RAD M-91

     Notes: This is a bolt-action 7.62mm sniper rifle that was built to the requirements of US Navy SEALs.  It is used by that organization alongside the M-40A3 and M-40 sniper rifles, and is generally the preferred weapon.  It is made largely of stainless steel and Kevlar for corrosion resistance.  Based on the Remington 700, the M-91 has a match-grade barrel, adjustable trigger and an adjustable stock.  The rifle has no backup iron sights.  Normal sight delivered with the M-91 is a Leupold 4.5x, though the SEALs use a wide variety of sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RAD M-91

7.62mm NATO

4.33 kg

4

$2400

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RAD M-91

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

104

RAD M-91 (Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

135

 

Remington 40-X (Tactical Version)

     Notes: These two rifles are essentially Remington 40-X competition rifles turned into snipers’ weapons.  The two tactical versions, the Model 40-XB and Model 40-XS, are built in the Remington Law Enforcement Custom Shop to highly exacting standards and tolerances.

     The Model 40-XB is the basic version of these rifles (if the word “basic” can be applied to what is an improved version of an already precision rifle).  The Model 40-XB uses the standard Model 40-X action as a base, but the metalwork is Teflon-coated, including the 27.5-inch heavy match target-crowned stainless steel barrel.  The stainless steel used for the barrel and action is 416R type.  The action is also bedded into the stock by aircraft-quality aluminum bedding blocks.  The stock itself is synthetic, built by H-S Precision, and has a semi-pistol grip.  The parts of the rifle are otherwise adjusted to almost unbelievable tolerances.

     The Model 40-XS is sort of a “tricked-out” version of the Model 40-XB.  The basic McMillan stock used on the Model 40-XB is replaced by a McMillan A3 stock which is adjustable for length of pull by the use of spacers, has an adjustable cheekpiece, and a buttplate with a recoil pad.  While the Model 40-XB uses standard Remington scope mounts, the Model 40-XS has a MIL-STD-1913 rail and is sold with a Leupold Vari-X III 3.5-10x scope with a Mil-Dot reticle.  The bipod is a Harris HLMB-S, which is fully adjustable for cant, height, and swivel, and also folds.  The sling is a Turner Saddlery AWS made from a polymer material that has the look and feel of leather, but is impervious to weather, sweat, and stretching.  The barrel is essentially the same as on the Model 40-XB, but has a deeper target crown at the muzzle. 

     An addition to the Remington 40-X Tactical line for 2006 is the Model 40-XS LR-338.  This is a version of the Model 40-XS chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum round.  For the most part, the Model 40-XS LR-338 is of the same construction as the Model 40-XS, but it is equipped with a muzzle brake and the receiver is topped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail as standard. A 26-inch stainless steel barrel is standard.

     Both the Model 40-XB and Model 40-XS have standard barrel lengths, calibers, bolt pull lengths, and trigger pull weights, but the Remington Law Enforcement Custom Shop often makes these two rifles to buyers’ specifications, or even individual shooters.

      Twilight 2000 Notes: These rifles do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 40-XB

7.62mm NATO

5.44 kg

5

$1710

Model 40-XS

7.62mm NATO

6.71 kg

5

$2458

Model 40-XS LR-338

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.19 kg

5

$3228

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 40-XB

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

113

Model 40-XS

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

113

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

146

Model 40-XS LR-338

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

3

Nil

118

With Bipod

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

1

Nil

152

 

Remington M-24 SWS (Sniper Weapon System)

     Notes: Developed for the US Army by Remington, the M-24 was first issued to US Army units in late 1988, with the eventual goal of replacing the M-21 as the primary sniper rifle in the US Army.  Remington based the M-24 on their tried-and-true Model 700, but with a large amount of changes and customizations which make the M-24 pretty much a different weapon than the Model 700.  As the US Army originally told Remington that they wanted the M-24 to use the 7.62mm NATO cartridge (specifically, the M-118 Special Ball version of it), but the rumor mill was already getting loud that the snipers themselves wanted the M-24 to fire the .300 Winchester Magnum cartridge, Remington used a modified long action that unit armorers could adjust to fire either chambering. However, the standard chambering for the M-24 at present is 7.62mm NATO.  The M-24 is so well-designed and constructed that the rifle is theoretically more accurate than even the 7.62mm Mk 316 Mod 0 Special Ball Long range cartridge is capable of delivering.  In addition to US Army use, the M-24 is used by Israel.

