AEC FV-4003 Centurion AVRE

     Notes:  This is a CEV similar in concept to the US M-728, and also a variant of a main battle tank, in this case, the Churchill Mk VII.  (In fact, the M-728 uses a modified version of the AVRE’s gun.) It started trials in 1962 and entered service with the British Army in 1963.  The last use of the AVRE was in Desert Storm, where it was put to use destroying obstacles and tank traps.  The AVRE is heavily modified for its role as an AEV, particularly in the main gun and large forward dozer blade.  The Chieftain AVRE was supposed to be replaced by the Vickers Trojan AVRE, but delays in the Trojan program as well as the spot-on demobbing of the AVRE has left the UK without any such vehicles.

     The AVRE was modified first by replacing the turret with one designed to take the 165mm AVRE L-9A1 gun, firing a 29-kilogram HESH round.  (Though effective range is short, and fire control sparse, the 165mm HESH can cause considerable damage to even the frontal aspect of a main battle tank.)  This gun has a very abbreviated barrel with a fume extractor that takes up most of the gun barrel and a modicum of a flash suppressor.  The gun is essentially used to fire a sort of tank shell version of a demolitions charge. The turret has large stowage boxes on either side, normally containing the large amount of block and tackle, ropes, wire ropes, and even hand-emplaced explosive charges.  The gun has an L-8A2 coaxial machinegun, and an L-7A2 as a commander’s machinegun.  Each side of the turret has a bank of four smoke grenade launchers, at the point where the mantlet meets the gun. Another grenade installation is on the front turret, facing to the front sides of the vehicle, with a cluster of five on either side. An optional weapon, carried on the rear deck when used, is a Flexible Linear Demolition Charge, or line-charge thrower. Another possible weapon is a trailer carrying the Giant Python or Barmine or Giant Viper mine throwing system.  One sighting device peculiar to such vehicles was the Type 2100 double-prism periscope, designed to produce a highly-magnified view at short range, to produce an enhanced sight figure of obstacles.

     Behind the turret is a pair of hatches in the roof of the vehicle; normally a “penthouse,” a structure to expand enclosed work area, is raised above the hatches.  This generally covers the rear deck and is made of steel or aluminum plates, or Kevlar or Fiberglas boards. These are used for anything from the preparation of specialist equipment to troop living space when off-duty, and it simply folds away when not needed.

     The driver is at the front center of the vehicle, behind the glacis, under a hatch that gives the driver a wide-angle vision block and a night vision block. The commander and gunner also have a night vision channel, though their night vision is short-ranged, as long distance night vision was not deemed necessary.  Likewise, the magnification of the gunsight for the main gun is also limited. Space in the turret is limited, but does include the requisite British hot-water heater for tea and rations. A vehicle collective NBC system is provided.

      A large framework, called a “hamper” can be mounted above the AVRE, including the turret.  This is used to carry more equipment if necessary.  On the rear hull plate is a capstan winch, with 60 meters of rope and with a 10-ton capacity.  The AVRE also has a crane, able to lift 13.6 tons.  The frontal dozer blade has a secondary use of pushing mines aside, and as such has an AV of 8. Alternately, a Pearson Combat Dozer may be mounted, with an AV of 12. It can excavate 229 cubic meters per hour. In front is another winch, with a capacity of 50 meters (of cable) and 20 tons. Above the dozer blade on the glacis is a rack that is used to carry and deploy fascine mats; another one can be carried on the rear, or on a hamper.

     Power for the Centurion AVRE is by a 650 hp Rolls-Royce Meteor diesel, along with a manual suspension.  Like the Centurion tank, the Centurion AVRE is known to have a particularly balky transmission.

     Prior to Desert Storm, AVRE’s were given a small amount of spaced appliqué armor.  While this increased the weight of an already-heavy vehicle, this was deemed acceptable for a vehicle that would be starting at the front or in follow-up forces, or brought up as a specialist asset and surrounded by dedicated fighting vehicles and infantry. Nonetheless, the AVRE with appliqué can barely move by today’s terms.

     Twilight/Merc 2000 Notes: These vehicles were never taken out of service – they were deemed too valuable in MOUT situations.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Centurion AVRE

$962,841

D, A

700 kg

51.81 tons

4

23

Passive IR (D, G)

Shielded

Centurion AVRE w/Appliqué

 

D, A

572 kg

54.3 tons

4

23

Passive IR (D, G)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Centurion AVRE

132/54

33/14

1037

235

Trtd

T6

TF40  TS17  TR11  HF60  HS13  HR8

Centurion AVRE w/Appliqué

118/48

30/12

1037

246

Trtd

T6

TF45Sp  TS17Sp  TR16  HF70Sp  HS13Sp  HR13*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Centurion AVRE

+1

Basic

165mm Demolition Gun, L-8A2, L-7A2 (C)

30x165mm, 3000x7.62mm

*Floor AV is 6Sp.

 

AEC FV-4018 Centurion BARV

     Notes: Most countries, when they need an engineer vehicle to aid amphibious landings, modify some already-in-use vehicles, and perhaps rig some purpose-built equipment for them.  The British, however, modify and redesign a whole vehicle, turning it into something nearly perfect for its role.  The first of the post-war BARVs (Beach Armored Recovery Vehicle) was the Centurion BARV. Other countries have also thought this a good idea, and they were bought by the Danish, Australians, and Israelis. Most have left service a while ago, either not replaced by a purpose-built vehicle or replaced with more up-to-date BARVs. The Royal Marines are known to have used 12.

     Normally, the BARVs were attached to amphibious units, though the Israelis have also used them successfully in sandy terrain away from water.  The BARV’s Design has been called “functional but crude.” They are normally (in British service) crewed by Royal Marine Commandoes, with one being diving instructor qualified, 2 cross-trained as mechanics, and a fourth as the driver.  The Assault Squadrons they supported served aboard Royal Navy ships. The Centurion BARV was made by removing the turret of the Centurion and replacing it with a raised superstructure. The suspension is also raised and the track skirts removed, allowing wading of up to 1.75 meters and swimming with the aid of a floatation screen. This is meant to allow the BARVs to leave a ship and go ashore under their own power in light seas.

