Erma EMP

     Notes:  Developed in 1934, this is the last of the “old-style” submachineguns that Erma built before switching to weapons like the MP-38.  Built until 1945, it was produced in moderate numbers for Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia, and larger amounts for the Spanish. German stocks were destroyed, but examples might still exist in Poland and definitely are still in use in the Balkans.  Large-scale use of the EMP was made during the Spanish Civil War, but examples from that time are generally heavily-worn and possibly dangerous to fire without extensive refurbishing.  Operation was similar to the MP-18 series, though the EMP used a longer 9.75-inch barrel and was a bit heavier.  The wooden stock extended to just in front of the receiver, where a simple pistol grip was mounted.  Rare variants include one without a foregrip, and one with a bayonet lug.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

EMP

9mm Parabellum

4.15 kg

20, 32

$297

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

EMP

5

2

Nil

5

1

2

26

 

Erma MP-38 & MP-40

     Notes:  This is perhaps the best-engineered and well-known submachinegun ever produced.  It is often mistakenly called a “Schmeisser,” though Hugo Schmieisser had nothing to do with the design.  The MP-38 began as a private venture by Erma, but the German Panzer Corps quickly realized it was just the weapon to arm their crews and mechanized infantry, and it was put into mass production.  The MP-38 was the first longarm to be designed without a wooden stock, using a folding metal stock instead.  Operation was essentially a slightly-modified blowback, with a very low cyclic rate of 500 rpm to ensure controllability. The MP-38 has no selector lever and no capacity for semiautomatic fire, but the cyclic rate is low enough to make short bursts and even single shots easy with practice.  Most MP-38s had no safety mechanism, but in 1940-41 some were modified by replacing the one-piece charging handle with a two-piece charging handle that could engage a cutout in the receiver when folded (these are called MP-38/40s).  The main drawback was the time and expense required to produce the MP-38, and this lead directly to the MP-40.  However, the MP-38 was produced in sufficient quantity and is so rugged that there are still a lot of them in the world, some of which are still being used in Africa, the Balkans and South America.

     The MP-40/II was a rare variant of the MP-40 built in 1943, with perhaps less than a thousand built.  It was an attempt to greatly speed up reloading by modifying the magazine well and magazine attachment.  The magazine housing was wide enough for two magazines; when one magazine was empty, the other could be slid over horizontally and the weapon immediately cocked.  This unusual magazine mechanism was way too complicated and prone to failures and the idea quickly dropped after a small amount of combat testing.

     The Schmeisser MP-41 is a rare thing indeed: a World War 2 German weapon that was a product of private enterprise and not of a request by the Nazis for a weapon.  Schmeisser took the MP-40 receiver and barrel and placed it on a wooden stock similar to his MP-28.  He then added a selective fire mechanism allowing semiautomatic fire.  However, the German Army was not interested; a very small number found their way into the military, but most were rejected and it is now a very rare weapon normally found only in museums.  Only 27,500 were built between 1941-45, but combat testing brought unfavorable reviews from the troops, and production costs were greater than those of either the MP-38 or MP-40.

     In 1940, the Nazis sought to produce the MP-38 with changes to allow quicker and cheaper manufacturing.  This was the MP-40.  It was made using lighter pressings and stampings instead of the milled or machined steel of the MP-38, but mechanically is virtually identical to the MP-38/40.  The MP-40 directly influenced the US MP-3 Grease Gun and the British Sten series.  Like the MP-38, large amounts of MP40s survive to this day.

     In the early 2010s, German Sport Guns made a .22 Long Rifle copy of the MP-40, called the GSG MP-40.  It is essentially a .22 rifle, with a 17.2-inch barrel (including a faux suppressor). The rear sight is adjustable and made for .22 Long Rifle ammunition, and the grips are Bakelite.  The action also differs, as it is by straight blowback instead of delayed blowback.  Otherwise, the GSG MP-40 is externally a virtually faithful reproduction of the original MP-40.  The standard version sold has a fixed (but authentic-looking) stock, but with special paperwork and dollars, a folding stock can be had.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-38

9mm Parabellum

4.14 kg

20, 32

$321

MP-40

9mm Parabellum

3.97 kg

20, 32

$235

MP-40/II

9mm Parabellum

4.17 kg

2x20, 2x32 (or combination)

$494

MP-41

9mm Parabellum

3.7 kg

20, 32

$297

GSG MP-40

.22 Long Rifle

3.2 kg

10, 23

$175

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-38

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

2

26

MP-40 & MP-40/II

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

2

26

MP-41

5

2

Nil

5

1

2

26

GSG MP-40

SA

1

Nil

5

2

Nil

20

 

Hanel MP-18

     Notes:  This weapon is believed to be the world’s first true submachinegun.  Development began in 1916 and over 30,000 had been deployed by the end of World War 1.  Production continued until 1945, with some Nazi regular military units and police using them early in the World War 2, and Home Guard units later on.  It was one of Hugo Schmeisser’s first weapon designs.  The MP-18 was first designed to use the snail drum developed for the Artillery Luger, but this quickly proved unsatisfactory and unreliable, and straight box magazines were produced.  The MP-18 is a simple, strong gun with excellent craftsmanship that can still be expected to function today.  There is no capacity for semiautomatic fire, but the normal rate of fire (400 rounds per minute) that single shots can be squeezed off without difficulty.  World War 1-era MP-18s used a 7.5-inch barrel; post-World War 1 MP-18/Is had 8-inch barrels, cut were unable to use the Luger-type snail-drum magazines.  Ironically, the earlier MP-18 continued in production until 1945, while the later MP-18/I was built only until the late 1930s.