     The base Model 700 long action is otherwise basically a standard Remington action, except for the special anticorrosion finish (at first matte black, but of late more often OD Green or other colors).  Stocks are built by H-S Precision and made of reinforced fiberglass composites.  The barrel is bedded in the stock by a full-length 7075T6 aluminum bedding block.  The standard M-24 stock is adjustable for length of pull, but US Army snipers have wanted an adjustable cheekpiece for a long time, and it is looking like the Pentagon is going to give it to them.  (Currently, M-24s will often be seen with faux cheekpieces made from foam rubber duct-taped to the stock.)  The buttplate also has a recoil pad.  The actions are mated to the stock and attached to the bedding block by a pair of screws torqued to 65 pounds.  The original sight mounts were designed specifically for US Army and NATO equipment, but MIL-STD-1913 rails are seen more and more often on M-24s.  In both cases, the mounts are fastened so that they are extremely unlikely to be jarred out of alignment by rough handling (even parachute drops).  In addition, the mounts allow optics to be mounted and dismounted quickly, and without losing the shooter’s zero.  The trigger unit is a modified version of that used on the Remington 40X target rifle, and is highly adjustable.  The standard telescopic sight for the M-24 is a 12x scope specifically designed for the M-24 by Leupold (designated the M-3A), and has coatings for the lenses that are antireflective, inhibit laser dazzling, and are also slightly tinted in such a way as to enhance observation.  The scope also has a MIL-DOT reticle.  The barrel is made of 416R stainless steel, and is a heavy match-quality free-floating type 24.1 inches long with a target-crowned muzzle.  The low wear rate of the barrel has astounded armorers (some have had 14,000 rounds fired through them before depot-level maintenance was done).  A mount is provided for a bipod (which is normally used on the M-24).

     As said above, the M-24 was initially conceived to fire 7.62mm NATO ammunition; in addition, Remington designed the prototypes of the M-24 to be able to use the 20-round box magazines of the M-21 as well as 5-round box magazines.  Though the idea of using box magazines was quickly dropped, using the 7.62mm NATO cartridge wasn’t, and therefore most M-24s are in fact chambered for that round.  However, US Army snipers for the most part wanted the M-24 to fire the .300 Winchester Magnum round, and by the time of Desert Shield in 1990, many M-24s were in fact using .300 Winchester Magnum.  (When I was at the 82nd Airborne, our battalion snipers were in fact using M-24s chambered for .300 Winchester Magnum, though I was told at the time that it was not a “standard caliber” for the weapon or the Army – see below.)  The M-24 is in fact designed for this possibility, as the action can be adjusted by unit armorers to accommodate the longer round, and then all the armorer has to do is change the barrel (as the rifling twist rates are different for the two rounds). In both cases, the M-24 uses a rotary magazine made of plastic, inserted through a hinged floorplate.

     The standard M-24 has been modified a few times, whether by the use of MIL-STD-1913 rails, the trials of different stocks, or different types of triggers.  One experimental variant was the XM-24A1, which was chambered for .300 Winchester Magnum instead of the standard 7.62mm NATO round.  At the time of its inception (early 1990s), the Army was concerned that snipers would run short of ammunition and be unable to replenish their supplies easily; the supply wonks were also concerned about introducing one more type of ammunition into the supply system.  The .300 Winchester Magnum ammunition available at the time also had a problem – undue barrel fouling would be caused due to incompletely-burned propellant, as at that time .300 Winchester Magnum rounds were not meant for “short” 24.1-inch barrels, unless you wanted to buy more expensive ammunition. It is interesting that the Army is once again (as of mid-2009) asking for Remington and other companies to submit kits to convert the M-24 to .300 Winchester Magnum.

