Degtyarev PPD-40

     Notes:  Early Russian submachineguns were of poor quality and few of them were built until the advent of the PPD-34/38.  The PPD-40 is an improved version of that weapon; the primary differences are the replacement of the drum magazine with one of Suomi design.  Unfortunately, the PPD-40 was a technically difficult weapon to make, and it was abandoned in favor of the PPSh-41.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PPD-40

7.62mm Tokarev

3.7 kg

71 Drum

$298

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PPD-40

5

2

Nil

5

1

2

21

 

Dragunov KEDR

     Notes: These weapons are small submachineguns designed by Evgeni Dragunov, the designer of the SVD Dragunov sniper rifle.  They are described as machine pistols by the Russians, and were originally meant to replace the Stechkin.  The KEDR fires the 9mm Makarov cartridge, and the Klin fires the 9mmM Hi-Impulse round (and is essentially a modernized version of the KEDR).  Russian internal security forces and some Russian military units use these weapons.  The KEDR was first issued in 1993, with the Klin becoming available in 1994.

     The design for the original submachinegun that became the KEDR originated in the early 1970s, but both the design that became the KEDR and the competing design (designed by Afanasyev) were limited by the quality of ammunition available in the Soviet Union at the time, and both were shelved.  In the early 1990s, with better-quality ammunition available, Izhevsk dusted off the design again, improved upon it, and re-introduced it to the Russian military and police.  The standard KEDR uses a very short barrel of only 4.7 inches, tipped with threading for screw-on type silencers and a ring lip for clamp-on type silencers.  It is simple in operation, construction, and usage, built largely of stamped steel and with a folding steel stock similar to that of the Kiparis, with the buttstock acting as a rudimentary foregrip when it is folded. 

     Variants of the KEDR were soon developed, including the PP-91-01 with a sort of “semi-silencer” – quieter and hiding more muzzle flash than a noise and flash suppressor, but not as efficient at either as a true silencer.  Another variant is the KEDR-B, which has an integral suppressor and a barrel which is specially designed for silenced use and is not intended for use without the silencer.  Of course, the best-known variant of the KEDR is the Klin, which is built stronger to allow the use of 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse ammunition.  A separate variant of the Klin is chambered for 9mm Parabellum ammunition and is intended primarily for export. All are designed to easily use laser aiming modules, tactical lights and night vision scopes. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These weapons are fairly common among Russian forces in the Twilight 2000 World, with the exception that the version of the Klin chambered for 9mm Parabellum does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

KEDR

9mm Makarov

1.59 kg

10, 20, 30

$267

PP-91-01

9mm Makarov

1.67 kg

10, 20, 30

$292

KEDR-B

9mm Makarov

2.04 kg

10, 20, 30

$364

Klin

9mm Makarov and 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse

1.54 kg

10, 20, 30

$270

Klin

9mm Parabellum

1.55 kg

10, 20, 30

$270

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

KEDR

10

1

Nil

1/3

2

8

16

PP-91-01

10

1

Nil

2/3

1

7

15

KEDR-B

10

1

Nil

2/4

1

6

13

Klin (9mm Makarov)

10

1

Nil

2/3

2

8

24

Klin (9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse)

10

2

1-Nil

1/3

2

8

19

Klin (9mm Parabellum)

10

1

Nil

1/3

2

8

16

 

Izhevsk PP-19 Bizon-2 

     Notes: This is a new Russian submachinegun designed by the son of Mikhail Kalashnikov. The Bizon has the rear end of an AKS-74U, and a new front end with a recoil-operated action instead of the gas operation normal to the AK series; however, some 60% of the parts of the Bizon are interchangeable with those of the AK-74 and its relatives.  The Bizon (for the most part) uses an under-barrel helical-feed magazine reminiscent of the Calico series; most in existence today are made of steel, but the newest ones are made from polymer.  The muzzle has what is termed by the Russians a muzzle brake, but is more of a flash suppressor.  All Bizons are able to mount a wide variety of optic, laser, and night vision devices.  The weapon is meant for military special operations and police forces fighting the Russian organized crime forces.  There are eight known variants: the Bizon-2 is chambered for 9mm Makarov and 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse, The Bison-2-01 is chambered for 9mm Parabellum, The Bizon-2-02 is chambered for .380 ACP, the Bizon-2-03 is chambered only for 9mm Makarov and is equipped with an integral suppressor, The Bizon-2-04, Bizon-2-05, and Bizon-2-06 are chambered for 9mm Makarov, 9mm Parabellum, and .380 ACP respectively, but are designed only for semiautomatic fire; and the Bizon-2-07 is chambered for 7.62mm Tokarev and feeds from a conventional box magazine.  (The Bizon-2-04, -05, and -06 are identical to the Bizon-2, -01, and -02 for game purposes, except for their inability to fire on automatic and the Bizon-2-04’s inability to use 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse ammunition.)  Bizon-2s have been seen at arms shows with Picatinny rails and Western-type optics, though in action they use no rail and Russian optics.