     The primary, and by far most obvious difference is the large, tall superstructure which takes the place of the turret; the BARV is nearly 51 centimeters taller than a Centurion tank.  It extends from the rear to about a third from the front. This contains a good portion of recovery equipment storage. Most TC weapons were magazine-fed Brens; though later they began to give way to L-7A2 MAGs, the Bren’s were never completely replaced. The TC’s position is at the front of the superstructure.  Crewmembers were also originally issued Sterling submachineguns, but have been issued L-85s since the mid-1980s. The superstructure is specially shaped to take high surf. With the sides sloped inwards and the front and rear wedge-shaped.

     The crew for the most part enters through a door in the rear superstructure, though they may also climb ladders on the sides to the top; there is one hatch up there (the TC’s hatch), though the hatchway is large enough for two men to work comfortably. The driver’s position is in the front, slung between the tracks.     The driver can put an airtight plastic bowl over his position; this is often done, as the BARV often spends its time hull-down in water.

     The hull is for the most part a Centurion hull. The engine was the Mk 3’s Meteor Mk 4B, developing 650 horsepower.  Due to the volume of recovery gear carried, and the fact that it would see only short blocks of action, the fuel tankage was drastically cut.  The hull is cauterized by numerous tie-off points, rails, and tow points, as the BARV did not have winches.  In fact, the glacis is cut down and replaced with the bumper mentioned above.  The superstructure blends with the area formerly used by the turret basket.

     Recovery equipment includes cables and ropes, block & tackle, and such recovery gear, but it’s primarily role is to provide a high perch for recovery personnel.  This is unfortunately not nearly as armored as a turret, so it is also a large, vulnerable section.  Other differences include a driver’s windshield, a large extended rope-coiled bumper to facilitate pushing, BARVs generally do not have track skirts, to keep wet sand from clogging the running gear. It also ensures that the BARV will not float, even in high tide conditions.  A 1.5kW APU can run many of the recovery tools.  Items and tools carried include basic, tracked vehicle, wheeled vehicle, and power tool kits; a removable gantry that is used as a rear facing crane with a capacity of 25 tons; two sets of block and tackle; six sets of shackles, three steel tow ropes and two hemp ropes; a large-capacity jack with a capacity of 35 tons, and assorted wood blocks, short sections of cable, and several fire extinguishers.. (This is in addition to the fire extinguishers carried for BARV vehicle fires.)  Often, the BARV would have logs, poles, treadways, planks, fascines, and such items strapped top its sides.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Centurion BARVs already taken out of service were refurbished, and those not taken out of service were retained.  Most found themselves being used as regular AEVs as well as ad hoc bridging vehicles using trackways and fascines, though most of them were present at the odd British, Danish, or Israeli amphibious landing.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

FV-4018

D, A

3 tons

50 tons

4

36

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

FV-4018

114/80

32/22

386

353

Stnd

T6

HF22  HS10  HR6

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

FV-4018

None

None

L-7A2 (C) or Bren

1600x7.62mm (belted) or 1500x7.62mm (in 50x30-round Bren magazines)

 

Alvis/BAE FV-434

     Notes: The ARV part of the FV-432 family, the FV-434 comes in three variants, most of which differ from each other only in the way they are equipped; others include the Fitter's Vehicle and the Maintenance Carrier. It is designed primarily to repair damaged and disabled vehicles, but because it is small, it has limited recovery ability.

     The FV-434 RMV is the primary subtype of the FV-434.  It has a crane with a capacity of 3 tons and a flat area at the rear of the deck for powerpacks -- however, an FV-430 series powerpack is about the largest one it can handle. The FV-434 is equipped with a selection of tools and parts appropriate it's to its job of repair work.  Parts are primarily for FV-430 vehicles, though the FV-434 can also be sent out to repair other vehicles of a similar size or smaller.  Toolsets include basic, wheeled vehicle, tracked vehicles, and power tools, as well as a set of pioneer tools.  A two-meter-long folding workbench can be extended out of the rear hatch, and a tent enclosure can also be extended over the work area. Another "penthouse" can be erected over the top of the of the vehicle, leaving a space for the crane.

     The FV-434 is powered by a Rolls-Royce K-60 Multifuel engine, developing 240 horsepower.  The transmission is semiautomatic and can be a bit balky, but once you get used to it, it is easy to manage (sort of like an M-113's).  The FV-434 has an external NBC pack on the front left side, allowing the crew to plug their hoses from the vehicle to their masks.  Swimming requires the erection of a flotation screen, the extension of a flotation screen, and the turning on of bilge pumps.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

FV-434

$122,952

D, A

3 tons

17.5 tons

4

17

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

FV-434

110/77

31/21/5

454

92

Stnd

T6

HF6  HS4  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

FV-434

None

None

L-7A2 (C) or Bren

1600x7.62mm (belted) or 1500x7.62mm (in 50x30-round Bren magazines)

 

BAE Terrier Armored Digger

     Notes: The Terrier was designed to replace the FV-180 CET in British service.  There have as yet been no export sales, though the French are in the process of field testing Terriers for its Army. The first prototype was displayed in mid-2005, but there were considerable delays, both during the testing and manufacturing process; manufacture of the first Terrier hull did not occur until early 2010, and Army and Marine service did not begin until 2013.

     The Terrier has a more powerful engine than the FV-180, as well as a drive train with exceptional torque.  The engine used is a C18 Caterpillar 700 horsepower diesel, with an automatic transmission. Most of the critical systems, lines, oil reservoirs, and power pack areas are under the Terrier’s belly armor. Armor is all-welded steel; appliqué is bolted on, except for the belly armor, which is a new installation. The fuel tank is made from synthetic material stronger than steel, and is self-sealing. Terrier borrows a feature from the FV-180: it’s double-walled construction, which also insulates from the noise of the tools and bucket and from mines.

     The most prominent feature of the Terrier is its front clamshell bucket; this bucket has AV6 on the sides, AV4 on the top, and AV12 on the bottom and back, and allows the Terrier to be used as an ad hoc demining vehicle. The bucket can be quick-detached and dropped, in the event of the bucket getting stuck or if it inadvertently picks up dangerous material that must be abandoned. It can lift 400 cubic meters of soil or 8 tons. Another prominent feature is the right-side-mounted digger/tool arm, which can operate with a bucket, claw-hook, drill, or pneumatic hammer. It is able to reach out 20 meters and lift 3 tons. If the bucket is not in use, a roll of fascine or trackway can be put between the partially-raised bucket and the vehicle, allowing the Terrier to carry and deploy a section. However, the Terrier is more likely to use a GKN HMT, carrying a roll of fascine, trackway, or concertina wire.  It can also tow a trailer with the Minotaur, Barmine, or Volcano minelaying systems.  A rocket anchor may be deployed to help anchor the vehicle when using the tools or bucket, in any direction from the Terrier.

