the BMP-2 were added, making it more stable when swimming.  The crew is protected by an NBC Overpressure system.

     The engine is inherited from the BMP-1, and is a UTD-20 multifuel developing 300 horsepower.  The BREM-2 also inherits the BMP-1’s manual transmission, and its torsion-bar suspension with shocks on the first and last roadwheels.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$488,738

D, G, AvG, A

2 tons

13.6 tons

4

8

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

154/108

43/30/5

460

89

Stnd

T3

HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Omsk BREM-80U

     Notes:  The intent of the BREM-80U is to replace the BREM-1 with a much improved recovery vehicle based on the T-80U tank chassis. It’s specific design role was to provide a recovery vehicle for the T-80 series, though it has a secondary role of recovering other tanks and some smaller vehicles. It was designed in the late 1980s, but did not enter service until 1998.  The advent of the T-80, with its gas turbine engine, introduced complexities in recovery and repair efforts that it was felt only a new ARV could address.  The BREM-80U has its own deficiencies (including its faulty gas turbine engine) and many feel that the need would be better met by a set of improvements to the BREM-1.  The need for the BREM-80 was made more acute by the introduction of the T-80 series onto the international market.  Many say that while the BREM-80U is an important step, and will do as a stopgap, it cannot meet the needs for which it was designed and may soon have to be upgraded or replaced.  The only export customer so far is Cyprus, who also run a number of T-80Us. It should be noted that the BREM-80U received only low-rate production orders, and never entered full production.

     The BREM-80U is generally similar in layout to the BREM-1, but is greatly improved. The turret of the T-80U is removed and replaced by a raised superstructure.  There are several external stowage boxes on the sides, and roof of the vehicle. (Though the stowage boxes are not armored, the vehicle underneath is.) Mounted on the front left of the BREM-80U is its crane; it has a capacity of 18 tons, or 30 tons with snatch blocks.  Those 18 tons are easily enough to lift out the T-80Us powerpack or lift its turret, but it should be noted that the typical Western tank-based ARV has almost double this lifting power (without snatch blocks). The rear deck can carry the T-80’s powerpack or other large cargoes.  It can rotate 240 degrees.  The main winch can pull 35 tons bare, though with sufficient block and tackle this can be increased to 140 tons.  (Again, note the superior winching power of Western vehicles.)  The main winch has 120 meters of cable; an auxiliary winch can pull 3.5 tons and has 320 meters of cable.  The BREM-80U can easily tow a T-80-series tank, as well as similarly-sized or smaller vehicles.  Tools include basic, tracked vehicle, small arms, heavy ordnance, electrical, and electronic tools; also included are two sets of pioneer tools.  The BREM-80U also has an arc welder, air compressor, a tow bar, and two hydraulic jacks.  A selection of spare parts is carried, usually in the outer lockers or attached directly to the hull.  The BREM-80U has a front-mounted dozer blade to brace the vehicle when using the crane or winching; a bracing leg can also be lowered at the rear. The BREM-80U has a 60kW APU to allow for most operations, including crane and winch operations, without having the engine on.

     The driver of the BREM-80U, due to the position of the crane, is moved to the top center of the vehicle, with three vision blocks to the front, one of which has a night channel.  The commander is behind him on a raised, rotatable cupola with a machinegun that may be aimed and fired from within the vehicle with the hatch closed.  The mount has a modicum of stabilization, and the front vision block of the cupola has a night channel. On the front left side of the vehicle is a cluster of six smoke grenade launchers.  The rest of the crew normally consists of two other members with seats in the hull, though there is a seat for a fifth crewmember if required.  The vehicle is protected with a fire detection and suppression system, and an NBC Overpressure system.  The vehicle also has air conditioning and heating.  A small computer with repair and recovery solutions is mounted inside the hull on the left side.  The vehicle is equipped with GPS or GLONASS, depending on the wishes of the buyer.

     The BREM-80U is powered by the GTD-1250 gas turbine engine, developing 1250 horsepower. The engine is known to be difficult to maintain and has high fuel consumption; while the intervals between routine servicing is longer, when it has a problem, it’s usually a big one.  The BREM-80U is equipped with a deep wading kit that takes 15 minutes to install; this allows wading (but not swimming) up to 5 meters depth.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,038,199

D, G, JP, AvG, A

4.5 tons

45 tons

4+1

31

WL/IR Spotlight (C), Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

186/130

52/36

1100

535

Stnd

T6

HF152Cp  HS21Sp  HR14

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

NSVT (C)

800x12.7mm

 

Kurganmashzavod BREM-L Berglianka

     Notes:  The BREM-L is an ARV (Armored Repair Vehicle) based on the BMP-3 chassis. It is specifically designed to take care of the BMP-3, but also has a role in taking care of other members of the BMP series.  Unlike most vehicles in Russian service, the BREM-L was exported first, to several Mediterranean, South American, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian countries. After that, full-rate production began for the Russian Army. It is based on the BMP-3 chassis and engine, and so has decent armor protection, speed, and agility.  It is regarded as one of the world’s best light ARVs.

     In the BREM-L, the BMP-3 turret is removed and replaced with a small armored cupola on the center right of the vehicle, mounting a PKT machinegun.  The left side of the roof has a crane that can lift 6 tons, or 12 tons if a pulley block is installed first; this is to the left and rear of the commander.  This crane can lift the BMP-3’s entire power pack, the turret, or, with a little work, the passenger compartment of the BMP-3.  The crane is capable of 360-degree slewing, and a reach of 4.852 meters. The BREM-L can move slowly (no more than Com Mov 5) with a load on the crane. The vehicle's winch has a 20-ton capacity, or 40 tons if a pulley block is installed first, or up to 80 tons with two such blocks.  It has 100 meters of cable. Usually, when the winch is used, a dozer blade mounted at the front of the vehicle is first lowered; this can also be used for obstacle clearance and for general preparation of fighting positions.  The blade is slightly wider than the front of the BREM-L.  There is a load area on the rear hull roof for carrying large stores such as BMP engines and transmissions.  Towing is up to 30 tons; however, at 20 tons, Tr Mov and Com Mov are halved. The BREM-L is equipped with two pulley blocks, a tow bar, various lengths of rope and cable, and basic tools, tracked vehicle tools, small arms tools, and heavy ordinance tools.  It has welding sets for steel and aluminum.  It has an air compressor, and a hydraulic jack, and a selection of spare parts. These are normally carried in external lockers or on the hull of the BREM-L.  A 20kW APU is carried to run the vehicle while the engine is turned off.