     The Bizon-1, the original Bizon, differed primarily in using front Dragunov-type sights instead of the Kalashnikov-type front sights of the Bizon-2 (and Bizon-3). The Bizon -1 and -2 have tangent rear sights graduated for 50, 100, and 150 meters; the Bizon-3 uses a simple aperture rear sight adjustable for elevation and deflection.  The handguards have been continually refined and are slightly different on each model.  The Bizon-3 has an integral mount for suppressors, compensators and muzzle devices.  The Bizon-3’s stock also folds up and over rather than to the side.

     The Bizon-1 was not proceeded very far with, and most versions are in museums or government or company arms rooms, or have been destroyed.  The Bizon-2 and -3 are identical for game purposes, except as noted above.  Currently, the Bizon-3 fires only 9mm Makarov of Makarov Hi-Impulse ammunition.  The Bizon-3 may represent the future of the Bizon, but currently is only in the testing phases.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Only the Bizon-2, Bizon-2-03, Bizon-2-04, and Bizon-2-07 exist in the Twilight 2000 World, and they are designated Bizon-2, Bizon-2-01, Bizon-2-02, and Bizon-2-03 respectively.  The Bizon-3 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 game world.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is one of the runaway best sellers of the Merc 2000 World.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Bizon-2

9mm Makarov or Makarov Hi-Impulse

2.68 kg

64 Helical

$304

Bizon-2-01

9mm Parabellum

2.99 kg

53 Helical

$307

Bizon-2-02

.380 ACP

2.68 kg

64 Helical

$290

Bizon-2-03

9mm Makarov

3.22 kg

64 Helical

$437

Bizon-2-07

7.62mm Tokarev

2.99 kg

35

$300

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Bizon-2 (9mm Makarov)

5

2

Nil

2/4

1

3

22

Bizon-2 (9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse)

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

1

3

27

Bizon-2-01

5

2

Nil

2/4

1

2

21

Bizon-2-02

5

2

Nil

2/4

1

2

20

Bizon-2-03

5

2

Nil

3/5

1

2

17

Bizon-2-07

5

2

Nil

2/4

1

2

16

 

Kovrov AEK-919 Kashtan (Chesnut)

     Notes: These Russian submachineguns were designed specifically for the KGB.  They use the Uzi-style telescoping bolt method of operation, and may have been inspired by that weapon, but the original weapon, the AEK-919, was apparently also based on the Austrian MPi-69.  The weapon will not fire if dropped or bumped; the trigger must be deliberately pulled.  This weapon comes with a removable suppressor as standard equipment, as well as a mount atop the receiver for optical accessories, laser aiming modules, and tactical lights.           

     Users asked for a smaller weapon and the change of the cross-bolt safety to a standard rotating switch, resulting in the AEK-919K. The AEK-919 was used extensively by Russian troops in Chechnya; it was, however found wanting in reliability department.  Changes were made, apparently dramatically improving reliability, producing the AYEK-919.  (Other than the enhanced reliability and ability to use a silencer, the AYEK-919 is identical to the AEK-919 for game purposes, figures below are for when the AYEK-918 and 919 are used with silencers.)  Versions chambered for 9mm Parabellum are called the AEK-918, but are otherwise identical for game purposes.

     The AEK-918G is almost identical to the AEK-918, but has some “Western-friendly” features, such as a 3-round burst setting and the ability to use the same magazines as the Heckler & Koch MP-5 as well as standard AEK-918 magazines.  The stock folds to the side instead of underneath, and has a more ergonomic shape.  The barrel is tipped with a removable muzzle brake, and the entire weapon if quite a bit heavier than the standard AEK-918.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is a rather rare weapon in the Twilight 2000 World, with the AYEK-919 being virtually unknown and the AEK-918 nonexistent.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AEK-919/AYEK-919