     An unusual feature of the Terrier is that it can be teleoperated, using a radio-connected remote control similar to a video game control, at a range of up 1000 meters.  This mode is used when clearing dangerous areas.  The cameras that the Terrier uses for teleoperation are in front of the driver’s hatch, above the bucket, and next to the side excavator.  They are designed primarily for the control of the apparatuses, but the driver’s camera can also look up to 300 meters in the distance.  The cameras are day/night.

    The crew of two has air conditioning, heating, and NBC Overpressure protection.  Both crewmembers have all-around vision blocks, with the front having a day/night channel.  The commander has a manually-rotating cupola with a weapon mounted so that it can be aimed and fired with the hatches closed; alternatively, an RWS may be mounted. A bank of four smoke grenade launchers are found on each side of the vehicle at the top of the hull side. They have five day/night cameras for their use, giving them a 360-degree view around the vehicle.

     Based on experience in Iraq and Afghanistan, the design of the Terrier has been modified.  Bucket AV has been increased by 1 for each face.  The Terrier has been given additional underside protection as well, and has also been given blast-absorbing seats. Finally, all-around appliqué armor has been added.

     While the British MoD claimed that the Terrier is air-transportable by a C-130, this has not proven to be the case.  They are now backing off that claim.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Terrier

$1,424,741

D, A

800 kg

30 tons

2

23

Thermal Imaging (D, G), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

Terrier (Modified)

$1,529,983

D, A

613 kg

33 tons

2

23

Thermal Imaging (D, G), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Terrier

171/119

43/30

521

254

Trtd

T6

HF12Sp  HS8Sp  HR7*

Terrier (Modified)

156/108

39/27

521

279

Trtd

T6

HF15Sp  HS11Sp  HR9**

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Terrier

+1

Basic

L-7A2 (C)

3000x7.62mm

*Floor armor is AV 4Sp.

**Roof Armor is 6.  Belly Armor is 8Sp.

 

BAE Titan AVLB

     Notes: This AVLB is a new AVLB system, able to use several types of bridges. The Titan was designed to replace the Chieftain AVLB; the Chieftain AVLB was proving deficient at the lengths of possible span, loads of possible spans, and survivability in general.  It is one of a planned family of vehicles based on the Challenger 2 chassis. The Titan has been service since 2006, and the final 33rd was delivered in 2008. The Titan has seen combat use in Afghanistan.

     Depending upon bridges used and the bank conditions, the Titan can bridge a span of up to 60 meters.  Three possible bridges can be carried: the No 10 Bridge can span 26 meters and weighs 13.88 tons, the No 11 can span 16 meters and weighs 8.54 tons, and the No 12 Bridge can span 13 meters and weighs 6.94 tons.  The Titan also carries a number of trestles and wedges to allow the Titans’ crews to overlay up to three of these bridges.  The Titan can also carry and lay two No 12 Bridges. Each of these bridges is capable of supporting 70 tons. The No 10 and 11 are not scissor bridges (the No 12 is a single span), the top slides out and locks onto the front of the bottom bridge.  (Unfolding a scissors bridge is like waving a big flag…)

     The Titan has a number of wide-angle vision blocks and CCD cameras to increase the visibility of the crew while they work, especially if it works under fire.  These cameras are day/night, with most of the night vision being by thermal imaging. The crew has an air conditioner, heater, and NBC Overpressure. The driver is in the front right while the other two crewmembers are in the center.  Both are ringed by wide-angle vision blocks, and all three have one block with a night channel; they also have several LCD screens that show them the relevant images from the CCD cameras. The commander has a low-pintle mount for a machinegun.

     Power for the Titan is the same as the rest of the Challenger 2 family: a 1200-horsepower Perkins CV12 turbocharged diesel, a David Brown low-loss gearbox (sort of like power assist for the steering and gearshifting), and an automatic transmission.  The Trojan also has a 10kW APU to power systems while the engine is off, thus using less fuel.

     The Trojan can tow the GKN HTT, with a variety of minelaying systems, MCLICs, fascines or trackway, or simple cargo.

     An optional feature is a dozer blade at the front, to make the terrain on the bank more suitable or to brace the Titan while it is working. (Theoretically, it could also mount a Pearson mine plow, though this would be an unusual circumstance.)

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Titan (No 10 Bridge)

$970,095

D, A

400 kg

62.5 tons

3

29

Thermal Imaging (D, G, RWS), Image Intensification (RWS), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

Titan (No 11 Bridge)

$887,211

D, A

734 kg

57.16 tons

3

29

Thermal Imaging (D, G, RWS), Image Intensification (RWS), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

Titan (No 12 Bridge)

$862,377

D, A

834 kg

55.56 tons

 

3

27

Thermal Imaging (D, G, RWS), Image Intensification (RWS), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

Titan (No 10 Bridge)

127/89

29/21

1592+600

616

CiH

T6

TF10  TS10  TR10  HF140Cp  HS24Sp  HR16

Titan (No 11 Bridge)

139/97

35/24

1592+600

565

CiH

T6

TF10  TS10  TR10  HF140Cp  HS24Sp  HR16

Titan (No 12 Bridge)

143/100

36/25

1592+600

549

CiH

T6

TF10  TS10  TR10  HF140Cp  HS24Sp  HR16

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Titan

None

None

L-7A2

2000x7.62mm

*The “turret” is actually the bridge; it does not actually have anyone in it.

 

BAE Trojan AVRE

     Notes: Designed to replace or supplement several vehicles, including the Centurion AVRE, Chieftain AVRE, and to some extent, the CR ARRV, the Trojan is an AVRE that can, to a certain extent, double as an ARV.  The Trojan is based on a Challenger 2 chassis, and retains the Chobham and spaced armor of that tank, though overall, the armor levels are lower to reduce weight.  They have not yet been offered for export, but a small number are stationed in Canada at the British Army Training Unit Suffield. Britain has 33 Trojans in service, and expects to have 66 by 2018. They saw their first combat use in Afghanistan in 2009.