     The Bergmann MP-28 is an improved MP-18/I.  It has a new selector mechanism that allows semiautomatic fire.  In addition, there are some minor internal improvements to simplify the weapon and facilitate production.  The cyclic rate of fire is higher at 500 rpm (not applicable under game rules).  The MP-28 was used by many Nazi units, including police, the Gestapo, and the SS MP units.  The MP-28 was also made under license by Pieper of Belgium and by Spain without a license.  The MP-28 was made for Portugal, chambered in 7.65mm Parabellum, but these copies are believed to have all been scrapped.  The MP-28 was exported in large numbers to South America, which is the only place that it may be encountered in combat today; guns converted or built without license in South America may also be chambered for 9mm Largo, 7.63mm Mauser, and even .45 ACP (with a special 25-round magazine).

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-18

9mm Parabellum

4.19 kg

20, 32 (some may use a 32-round Snail Drum)

$273

MP-18/I

9mm Parabellum

4.19 kg

20, 32

$278

MP-28

9mm Parabellum

3.99 kg

20, 32, 50

$278

MP-28

7.65mm Parabellum

3.78 kg

20, 32, 50

$235

MP-28

9mm Largo

4.14 kg

20, 32, 50

$314

MP-28

7.63mm Mauser

4.25 kg

20, 32, 50

$339

MP-28

.45 ACP

4.45 kg

25

$437

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-18

5

2

Nil

4

1

2

20

MP-18/I

5

2

Nil

4

1

2

21

MP-28 (9mm Para)

5

2

Nil

5

1

2

21

MP-28 (7.65mm)

5

1

Nil

5

1

2

20

MP-28 (9mm Largo)

5

2

1-Nil

5

1

2

24

MP-28 (7.63mm)

5

2

1-Nil

5

1

2

20

MP-28 (.45)

5

2

Nil

5

2

5

23

 

Heckler & Koch MP-5

     Notes: Though most civilians in the world knew nothing of the MP-5’s existence until the British SAS’s raid on the Iranian Embassy in London on 5 May 1980, the MP-5 had by then already been in production for nearly a decade and a half, having been mass-produced since December of 1966, and in development since early 1964.  (Oddly, the Bundeswehr passed on the MP-5 for a long time; the West German Border Police were actually the first ones to adopt the MP-5 in large numbers.)  Since then, the MP-5 has become one of the most widely used submachineguns ever made; indeed, it is one of the most widely-used small arms ever built, with police, military, and government forces in over 50 countries using it.  Several of those countries are in fact license-producing the MP-5, and one of the most active production facilities for the MP-5 series is actually in Heckler & Koch’s US facility.  There are variants to suit almost any user need, from semiautomatic carbines to silenced versions to PDWs.  It is light, compact, reliable, and accurate, without being too expensive.  It can be difficult to go anywhere in the world without encountering MP-5s. 

     The MP-5’s basic operation is virtually identical to that of Heckler & Koch’s G-3 series of battle rifles.  Indeed, most of the internal operating components are the same as those of the G-3, though modified for the much-smaller 9mm Parabellum cartridge (and not interchangeable with those of the G-3).  The receiver, stock, and trigger group are likewise simply modified versions of those found on the G-3.  The MP-5 uses delayed-blowback operation, with roller-locking to help mitigate the biggest problem with delayed- blowback – case extraction is often so violent that the spent case is ripped in half during extraction, with half of the case left behind in the chamber in a very hot and expanded condition.  This can cause a stoppage that requires an armorer’s intervention to fix.  Roller locking slows the rapid movement of the bolt carrier.

     Most submachineguns fire from an open bolt to aid in cooling, but the MP-5 fires from a closed bolt.  The closed bolt firing allows for the use of a much lighter bolt, and contributes to the MP-5’s accuracy.  This is most evident in semiautomatic fire and burst fire, but it also helps somewhat in automatic fire.  Closed-bolt firing also helps protect the inside of the weapon from dirt and the elements.  In any case, cooling appears to not be a problem with the MP-5.  The cold hammer-forged barrel is 8.85 inches long, and at first had conventional rifling (later changed to polygonal rifling).  The muzzle is threaded for use with most silencers and suppressors, and in addition the area just behind the muzzle has a three-lug system that allows for other muzzle devices to be mounted.  Construction of most of the MP-5 is of stamped steel, but the fore-end, pistol grip, trigger group housing, trigger guard, and stock (on the fixed-stock models) was of high-impact plastic (later replaced by polymers).  The rear sight is an adjustable diopter type, with the front sight being a blade protected by a ring.

     The design of the MP-5 series remained relatively unchanged until 1971, but from 1971 to 1976, several modifications were made to the basic MP-5 design in rapid succession.  The serrations that were on the bolt carrier group, designed to help the mechanism push the bolt forward in tough environments, proved to be unnecessary and were removed.  The bolt carrier was also shortened.  Trigger pull was made lighter and smoother. The ejection port was reshaped to increase the reliability of extraction and case ejection.  The chamber shoulder width was increased very slightly to improve feed reliability.  The parts that keep the recoil spring guide in place were strengthened and enlarged to maintain spring tension and keep the bolt carrier from slamming against the buffer.  The above-mentioned changes to the non-metallic parts were made (strengthening the acrylic plastic with glass fiber resin), along with a change to polygonal rifling.  The pistol grip, formerly closed with a cap that was glued on, was left off, making the pistol grip open and hollow.  The curved butt of both the fixed and sliding stock models was changed to a straight butt plate, with a checkered hard rubber surface.  The original stick-type 15-round and 30-round steel magazines were replaced with curved magazines made of aluminum (and much later, would be replaced in production by both stick-type and curved magazines of carbon fiber), allowing the MP-5 to reliably feed a wider variety of 9mm Parabellum rounds.  Above the receiver, quick-detach mounts for optics were added.  The sling attachment points were altered, with one being under the front sight, one on the stock (or at the base of the stock on MP-5s with sliding stocks), and one on the left side of the magazine well.  These attachment points, originally designed for use with Heckler & Koch’s R3/3 tactical sling, are usable with a large variety of other slings.  The charging handle was redesigned to give the shooter a better grip when quickly grabbed.  The hammer was redesigned to better resist wear and tear.