     The BREM-L may swim with a little preparation.  If the vehicle being towed can also swim, the BREM-L may swim while towing the stricken vehicle.  The engine of the BREM-L is the BMP-3’s UTD-29M turbocharged multifuel developing 500 horsepower, along with an automatic transmission. To the left of the commander is a bank of four smoke grenade launchers.

     As stated, the commander is on a raised cupola with all-around vision blocks.  His center front block has a night channel.  He is armed with a machinegun which can be aimed and fired from within the vehicle.  Behind the commander is a spotlight on a mast, along with a CCTV day/night camera; this may be rotated by any crewmember needing it, except from the driver’s position. The driver is on the front left; he has vision blocks to the front.  The center block is a wide-angle block and has a night channel. Normally, there is only one other crewmember, seated in the hull; however, the BREM-L may carry two other crewmembers if the need arises. The large doors in the rear of the BMP-3 are deleted, but there is one smaller hatch.  This does not have a firing port, but does have a vision block.  Other vision blocks have been retained, but not the firing ports. The crew has air conditioning and heating and an NBC Overpressure system, as well as a fire detection and suppression system.  They have a small computer loaded with manuals pertaining to its roles.

     The BREM-L has a tertiary role: reconnaissance.  In this role, the BREM-L uses its internal BMS and GLONASS to spot enemy groups and positions and relay them to higher units.  It is also equipped with FLIR, a laser rangefinder, and a laser designator.

The gun

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,409,418

D, G, AvG, A

3.3 tons

18.7 tons

3+2

11

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), FLIR (C), WL Spotlight (G), Day/Night CCTV (G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

180/126

50/35/10

460

185

Stnd

T3

HF9  HS5  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Basic

PKTM (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Volgograd JSC BREhM-D

     Notes: The BREhM-D is based on the BTR-D and is meant to service and recover the BMD series of IFVs.  The BREhM-D entered service in the late 1990s, and is currently in service with Russia and most of the former Soviet Republics that inherited part or all of the BMD-1 and BMD-2 forces in their countries.  It is a very light ARV, with construction very similar to the BTR-D and BMD-1’s chassis’.

     The BREhM-D uses an A-frame crane that can rotate through 150 degrees, enabling it to reach over the front or rear of the vehicle.  It has a reach of 3 meters in either direction.  Its base capacity is 1.5 tons, but this may be doubled, quadrupled, or octupled depending on how many times the cable is run through the pulley and the top of the vehicle.  The crane rests over the rear of the vehicle and is locked down in a retaining frame for traveling or parachute drops.  The crane is powered through the BREhM-D’s vehicular hydraulic system, though it can be powered by a hand pump if the engine is switched off.  The crane is controlled by the vehicle commander.  The BREhM-D’s winch is capable of a single pull of 3.5 tons, though again this may be doubled or greater through the use of successive snatch blocks, to a maximum pull of 10.5 tons.  The cable is 100 meters long and runs through several internal rubber rollers in a framework inside the vehicle, ultimately unrolling from a reel inside the front of the vehicle.  The dozer blade is used to brace the vehicle during crane and winch operations; the blade has no actual mechanism and is deployed by one man lifting or lowering on each side of the blade to the ground position, travel position, or obstacle-dozing position.  The blade cannot be used to dig fighting positions.  Instead of a towbar, the BREhM-D has twin telescoping towbars with internal shock absorbers, and powered by vehicle hydraulic power.  Other tools include basic, power, electrical, electronic, tracked vehicle, small arms, and heavy ordnance tools.  It also carries a welding set powered by the vehicle’s electrical system (the engine must be on, as the welding set would otherwise drain the batteries almost immediately), and an air compressor.  It does not carry a hydraulic jack; the crane is used for this purpose instead.  A set of pioneer tools is carried, along with several ropes, cables, and snatch blocks, and a selection or spare parts.

     The commander/crane operator has a cupola on the front right; this cupola is manually-rotating and has all around vision blocks.  It is armed, usually with a PKT, AGS-17, or AGS-30.  The commander has an elevated periscope and a spotlight on a mast. A crewmember is seated to the right of the driver; he may fire a PKMS machinegun, though this is mounted in the bow ahead of the gunner and has no more than 15 degrees of traverse and elevation.  The driver is on the front left.  The three firing ports on each side of the BTR-D are retained on the BREhM-D, though not normally manned.  Crewmembers exit and enter through the various hatches on the roof; there is no rear hatch and the engine is in the back.  The crew has a heater and a collective NBC system to plug their protective masks into.

     The engine is that of the BTR-D, a Type 5D20-240 diesel engine, developing 240 horsepower.  The transmission is automatic. The suspension is specially-designed for the BREhM-D’s role; it is a variable-height hydropneumatic suspension that allows the BREhM-D to “squat” when being carried in aircraft and being airdropped.  The roadwheels are likewise small, and the tracks are a mere 230mm wide.  A side-effect of this suspension appears to be a relatively decent ride.  The BREhM-D is amphibious with a little preparation – a trim vane must be erected, bilge pumps turned on, and a periscope must be inserted into a socket and extended by the driver.  The bilge pump has a manual backup. This preparation takes 10 minutes.  Propulsion in the water is by hydrojets. The hydrojets have shutters which allow for surprising maneuverability when swimming – the BREhM-D can turn a complete circle in place while floating.  This is aided by the hydrojets’ being able to suck in water as well as expel it.  The BREhM-D can tow another vehicle while swimming if that vehicle is also amphibious.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$381,228

D, A

2 tons

8 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

198/139

55/39/8

300

89

Stnd

T4

HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT, AGS-17, or AGS-30 (C), PKTS (Bow)

2000x7.62mm, or 1000x7.62mm and 254x30mm

 

Volgograd JSC RKhM-5 Povozka

     Notes: The RKhM-5 is based on the BTR-D chassis and is designed to provide NBC reconnaissance to Russian Airborne troops, and to a lesser extent, Naval Infantrymen.  It entered very limited service (3 vehicles) in March 2012, and the Russian Army began testing these first examples in 2011.  Acquisition has been hampered by budgetary problems, and it is still in a low LRIP at this time.  It is used only by Russia at this time, but is available for export, but no such orders have been made.