     The most prominent feature of the Trojan is its huge over-width mine plow. A Pearson Full-Width Mine Plow, it is generally able to push mines out of the way, being angles to slide the mines to the side without detonating them.  It can, however, take some mine explosions and has an AV of 30Sp. (It not actually Spaced armor; this is an illustration of the plow’s strength.) The mine plow can instead be replaced with a standard bulldozer; this has an AV of 6. Another alternate installation is the mine plow at the front and bulldozer blade at the rear, though this makes towing a trailer impossible. This configuration is chosen when the excavator arm needs extra bracing, or when large positions need to be dug. The Trojan has a huge excavator arm attached on the front left, which can dig, clear obstacles, or deposit the fascine or trackway that the Trojan can carry at its rear. This bucket has a capacity of one cubic meter.6.5 tons. Alternate attachments include a three-way claw, a drill, an auger, and a hammer/pile driver. The Trojan can automatically mark the mines or mine-free lanes it has found with small flags (the Pearson Pathfinder system).

     The armor suite of the Trojan is based on the armor of the Challenger 2, but it is believed that the individual layers in the armor are not as thick.  The Trojan can also take lugs for ERA on the hull front and hull sides. It should be noted that though armor levels are not as great as the Challenger 2, but the suspension is actually much better protected, even though the roadwheels are aluminum (the drive sprocket, idler, and return rollers are steel).  The engine is similar to that of the Challenger 2, being a 1200-horsepower Perkins CV12 turbocharged diesel, a David Brown low-loss gearbox (sort of like power assist for the steering and gearshifting), and an automatic transmission.  The Trojan also has a 10kW APU to power systems while the engine is off, thus using less fuel.

     The Trojan can tow the GKN HTT, with a variety of minelaying systems, MCLICs, fascines or trackway, or simple cargo.

     The crew consists of a driver on the front left, a commander’s hatch, and the raised position for the operator of the excavator arm and plow, next to the driver.  The driver has one day/night wide-angle vision block to the front.  The commander does not have a cupola, but his position is ringed by vision blocks.  The equipment operator has an electrically-operating cupola with all around vision blocks; one is day/night. The Trojan has an L-8A2 MAG machinegun mounted on an RWS to the left of the commander; this RWS has it’s own vision devices for the commander or equipment operator to use (either may control the machinegun), Also on the roof is a spotlight, which may be controlled by the commander or the equipment operator. The crew has air conditioning, heating, and NBC Overpressure, and there is some room inside for rations, ammunition, personal weapons and ammunition, and a few assorted personal items.  (The Trojan has, to an extent, been designed around the crew positions.)

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Trojan

$1,292,539

D, A

700 kg

62.5 tons

3

35

Thermal Imaging (D, G, RWS), Image Intensification (RWS), WL/IR Spotlight

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

Trojan

127/89

29/21

1592+600

616

CiH

T6

TF8  TF8  TR8  HF140Cp  HS24Sp  HR16

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Trojan

+2

Fair

L-8A2 (RWS)

3000x7.62mm

*The “turret” refers to the plow and excavator arm.  The Mine Plow has an AV of 30Sp, the standard dozer has an AV of 6, and the excavator arm an AV of 10. Belly AV is 9Sp.

 

Vickers FV-4205 Chieftain AVLB

     Notes:  This is an AVLB in British service, based on the chassis of the Chieftain main battle tank.  I have discovered that there were some export sales, but the only customer I have been able to find is Iran (before the revolution). The design work began in 1962, but the first examples did not see service until 1974. The Chieftain AVLB is currently used by only one regiment of the British Army. Chieftain AVLBs have seen action with the British in Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom, and by the Iranians against the Iraqis.

     The Chieftain can use one of two bridges: the No 8 Scissors Bridge, or the No 9 Single-Span Bridge.  The No 8 Bridge weighs 12.2 tons, takes 5 minutes to emplace, and 10 minutes to recover.  It is designed for up to 70-ton loads, and is capable of bridging a 22.86-meter gap. The No 9 Bridge is lighter at only 9.14 tons, and shorter at being able to bridge a 13.4-meter gap.  It is still capable of holding 70 tons.  Though the No 9 Bridge is not as capable in most ways, the Chieftain AVLB is much quicker carrying the No 9 Bridge. The Chieftain AVLB can also carry the No 8 or No 9 Bridge on top, and tow a trailer with a No 9 Bridge on it. The AVLB is able to grab the bridge from the trailer and lay it as an extension or adjunct to the previous bridge. Bridges may be combined by laying one bridge on top of the other at approximately the halfway point of the first span.

     The driver, bridge operator, and commander are all in tandem, each seated somewhat above each other as you go back.  The commander’s cupola has a light machinegun which can be fired with hatches closed, and has full rotation, with all-around vision blocks.  He does not have night vision.  The bridge operator has vision blocks as needed – to the front and to see the bridge atop the vehicle. He has night vision.  The driver has vision blocks to the left, front, and one that allows him to see somewhat to the right side.  He has night vision.. A cluster of four smoke grenade launchers are on the hull on each side just forward of the driver’s position.

     Power is provided by the Leyland L60 multifuel 730-hp engine, coupled to a manual transmission.  The transmission has an unusual feature – it can jump from Park to 2nd gear if necessary for a quicker takeoff.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Chieftain AVLB (No 8 Bridge)

$237,738

D, G, A

400 kg

53.3 tons

3

25

Passive IR (D, BO)

Shielded

Chieftain AVLB (No 9 Bridge)

$230,844

D, G, A

450 kg

50.24 tons

3

25

Passive IR (D, BO)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config*

Susp

Armor*

Chieftain AVLB (No 8 Bridge)

138/56

35/14

1037

263

CiH

T6

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF48  HS16  HR10

Chieftain AVLB (No 9 Bridge)

142/58

36/15

1037

255

CiH

T6

TF3  TS3  TR3  HF48  HS16  HR10

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Chieftain AVLB

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

4500x7.62mm

*The “turret” is actually the bridge; it does not actually have anyone in it.