     One of the newest service models of the M-24, the M-24A2, came with the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.  This version is fed by a 10-round box magazine, and has additional MIL-STD-1913 rails on the sides of the fore-end.  The stock is a new H-S Precision PST-25 stock adjustable for length of pull and cheekpiece height.  The barrel is threaded for a silencer.  Existing M-24 actions can be converted for use with the rest of the components of the M-24A2.  Another new version of the M-24, the M-24A3, is similar, but is chambered for the .338 Lapua Magnum round and is relatively rare, even among US Army snipers.  It feeds exclusively from a 5-round rotary magazine, and the barrel is not threaded for a silencer.

          Twilight 2000 Notes:  Many Regular Army units were still awaiting their M-24s when the war broke out, and virtually none of them had entered Reserve or National Guard units. Most M-24s are in 7.62mm NATO caliber instead of .300 Winchester Magnum in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-24

7.62mm NATO

5.49 kg

5

$2331

XM-24A1

.300 Winchester Magnum

6.19 kg

5

$2693

M-24A2

7.62mm NATO

5.55 kg

10

$2256

M-24A2 Silencer

N/A

2.6 kg

N/A

$804

M-24A3

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.19 kg

5

$3025

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-24

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

97

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

125

XM-24A1

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

96

With Bipod

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

125

M-24A2

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

97

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

125

M-24A2 (Silenced)

BA

3

1-Nil

10

2

Nil

56

With Bipod

BA

3

1-Nil

10

1

Nil

72

M-24A3

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

102

With Bipod

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

132

 

Remington M-40

     Notes: This highly-modified Remington 700 began to equip the USMC in the early 1970s.  They are hand-modified from stock Remington 700s, using a glass fiber stock, a heavy match-grade barrel, no iron sights, and scope mount for a Unertl 10x telescopic sight; when the USMC armorers at Quantico are done, the M-40A1 only looks like a Remington 700.  The former users of this weapon are legendary, including Carlos Hathcock.

     The Marines actually only buy the receiver assemblies from Remington, since the armorers at the RTE (Rifle Team Equipment) Shop intend to modify pretty much everything else or fit the rifles with custom components bought from other manufacturers (and the receiver assemblies are heavily reworked as well).  Barrels for the M-40A1 are heavy, match-grade 24.1-inch barrels made by Hart, Atkinson, or H-S Precision; they are intensely-inspected and tested for quality.  These barrels and the receiver are placed into a McMillan fiberglass composite stock, with the action being glass-bedded and the barrel free-floating.  The trigger unit used is a modified Winchester 70 trigger group.  The scope mounts are essentially proprietary to the Marines; they are specifically designed to use a special version of a 10x Unertl telescopic sight, or night vision scopes used by the US Marines.  There are no iron sights, nor any provision for mounting any.

     The M-40A1 PIP was originally going to be called the M-40A2, but because the M-40A3 was to follow close afterward, and because the M-40A1 PIP was a heavily reworked M-40A1 instead of being a brand new weapon, the M-40A2 designation was not used.  The M-40A1 PIP uses a new McMillan stock with a deep pistol grip wrist, adjustable cheekpiece, and installable spacers for adjusting the length of pull.  The new stock is much lighter than that of the original M-40A1.  The entire rifle was worked over to improve it and refurbish it.  Though a great improvement over the M-40A1, the M-40A1 PIP was basically meant to only be a stopgap weapon until the M-40A3 was produced in large enough numbers, and it did not appear in large numbers.