     Though the Heckler & Koch and its license-producers have made the MP-5 series with almost innumerable small differences, the 9mm version of the MP-5 can (for game purposes) be considered to come in five basic variants.  The version that is considered the base model is the MP-5A2; this version has fixed stock.  The MP-5A3 is the same, but is equipped with a sliding stock.  The MP-5A4 and MP-5A5 are identical to the MP-5A2 and A3, but their standard trigger group allows for 3-round bursts in addition to semiautomatic and automatic fire.  The MP-5A1 is essentially the same as an MP-5A2 or A3, but the stock is deleted, replaced by a receiver endcap.  However…

     All that said about the “basic” variants, MP-5-series submachineguns are highly configurable, since the stocks and trigger groups (for the most part) can easily be interchanged.  This means that the designations above are rather general in nature, and usually reflect the configuration in which they were delivered from the factory.  Almost any MP-5-series submachinegun can be equipped with a fixed or sliding stock (or none at all).  There are a lot of different trigger groups available as well, and unfortunately, I will be dealing with this in a rather general manner as well.  Trigger groups available include: Safe/Semiautomatic/Automatic; Safe/Semiautomatic/Burst (2 or 3 rounds, but not both on the same weapon); Safe/Semiautomatic/Burst/Automatic (again, 2 or 3-round bursts), and Safe/Semiautomatic.  In all cases, the trigger group may have a standard-type selector switch on the left side of the receiver above and slightly behind the trigger; the selector switch may also be of the so-called “Navy” type, which uses ambidextrous controls.  (The “Navy” name came about since ambidextrous controls were first requested by US Navy SEAL teams.)  Though most MP-5s are made with threaded barrels, entries for versions with a suppressor are not given below for the basic MP-5 models.  The figures for the weight and cost of the silencers listed below are generic figures (with the cost in game terms, of course), and do not reflect any particular make or type of silencer.  (In particular, the silencers made for the MP-5Ns used by US special ops, made by Knight Armament, are lighter, smaller, and stronger than the generic silencer listed; and are designed to not be quickly destroyed by the use of full-power ammunition.)

     Several more specialized versions of the basic MP-5 have also been built over time.  Most of these are simple variations of the basic design built to the request of specific countries or agencies, and are identical to other MP-5-series submachineguns for game purposes.  However, a few require more elaboration.

     The MP-5N was designed specifically for use by US Navy SEAL teams, but have since been adopted by other armed forces and a few police and security agencies around the world.  The MP-5N uses modified barrel threads which allow an even larger choice of silencers and suppressors than standard MP-5 barrel threads, and also retain the 3-lug muzzle attachment system.  The barrel is free-floating to further enhance accuracy.  In addition to the fixed or sliding stocks, the MP-5N can also use the same side-folding stock as used on the MP-5K PDW; the SEALs and other special operations units use the sliding-stock version almost exclusively.  Special attachment points have been added to the top of the receiver to increase the amount of accessories that can be mounted, including MIL-STD-1913 rails.  Rumors also state that the MP-5N can also use modified handguards that carry further accessory attachment points.  The finish is specially-designed to provide the maximum resistance to corrosion, and the parts are coated so that the MP-5N requires only a very minimal amount of lubrication and has even better resistance to wear, tear, dirt, and other difficult operating conditions.  The MP-5N’s sights are standard MP-5 sights, but have tritium inlays.

     The MP-5F was designed at the request of French special operations units.  The primary alteration in the MP-5F is inside of the weapon, where the receiver and most of the operating components have been strengthened to allow the use of the 9mm Parabellum “hotloads” preferred by French special operations units; some of these loadings are well beyond even +P and +P+ loadings.  (Unfortunately, the Twilight 2000 v2.2 rules do not allow for these types of rounds, but I’m working on it…) Most of these internal parts are not interchangeable with other MP-5s.  The MP-5F comes only in a sliding stock version, but the stock is an inch longer than the standard MP-5 sliding stock when extended, and the buttplate has a two-inch-thick rubber recoil pad.  Extra sling attachment points have been added to better accommodate left and right-handed shooters.

     The MP-5SFA is designed for use by police and other users who do not require automatic fire; it is in essence a short-barreled carbine.  The MP-5SFA is not meant to be a civilian version of the MP-5, as most countries don’t allow civilians to own such short-barreled carbines without special licensing.  The MP-5SFA can be equipped with a detachable flash suppressor on the muzzle.  Other than being capable only of semiautomatic fire, the MP-5SFA is identical to standard MP5s.

     Of course, there are two other versions of the MP-5: the MP-5/10 and MP-5/40.  These versions, chambered for 10mm Colt and .40 Smith & Wesson respectively, were designed with the US military and police markets in mind (in fact, the first sales were MP-5/10s for the FBI HRT teams; they use a safe/semiautomatic/2-round burst/automatic trigger group with ambidextrous controls), and were both introduced in 1992.  Both are available use the same stock configurations as the other MP-5s, and have the same trigger group options available to them.  Both also have barrels threaded in the same configuration as the MP-5N, as well as the 3-lug muzzle attachment system.  Externally, both look virtually identical to 9mm MP-5s.  Their magazines, however, are of polymer and are straight instead of being curved.  The original MP-5/10 and MP-5/40 magazines were made of translucent smoked polymer, but current magazines are of black carbon fiber composites.  Both the MP-5/10 and MP-5/40 have a bolt hold-open feature added to them, with the latch located above the selector switch on the left side.  Their sights use high-contrast markings and tritium inlays.  That said, the sales of the MP-5/10 and MP-5/40 were always limited; they were designed for a niche market that was primarily in the US and some special operations units worldwide, and production was discontinued in 2000 in favor of the UMP series of submachineguns.  (A note to Dark Conspiracy players: the MP-5/10 is referred to as the “MP-7” in the Dark Conspiracy manual.  I would suggest that GMs retain the designation of MP-5/10, since there actually is a PDW called the MP-7 that would exist in the Dark Conspiracy timeline.)