 

Vickers CR ARRAV (Challenger Armored Repair and Recovery Vehicle) Rhino

     Notes:  This is an engineer vehicle based upon the Challenger chassis.  The adoption of the Challenger 1 tank and it’s dramatic increase in size and complexity meant that a new class of recovery and repair vehicles was needed to perform field engineer work on them.  As yet, it is exported only to Oman. The vehicle is officially referred to as the CR ARRAV, but more popularly known as the Rhino.

     The Rhino is capable of carrying an entire Challenger power pack as well as all necessary repair equipment.  There is a winch that can pull 68 tons (104 tons with block and tackle), an auxiliary winch that can pull 20 tons, and a crane on the left hull (able to reach over the entire vehicle) with a capacity of 6.5 tons and capable of lifting an entire Challenger 1 or 2 powerpack.  The Rhino also has a front-mounted dozer blade capable of excavating 229 cubic meters per hour and offers increased bracing and traction when lifting heavy loads.  A special trailer (The HMT, of High-Mobility Trailer) is often towed, carrying a spare powerpack, to free up room for other spare parts. The Rhino is equipped with welding and cutting equipment, powered by the vehicle’s engine. Tracked and wheeled vehicle tool sets are also carried.

     The CR ARRAV generally carries a crew of three, including a specialist mechanic.  An extra two seats are provided, to seat the extra two mechanics that are normally carried. There is also room for two more passengers. The Rhino is equipped with night vision devices and has an L-37A2 MG located in a remote cupola, operated by the commander or one of the mechanics; feeding is by a continuous-feed belt mechanism.  At the rear of the vehicle at the corners are, on each side, a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers.  Two more are found at the front of the Rhino. The Rhino has an NBC Overpressure system with a vehicular collective system backup.  Omani Rhinos have in addition an air conditioner and an engine able to operate without penalty up to 50 degrees Celsius; these modifications have since been made to British Rhinos.

     The CR ARRAV is powered by the same Rolls-Royce Condor CV12 TCA turbocharged diesel engine as on the Challenger 1, developing 1200 horsepower.  The transmission is automatic, and the engine and transmission can be set to bypass the drive train to bring full power to the devices (winches, cranes, power tools, etc. Towing capacity is 68 tons, with a solid tow bar or by wire rope. (If the latter option is chosen, someone must be in the disabled vehicle to actuate the brakes on it.) While towing 68 tons, the Rhino can maintain a speed of 30 kilometers per hour.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$751,951

D, A

5.8 tons

62 tons

3+4

37

Thermal Imaging (C, CO), Image Intensification (D, C, CO)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

150/105

38/26

1592

440

Stnd

T6

HF149  HS21Sp  HR16

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+1

Basic

L-37A2

1000x7.62mm

 

Vickers Chieftain  Engineer Vehicles

      Notes: These vehicles are grouped mainly because they use the same chassis, powerpack, running gear, roadwheels, and tracks.  Equipment varies, however.

 

FV-4002 Chieftain AVRE

     There was to be a standardized Chieftain AVRE, with the designation of FV-4203, but that vehicle was never produced.  Meanwhile, the need for AVREs did not dissipate, in Willich, Germany, the BAOR came up with their own Chieftain-based AVRE.  This vehicle, at first being considered an interim design. was later put into production.

     The primary role of the Chieftain AVRE is to enhance the mobility of combat forces.  To this end, it has a large rack above the vehicle able to carry three sections of 60-meter, steel pipe type, 14.5-ton MLC-70 fascine trackways. The Chieftain AVREs winch can pull 57 tons, the auxiliary winch can pull 17 tons, and the crane can lift 36 tons.  The dozer blade can excavate 192 cubic meters per hour.  It thus has racks for explosives and connections to pull multiple trailers that are usually carrying more fascines or the Giant Viper or Python mine-clearing systems.

     The hull of the Chieftain has had its turret removed; the positions for the crew are equipped with several wide-angle vision blocks, and the commander’s position has a weapon on a pintle. Observation is also available to the rack operator through a wide angle periscope mounted on the left-rear bumper.  A similar periscope is found on the front-left bumper.  The rear of the Chieftain AVRE normally has a “penthouse” fitted, a simple position covered with pads to even out the surface and with bows and a tarp; up to six more periscopes may be fitted around the penthouse if necessary.  In the penthouse, a collective NBC pack can be fitted; the inside of the vehicle has NBC Overpressure protection.  The driver is still on the left front, the commander is in the center, while the equipment operator is on the right.  Behind and below them are the other two engineers.  Only the driver has night vision.

     Power is provided by the Leyland L60 multifuel 730-hp engine, coupled to a manual transmission.  The transmission has an unusual feature – it can jump from Park to 2nd gear if necessary for a quicker takeoff. (I have not yet determined the game effect of this feature.)

     The statistics below are with the Chieftain AVRE carrying two fascine rolls and with the penthouse deployed, the standard configuration.

     It should be noted that Danish Chieftain AVLBs and CHAVREs used different tracks and sprockets, and they are not interchangeable with British tracks and sprockets.

 

FV-4006 Chieftain CHAVRE

     The CHAVRE (Chieftain Assault Vehicle Royal Engineers) has been replaced, first by modified Challenger 1, then by later Challenger 2-based like the Trojan and Terrier.  Unlike the AVLB, most CHAVREs are new-build vehicles. The turret is removed, replaced by a higher roof with numerous cutouts for observation when using the CHAVRE's tools. Atop this raised roof, on the right side, in front and under full armor, is a commander's position with a pintle-mounted position; this is normally an L-7A2, but M-2HBs and L-86A1s have also been seen of CHAVREs. At the front of the vehicle is a heavy dozer blade, which has an AV of 20 against mine blast and IEDs.  If desired, this dozer blade can be replaced by a dedicated mine plow. The winch at the rear is capable of pulling 10 tons, and in the center is a smaller winch with a capacity of 3.5 tons.  A common attachment was a Giant Viper mine clearance device, towed by the winch or the vehicle itself.  Atop the vehicle, up to four bundles of fascines.  The CHAVRE has a telescopic jib; this is not for heavy loads, but for general clearance work or to attack heavy tools such an auger, pile driver, or small bucket.

     Along with clearing obstacles, the Chieftain CHAVRE was often tasked with digging fighting positions, using its dozer blade and bucket.