9mm Makarov

1.68 kg

20, 30

$286

AEK-919K

9mm Makarov

1.68 kg

20, 30

$269

AEK-918

9mm Parabellum

1.69 kg

20, 30

$289

AYEK-918

9mm Parabellum

1.69 kg

20, 30

$272

AEK-918G

9mm Parabellum

2.65 kg

20, 30

$430

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AEK/AYEK-919

10

2

Nil

1/3

2

8

19

AEK-919K

10

1

Nil

1/3

1

7

17

AEK-918K

10

2

Nil

1/3

2

8

18

AYEK-918

10

1

Nil

1/3

1

7

16

AEK-918G

3/10

2

Nil

1/3

1

1/4

18

(Silenced)

3/10

1

Nil

1/3

1

1/4

16

 

PP-2000

     Notes: This submachinegun is a recent design, not used by Russian troops, but meant specifically for export.  It was designed for use as a PDW as well as a close-assault weapon for use by infantry, special operations, and police.  It is a very light weapon, built primarily of green or black high-impact plastic, and it is built with as few parts as possible.  The PP-2000 does not even have a normal stock; the specially-shaped magazines may be snapped into the rear of the weapon to form a stock, but the PP-2000 is designed to use no stock under normal circumstances.  The PP-2000 has an ergonomic foregrip instead.  A special armor piercing ammunition was designed for use with the PP-2000; this ammunition is also offered for export.

     Twilight/Merc 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PP-2000

9mm Parabellum or 9mm 7N31

1.5 kg

20, 40

$296

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PP-2000 (9mm Parabellum)

5

2

Nil

2

1

3

19

PP-2000 (9mm 7N31)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2

1

3

24

 

Sudaev PPS-42/43

     Notes:  The siege of Leningrad showed that while the PPSh-41 was effective and easy to maintain and produce, it was not easy enough to produce for the needs of the Soviets, and it was simplified further into the PPS-42.  The PPS-42 was characterized by steel stampings and very crude construction, with almost no finish on the metal or the stock.  It proved to be surprisingly tough and effective.  It was then replaced in production by the PPS-43, which had a different folding stock and a simpler safety mechanism.  After World War 2, the PPS-43s were mostly passed to the North Koreans, then to the Chinese, and then to the Vietnamese and Viet Cong.  Like the PPSh-41 they can now be found almost anywhere in the world.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PPS-42

7.62mm Tokarev

2.99 kg

35

$244

PPS-43

7.62mm Tokarev

3.36 kg

35

$236

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PPS-42

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

3

22

PPS-43

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

2

20

 

Rex Gepard

     Notes: This is a Russian weapon that is derived from the AKS-74U short assault rifle, and has 65% parts commonality with that weapon.  Variously referred to by the Russians as a “modular submachinegun” and a “weapons complex,” it may fire several different types of ammunition with little modification, and can mount a wide variety of Western, Russian, and Chinese-made silencers, suppressors, flash suppressors and muzzle brakes, optical and night vision scopes, laser aiming modules, and tactical lights.  Depending on the ammunition, the weapon fires by blowback, delayed blowback, or gas operation; for most caliber changes, only a change in the recoil springs, bolt, and barrel is necessary.  Only the use of the 9mm Grom cartridge requires more modification; due to the length of the 9mm Grom, the chamber extension must also be replaced to form a longer chamber for the round.  The former wooden pieces of the AKS-74U have been replaced with plastic on the Gepard; in addition, the pistol grip and trigger guard have been totally replaced with a polymer unit which incorporates both as well as a better anchor point for the folding stock.  Two lengths of barrel are also available.  The standard Gepard uses a muzzle brake, and that is how the figures below have been generated.

     Perhaps the biggest problem with the Gepard is also its biggest strength – it’s ability to fire many different calibers.  While this makes the Gepard an incredibly flexible weapon, it also makes the Gepard a very complicated weapon, with a bewildering number of different parts required to accomplish all the caliber changes.  While the changes can be done in the field by the shooter, the sheer number of parts necessary for the caliber changes mean that for the most part, it is difficult for a soldier to carry even a single caliber-change kit, along with the ammunition of a different caliber, a possible barrel change, different magazines, keeping track of all the parts, etc.  The Gepard also has the possibility to screw up the logistical systems of some countries.  Despite this, troops who have used the Gepard seem to like it, though so far there have been only a very few domestic and export sales, and the Gepard is used primarily by a few special ops units.  (It is rumored that only two were used in Chechnya, for combat testing.)

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though rather rare, some Russian troops are using the Gepard; most of them are internal security units, and they are primarily chambered for cartridges of Russian origin, i.e., the 9mm Makarov and Makarov Hi-Impulse, 9mm Gurza, and 9mm Grom.