    The NBC suite is almost the same at that of the RKhM-4-01 (see Russian Wheeled Engineer Vehicles), but it does not carry as many flags, and if airdropped the flag dispensers have to be mounted after it reaches the ground. (They are secured to the same pallet as the RKhM-5, but they would be ripped off in the slipstream if dropped connected to the vehicle). It also carries a smaller crew of specialists, and the NBC instruments are more advanced (for the most part, the same as the RKhM-4-01 for game purposes). The RKhM-5 has a Geiger counter, two dosimeters, an automatic chemical contamination alarm, devices for determining what agent is causing chemical contamination, and devices to analyze general weather conditions, especially wind direction and speed.  Gamma, beta, and alpha radiation can be detected and analyzed from within the vehicle.  The RKhM-5 has special arms on one side of the vehicle to take samples and bring them into a special compartment for analysis. The RKhM-5 can detect most types of chemical contamination used or stockpiled today. The arm is dexterous enough (assuming the operator is dexterous enough) to take in leaves, earth, and reach up to two meters into a tree or other surface to take materials for analysis.  The RKhM-5 can also take air samples and analyze them. It can also detect some types of biological contamination, such as bacteria and food poisoning. On the rear and sides of the RKhM-5 are three warning flag dispensers, each with 30 flags.  They can be deployed from within the vehicle or set to deploy automatically at a certain interval, and come in different colors to denote radiation and chemical contamination. The RKhM-5 has an eight-barreled signal flare launcher, which may be manually triggered or set to fire automatically upon detecting chemical or radiological contamination.  The RKhM-5 has a meteorological set, detecting wind speed and direction, humidity, and temperature. The RKhM-5 carries a complete set of reloads for the flare launcher.  The RKhM-5 has GPS navigation and a small computer to act as a mapping module, advise the commander of the proper routes, and convert areas to map coordinates. The RKhM-5 also conducts general route reconnaissance, and can note condition of roads, bridges, and areas of high water and put them on the map. The RKhM-5 has several short-range and long-range radios, which are data-capable, and is equipped with a BMS.

     The RKhM-5 has more advanced armor than the rest of the BMD series.  It is spaced on the front and the body of the vehicle is made from alternating steel and aluminum plates.

     The driver is on the front center, and the driver also mans an RPKS-74 automatic rifle.  The RPKS-74 can be removed and used as a dismounted weapon, but doing so reportedly requires a contortionist to accomplish. The mount gives its weapon about 30 degrees of traverse and elevation and 10 degrees of depression.  The commander is on the front right, and has a manually-rotating cupola with all-around vision blocks.  Both have night vision.   The driver has an overhead hatch, and has three vision blocks to the front. The commander is armed with a machinegun on a pintle mount connected to the cupola. The three firing ports on each side of the vehicle are retained. Three NBC specialists are in the center crew compartment of the RKhM-5, along with scads of instruments, radios, and a computer; the crew compartment is a bit cramped, and the specialists cannot stand all the way up; they normally use most of their instruments while seated or crouching.  They have two hatches on the center deck.

     The engine used on the RKhM-5 is a 2V-06-2 450-horsepower supercharged diesel, coupled to an automatic transmission.  This gives it excellent speed, needed when conducting reconnaissance missions possibly behind enemy lines. The suspension type is the same – a hydropneumatic variable-height suspension, but the height adjustment capability is different (130-530mm, versus 100-450mm for the BMD-1 and BMD-2).  The roadwheels are small, and the tracks are a mere 230mm wide.  A side-effect of this suspension appears to be a relatively decent ride.  Preparation for amphibious operations and amphibious performance is largely the same as the BMD-1 and BMD-2. RKhM-5 is amphibious with a little preparation – a trim vane must be erected, a periscope must be inserted into a socket and extended by the driver, and bilge pumps turned on.  The bilge pump has a manual backup. This preparation takes 10 minutes.  Propulsion in the water is by hydrojets. The hydrojets have shutters which allow for surprising maneuverability when swimming – the RKhM-5 can turn a complete circle in place while floating.  This is aided by the hydrojets’ being able to suck in water as well as expel it. 

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,259,430

D, A

500 kg

13.2 tons

5

Passive IR (D, C), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

222/155

62/43/13

300

167

Stnd

T4

HF11Sp  HS7  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT (C), RPKS-74 (D)

2000x7.62mm, 2160x5.45mm

 

 

ZTS BTS-1

     Notes:  The BTS-1 is one of the Soviet Union's first post-war armored recovery vehicle designs.  The first version, the BTS-1, is a rather primitive design with very limited capabilities.  It entered service in the early 1950s.  The BTS-1 underwent a long series of upgrading and refurbishment throughout its career, both in Soviet service and in the services of the many countries it was used by.  The BTS-1 did establish the basic form of tank-based ARVs.

 

BTS-1

     The BTS-1 established for basic form for tank-based ARVs: the turret removed and replaced by a raised superstructure.  In the BTS-1, only the front of the vehicle is a raised superstructure; the rear has eight large stowage boxes to carry its equipment, personal equipment, and spare parts.  There is no flat platform, and the BTS-1 cannot carry a powerpack on top.  If it needs to bring an engine and/or transmission, it usually does this with a trailer.  The BTS-1 has a light crane with a bare lift capacity of 1 ton, though by increasing cable runs between the pulley and the rear of the vehicle, up to 4 tons may be lifted.  The BTS-1 is hampered in recovery efforts by its lack of a winch; it is limited to hooking rope or cable onto the vehicle to be recovered and pulling with the BTS-1 itself.  It has a dozer blade in the rear to brace itself during crane operations.  Equipment carried includes most basic toolsets, an air compressor, and a hydraulic jack, along with a large selection of spare parts.  Also carried is several ropes, cables of various thicknesses, snatch blocks, and a chain saw.

     Notes: The driver is on the front left, and the commander is on a manually-rotating raised cupola armed with a weapon.  The third crewmember is the crane operator; he has a hatch on the center left, and his seat faces to the rear.  Up to two other mechanics may be carried in the hull.

     The Finnish version of the BTS-1, which they designated the BTS-2, is equipped with a winch capable of a basic lift of 12 tons.  It is otherwise like the BTS-1.

     The engine of the BTS-1 is the same as early T-54s: a 500-horsepower diesel V-54 engine.

 

BTS-1M

     This was an attempt to replace the BTR-1 with a vehicle capable of providing real support to T-54, T-55, and other vehicles.  In the center rear deck is a flat space surrounded by drop sides.  The BTS-1M has a more powerful V-55 580-horsepower engine, and a more capable crane of 20 tons (but still no winch). The superstructure is extended to the rear, and the stowage boxes are moved to the sides and the roof.

 

BTS-2

     The BTS-2 is different largely in that is based on the T-55 hull rather than the T-54.  It also adds a winch with a basic pulling force of 30 tons.  The cargo capacity is greater than either iteration of the BTS-1. 