     As a final note, there is a civilian carbine version of the 9mm MP-5, called the HK-94.  The HK-94 uses a 16.54-inch barrel (sometimes with a faux silencer around it), and had a special safe/semiautomatic trigger group that is close to impossible to convert to automatic fire without replacing the entire guts of the weapon.  Versions of the HK-94 include the fixed-stock HK-94A2, the sliding-stock HK-94A3, and the HK-94 SG1 target model (with a folding aluminum bipod and a 6x Leopold scope).  In addition, the HK-94A2 and A3 are available with scope bases of various sorts.  Sales of the HK-94 SG1 proved to be disappointing and production stopped a year later, and currently-produced HK-94s are primarily made by a variety of license-producers.  US police forces have been an unexpected market for HK-94s, though most are sold to civilians.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The MP-5F is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The MP-5/10 and MP-5/40 are rather rare versions in the Twilight 2000 timeline, and most of them are found in the US, Mexico, and Canada; however, some MP-5/10s were issued to US Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard for use by boarding parties and by the US Marines’ FAST teams.  As in real life, the HK-94 SG1 is an extremely rare variant in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The MP-5N is somewhat rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline, but does exist in decent numbers; they are primarily in the hands of US special operations units, though some MP-5Ns were also issued in small numbers to the US Navy and Marines for use by boarding parties and US Marine FAST Teams.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price*

MP-5A1

9mm Parabellum

2.24 kg

10, 15, 30

$348

MP-5A2

9mm Parabellum

2.54 kg

10, 15, 30

$293

MP-5A3

9mm Parabellum

2.88 kg

10, 15, 30

$313

MP-5A4

9mm Parabellum

2.54 kg

10, 15, 30

$378

MP-5A5

9mm Parabellum

2.88 kg

10, 15, 30

$398

MP-5N (Fixed Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.88 kg

10, 15, 30

$383

MP-5N (Folding Stock)

9mm Parabellum

3.07 kg

10, 15, 30

$403

MP-5F

9mm Parabellum

3.23 kg

10, 15, 30

$473

MP-5/10 (Fixed Stock)

10mm Colt

2.67 kg

30

$549

MP-5/10 (Folding Stock)

10mm Colt

2.85 kg

30

$569

MP-5/40 (Fixed Stock)

.40 Smith & Wesson

2.67 kg

30

$489

MP-5/40 (Folding Stock)

.40 Smith & Wesson

2.85 kg

30

$509

HK-94A2

9mm Parabellum

2.9 kg

10, 15, 30

$372

HK-94A3

9mm Parabellum

3.28 kg

10, 15, 30

$392

HK-94 SG1

9mm Parabellum

3.68 kg

10, 15, 30

$978

Silencer for 9mm MP-5 SMGs

N/A

0.7 kg

N/A

$140

Silencer for MP-5/10

N/A

1 kg

N/A

$200

Silencer for MP-5/40

N/A

0.95 kg

N/A

$190

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-5A1

2/3/5

2

Nil

3

2

2/2/4

22

MP-5A2

5

2

Nil

4

1

3

24

MP-5A3

5

2

Nil

3/4

1

3

24

MP-5A4

2/3/5

2

Nil

4

1

1/2/3

24

MP-5A5

3/5

2

Nil

3/4

1

1/2/3

25

MP-5N (Fixed)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4

1

1/2/3

24

MP-5N (Fixed, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/1/2

20

MP-5N (Fixed, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

1

Nil

5

1

1/1/2

19

MP-5N (Folding)

2/3/5

2

Nil

3/4

1

1/2/3

24

MP-5N (Folding, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/1/2

20

MP-5N (Folding, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

1

Nil

4/5

1

1/1/2

19

MP-5F

2/3/5

2

Nil

3/4

1

1/1/2

24

MP-5/10 (Fixed)

2/3/5

2

1-Nil

4

1

1/2/3

27

MP-5/10 (Fixed, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/2/3

22

MP-5/10 (Fixed, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/1/2

18

MP-5/10 (Folding)

2/3/5

2

1-Nil

3/4

1

1/2/3

27

MP-5/10 (Folding, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/2/3

22

MP-5/10 (Folding, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/1/2

18

MP-5/40 (Fixed)

2/3/5

2

1-Nil

4

1

1/2/3

26

MP-5/40 (Fixed, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/2/3

22

MP-5/40 (Fixed, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/1/2

16

MP-5/40 (Folding)

2/3/5

2

1-Nil

3/4

1

1/2/3

26

MP-5/40 (Folding, Silenced)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/2/3

22

MP-5/40 (Folding, Silenced, Subsonic)

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/1/2

16

HK-94A2

SA

2

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

42

HK-94A3

SA

2

2-Nil

4/6

1

Nil

42

HK-94 SG1

SA

2

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

42

With Bipod

SA

2

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

55

*For MP-5-series submachineguns which are capable only of semiautomatic fire and bursts, semiautomatic fire and automatic fire, or semiautomatic fire only, subtract $85 from the cost.  This does not apply to weapons like the HK-94 series, which come only in semiautomatic versions, or the MP-5A2 and A3, which come only in semiautomatic/automatic versions.