     The British keep some of the AVLBs in reserve.  Some are also "civilianized" and sold on the open market.  Others have ended up on display, in various states of running order. Many have also ended up as range targets at training ranges in Canada.  One Danish AVLB is kept in running condition in a museum, one is on display at the Danish base Skive Barracks, and yet another Danish AVRE  is a range target on a Danish range.  The British also keep some CHAVREs in reserve, though like many AVLBs, they've been civilianized, put on display, or used as range targets.  However, unlike the AVLB, CHAVREs are still used by Australia, India, Israel, Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though some Challenger CRARRV made to the festivities, most of these were sent to the Middle East.  The AVLB was the primary British AVLB of the European Theater, and the CHAVRE was heavily used.

    

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Chieftain AVLB

$345,276

G, AvG, D, A

4.9 tons

52 tons

5

18

Passive IR

Shielded

Chieftain CHAVRE

 

G, AvG, D, A

5 tons

48.35 tons

4

 

Passive IR

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

Chieftain AVLB

140/56

35/14

955

265

CiH*

T6

TF8  TS8  TR8  HF84  HS18  HR10

Chieftain CHAVRE

 

 

1014

 

CiH**

T6

TF8  TS8  TR8  HF84  HS18  HR10

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Chieftain AVLB

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

1800x7.62mm

Chieftain CHAVRE

None

None

M-2HB (C) or L-7A2 (C) or L-86A1 (C)

1100x.50 or 1800x7.62 or 2460x5.56mm

*The “turret” is actually the fascine rolls.  If they have already been deployed, the configuration of the Chieftain AVRE changes to “Stnd.”

 

Alvis FV-106 Samson ARV

     Notes:  The Samson is an armored recovery vehicle built on the Scorpion chassis. It is designed primarily to recover members of the CVR(T) family, but can also service the FV-430 series.  Design work began in the early 1970s, with production starting in 1978. Users include Britain, Belgium, Brunei, Philippines, Oman, and Thailand.

     The Samson is fitted with an internally mounted capstan 3.5-ton winch in place of the vehicle's turret and main gun. The vehicle is stabilized when working by an earth anchor that is manually deployed. Entry is by a small door in the rear of the vehicle, or by the commander's and driver's hatches on the roof. The Samson is used to repair and recover smaller armored vehicles and unarmored vehicles.  Except as noted below, it is identical in characteristics to the Scorpion. The Samson has a main winch with a pull of 12 tons, a secondary winch with a pull of 3 tons, and an A-frame crane that can lift 5.5 tons.

     The Samson is capable of amphibious operation by raising a flotation screen, and can be fitted with a propeller kit. Power is provided by a Jaguar J60 No 1 Mk 100B 190 horsepower gasoline engine, or a Perkins T6-3544 200-horsepower diesel engine, with a manual transmission.  British Samsons, however, are powered by a Cummins 6BT diesel with 235 horsepower.

     The driver is in the front left; behind him and in the center of the deck is a gunner manning a No 27 cupola with a pintle-mounted L-7A2.  The commander and the other engineer are seated in the hull. The crew is protected by a collective NBC system.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Samson (Gas Engine)

$99,216

G, A

1 ton

8.74 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

Samson (Diesel Engine)

$99,861

D, A

1 ton

8.76 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

Samson (Perkins Engine)

$99,911

D, A

1 ton

8.77 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Samson (Gas Engine)

174/70

44/18

405

97

Stnd

T3

HF6  HS3  HR3

Samson (Diesel Engine)

168/66

42/17

405

68

Stnd

T3

HF6  HS3  HR3

Samson (Perkins Engine)

188/76

47/19

405

81

Stnd

T3

HF6  HS3  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Samson

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

900x7.62mm

 

BAE FV-180 RO Defence Combat Engineer Vehicle (CET)

     Notes: Three British companies originally participated in the competition for the CET; later, France and Germany also became interested in the eventual vehicle which would become the CET.  In fact, tests were carried for the British in the UK and for Germany and France in Germany.  Royal Ordnance Facility Leeds originally received the contract, but they were eventually bought by Vickers; the project was later bought by BAE.  They incorporated some of the features of the US CET.  The Germans withdrew from the project in 1968, after they expressed a need for a heavier vehicle.  British service began in 1975, after two major redesigns were carried out; full production began in 1978. The system, however, was discontinued in the 1990s, though it was deployed to Iraq as part of Operation Granby, and the type did not begin to leave service until 2001, when replacement started at a slow rate with the Trojan.

     Though the design looks like it is based on a tank chassis, it is in fact a new design.  It is unusual in that it has two casemates, one lower than the other.  The dozer blade is a modification of that of the US CET; a different mine plowing blade may be installed instead.  In either case, the driver controls the blade, as the blade is connected to the vehicle’s final drives. The hull is all aluminum; in fact, only crucial parts which require high strength are made of steel, and some parts are of plastic.  Most surfaces of the FV-180 are double walled; this not only has the effect of spaced armor.  It’s primary function, however, to decrease the amount of vibrations and noise inside the cabin (with mixed results).

     The driver normally operates the winch. Behind him, on the upper casemate, is the dedicated crane operator; he can also operate the winch, or the jib crane. The commander’s cupola is behind the engine on the lower casemate; it is armed with a heavy machinegun or grenade launcher.  Note that it cannot be fired in the direction of the upper casemate. The crane operator’s position can also be equipped with a medium or light machinegun, though it is on a normal pintle mount. (Many crewmen of the FV-180 prefer a grenade launcher. The FV-180 may skid steer to position itself more precisely, or to make sharp turns (though, as is usual for tracked vehicles, a thrown track is a possibility).  The bucket/dozer is of light alloy, while the teeth at front are of steel.  It has a maximum capacity of 1.72m3, and the maximum lift height is 1.829 meters. (The FV-180 also travels with the bucket up when carrying fascines.)  The bucket can dig 10.2 centimeters below ground height for digging or scarifying roads and runways.  The bucket can also be used to steady the vehicle when using the winch on heavy loads.  An earth anchor may also be employed, with a maximum reach of 91.4 meters; 10 charges are available for the rocket anchor, and the anchor may be repeatedly shot and reeled in.  This may be employed for self recovery or normal recovery of vehicle, or to help increase pulling and digging power; however, the FV-180 is not primarily a recovery vehicle. The anchor can also be attached to the winch for an even longer shot.  The dozer blade has an attachment that smoothes and hides the earth excavated, if possible.