 

BTS-4

     The BTS-4 is similar to the BTS-2, but it carries a long snorkel device to allow it to crawl along the bottom of bodies of water up to 8 meters deep.  The entire vehicle is watertight because of this, but it cannot actually swim.  Mounting the snorkel takes 20 minutes.  The snorkel connects to the commander’s hatch and there is a platform at the top for the commander to stand on.  On the outside of the snorkel is a ladder to allow the commander to climb to the top. Mounting the snorkel is a three-man job.  Removing the snorkel is also a 3-man job, and takes 10 minutes to dismount the snorkel.  At this point, the snorkel may be left behind, or 4 more minutes may be taken to lock is back down on top of the vehicle.  It locks down just left of center. After the snorkel operation, the commander’s machinegun must be tilted down to empty the barrel of water.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

BTS-1

$521,801

D, A

1 ton

36 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-2 (Finnish)

$586,408

D, A

1 ton

36.03 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-1M

$633,770

D, A

1.5 tons

34 tons

3+2

19

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-2

$647,756

D, A

3 tons

32 tons

3+2

17

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

BTS-4

 

D, A

3 tons

32.14 tons

3+2

18

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

BTS-1

108/76

30/21

812

149

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-2 (Finnish)

108/76

30/21

812

149

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-1M

126/88

35/25

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF63  HS12  HR8

BTS-2

132/93

37/26

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF60  HS12  HR6

BTS-4

132/92

37/26

812

173

Stnd

T6

HF60  HS12  HR6

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

(All)

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

Rubisovsk RM-G

     Notes: Called by the Russians the Repair Tracked Vehicle or RTV, this vehicle is in service only with the Russian Army, and has not been offered for export sales.  Though specifically-designed to service the BMP series, the RM-G is capable of performing repairs on a wide variety of vehicles to one degree or another.

     The RM-G is built on the chassis of the BMP-1, though it is modified almost beyond recognition.  The turret is removed; the rear has a raised superstructure, and the platform for carrying powerpacks or large cargoes is on top of this superstructure. It is designed for repair, and features a complete toolkit composed of all types of tools as well as pioneer tools.  The RM-G also has a welding set, air compressor, hydraulic jack, a hand-held circular cutter, and a slave cable.  The RM-G has space for one ton of spare parts, including several roadwheels and track sections. The RM-G has a crane with a capacity of 3 tons and a range of 228 degrees, and a reach of 4.01 meters.  It is mounted to the left side of the turret. The RM-G is a repair vehicle, not a recovery vehicle, and does not have a winch for recovery.

     The driver is on the front left, with the commander to the rear of him in a small turret (bigger than a cupola, but otherwise the same).  The turret does not actually mount a weapon; the weapon is on a mount on the turret ring, Atop this turret is a hatch. The vehicle’s weapon can be aimed and fired from inside the vehicle. The driver has one wide angle vision block to the front and two more to the front and two others looking left.  The commander’s turret is ringed with vision blocks.  The driver’s middle block has a night vision channel, as does the front block and gunsight on the commander’s cupola.  Two other mechanics are seated in the hull behind the commander’s turret; one of these has a position behind the commander with a simple hatch, and he operates the crane.  The crew is protected by NBC Overpressure with a collective NBC backup, and a heater.  The RM-G retains the BMP-1’s rear doors and firing ports.

     The RM-G has the BMP-1’s engine and transmission, and so has torsion bar suspension with shocks on the first and rear roadwheels.  The engine is a UTD-20 diesel developing 300 horsepower.  As it is amphibious, it is cable of performing repair while swimming, though the crane is not useable when swimming.6.736

     Most RM-Gs are based on the BMP-1 chassis; however, newer conversions have been based on the BMP-2 chassis.  This variant is nearly identical for game purposes, but does have some differences.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

RM-G

$399,701

D, A

500 kg

13.8 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

RM-GM

$401,501

D, A

500 kg

14.38 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

RM-G

155/109

43/30/4

462

111

CiH

T6

TF10  TS6  TS6  HF8  HS4  HR4

RM-GM

150/105

42/29/4

462

113

CiH

T6

TF11  TS7  TR6  HF9  HS5  HR4

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

RM-G/GM

None

None

PKT (C)

2000x7.62mm

 

 

OKB-520 IMR

     Notes: This predecessor of the IMR-2MA was first seen in 1973.  It is based on the chassis of a T-55. The IMR is no longer being used by Russian regular or reserve units or Eastern European countries, but still equips some Russian Mobilization-Only units.  In addition, it is being used in regular or reserve units by China, several Middle Eastern nations, and some African countries.  The IMR is a CEV, but has a secondary role as an NBC reconnaissance vehicle.

     In the IMR, the turret of the T-55 is removed and replaced by large crane In the IMR, the T-55 turret is removed and replaced with the crane turntable (in the center of the vehicle) and other combat engineer equipment.  The crane is telescoping and is normally carried back on the center, telescoped fully in. The crane head may be equipped with a standard lifting head, or other accessories, including a pincer for grabbing, a bucket, or an auger.  The pincer can be used for clearing obstacles and ripping down items such as trees and building supports. The front of the IRM has a dozer blade for digging fighting positions, clearing obstacles, or other work.  The IRM normally carries an assortment of tools, including basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, and air compressor, and a welding and cutting set. The crane can turn through 360 degrees and has a capacity of 2 tons.  The IMR has a winch with a basic pulling capacity of 20 tons, and the cable goes out through the front.  In front is a large mine plow that can also be used to brace the vehicle during crane operations.  The blade also has teeth to rip up roads and asphalt, and concrete surfaces.  The crane has variable geometry and can be pulled almost straight to aid when digging fighting positions or when the crane arm is being operated.  The blade may also be used with the teeth removed and used to construct dirt roads, at the rate 8 kilometers per hour.  It can be used to smooth over existing roads and fill trenches, or dig fighting positions.

     The commander and driver both have raised cupolas; the commander’s is manually-rotating, while the driver’s is non-rotating.  The commander’s cupola has all-around vision blocks and a night vision device, as well as a rotating periscope.  The driver has vision blocks to his front and both sides; the center front vision block may be removed and replaced with a night vision block.  The commander operates all of the external tools, including the crane and its accessories.  The driver operates the winch, with the commander (out of the vehicle paying out the cable); he also operates the mine plow.  Inside the IMR, the crew has the protection of NBC Overpressure, as well as an automatic fire detection suppression system.  The commander has a rotating spotlight for use when operating the arm or clearing obstacles. The IMR also carries 20 kilograms of C4 and the equivalent of an engineer’s demo kit.

     The IMR, being based on the T-55, uses a V-55 580-horsepower diesel, modified to produce high torque. It has a manual transmission.  The IMR can be hermetically sealed, allowing fording in water of up to 5 meters.   On each side of the vehicle are banks of 4 smoke grenade launchers.  The IMR can also produce a thick, oily smokescreen by injecting diesel into its exhaust. The IMR has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: During the Twilight War the IMR was still being used by many second-line Warsaw pact countries, China, several Middle Eastern nations, and some African countries. 