 

Heckler & Koch  MP-5K

     Notes: Introduced in 1976, the MP-5K (Kurz, or short) was originally designed after a client of one of Heckler & Koch’s representatives in South America received a request for a very small, concealable version of the MP-5.  The redesign of the MP-5 into the MP-5K required a great deal of modifications – about half the parts of the MP-5 and MP-5K cannot be interchanged, mostly because the design of the MP-5K required much of the firing mechanism to be built with parts that are changed in shape or dimensions.  The basic operation, however, is not changed from that of the MP-5.  The resulting weapon is not much larger than a big pistol, but it is ideal for use by police, bodyguards, special operations, and others who need compact firepower.

     The barrel length of most of the MP-5K series has been reduced to a mere 4.5 inches, and in almost all variants, does not extend beyond the fore-end.  No provision for a stock of any kind was made – the rear of the receiver has a flat cap with a sling swivel, with another swivel on each side of the fore-end near the muzzle.  The bolt, being much shorter and lighter, has caused the cyclic rate of fire to rise to nearly 1000 rpm.  Under for fore-end of the MP-5K is a vertical foregrip; in front of the muzzle, the fore-end has a hooked portion extending downward to prevent the user from shooting his own fingers off if they stray in front of the muzzle or his non-firing hand slips off the foregrip.  A shoulder holster rig has been designed for the MP-5K, but the most unusual firing rig for the MP-5K is a special briefcase.  This briefcase (which may be hard or soft-sided) allows the user to lock the weapon into the briefcase, with the muzzle connecting to a barrel extension.  The trigger of the MP-5K connects to a lever system, allowing the shooter to fire the MP-5K using a small trigger on the handle of the briefcase.  The briefcase is large enough to allow the MP-5K to feed from a 30-round magazine.  Firing the MP-5K from this briefcase is not particularly accurate (two levels harder), but it can be quite a surprise for an attacker.

     In general, there are 4 variants of the basic MP-5K.  The standard MP-5K uses a modified version of the MP-5’s sights and a fire selector allowing for safe, semiautomatic, and automatic fire.  The MP-5KA1 is almost identical to the MP-5K, but the large sights have been replaced with low-profile rear notch and front blade sights.  The MP-5KA4 adds a burst setting to the fire selector mechanism of the MP-5K (the burst size may be two or three rounds, according to the wishes of the buyer); the MP-5KA5 is the same as the MP-5KA4, but has the low-profile sights of the MP-5KA1.

     A further variant, designated the MP-5K-N, was designed by Heckler & Koch at the request of the US Navy SEALs.  The MP-5K-N uses a trigger group with safe, semiautomatic, and full automatic settings, but the controls are also ambidextrous.  The sights used are full-sized MP-5 sights.  The barrel is lengthened to 5.5 inches, with the additional length being threaded for use with a silencer.  The additional length of the barrel also has a 3-point locking lug that allows the mounting of other muzzle accessories ranging from blank adapters to rifle grenade adapters.

     The MP-5K PDW began as a request by the SEALs to Heckler & Koch for a buttstock that could be attached to their MP-5K-Ns.  The wanted a stock that was folding and removable, but require extremely minimal modifications to the MP-5K-N, or preferably, none at all; they also wanted it ASAP.  Heckler & Koch not only had no such item for the MP-5K series, they had no plans at all for such a stock.  Heckler & Koch therefore asked their US branch to look in the US (where companies that make add-ons to existing weapons are plentiful), and eventually chose Choate to design the stock.  This they did quickly, modifying it from a folding stock kit they already had in stock; the result, with a few more minor modifications, became the MP-5K PDW.  Choate’s stock is largely made from steel-reinforced polymer, and has a “flip-open” feature that allows the stock to be opened quickly with a slight pull and a shake; however, the stock will not suddenly spring open or shut accidentally.  Though originally meant for use by SEALs, the MP-5K PDW quickly spread to other elements of US SOCOM, and then became used in some other US units and worldwide as a compact weapon for use by vehicle crewmen, aircraft crewmen, bodyguards, and rear-echelon troops, as well as police.  A rig was devised that allows the MP-5K PDW to be carried in a similar manner to a shoulder holster (provided the stock is removed), and a variety of tactical slings were also designed or taken from existing aftermarket designs.  The shoulder rig also gives the user an easy means to carry extra ammunition, as the rig also has pouches for a pair of extra magazines (of any size usable by the MP-5K PDW; the magazine pouches can also hold a silencer ), and it can be set up for carrying under the right or left shoulders.  A rig is also available that allows the user to carry the MP-5K PDW, in the same configuration (or one with five pouches), on the thigh; these thigh rigs are reportedly quite popular with the aircrews of the US Army’s special operations air wing, Task Force 160 (who use the MP-5K, MP-5K-N, and MP-5K PDW sans stock with those rigs).  The MP-5K PDW otherwise uses the same barrel (with the same threading and 3-point locking lug for other accessories), and has attachment points atop the receiver for a limited amount of other accessories.  The fire selector mechanism may be had with setting for safe, semiautomatic, and either 3-round bursts or full automatic fire.  The sights have been given tritium inlays for night use.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The MP-5K PDW does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline as such, though several aftermarket kits are used by various forces around the world that essentially duplicate the MP-5K PDW in form and function.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-5K/MP-5KA1