     The driver is seated in the front left, with a hatchway that opens left and right.  The driver has a vision block to the front which may be removed and replaced with an IR block. (The vehicle also has a WL/IR spotlight at the top of the lower casemate; the upper casemate has a WL spotlight.)  Behind him on the upper casemate is the winch operator, who also operates the WL spotlight.  The other crewmen normally face to the front when they are at their stations; however, any one these may reverse his seat and consult an LCD panel, allowing them to take over the driver’s duties using a set of duplicate controls. The other two may operate the bucket, winches, of any of the rest of the vehicle’s mounted tools. The crew does not have NBC Overpressure protection, but does have an NBC collective system. It is air-portable in a C-130 Hercules aircraft.  A normal crew for the FV-180 is only two, though up to two more engineers may be housed and accommodated within the vehicle.  They enter and leave through a door on the rear.

     The engine is to the right of the driver and the transmission is underneath it; they form an integrated power pack.  The engine is a 320-horsepower Perkins E320TX diesel with a manual transmission that has four speeds forward and in reverse.  The two together not only have power, but possess considerable torc.  Without preparation, the FV-180 can ford 1.83 meters; it is amphibious with (considerable, 15 minutes) preparation.  A trim vane must be lowered at the front of the vehicle, the bucket must be raised to its maximum elevation, and Hydrafloat blocks, made of plastic-cased foam, are attached behind the open trim vane, to the sides of the vehicle, and to the rear of the vehicle.  It is propelled in water by waterjets; when they are turned on, the driver’s controls are used to change the angle and deflection of the waterjets.

     The main winch has a maximum pulling strength of 8 tons; it has 113 meters of wire rope and other lengths of rope may be attached at the end.  The rope can be led to the front or back by changing the direction of the winch drum’s rotation. The movable bucket can be rotated up to 270 degrees and may move 4 tons/1.72 cubic meters at one go. It may lift this crane, regardless of angle, to 1.829 meters at a maximum and a minimum height of 102 millimeters. It may travel safely with that load in either the front bucket of the crane for 50 meters at maximum load. An auxiliary lifiting device, a davit with a lifting winch, can be fitted to the inside of the earthmoving bucket. (It cannot, however, skid-steer while under load in the jib bucket of the main bucket.)

     Other roles for the FV-180 include towing the Giant Viper and Python MCLICs. It can carry and deploy up to two fascine rolls, a class 30 or 60 trackway, or a pusher bar to aid an AVLB in deploying a bridge or to deploy a non-vehicle-launched bridge.  A jib crane with a capacity of 4 tons can be installed in the bucket and hooked up to the crane bucket.

     The FV-180 carries two sets of basic tools and two sets of power tools.  It also has two air compressors to power the external tool sets. 20 kilograms of C4 are carried for exceptionally tough obstacles.  Two sets of pioneer tools are also carried for when hands-on excavation is required. Heavy manual tools, like wire rope or normal rope cutters, are also carried.  A full set of manuals (the actual printed manuals) are carried as part of the vehicle’s basic equipment.

     Indian and Singapore vehicles are equipped with air conditioners, but these were not retrofitted until the FV-180s were deployed to Iraq.  (They were not so equipped for Desert Storm.) The weapon mounts are optional; British and Indian FV-180s have them, but most of Singapore’s FV-180s do not. On the front of each bumper is a cluster of three smoke grenade launchers, for a total of six; these all face to the outside of the FV-180.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$752,844

D, A

800 kg

18.35 tons

2+2

30

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

123/86

34/24/7

418

113

Stnd

T4

HF6Sp  HS4Sp  HR4Sp

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

M-2HB or Mk 19 AGL (C), L-7A2

1000x.50 or 320x40mm; 1000x7.62mm

*The front bucket is 50% likely to be hit by frontal shots.  This bucket adds 6Sp to the FV-180’s front armor, essentially doubling the effect of spaced armor if the bucket is hit. Belly and roof armor are 4Sp and 4, respectively.

 

GKN FV-434 Fitters Vehicle

     Notes:  Also known as the REME Fitters’ Vehicle, this is an older repair vehicle used by England; design work began in the early 1960s and introduction was made in the mid-1960s.  As yet, no export sales have been made or attempted. These vehicles have been partially replaced by the Challenger Repair and Recovery Vehicle, especially in tank units, and the FV-512/13 in armored units.

     The FV-434 is based on the FV-432 APC, and cannot service vehicles larger than the Chieftain main battle tank (it is not powerful enough to carry the Challenger-series' engine or transmission), and even taking care of Chieftains is a stretch. It is basically similar to the FV-432, but has a load area at the rear of the hull roof for carrying large items.  This load area is covered with a canvas tarpaulin supported by bows.  On the right side of the hull is a crane with a capacity of 1.25 tons and a reach of 3.96 meters, or 3.05 tons at a 2.26-meter reach.  A full range of tools is carried, along with workbench, vise, tow bars, and tow cables.  The FV-434 does not have a winch, and it not means to recover vehicles (even itself).  Light armored and unarmored vehicle repair is its purview.

     On the right side of the hull is a crane with a capacity of 1.25 tons and a reach of 3.96 meters, or 3.05 tons at a 2.26-meter reach.  A full range of tools is carried, along with workbench, vise, tow bars, and tow cables.  The FV-434 does not have a winch.  Though there are no blades or anchoring devices, the suspension can be locked when equipment such as the crane are used. These vehicles have been partially replaced by the Challenger Repair and Recovery Vehicle, especially in tank units.

     The FV-434 is equipped with a fold-away work bench that opens to the rear of the vehicle, along with an attached, folding tent that extends the work area by one meter. There is also an interior folding work bench inside the rear of the vehicle. Power is provided by a K60 Multifuel engine with 240 horsepower, and a manual transmission.  The engine does not only have high horsepower, but also a lot of torque.  Toolsets include tracked and wheeled vehicle tools, pneumatic tools, and welding and cutting tools. (Once everything is loaded, along with a part of the crews’ personal gear and ammo storage, not much room is left for any potential passengers.) Limited recovery can be done by towing or by the crane.