     The new standard sniper rifle of the US Marines is the M-40A3.  As earlier M-40s rotate in for repairs, they are being replaced by this version of the M-40.  As with the M-40A1 PIP, the M-40A3 was to have been designated the M-40A2, but the improvements and modifications made were so great that it essentially as a different rifle, and it was designated the M-40A3 instead.  Changes include the use of a new McMillan-built stock, with a padded buttplate adjustable for length of pull, a stock with an adjustable cheekpiece, a MIL-STD-1913 rail for optics mounting (though the standard scope is the same, except for being built by US Optics instead of the now-defunct Unertl company), the incorporation of a Harris lightweight bipod adjustable for height and cant, and a trigger unit adjustable for pull weight and pull length.  The action is also, to a limited extent, adjustable for bolt pull length (and begins with a shorter bolt pull than the M-40A1).  The barrels are still 24.1 inches long, but built of better steel, and the muzzles are threaded to accept a suppressor or muzzle brake.  The MIL-STD-1913 rail is mounted so that it tilts 30 degrees upward in the direction of the muzzle, to facilitate long-range shooting.  The stocks are normally OD Green; metalwork is also finished in OD Green, using Robar Teflon or Birdsong Black T anticorrosion finishes.

     In 2015, M40 Rifle Company introduced the M-40-66.  The “66” refers to the M-40’s date of introduction, and the M-40-66 is meant to be true to the original M-40, with a few selected improvements.  The stock is oil-finished walnut and of Monte Carlo profile; finish is black Parkerized. (While the stock is historically accurate, the Monte Carlo stock is frowned upon by the Marines.)  The barrel profile of the stock is finished in black paint, as happened often in Vietnam. The stock is epoxy bedded, an improvement carefully added.  The receiver is blueprinted, which means it has been mounted with special care to be square to the barrel. The threads have been re-cut and cleaned up.  The M-40-66 has the original factory bolt release located forward of the trigger. Steel has been thickened, something that would not appear until the M-40A1, but most shooters of the M-40-66 are glad they added it, as it strengthens the receiver, magazine, and bolt.  The trigger is a Timney 510 with pull parameters identical to the original M-40.  The M-40-66 uses a Redfield 3-9x scope, a close approximation of the scope used on the M-40 (which is no longer being manufactured. The barrel is 24 inches, the same as the M-40. The resulting rifle is quite a bit lighter, but more accurate.

     Twilight 2000 and Merc 2000 stories: The M-40A1 weapons are still in large-scale issue in the Twilight 2000 timeline (as well as the M-40A1 PIP, to a lesser extent).  The M-40A3 appeared late and was always in short supply during the Twilight War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-40A1

7.62mm NATO

6.58 kg

5 Internal

$1674

M-40A1 PIP

7.62mm NATO

6.11 kg

5 Internal

$1683

M-40A3

7.62mm NATO

6.08 kg

5 Internal

$2343

M-40-66

7.62mm NATO

5.07 kg

5 Internal

$1461

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-40A1

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

M-40A1 PIP

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

98

M-40A3

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

127

M-40-66

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

100

 

Remington M-700P

     Notes: The Remington M-700P (“P” for Patrol Rifle) is intended for use by police officers as sort of an “on the fly” marksman’s weapon – for use in situations where reasonably precision shooting is necessary, but an actual sniper and sniper rifle is not available or called for.  It is essentially an improved version of the standard Remington 700, with a composite stock made of fiberglass reinforced with Kevlar, with an aircraft-quality aluminum bedding block for the receiver.  The barrel is a 26-inch bull barrel with steel composition and configuration designed for stiffness and heat dissipation.  The sight mounts are standard Remington mounts designed for scope rings; no particular telescopic sight is standard for the M-700P.  A variant of the M-700P, the M-700P TWS (Tactical Weapon System), adds a Leupold Vari-X III 3.5-10x scope as standard, a Harris lightweight bipod adjustable for height and cant, a quick-adjustable sling made by Michaels of Oregon, and a carrying case.  The M-700P TWS is other wise built in the same manner as the M-700P.  While the M-700P comes in several calibers, the M-700P TWS is chambered only in 7.62mm NATO.