9mm Parabellum

1.99 kg

10, 15, 30

$218

MP-5KA4/MP-5KA5

9mm Parabellum

1.99 kg

10, 15, 30

$303

MP-5K-N

9mm Parabellum

2.09 kg

10, 15, 30

$230

MP-5K PDW (No Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.09 kg

10, 15, 30

$315

MP-5K PDW (With Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.79 kg

10, 15, 30

$365

Standard MP-5K-N/MP-5K PDW Silencer

N/A

0.57 kg

N/A

$105

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-5K/MP-5KA1

10

1

Nil

2

1

6

14

MP-5KA4/MP-5KA5

2/3/10*

1

Nil

2

1

1/2/6

14

MP-5K-N

10

2

Nil

2

1

6

15

With Silencer

10

1

Nil

3

1

4

13

Silenced, Subsonic Ammo

10

1

Nil

3

1

5

12

MP-5K PDW

3/10**

2

Nil

2

1

2/6

15

With Stock

3/10**

2

Nil

2/4

1

1/5

17

With Silencer

3/10**

1

Nil

3

1

1/4

13

Silenced, Subsonic Ammo

3/10**

1

Nil

3

1

1/4

12

With Stock and Silencer

3/10**

1

Nil

3/5

1

1/4

14

Stock, Silenced, Subsonic Ammo

3/10**

1

Nil

3/5

1

1/3

14

*The burst settings on the MP-5KA4 and A5 may allow two or three-round bursts, but not both.

**The MP-5K PDW may have a 3-round burst setting, a full automatic setting, or both.  If the MP-5K PDW has only a burst or full automatic setting, reduce price by $85.

 

Heckler & Koch MP-5SD

      Notes: Work on the MP-5SD (Schall Dämpfer, or Sound Suppressed) began in 1974, with production beginning in 1976.  The MP-5SD is an MP-5 with a special integrally-silenced barrel instead of the standard barrel. 

     The MP-5SD was (and still is) unusual for a silenced weapon, in that it is designed for use with full-power ammunition; in fact, the use of the sort of reduced-load subsonic ammunition normally used in a silenced weapon would emerge from the silenced barrel or the MP-5SD at such a low velocity and power that the 9mm Parabellum rounds the MP-5SD fires would have less effect than a .32 ACP round.  (Furthermore, the MP-5SD is designed for use with standard 9mm Parabellum propellant loads and bullet weights – sub-loads, hot loads, and heavy or light bullets are not recommended.)  The silencer and the barrel of the MP-5SD are basically one unit – one can remove the barrel/silencer for refurbishing or repair, but this sort of work is not intended to be done by the user, at the unit level, or even by the military of the country that uses the MP-5SD – such maintenance is supposed to be done by Heckler & Koch themselves, and the barrel/silencer are delivered as a single unit with the end caps of the silencer superglued on.  (Heckler & Koch says that the only user maintenance should be for the user to remove the entire barrel/silencer unit and tap the rear of the unit on a hard surface a few times to knock out any carbon build-up that may be inside; occasionally a quick rinse with a special oil-free compound can be used.)

     Inside the silencer/barrel, the 5.73-inch barrel has 30 small holes (about 2.5mm diameter each) just ahead of the chamber.  These bleed off a significant amount of propellant gasses, which are used to do most of the work of slowing the velocity of the bullet until it is traveling at subsonic velocities.  These gasses are cooled and vented outside of the barrel/suppressor, with the cooling greatly reducing what would otherwise be a large infrared signature when the MP-5SD is fired.  The bullet then passes though a one piece aluminum baffle unit that completes the slowing of the bullet to subsonic velocities, as well as doing an excellent job of quieting and diffusing the sound of the detonation of the round’s propellant charge.  The result is a 9mm Parabellum submachinegun that is quieter than a weapon firing a .22 Short round; an ex-Ranger friend of mine in the Army told me that the sound of the bolt is much louder than the firing report on an MP-5SD.  The barrel/silencer unit is designed wear very slowly; Heckler & Koch says it is good for at least 20,000 rounds (even on full automatic fire), but many MP-5SD barrel/silencer units are known to have lasted far longer.

     Like the MP-5, there are several models of the MP-5SD, differing in the stock configurations and the trigger groups.  However, also by the MP-5, MP-5SD stock and trigger mechanisms are easy to change, and the designations reflect the configurations as they were delivered from Heckler & Koch.  In addition, the MP-5SD can also have the “Navy” trigger group.  The MP-5SD1 is stockless, and has a safe/semiautomatic/automatic trigger group; the MP-5SD2 is the same, but with a fixed stock; the MP-5SD3 is also the same, but with a sliding stock; and the MP-5SD4, SD5, and SD6 are the same as the first three, but with safe/burst/semiautomatic/automatic settings. (The burst setting may be for a two or three-round burst, but not both on the same weapon.)

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-5SD1

9mm Parabellum

2.8 kg

10, 15, 30

$336

MP-5SD2

9mm Parabellum

3.1 kg

10, 15, 30

$366

MP-5SD3

9mm Parabellum

3.4 kg

10, 15, 30

$386

MP-5SD4

9mm Parabellum

2.8 kg

10, 15, 30

$422

MP-5SD5

9mm Parabellum

3.1 kg

10, 15, 30

$452

MP-5SD6

9mm Parabellum

3.4 kg

10, 15. 30

$472

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-5SD1

5

2

Nil

4

1

3

13

MP-5SD2

5

2

Nil

5

1

2

14

MP-5SD3

5

2

Nil

4/5

1

2

14

MP-5SD4

2/3/5

2

Nil

4

1

1/2/3

13

MP-5SD5

2/3/5

2

Nil

5

1

1/1/2

14

MP-5SD6

2/3/5

2

Nil

4/5

1

1/1/2

14

 

Heckler & Koch MP-7

     Notes: In the early-1990s, NATO floated a trial balloon for a short-range submachinegun-like weapon to replace the handgun among certain rear-echelon troops, military drivers, crewmen of weapons like towed artillery and SAMs, and even some senior NCOs and officers who normally carry handguns instead of rifles – a Personal Defense Weapon (PDW).  (Sort of sounds familiar, doesn’t it?)  At the same time, the new weapon should also be useful to bodyguards, special operations troops, and covert operators.  Though the NATO request has not yet resulted in any large-scale military sales, it has resulted in a number of new weapon and ammunition concepts, as well as small-scale acquisition of these weapons. One of these weapons is Heckler & Koch’s MP-7 (often called the Heckler & Koch PDW, as it was often referred to during development). 