     The FV-434 has a crew of driver, commander, and two mechanics, though the driver and commander are also qualified mechanics. The commander has a cupola with manual rotation and a pintle mount for a light machinegun.  The driver is in the front left; the commander is directly behind and above the driver.  The two other mechanics are seated inside the vehicle.  The FV-434 has a small computer that primarily provides access to the many British Army vehicles’ specifications. On the glacis is a cluster of four smoke grenade launchers on each side of the vehicle.  A small “penthouse” can be erected over part of the rear deck of the vehicle, but this is limited in space by the installation of the crane.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$102,433

D, G, A

2.71 tons

17.75 tons

4

17

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

134/54

34/14

454

83

Stnd

T2

HF6  HS4  HR3

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

None

None

L-7A2 (C) or Bren L-2A4 (C)

1600x7.62mm

 

Alvis FV-512 MCRV/FV-513 MRV(R)

     Notes:  These related vehicles are also known as the Warrior Recovery and Repair Vehicles, or WRRV or the MCRV (Mechanized Combat Repair Vehicles).  As the name suggests, they are recovery vehicle versions of the FV-510 Warrior IFV, and are used by Great Britain and Kuwait to support those vehicles and sometimes tanks.  The primary difference between these vehicles is that the FV-512 does not have a winch, while the FV-513 does.  The FV-512 may not have a winch, but it has a much greater stowage of repair parts.

      Both vehicles have a crane with a 6.5-ton capacity in place of the turret of the FV-510, with a maximum reach of 4.52 meters.  The FV-513 has a winch internally at the rear with a capacity of 20 tons (38 tons with pulleys installed), and has 100 meters of cable. The FV-513 also has a pilot winch on this vehicle that has 200 meters of cable and a capacity of 1.25 tons.  On the front of the superstructure of both vehicles, there is a small one-man turret mounting a 7.62mm EX-34 ChainGun.  The vehicles are air-conditioned, and have a small spade at the rear that is lowered to provide stability for the crane.  NBC Overpressure with a collective backup is provided. These vehicles typically carry a wide variety of tools appropriate for their task of repairing tracked fighting vehicles.

     Power for the vehicle and its components is provided by Perkins CV8 TCA 550-horsepower diesel, coupled to an automatic transmission.  On either side of the forward superstructure are banks of four smoke grenade launchers.

     In preparation for Operation Granby (the operational name for Britain’s part in OIF), a decent layer of appliqué armor was added to British MRV(R)s. MCRVs were not sent to Iraq.

     Both of these vehicles can tow the GKN High Mobility Trailer.  This four-wheeled trailer was purpose-designed for these vehicles, but may be towed by other vehicles capable of handling the weight.  It weighs 5.5 tons, can carry 6.5 tons (approximately the weight of a Challenger power pack or two Warrior power packs), and is designed to provide a stable platform regardless of terrain conditions.  The trailer's platform can be raised and lowered and provides a safe level platform for work when not connected for towing.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

FV-512

$216,956

D, A

1.2 tons

30 tons

5

23

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

FV-513

$197,232

D, A

1.2 tons

30.2 tons

5

23

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

FV-513 (w/Side Applique)

$218,746

D, A

900 kg

32.63 tons

5

 

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

FV-512/513

150/60

38/25

770

197

CiH

T4

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF20  HS6  HR6

FV-513 (w/Side Applique)

118/83

33/23

770

205

CiH

T4

TF4  TS4  TR4  HF20  HS12Sp  HR6

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

(Both)

None

None

EX-34 ChainGun

1500x7.62mm

 

Vickers ARRV

     Notes: These are Armored Repair and Recovery Vehicles based on the Vickers Mk 3 main battle tank. The users of the Vickers ARRV are the same as those who use the Vickers series of tanks, including Kenya, Kuwait, Nigeria, and Tanzania.

     The Vickers ARRV lacks the heavy and composite armor of the Vickers Mk 3 (though it’s protection is still substantial), and instead of a turret has a raised superstructure mounting a crane with a capacity of 4 tons (just enough to lift a tank power pack).  Mounted to the left of the driver in the front of the vehicle is the main winch.  It has 122 meters of cable and has a capacity of 25 tons, or 65 tons with block and tackle.  When using the winch, an earth anchor is normally employed to brace the vehicle.  There is also an auxiliary winch at the rear with a capacity of 4.06 tons and 250 meters of cable.  The Vickers ARRV normally carries a full range of recovery and repair equipment, including welding and cutting gear, an air compressor, a fuel pump, a large set of tools (basic, wheeled vehicle, tracked vehicle, small arms, heavy ordinance), a tow bar, block and tackle, and various ropes, cables, and chains.  The Vickers has a hatch on the front right deck for the driver, a commander's cupola on the left superstructure deck with an externally mounted machinegun that can be aimed and fired from within the vehicle, and a large hatch for the crew to work with the crane.  A flat area on the rear deck can carry a complete MBT power pack.

     Power is provided by a Detroit Diesel 12V-712T 720-horsepower turbocharged diesel. Vickers will instead equip the Vickers ARRV with a Perkins CV12 800E turbocharged diesel developing 800 horsepower. (No actual orders for a Vickers ARRV with this engine have been made, but the stats have been worked out anyway.) The Vickers ARRV is known for its exceptional suspension. Three of Kenya’s Vickers ARRVs are unusual – they are not equipped with cranes, and are meant to be primarily recovery vehicles instead of repair and recovery vehicles, and the main winch can pull 75 tons with block and tackle.  On each bumper, aimed slightly outward, is a cluster of six smoke grenade launchers. The driver is on the front left, and the commander behind and opposite of him, with a manually-operated cupola with a weapon mount.

     The driver is on the front right, with the commander opposite him on the front left.  As noted above, there is a large hatch on the left rear, running to the center; this is normally meant to facilitate working with the crane. (Supposedly, Kenyan ARRVs that do not have a crane use the extra space, modified into a rack for water and food and various oddments of personal items.)

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Prewar sales went only to Kenya, Nigeria, and Tanzania, and even then only in small numbers, but some of these vehicles were produced during the Twilight War, and a few of these went to British forces in Europe.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Vickers ARRV

$875,340

D, A

3 tons

36.8 tons

4

23

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

Vickers ARRV w/800hp

$876,240

D, A

3 tons

36.8 tons

4

23

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Vickers ARRV

168/68

42/17

1000

262

Stnd

T6

HF76  HS10  HR8

Vickers ARRV w/800hp

177/72

44/18

1000

277

Stnd

T6

HF76  HS10  HR8

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Vickers ARRV

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

2600x7.62mm