     Further development of the M-700P led to the M-700P LTR (Light Tactical Rifle).  This is essentially a shorter and lighter version of the M-700P TWS, designed to have accuracy superior to standard police rifles, but without being a large or cumbersome weapon.  As such, it appears to be very like the M-700P TWS, but with a much shorter 20-inch bull barrel and chambered only for short-action cartridges.  The stock is made from the latest lightweight carbon fiber composites, reinforced with Kevlar, as well as an extension of the aircraft-grade aluminum receiver bedding block.  The finish is designed to be non-reflective, and the sling swivels may be removed to allow the mounting of a bipod (normally a Harris lightweight adjustable bipod, as used on the M-700P TWS).  The sight mount is still a Remington-designed proprietary mount, but this mount is designed to allow far greater choice in optics than the mounts of the M-700P and M-700P TWS.  The scope sold with the M-700P LTR is one of the best available to police marksmen and snipers; it is Leupold 4.5-14x scope coupled with a removable Generation III night vision optic that can be used to make the telescopic sight the equivalent of an image intensifier for night vision purposes, but with superior range.  This makes the scope of an M-700P LTR a bit expensive, but well worth the cost.

     Twilight 2000 Notes:  This weapon is not available in the Twilight 2000 World.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-700P

5.56mm NATO

4.08 kg

5

$1062

M-700P

7mm Remington Magnum

4.87 kg

3

$1763

M-700P

7.62mm NATO

4.87 kg

4

$1696

M-700P

.300 Winchester Magnum

5.2 kg

3

$2622

M-700P

.300 Remington Ultra-Magnum

5.48 kg

3

$2754

M-700P TWS

7.62mm NATO

5.71 kg

4

$2338

M-700P LTR

5.56mm NATO

3.4 kg

4

$1494

M-700P LTR

6.8mm SPC

3.68 kg

4

$1702

M-700P LTR

7.62mm NATO

4.01 kg

4

$2136

M-700P LTR

.300 Remington Short-Action UltraMag

4.01 kg

3

$2139

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-700P (5.56mm)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

90

M-700P (7mm)

BA

4

1-2-3

8

4

Nil

108

M-700P (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

107

M-700P (.300 Win)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

4

Nil

111

M-700P (.300 Rem)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

4

Nil

112

M-700P TWS

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

107

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

139

M-700P LTR (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

68

(With Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

1

Nil

88

M-700P LTR (6.8mm)

BA

3

1-2-Nil

6

4

Nil

83

(With Bipod)

BA

3

1-2-Nil

6

2

Nil

108

M-700P LTR (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

76

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

99

M-700P LTR (.300 RSAUM)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

91

(With Bipod)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

119

 

Remington/JP Arms R-11 RSASS

     Notes: The result of a collaboration between Remington and JP Arms, the R-11 was designed to produced highly accurate sniper fire with quick follow-up shots.  The R-11 is capable of sub-MOA fire out to 800 meters with accuracy following off only slowly beyond this point.  It has been tested or is in use by US and NATO special operations forces and was a candidate for the XM-110 SASS competition eventually won by Stoner.  The R-11 can be used as a designated marksman’s rifle or as a semiautomatic sniper platform.  Military sales are being handled by Remington, civilian sales by JP Arms, and police sales and other assorted sales handled by both entities.  The R-11 is a piston operated design otherwise made on the AR pattern, and with the charging handle attached to the charging handle instead of at the rear of the receiver. The top of the receiver and handguard has a MIL-STD-1913 rail, with rails to the sides of the handguards and bottom.  The whole is referred to as the JP Industries VTAC. Normally, a Harris HM-5 bipod adjustable for cant and height is attached near the front of the handguard.  The barrels may be 18 or 22 inches, and are stainless steel and cryogenically-treated.  The barrel is normally tipped with an AAC Black Out model flash suppressor; optionally, a quick-detach AAC suppressor/silencer may be mounted. Though BUIS may be added to the rails, the normal scope sold with the rifle is Leupold Mk 4 M3 LR/T 4.5x14x scope. The stock is normally a Magpul PSR stock adjustable for LOP, cheekpiece, and butt angle.  Most of the rifle’s furniture is synthetic, and may have virtually any color imaginable, including camouflage patterns.  The trigger pack is another JP product and user-adjustable for pull weight.