     Merc 2000 Notes: Sales of this weapon are picking up steam. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Gepard (Long Barrel)

.380 ACP

2 kg

22, 40

$369

Gepard (Long Barrel)

9mm Makarov or Makarov Hi-Impulse

2.03 kg

22, 40

$382

Gepard (Long Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

2.04 kg

22, 40

$385

Gepard (Long Barrel)

9mm SPS

2.07 kg

22, 40

$399

Gepard (Long Barrel)

9mm Grom

2.13 kg

22, 40

$481

Gepard (Short Barrel)

.380 ACP

1.7 kg

22, 40

$295

Gepard (Short Barrel)

9mm Makarov or Makarov Hi-Impulse

1.73 kg

22, 40

$308

Gepard (Short Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.74 kg

22, 40

$311

Gepard (Short Barrel)

9mm SPS

1.78 kg

22, 40

$328

Gepard (Short Barrel)

9mm Grom

1.82 kg

22, 40

$407

Complete Barrel Kit

NA

5 kg

NA

$1000

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Gepard (Long, .380 ACP)

5

2

Nil

2/4

1

3

29

Gepard (Long, 9mm Makarov)

5

2

2-Nil

2/4

1

3

29

Gepard (Long, 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse)

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

1

3

35

Gepard (Long, 9mm Parabellum)

5

2

2-Nil

2/4

1

3

29

Gepard (Long, 9mm Gyurza)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2/4

1

3

25

Gepard (Long, 9mm Grom)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2/4

1

3

27

Gepard (Short, .380 ACP)

5

2

Nil

2/3

2

4

23

Gepard (Short, 9mm Makarov)

5

2

Nil

2/3

2

4

24

Gepard (Short, 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse)

5

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

4

28

Gepard (Short, 9mm Parabellum)

5

2

Nil

2/3

2

4

23

Gepard (Short, 9mm SPS SP-9)

5

3

Nil

2/3

2

4

22

Gepard (Short, 9mm SPS SP-10)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2/3

2

4

26

Gepard (Short, 9mm SPS SP-11)

5

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

4

22

Gepard (9mm Grom)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2/3

2

4

24

 

Shpagin PPSh-41

     Notes:  There were two contributing factors to the Soviet decision to equip their troops largely with submachineguns during World War 2.  First was the Russo-Finnish War; the Russians learned to their great regret that long rifles are not the best weapons for use in dense forests and built up areas.  The second was the Nazi Operation Barabarossa, and the massive retreat by the Soviets in the opening phase of that invasion, during which the small arms of millions of troops were lost or captured.  The Soviets wanted a weapon with a high rate of fire, easy to use, and above all else, cheap and easy to manufacture.  Georgi Shpagin responded with a reworking of the PPD-40 to produce the PPSh-41.  The PPSh-41 is not capable of semiautomatic fire, but has a rudimentary compensator at the end of the muzzle to help fight barrel climb.  The PPSh-41 went out of Soviet service in the early 1950s, but since over a million were made, they are likely to turn up almost anywhere in the world; the last reported organized military use was by Iran in her war with Iraq.  The Nazis captured large amounts of PPSh-41s and converted some of them to 9mm Parabellum ammunition, but they are very rare these days.  Barrel length is 10.5 inches, and the sights consist of a flip L rear with notches for 100 and 200 meters, and a front sight post adjustable for elevation and windage.

     Starting in the early 2000s, Inter-Ordnance of America began selling a civilian semiautomatic carbine copy of the PPSh-41, called the SR-41.  This version is virtually identical to the PPSh-41, except for the 16.5-inch barrel underneath a barrel shroud. It is very difficult if not impossible to convert to automatic fire. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PPSh-41

7.62mm Tokarev

3.64 kg

35, 71 Drum

$296

PPSh-41 (Nazi)

9mm Parabellum

3.67 kg

35, 71 Drum

$301

SR-41

7.62mm Tokarev

3.65 kg

35, 71 Drum

$353

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PPSh-41

10

2

Nil

5

1

4

21

PPSh-41 (Nazi)

10

2

Nil

5

1

4

27

SR-41

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

32

 

TsNIITOCHMASH SR-2 Veresk

     Notes: Though first shown at arms shows in 1999, the SR-2 has been little-seen since then, and it is not certain who, is using this submachinegun.  The SR-2 (in its early iterations) looks similar to the Uzi in many ways.  Originally designed as a CQB weapon for Russian special operations units, the FSB (the successors to the KGB) saw the effectiveness of the Veresk and requested that some of their SRT-type units also be issued the Veresk.