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$839,014

D, A

2 tons

37.5 tons

2

24

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Searchlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

117/82

33/23

812+380

173

Stnd

T6

HF67  HS16  HR8**

 

Uralvagonzavod IMR-2

     Notes:  This is a more advanced Russian combat engineer vehicle than the IMR, being based on a T-72 chassis.  That said, the IMR and IMR-2 are similar designs, except for their chassis. They entered service in 1982, and had replaced most of the IMRs in Russian, Czech, and Polish service by 1987.  The IMR-2 saw some action in Chechnya and was also used to help bury the breached reactor at Chernobyl, due to its high protection against radiation. 

     The turret of the T-72 has been replaced by a large turntable/small turret, from which is controlled the crane.  The crane is locked to the rear during traveling. The crane can be traversed through 360 degrees and has a capacity of 2 tons at a reach of 8.15 meters.  The crane may use several heads, including a lifting hook, pincer claws, and an auger.  The front of the IMR-2 has a V-shaped mine plow that is armored against mines and is 1 meter high and 3.38 meters wide.  It has a variable geometry; angle grading as well as straight plowing is possible with this blade.  The front of the blade also had an extendible probe that is used to send radio signals to trigger the fuses on mines, explosive shells, and other such hazards.  It is 65% likely to detonate any such device it encounters if the fuse is a contact, tilt rod, or radio type.  When not in use, the plough is raised completely upwards to the 90-degree position. The IMR-2 carries a wide assortment of tools, including basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, and air compressor, and a welding and cutting set. The IMR-2 series does not have a winch.

     The crew consists of a driver and commander/crane operator; the driver is in the center front and the commander is in the small space in front of the crane.  (It really is cramped.) He has a pintle-mounted weapon to his front, but he is not on a cupola, though he does have a wide-angle vision block on each side of him, and his seat rotates.  They are protected by an NBC Overpressure system and an automatic fire detection and suppression system.  The driver and commander’s positions connect through a small tunnel, and there is also a space to keep personal gear, branching off this tunnel.

     The IMR-2 uses a V-84-1 turbocharged diesel engine developing 840 horsepower, modified to produce high torque, and is controlled by an automatic transmission.  With preparation, the IMR-2 may ford up to 5 meters. On each side of the vehicle are banks of 4 smoke grenade launchers.  At the rear of the vehicle are a pair of MICLIC launchers for minefield breaching.

     There were several variants produced over the years.  The IMR-2M1 is identical, except for a difference in weight and speed caused by the removal of the MICLIC launchers; the hydraulic system is also more protected and has a backup system.  The IMR-2M2 is designed for NBC reconnaissance as well as normal combat engineer jobs. The IMR-2M2 has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR-2M2 has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.  It adds to the tool set for the crane arm with a more useful bucket.  The commander’s machinegun, however, is removed; the small quarters never really allowed it to be used effectively in battle; for the commander, small arms are more easily used.  It also does not have the MICLIC launchers.  It does, however, have extra mine protection in the form of extra armor plate for the floor. It entered service in 1990, as did the IMR-2M1.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

IMR-2

$1,286,732

D, A

1.5 tons

44.3 tons

2

28

Active/Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

IMR-2M1

$908,965

D, A

1.5 tons

43.28 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

IMR-2M2

$1,295,678

D, A

1.5 tons

44.28 tons

2

29

Passive IR (D), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor**

IMR-2

139/97

39/27

1000+400

310

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

IMR-2M1

142/99

39/28

1000+400

296

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

IMR-2M2

142/99

39/27

1000+400

296

CiH

T6

TF30Sp  TS30Sp  TS30Sp  HF140Cp  HS22Sp  HR12***

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

IMR-2/2M1

None

None

NSVT (C)

500x12.7mm, 20 kg C4, Engineer Demo Chest

 

Uralvagonzavod IMR-3

     Notes:  This is the Russians' newest combat engineer vehicle, based on the chassis of the T-90 tank.  It was in LRIP as early as 1991, but full production did not occur until 1999. It is also known as the IMR-2MA, IMR-2A and IMR-3MA. Its primary job is to clear obstacles, smooth damaged roadways, and clear rubble from urban areas.  This vehicle is only in Russian service, and has seen action in Chechnya and Ukraine.  The IMR-3 has always been a limited-production vehicle.

     As is usual for these converted tanks, the turret is removed; in its place is the turntable for the jib and the commander’s turret.  The dozer blade can smooth a road of about 6 km by the width of the vehicle in one hour, depending on the degree of difficulty of the obstacles, or clear earthwork at a rate of 300 cubic meters per hour, or loose rubble at a rate of about 400 cubic meters an hour.  The dozer blade is also almost mine proof for purposes of clearing mines.  It uses a lighter dozer blade (though just as strong) called the KMT-3R.  This blade is described by many sources as “massive” or “huge.”  It comes in two wings, which may be operated individually, allowing for a greater variety of obstacle-clearing scenarios.  It is usually used in a V-shape, as a mine plow; it can be used straight, though, for bulldozing.  Even through asphalt or concrete, the blade can dig 450 centimeters per pass. The front of both wings also had an extendible probe that is used to send radio signals to trigger the fuses on mines, explosive shells, and other such hazards.  It is 85% likely to detonate any such device it encounters if the fuse is a contact, tilt rod, or radio type.  This type of detonation does not damage the plow. 

     The IRM-2MA has a crane with a capacity of 3 tons, a main winch with a capacity of 35 tons and 100 meters of cable, and a secondary winch with a capacity of 15 tons and 120 meters of cable.  Normal tools carried include basic tools, excavating tools, power tools, construction tools, an air compressor, and a welding and cutting set.  The jib is designed to use three tools; an auger, a lifting hook, and a combination excavator bucket/pincers.  However, replacing tool heads is a long process, requiring 15 minutes and the crew to leave the vehicle and work with tools to accomplish the task.  (For some reason, the Russians chose not to use the snap-in tools they used on early versions of the IMR.) For this reason, the head normally used, the bucket/pincers, is almost always mounted. The arm is mounted on the left side of the vehicle, about one-third of the way back, next to the turret.  It has a reach of 8 meters and has a swing of 360 degrees.

     There are two crewmembers.  The driver is in the front center; he is in the front center and has three large windows to the front, with the sides angled to the left and right sides.  The windows may have armored shutters lowered over them, in which case the driver sees through vision blocks above the windows.  One has a day/night channel.  The driver has an overhead hatch, but getting into it past all the plow machinery is a little difficult.  The commander has a conical-shaped small turret, which has a cupola at the top with all-around vision blocks and a night channel on the front block.  The cupola is manually rotatable.  Between the commander and driver is a small tunnel which connects the two positions, along with a space to put personal items.  The commander’s machinegun can be aimed and fired from under armor. The driver’s and commander’s position are much more roomy than on an IMR-2.