     One of the keys to the modern concept of a personal defense weapon is a cartridge that is more powerful than the pistol cartridges fired by the typical submachinegun, yet still lighter in weight than pistol cartridges, capable of better penetration than something like the 9mm Parabellum round so common these days in submachineguns, and still be able to be used in a lightweight weapon while producing less recoil than most pistol cartridges would produce in a similar-sized weapon would.  A plus would be a wider choice of bullet types and propellant loads.

     Heckler & Koch tackled the ammunition part of their PDW design first.  They went all the way back to the late 1960s and their experimental HK-36 rifle (not to be confused with the present-day G-36 assault rifle, a totally different weapon), and its unusual 4.6x36mm löffelspitz (spoon-tip) ammunition.  The explanation of the löffelspitz round’s characteristics are too lengthy for this entry; suffice it to say that it was a sort of enhanced-damage round that barely skirted the provisions of the Geneva Conventions for enhanced damage rounds (provisions that are being more and more ignored these days).  Heckler & Koch gave their partners at the BAE facilities at Radway Green their requirements and told them that they wanted the new round to be based upon the 4.6x36mm round; Radway Green had a family of ammunition based upon the new round (nominally measuring 4.6x30mm) ready by 1995.  The first MP-7 prototypes appeared later in 1995.  Though German peacekeeping troops were combat-testing them as early as 1997 in Balkans as part of the IFOR contingent, the MP-7 was not considered officially ready for prime time by Heckler & Koch until 2000, with sales beginning in early 2001.  Currently, the largest single military user of the MP-7 is the German KSK special operations unit, though MP-7s have been adopted on a smaller scale by other military and police units worldwide (primarily by various military special operations units and police SRT-type units).  Bodyguards also like the small size and firepower of the MP-7.

     The MP-7 itself is based upon a much smaller version of the firing mechanism of the G-36 assault rifle, also further modified for the much smaller package.  The MP-7 is gas-piston operated using a short-stroke piston and rotating bolt, and firing from an open bolt.  The design is sort of a semi-bullpup, with the polymer magazines being inserted into the pistol grip.  The 20-round magazine fits flush with the bottom of the pistol grip, while the 40-round magazine extends quite a way below the pistol grip and is slightly curved below the pistol grip.  Controls are ambidextrous and located just above the pistol grip; the magazine release is below the trigger guard and the charging handle is T-shaped and easily operated with one hand from either side.  A short MIL-STD-1913 rail is located at the rear of the receiver (and is actually a part of the upper receiver molding), and backup iron sights consist of a front blade and a rear notch, both non-adjustable.  The primary sights are Hensoldt reflex red-dot-type sights, mounted on the MIL-STD-1913 rail. Construction of the MP-7 is largely of advanced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer, with surprisingly little metal used in the design (even some of the operating parts are of advanced polymer).  The sliding stock retracts nearly flush with the rear of the receiver, allowing for greater concealment and balancing the MP-7 nicely for one-handed firing.  Near the front of the MP-7, there is a folding foregrip; in front of this is finger guard to prevent the shooter’s fingers from accidentally straying in front of the muzzle when firing.  The 7.1-inch barrel is tipped with a small but effective flash suppressor.  The flash suppressor is a screw-on design, and when removed it can be replaced with a simple cap to protect the threads, a blank firing adaptor, or a special silencer designed specifically for use with the MP-7 and a subsonic version of its ammunition.  Other ammunition types include the standard ball, UC Ball (Ultimate Combat) ball spoon nose (enhanced lethality), ball frangible, and ball subsonic.  The UC ball round uses a hard steel bullet with a copper jacket for increased penetration; the ball spoon nose is designed to exhibit increased deformation upon hitting a target (unfortunately, there is no good way to simulate the ball spoon round’s performance in game terms; I’ll admit the tables below don’t properly give an idea of the difference between a standard ball round and a ball spoon nose round); and the ball frangible is designed to damage bodies, but not penetrate even thin solid objects (such as aircraft skins; for game purposes, it not only has Nil penetration, it is totally unable to penetrate or even damage hard surfaces).  There are also ball tracer and several training rounds.

     Combat use of the MP-7 has led to a slightly-modified version, the MP-7A1.  The MP-7A1 has a MIL-STD-1913 that runs the entire length of the top of the receiver (the rail atop the MP-7 is only half the length of the receiver), plus two more half-length MIL-STD-1913 rails on either side of the forward end of the receiver.  Like the MP-7, these rails are molded into the receiver, with the top rail being a part of the upper receiver and the two side rails being a part of the lower receiver.  The butt plate of the sliding stock was made thicker and the rubber covering the butt plate given serrations.  The foregrip, which tended to fall open when folded, was given an easily-released latch to hold it closed.  The fixed iron backup sights were replaced with iron sights that are removable and mount on the MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver when needed, and also fold up and down as necessary when mounted.  In 2006, another minor change was made to the MP-7A1 to enhance safety; the MP-7A1 was given a “Safety Trigger” similar to that of current-production Glock of pistols.  This trigger has a small lever attached to the trigger, providing additional protection against accidental firing if the MP-7A1 is dropped, bumped, or the trigger is tugged upon, since the lever is depressed as the trigger is actually pulled for shots.  The weight difference between the MP-7 and MP-7A1 is minor, and both shoot the same for game purposes.  The MP-7A1 replaced the original MP-7 in production in 2003.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The MP-7 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 World.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-7