     Operation of the Veresk is by gas, and is essentially a modified form of that used by the Vikhr small assault rifle.  The Veresk uses a long-stroke gas piston (located above the barrel), allowing a short barrel to be used with gas operation.  Most of the metalwork is stamped steel, while other parts, such as the handguard, pistol grip, and (on later iterations) the foregrip, are made from high-strength polymer.  The stock folds forward; on earlier models, the butt folds upward over the weapon, without interfering with the sights or sight mounts.  Chambering is for the new 9mm Gurza round, with several types available.  Early models use simple notch-and-blade sights, while later models use a rail atop the receiver similar to a MIL-STD-1913 rail, able to mount most eastern and western optics (standard sight for the SR-2M is a collimating or laser aiming module).  Barrel length is a mere 6.77 inches, with no sort of muzzle device, though there is an adapter to make sure that the shooter’s fingers do not accidentally slip over the barrel while firing.

     The SR-2M is a modernized version of the SR-2.  The folding metal stock folds again over the top of the weapon; though iron sights are provided, standard sights are the KP-SR-2 Reflex Sight (equivalent to an optical sight in T2K terms).  MIL-STD-1913 rails are standard, with them over the top of the receiver and underneath the muzzle.  Two choices of stock are available – the folding stock mentioned, and a strut/skeletonized fixed version.  The SR-2M is designed to be fired with a silencer and has the ammunition to match.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The SR-2 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR-2

9mm Gurza

1.54 kg

20, 30

$304

SR-2M

9mm Gurza

1.65 kg

20, 30

$308

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR-2/2M (SPS SP-9)

5

3

Nil

2/3

2

4

20

SR-2/2M (SPS SP-11)

5

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

4

20

SR-2/2M (SPS SP-10)

5

2

1-1-Nil

2/3

2

4

24

 

Tula A-9

     The A-9 and it’s cousins are derived from the A-91 assault rifle, and share a great deal of components with the A-91.  It uses a gas piston operation system, which is very unusual for submachineguns, especially in its calibers.  This makes it a complex and expensive, if reliable, submachinegun.  (It inherits its operation from the A-91, and the piston and recoil spring are common with the A-91 as a result.) It should be noted that most newer pistols and submachineguns which are 9mm are chambered for 9mm Parabellum or its high-penetration counterpart; it may be that, after 40 years, the Russians are moving away from the 9mm Makarov round; attempts to improve the performance of the 9mm Makarov round have been marginal at best. Sights are a simple rear notch and front blade, set for 100 meters. These submachineguns, especially the A-9, are used by the MVD.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

A-9

9mm Parabellum

1.75 kg

20, 30

$344

A-7.62

7.62mm Tokarev

1.75 kg

20, 30

$337

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

A-9

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

4

31

A-7.62

5

2

Nil

2/4

2

4

24

 

Tula OTs-02 Kiparis

     Notes: This submachinegun was designed in 1972, but not introduced into Russian service until 1991.  It is intended primarily for internal security and police units.  The weapon can fire 9mm Makarov ammunition, but may also use the more powerful 9mm Makarov Hi-Impulse ammunition.  The Kiparis is made largely of simple steel stampings with a plastic grip, and is inexpensive, easy, and cheap to manufacture.  The steel stock folds over the top of the receiver; it consists of twin booms with a simple skeleton buttplate, and when folded, the two halves of the buttplate lie on either side of the barrel and can be used as a rudimentary foregrip.  The Kiparis is often issued with a special silencer that has a life of 6000 rounds.  (In this form, the Kiparis is known as the OTs-02-1.)  The Kiparis can use laser-aiming devices; they are generally mounted under the receiver forward of the magazine housing. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

OTs-02

9mm Makarov or Makarov Hi-Impulse

1.57 kg

10, 20, 30

$281

OTs-02-1

9mm Makarov

2.06 kg

10, 20, 30

$392

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

OTs-02 (Makarov)

5

2

Nil

2/4

2

4

18

OTs-02 (Hi-Impulse)

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

4

24

OTs-02-1

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

3

15

 

Tula OTs-22

     Notes:  This Russian small submachinegun was designed specifically for export, firing Western ammunition.  It uses the telescoping bolt principle and is reminiscent in design to the US Ingram M-10 and M-11 submachineguns, as well as the Israeli Micro-Uzi.  It is simply built from steel stamping and is easy to maintain, though it can be a handful to fire.  The muzzle brake, unusual in a weapon this size, is helpful in this respect.  The stock is a simple wire stock which folds upwards, with the butt folding flat against the receiver.  The OTs-22 has both a manual safety catch and a grip safety on the forward side of the pistol grip. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 World: This weapon was pressed into Russian service use, primarily used by KGB, GRU, and Spetznaz forces.   