     The IMR-3 has a DP-38 retenonmeter for radiation detection and measuring the amount of contamination.  The IMR-3 has VHPR device, which detects chemical contamination and to a limited extend, the type and degree of contamination.  There is a 5kW generator to power the tools, winches, and crane when the engine is off.  The engine is the same as the early versions of the T-90 – a V-84MS 840-horsepower turbocharged diesel.  The armor level is also the same.  IMR-3s in service with the Russian Army have a BMS and GLONASS.  The crew is protected by an NBC Overpressure system and a fire detection/suppression system.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This vehicle is extremely rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline, with perhaps 12 having been built before the start of the War.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$2,091,070

D, G, AvG, A

2.5 tons

47.4 tons

2

19

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), Thermal Imaging (C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

132/93

37/26

1200

311

CiH

T6

TF50Cp  TS30Sp  TR16  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Basic

Kord (C)

1050x12.7mm, 20 kg C4, Engineer Demo Chest

 

Kurganmashzavod IRM Zhuk

     Notes:  This vehicle is described by the Russians as an "Engineer Reconnaissance Vehicle,” and is based on a lengthened BMP-1 chassis (seven roadwheels instead of six).  Used only by the Russians, the IRM’s job is to conduct route reconnaissance, checking the conditions or roads, trails, bridges, and fording sites.  It is also used to detect mines and minefields.  It has a secondary role as an artillery observer vehicle, and can also detect radiation and chemical contamination.  A tertiary role is electronic intrusion to listen into enemy radio networks.

     The IRM is fully amphibious, and may operate fully submerged along the bottom of a body of water with the aid of a 10-meter snorkel.  The IRM does this with small ballast tanks, a trim vane, and some sandbags in the hull. The IRM can also swim, using two propellers at the rear to propel itself and maneuver. The IRM is also equipped with two mine detectors on booms, a sensor for determining the load-bearing capacities of a piece of terrain, devices to determine water depth, surf action, terrain angles, and the thickness of ice.  The vehicle is also equipped with a laser rangefinder/designator, an artillery aiming circle, and two radios with a range of 20 kilometers in addition to the normal vehicle complement.  The IRM is equipped with a rocket-powered grapple for self-recovery, even under enemy fire.  At the rear is a bank of 12 solid rockets to assist in this recovery if necessary.  The IRM may generate a smoke screen by injecting diesel fuel into its exhaust. Other tools consist of the vehicle’s basic and tracked vehicle tools, a chainsaw, and an air compressor.

     The IRM is equipped with sensors for detecting the amount or type of chemical contamination, and the amount and type of radioactive contamination.  To aid in this, the IRM is equipped with a small arm that allows the crew to snag a piece of vegetation or some other interesting piece of debris. The arm is long enough to reach the ground and into the low branches of a tree.  These are then brought into a special container in the vehicle’s wall for analysis.

     The IRM carries a crew of six; of these, one is the driver and another is the commander, who is in a small turret armed only with a medium machinegun.  The other crewmembers are specialists who each have their own duties in the vehicle. The turret is in the center left of the vehicle; the driver is on the front left.  Naturally, the IRM has NBC Overpressure protection; it also has an automatic fire detection/suppression system, and unusually for a Russian vehicle, air conditioning and heating. There are four MOPP suits and masks for every crewmember, as well as extra filters for the masks. The specialists have CCTV cameras on the center roof and rear roof connected to a monitor on one side of the IRM, as well as an internal computer to aid in their analyses. The commander and driver navigate with a mapping computer module and inertial navigation. Digital information may be sent back to higher HQ up to 300 kilometers away, though using this much range requires the extension of a long-range antenna.

     The IRM may use BMP-1 appliqué armor on the hull, but not on the turret, which is more akin to a BTR-80’s turret than a BMP-1’s turret. It may also mount lugs for ERA, over the appliqué armor.

     Being a BMP-1 variant, the IRM has a 300-horsepower UTD-20 diesel engine, with a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bar, with shocks on the first and fifth roadwheels.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$1,106,952

D, A

1 ton

17.2 tons

2+4

10

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C), FLIR (C), 4xDay/Night CCTV

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

131/92

36/25/8

600

89

CiH

T3

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PKT

2000x7.62mm, 15 kg C4, Engineer Demo Kit.

 

Chelyabinsk MTP Technical Support Vehicle

     Notes:  Russia and Pact forces used this armored repair and recovery vehicle.  Though it has long been out of service in Russian and Pact units, it is still being used by several Third-World nations, and some Mobilization-Only Russian units are equipped with them. It is based on the closed-top version of the BTR-50, and is used to support armored personnel carriers such as the BTR-series and BMP-series. It was used by virtually all countries who used the BTR-50 or early versions of the BMP or BTR series, though most MTPs are long out of service in the world, except in the Third World and some Russian Mobilization-Only units.  Most were out service by the early 1970s. Museums are more interested in the actual BTR-50 though some are used as OPFOR vehicles when they are still running.  They are old, and parts for them are difficult to find, and most ended up as range targets.

     The chassis of the MTP is, for the most part, the same as the BTR-50PK, differing only in minor details.  The upper hull, however, differs greatly from the BTR-50PK, as the raised superstructure of the BTR-50PK extends all the way back on the MTP, and is tall enough for crewmembers to stand within it.  This allows for ample space for work and carrying of personal gear and spare parts and some tools.  Other tools and spare parts are kept in boxes on the sides and rear of the MTP. There is space on the rear deck for carrying a power pack or other large spares. Recovery equipment carried includes anchors, tow bars and cables, block and tackle, oil and fuel pumps, a 5kW APU, a complete welding set, an air compressor, and a set of tools appropriate for working on wheeled and tracked vehicles.  Ample room is provided for spare parts, and the MTP also has a crane with a capacity of 1.5 tons and a reach of 2.85 meters, and a winch with a capacity of 8 tons (15 tons with block and tackle installed) and 60 meters of cable.

     The MTP has a raised superstructure with hatches for the crew and commander in it.  The driver's hatch is in the normal place, and there are two doors in the rear. Above which is kept an extension tent to increase the available covered room for work.  A folding trestle table is carried on the outside for use in these circumstances.  There is a firing port in each side of the crew compartment and in one of the rear doors that can take an AK-series assault rifle or the PK machine gun. The commander’s position is a simple hatch with a pintle-mounted weapon.  He can also bring out an RPG-7 from a rack near his position. Three other mechanics have seats in the hull.  The vehicle has no heater or air conditioner and does not even have a collective NBC system; the crew is reliant on their own MOPP gear and protective masks in case of chemical attack.  There is not even an automatic fire detection/suppression system – there are five fire extinguishers instead for the crew compartment, and one mounted by the engine.