4.6mm Radway

1.5 kg

20, 40

$588

MP-7A1

4.6mm Radway

1.8 kg

20, 40

$594

MP-7 Silencer

N/A

0.58 kg

N/A

$115

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-7 (Ball)

10

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

8

14

MP-7 (UC Ball)

10

2

1-1-Nil

2/3

2

8

17

MP-7 (Ball Spoon Nose)

10

3

Nil

2/3

2

8

12

MP-7 (Ball Frangible)

10

2

Nil

2/3

2

8

14

MP-7 (Silenced)

10

2

Nil

3/4

1

6

10

 

HK UMP 

     Notes: This weapon is sought after by security commands worldwide, and is a favorite of personnel not required to carry their own ammunition very far, security details, border guards, police, and vehicle crews.   The variety of accessories for the UMP is very wide.  The design of the UMP started in 1996, with the goal of providing a modern .45 ACP submachinegun to members of the world’s special operations units, many of whom (especially in the US) were clamoring for a submachinegun with more punch, but not simply a scaled down assault rifle.  The first production UMPs appeared in 1999; it was for a few months chambered only for .45 ACP, but popular demand quickly led to the UMP-9 and UMP-40. 

     The UMP uses many of the components of the G-36 assault rifle, along with much existing Heckler & Koch small arms technology and a healthy dose of new ideas.  Much of the shell of the UMP is of a fiberglass/polymer material, with steel reinforcement molded in at strategic points to increase strength.  The magazines are proprietary, and are also made of polymer, with a clear plastic strip at the rear so the user can tell how many rounds he has left.  All versions of the UMP are capable of firing almost all types of ammunition in their caliber, from subsonic rounds to hot +P+ loads (and, rumors say, even some kinds of wildcat rounds).  The magazine well is flared to help the user reload quickly.  The stock folds to the right and has a rubber butt pad and cheek pad.  The top of the receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail; though more rails do not come standard with the weapon, there are mounting points for three shorter MIL-STD-1913 rails on the forearm at the 3, 6, and 9 o’clock positions.  Mounted to the rails are adjustable flip-up rear sights (which unfortunately require an Allen wrench to adjust them) and a front post sight in a protective hood.  Tritium inserts for the sights are available as an option, but are not standard.  The muzzle is equipped with a quick-attachment interface for a suppressor or a silencer.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 World.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

UMP-9

9mm Parabellum

2.1 kg

10, 25, 30

$388

UMP-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

2.1 kg

10, 25, 30

$499

UMP-45

.45 ACP

2.2 kg

10, 25

$623

 

Weapon

ROF

Dam

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

UMP-9

2/5

2

Nil

2/4

1

1/4

20

UMP-40

2/5

2

2-Nil

2/4

2

2/4

22

UMP-45

2/5

2

2-Nil

2/4

2

3/7

23

 

MP-717(r)

     Notes: This German copy/modification of the Russian PPSh-41 came about due to the large amount of PPSh-41s captured in Russia during the 1942 summer campaign, and the German soldiers’ seeming preference to the PPSh-41 to their own submachineguns.  Though a few were of new construction, the vast majority of MP-717(r)’s were simple conversions of the PPSh-41 to fire 9mm Parabellum ammunition.  This was a relatively-straightforward conversion; the case-head dimensions of the 7.62mm Tokarev and 9mm Parabellum rounds are nearly identical, and only modifications of the barrel (the most difficult part, requiring hand-fitting), and modifications to the magazine well and magazine.  Though German troops using the MP-717(r) were routinely issued MP-38 and MP-40 magazines, standard PPSh-41 magazines could be used in it if the magazine well was unmodified or brought back to original specifications, and a few were found in this configuration.  Some even more basic conversions were done, making only a quick conversion to 9mm ammunition; this may be found under Russian Submachineguns, in the PPSh-41 entry.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-717(r)

9mm Parabellum

3.58 kg

32

$302

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-717(r)

5

2

Nil

4

1

5

27

 

MP-3008

     Notes:  This weapon is in fact what it appears to be: a Nazi copy of the British Sten submachinegun.  The Germans were quite impressed by cheap British and US submachineguns such as the Sten and M-3 Grease Gun, due to the ease of manufacture and low cost.  By 1944, they were quite desperate for any sort of weapon they produce, and they reverse-engineered the Sten and made a few of what they considered improvements, such as the bottom-mounted magazine, addition of a pistol grip, and a longer barrel.  They called this weapon the MP-3008.  The MP-3008s manufactured varied wildly in finish and quality; if you get one, you might have an absolute dog, or a real gem.  The finishes used on the weapons were, in particular, considered some of the worst ever put on weapons.  By and large, however, the MP-3008s worked, and that’s why over 10,000 of them were made and issued in the few short months before the Nazi surrender.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MP-3008

9mm Parabellum

2.95 kg

32

 

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MP-3008

5

2

Nil

5

1

3

20

 

Walther MP

     Notes: The MP is a conventional SMG design with a folding barrel. It is in use by several police and internal security organizations worldwide, but the only military organization to use it is the Mexican Navy. Brazil, and Columbia, along with the Portuguese Navy. There was also some small-scale use by the SEALs in Vietnam, Delta in between the M-3 Grease Guns and MP-5, and the few taken by the Son Tay raiders. Some were also used by German Police agencies until they switched to the MP-5The MPK and MPL differ only in the length of the barrel. It is simple to use, build, and maintain.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Since the Mexicans used it, many were captured at various points and put to use by American and Central American partisans and even the military.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is a mercenary favorite.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MPK

9mm Parabellum

2.83 kg

32

$292

MPL

9mm Parabellum

3 kg

32

$327

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MPK

5

2

Nil

3/4

1

3

19

MPL

5

2

2-Nil

3/4

1

3

27