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

OTs-22

9mm Parabellum

1.2 kg

20, 30

$273

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

OTs-22

5

1

Nil

1/3

2

5

16

 

Tula PP-90

     Notes: This weapon appears to have been influenced by the US Ares Folding SMG, and it appears similar.  When folded, the weapon looks like a battle rifle magazine, and only a hook at one end belies its true purpose.  The PP-90 is the initial design; it was dropped in favor of the PP-90M due to unspecified problems.  The PP-90M is the standard version in 9mm Makarov, and the PP-90M1 is the export version in 9mm Parabellum caliber.  The weapon, when folded, is larger than the Ares Folding SMG and can fold with a 30-round magazine.  The PP-90 can be fitted with a suppressor or an Aimpoint-type sight.  The PP-90 series is reportedly quite poor in the ergonomics department, and is difficult to aim and uncomfortable to fire.  The PP-90 series has no setting for semiautomatic fire, but the cyclic rate is only about 650 rpm, so squeezing off short burst should not be difficult.  Another notable fact is that the PP-90 series has no safeties of any kind other than one that prevents an accidental discharge if dropped or bumped.

     Merc 2000 Notes: Since the Ares Folding SMG and other Western designs of its ilk were taken off the market, the PP-90 series (and especially the PP-90M1) have taken their place. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PP-90

9mm Makarov

1.83 kg

30

$296

PP-90M

9mm Makarov

1.38 kg

30

$298

PP-90M1

9mm Parabellum

1.39 kg

30

$301

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PP-90

5

2

Nil

3

2

4

20

PP-90M

5

2

Nil

3

2

5

20

PP-90M1

5

2

Nil

3

2

5

20

 

Tula PP-90M1

     Notes: This submachinegun is not related in any way to nor should it be confused with the PP-90M1 mentioned in the entry above.  This PP-90M1 is a compact submachinegun introduced in 2001 built primarily for use by special operations both of Russia and for export to the special operations units of other countries.  (The Russians claim many sales, but will not say to whom they have sold this weapon.)  The PP-90M1 uses a receiver largely built of high-strength polymer, with steel reinforcement in strategic places.  There is no real upper receiver, though there is a hinged steel cover for field stripping purposes.  The operating parts are also of steel, with operation being simple blowback and using a weighted recoil buffer and a rather heavy bolt to keep the cyclic rate manageable (in fact, at 450-540 rpm, it’s rather slow for a modern submachinegun).  The PP-90M1 may feed from either a 32-round box magazine or a 64-round helical magazine (but not both at once); if a helical magazine is used, the forearm sleeve must first be removed, with the magazine then acting as the forearm.  Both magazine types are made from polymer, though metal box magazines are also made.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PP-90M1

9mm Parabellum

2.05 kg

32, 64 Helical

$310

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PP-90M1

5

2

Nil

2/3

1

3

23

 

Tula PP-93

     Notes: This weapon is described as a “light machine pistol,” for use by law enforcement or special operations forces; it is essentially a PP-90 which is non-collapsible and has selective-fire capability.  It can use a suppressor and a laser spot device, and can be hung and fired from a shoulder holster.  The weapon is simply and robustly-built from steel stampings.  The PP-93 is a seldom-seen weapon.  Most are chambered for 9mm Makarov, but some are chambered for 9mm Parabellum, and these are also capable of firing a special AP round which the Russians have developed recently.  Optional accessories include a screw-on suppressor, a laser aiming module, and holsters for the shoulder, belt, or thigh.

     The PP-93 is reportedly disliked by the troops who have to use it; this is primarily due to the folding stock, which is at a considerable angle downward when extended, increasing felt recoil and barrel climb.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 World.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PP-93

9mm Makarov or Makarov Hi-Impulse

1.47 kg

20, 30

$297

PP-93

9mm Parabellum

1.48 kg

20, 30

$299

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PP-93 (9mm Makarov)

5

2

Nil

2/3

2

5

20

PP-93 (Hi-Impulse)

5

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

5

25

PP-93 (9mm Parabellum)

5

2

Nil

2/3

2

4

20