     The MTP can carry bulk amounts of fuel or POL to units which are hard to reach on wheels.  This necessitates removing all but the base crew, and removing the internal lockers for tools and spare parts.

     As a derivative of the BTR-50PK, the MTP uses the same V-6B 240-horsepower diesel, with a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bars, with no shock absorbers.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$211,738

D, A

1.5 tons

15.5 tons

5

9

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

120/84

33/23/4

400

69

Stnd

T3

HF3  HS2  HR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PK, RPG-7 (C)

1250x7.62mm, 4x73mm

 

Kharkiv MTP-LB Technical Support Vehicle

     Notes:  Similar in concept to the MTB technical support vehicle listed above, this vehicle is based on the MT-LB chassis.  It was meant to be a new vehicle, replacing the MTP, and is designed to service the BMP and BTR-series of vehicles.  The MTP-LB does not appear to have been exported, nor was it built in large numbers.

     The basic form of the MT-LB is unchanged, except for the addition of a crane, winch, and platform on the rear deck for carrying engines and other large assemblies. The crane is driven by the winch (the winch and the crane cannot be used at the same time), and has a capacity of 1.5 tons.  The crane is an A-frame structure mounted on the front of the vehicle that has a reach of 4.2 meters.  The winch may be used by itself, in which case the capacity is 6.12 tons with 80 meters of cable.  There is a jack located on the front of the vehicle which may jack up to 15 tons.  (This jack must be moved to the cargo platform before amphibious operations can take place.)   Other equipment carried by the MTP-LB includes tow bars and tow cables, chock blocks, electric and gas welding and cutting gear, a vehicle decontamination kit, and a full range of tools, including a welding set/cutter, air compressor, and tow bar.

     The MTP-LB is amphibious, and can make amphibious recoveries (with the MTP-LB partially in the water, not full swimming) as well as land recoveries.  The MTP-LB may tow a vehicle over water, if the vehicle can also swim or ford to depths of no more than 5 meters.  (It would be a very slow tow.)

     The MT-LBs commander’s cupola has been removed and replace with a simple hatch and four vision blocks.  And there are crew hatches on the roof between this area and the cargo platform; one is a position for operating the crane, with an elevated seat and four wide-angle vision blocks and a simple hatch.  There are also two doors on the rear of the vehicle.  The driver is in the front left; normally, no other persons are carried, but there are seats and space for two other mechanics.  The vehicle has NBC Overpressure and a heater. While most versions of this vehicle are armed with a PK, the Polish version of the MTP-LB is armed with an NSV heavy machinegun.

     The MTP-LB has the same engine as the MT-LB: A YaMZ-238 240-horsepower diesel.  This is coupled to a manual transmission.  Suspension is by torsion bar, with no shocks.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$305,608

D, A

2 tons

12.3 tons

2+2

11

Headlights

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

143/100

40/28/4

450

71

Stnd

T3

HF5  HS2  HR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

PK (C) or NSV (C)

2500x7.62mm, or 1500x12.7mm

 

Omsk MTU-20

     Notes:  This is a tracked bridging vehicle based on a T-55 chassis. Russian and Pact forces rarely use the MTU-20, but the MTU-20 is used by Afghanistan, Egypt, Finland, India, Israel, Nigeria, and Syria. Israel uses captured versions.

     The turret has been removed so the bridge span can lay flat on the deck area. The bridge can span 18 meters.  It weighs 6 tons and can support 50 tons, taking 5 minutes to deploy and 7 minutes to recover.  The bridge is a semi-cantilever bridge; the ends are deployed like a scissors bridge, and then the entire assembly is extended out horizontally. The bridge has a double treadway, with the treadways made of box-type aluminum girders. Two legs in the front are lowered into the ground as far as possible before bridgelaying or recovering takes place.

     The crew consists of a driver on the front left and the commander/bridge operator behind and to the right of him.  The commander has a rotating cupola with all-around vision blocks, and the crew need not crack their hatches to deploy the bridge.  The commander has a machinegun, but due to the bridge supports and machinery, shooting while the bridge is mounted is very difficult; especially, clear shots to the front of the vehicle are virtually impossible. The MTU-20 has NBC Overpressure protection.  Just behind each bumper is a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers.

     Two variants of the MTU-20 were made, each differing only in their engines.  The older version uses a W-2-54 diesel developing 520 horsepower.  The newer versions use a W-2-55 diesel developing 580 horsepower.  Both have manual transmissions.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-20 (Early)

$517,000

D, A

500 kg

34 tons

2

51

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

MTU-20 (Late)

$517,240

D, A

500 kg

34.04 tons

2

51

Active/Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-20 (Early)

118/83

33/23

960

153

CiH

T6

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF67  HS16  HR8

MTU-20 (Late)

128/90

36/25

960

171

CiH

T6

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF67  HS16  HR8

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

(Both)

None

None

DShK (C)

500x12.7mm

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

Uralvagonzavod MTU-72

     Notes:  This AVLB is based on the T-72B or T-72M1 chassis. (Some sources say that some MTU-72s were made using new-built T-72 chassis.)  The MTU-72 is used only by Russian and Pact forces.

     It uses a bridge similar in design, but much larger and heavier then, the bridge of the MTU-20 listed above.  This bridge can span a gap of 18 meters and support 50 tons.  By utilizing a second MTU-72’s bridge, a gap of 30 meters can be spanned. Three minutes are required to lay the bridge, and 8 minutes to recover it.  The bridge is of aluminum alloy construction and weighs 6.4 tons.  The bridge is extremely strong for such an item – it was made to withstand small arms fire and some artillery and rocket attacks. The bridge is laid in the same manner as that of the MTU-20 – the center portion is slid out, and then the ends are deployed. The MTU-72 carries a dozer blade at the front to clear obstacles to bridge laying or otherwise prepare bridging sites.  The MTU-72 uses the V-46-6 turbocharged diesel engine, developing 780 horsepower, unless it is T-72B-based; in this case, it has an 840-horsepower engine.  These versions are known as MTU-72Ms. It has an automatic transmission.

     The commander has a full, rotating cupola, but is not armed except for his small arms and some grenades.  He is in the center of the vehicle.  The driver is ahead of him, in the front center.  The crew has a heater and NBC Overpressure protection, as well as an automatic fire detection/suppression system.

     There is a similar vehicle in Czech service called the MT-72. It is essentially the same vehicle, but is heavier in weight even though the bridge is lighter. It is based on the Czech version of the base T-72, the T-72M3 CZ.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-72

$706,826

D, A

300 kg

40 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D, C)

Shielded

MTU-72M

$729,741

D, A

300 kg

41.1 tons

2

27

Passive IR (D, C)

Shielded

MT-72

$721,880

D, A

300 kg

41.5 tons

2

35

Passive IR (D), Image Intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-72

142/100

40/28

1000

288

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF138Cp  HS20Sp  HR12

MTU-72M

147/103

41/29

1000

310

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF148Cp  HS24Sp  HR12

MT-72

138/97

38/27

1000

299

CiH

T6

TF20  TS20  TR20  HF129Cp  HS17Sp  HR12

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

Uralvagonzavod MTU-90

     Notes:  This is an AVLB based on the T-90 chassis.  It is being looked at by many of the same countries that use the T-90S export version of the T-90 tank.  The Russians meant to replace the MTU-72 with the MTU-90, but budgetary versions kept them from acquiring more than just a few, even though it was approved for service with the Russian Army in 1997.  So far, the MTU-90 is officially in LRIP, but it has received no production orders as of yet. 

     This bridge weighs 6.62 tons and can span a 23-meter obstacle, supporting a vehicle weighing 50 tons.  The bridge is easy to lay and recover, requiring only 2 minutes to lay and 2.5 minutes to recover.  The MTU-90 offers the same armor protection as the early T-90, and the chassis is in fact nearly identical to the early T-90.  It can also be fitted with appliqué armor, track skirts, and ERA.  The bridge is strong – similar in protection to the MTU-72.  It is laid by unfolding the rear section, lowering the two sections across the obstacle, and as this is done, the third section automatically swings into position. The crew need not open the hatches to lay or recover the bridge.  The crew has night vision channels to their vision blocks and the bridge can be lain and recovered at night, still without the crew opening the hatches.  The bridge is operationally compatible with the bridge on the truck-mounted TMM-6, though they are different chassis.

     The commander/bridge operator is in the center of the vehicle; he is in a manually-rotating cupola with the center front vision block being a wide-angle block that has a night vision channel.  The driver is in the center front.  The vehicle has air conditioning, heating, and an NBC Overpressure system, as well as an automatic fire detection/suppression system.  The commander’s cupola is not armed; the crew relies on their small arms and grenades for defense.  The MTU-90 has a BMS and GPS.

     The MTU-90 uses the same 840-horsepower turbocharged multifuel, coupled with an automatic transmission. It can use a deep wading kit allowing submerging up to 5 meters, but cannot actually swim. The wading kit takes 5 minutes to mount.

     The MTU-90M was designed to attract export customers; the Russian Army cannot afford them, even though they were accepted for service in 2013. Azerbaijan ordered an undisclosed number of MTU-90Ms in 2014, and they go into service as soon as they are received and readied. It uses a shorter bridge able to span 19 meters, but is an MLC-60 bridge.  The bridge is essentially like the standard MTU-90 bridge, but the center section is much shorter, as are the wings; they unfold in the same manner.  The MTU-90M is based on the T-90S chassis, but it is identical to the T-90 chassis for game purposes.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

MTU-90

$1,400,997

D, G, AvG, A

300 kg

45.5 tons

2

25

Passive IR (D), Image intensification (C)

Shielded

MTU-90M

$1,344,351

D, G, AvG, A

300 kg

45.3 tons

2

 

Passive IR (D), Image intensification (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor

MTU-90

136/95

38/27

1200

310

CiH

T6

TF20 TS20  TR20  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

MTU-90M

137/96

38/27

1200

309

CiH

T6

TF20 TS20  TR20  HF180Cp  HS30Sp  HR18

*The Crew-in-Hull refers to the bridge as a turret.  If the bridge is deployed, the Configuration is Stnd.

 

KVZ PMM-2

     Notes:  This Russian vehicle has the tracks and suspension of the T-64 tank, and upper chassis of the PTS-2 amphibious carrier; it also uses components of the MDK-5 trench-digger and the MT-T tracked transporter.  It is service only with Russia.  Production is now complete, but the assembly lines can resume at any time if necessary.

     The PMM-2 is used as a floating bridge, and may be used as either a bridge or ferry, or grounded at the bottom of a body of water.  The vehicle opens like a clamshell when being used. When used as a bridge or ferry, the PMM-2 can carry 42.5 tons, but it is unable to carry this weight on land.  Up to 10 PMM-2 vehicles can be latched together to form long bridges; each PMM-2 unit can bridge a gap 17 meters wide (or float vehicles that long).  This does not require anyone to leave the vehicles, but they must be maneuvered in such a way that the vehicles latch together. PMM-2s can operate in bodies of water with currents of up to 2 meters per second.  The PMM-2 uses retractable anchors and waterjets at the rear corners to maintain position if being used as a ferry or floating bridge. When the bridge is opened, it has a width of 20 meters; it can carry vehicles that wide, but practically only 17 meters are useful. Vehicles, troops, or cargo can be loaded via loading ramps which are 5 meters long and pull back into the platform for travel.  A similar ramp is at the front for unloading. The vehicle takes 10 minutes to ready for use as a ferry or bridge.

     The cab is at the front, with large bullet-resistant windows to the front and sides.  They are watertight; in fact, the entire vehicle is watertight down to a depth of 3.6 meters. The cab carries 3: the driver, the commander, and the bridge/ferry operator.  The bridge/ferry operator is responsible for unfolding the sections above, and re-readying it for travel.  The other crewmembers are in the hull, and they monitor the integrity of the vehicle when the vehicle is submerged and ensure the engine and batteries operate properly. The PMM-2 is not armed.  The engine used is a variant of the T-64’s V-64-4 diesel engine, with 710 horsepower and turbocharging.  Transmission is automatic.  When submerged, the PMM-2 is powered by banks of batteries that are the equivalent of a 20kW generator, though they discharge in 1 hour and must be recharged or the vehicle recovered at that point.  The PMM-2 has an air conditioner, heating, and NBC Overpressure. The PMM-2 has inertial positioning, GPS, and a map computer.  The PMM-2 has an automatic fire detection/suppression system.

     The new version, the PMM-2M, has a load carrying capacity when used as a bridge or ferry of 85 tons.  However, the spotters have been removed and there are only three crewmembers. It is otherwise the same as the PMM-2 for game purposes.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

PMM-2

$908,232

D, A

500 kg

30 tons

5

21

Headlights

Enclosed

PMM-2M

$1,439,520

D, A

500 kg

29.86 tons

3

21

Headlights

Enclosed

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

PMM-2

165/115

46/32/8

1000

261

Stnd

T6

HF6  HS3  HR2

PMM-2M

166/116

46/32/8

1000

261

Stnd

T6

HF6  HS3  HR2