     Since the R-11 is also intended for use by civilians, Remington and JP Arms have also developed two versions in one popular and one up-and-coming civilian chambering.  These versions cannot mount a suppressor (at least not of the type developed for the XM-2010 project).  These versions use proprietary magazines.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

5.44 kg

20

$3124

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel, Suppressed)

7.62mm NATO Subsonic

9 kg

20

$3814

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

5.49 kg

20

$3327

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel, Suppressed)

7.62mm NATO Subsonic

9.05 kg

20

$3817

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel)

.260 Remington

5.32 kg

20

$3253

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel)

.260 Remington

5.37 kg

20

$3056

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel)

.338 Federal

5.76 kg

20

$3051

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel)

.338 Federal

5.81 kg

20

$3297

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel)

sa

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

With Bipod

sa

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

92

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel, Silenced)

sa

3

1-Nil

11

2

Nil

46

With Bipod

sa

3

1-Nil

11

1

Nil

56

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel)

sa

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

80

With Bipod

sa

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

104

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel, Silenced)

sa

3

1-Nil

12

2

Nil

58

With Bipod

sa

3

1-Nil

12

1

Nil

62

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel, .260)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

7

3

Nil

52

With Bipod

SA

4

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

68

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel, .260)

SA

4

1-2-3

8

3

Nil

71

With Bipod

SA

4

1-2-3

8

2

Nil

92

R-11 RSASS (18” Barrel, .338)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

59

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

76

R-11 RSASS (22” Barrel, .338)

SA

5

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

79

With Bipod

SA

5

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

103

 

Remington SR-8 

     Notes: The SR-8 is a prototype sniper rifle, and there are no plans to mass-produce it.  It was designed when the Italian Army made it known that they were looking for a new sniper rifle in .338 Lapua Magnum.  Remington came up with a rifle based on their Remington 700 Long Action and the adjustable trigger from the M-24 sniper rifle, with a Sako-style extractor to cope with the wide rim of the .338 Lapua round.  The sight Remington used was a 16x Leupold Mk 4.  The SR-8 has an adjustable stock.  As of 2002, the SR-8 is listed as being in “advanced development.”

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Scores of these rifles were taken into NATO service during the Twilight War; the Italians actually got very few of them.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR-8

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.16 kg

5

$3403

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR-8

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

124

SR-8 (Bipod)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

160

 

Ruger M-77 MkII VLE

     Notes: This is basically an upgraded version of the M-77 sporting rifle, produced primarily for US law-enforcement interests.  VLE literally stands for Varmint/Law Enforcement, and reflects the small calibers used (5.56N or 7.62N), as well as its roots as a hunting rifle for light game.  The stock is in dark wood, and the metal is finished in a dark color.  The stock is reshaped for better shooter comfort.  They have a two stage trigger.  The accuracy of this rifle is a bit spotty; it was known that when you bought one, you either had a very accurate weapon or one with decent, but unspectacular accuracy; there were generally no in-betweens.  The stats given below are for the accurate one. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Not available.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-77 MkII VLE

5.56mm NATO

3.12 kg

5-I

$1738

M-77 MkII VLE

7.62mm NATO

4.52 kg

5-I

$2384

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-77 MkII VLE (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

87

M-77 MkII VLE (5.56mm, Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

1

Nil

114

M-77 MkII VLE (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

104

M-77 MkII VLE (7.62mm, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

135

 

Ruger Precision Rifle

     Notes: Also known as the RPR, this is a designated marksman’s rifle which is also useful to police tactical sharpshooters.  It takes the AR-10 as a loose base, but is constructed of more modern materials and methods, up-to-date accessories, handguards, and stocks, and with bolt-action operation instead of the selective fire of the AR-10.  The same attributes that make is good DMR and PTR also make it excellent for hunting, particularly in its “civilian” calibers and if one does not have to lug it around all day by hand.

     The RPR is built around its action.  The bolt has three beefy lugs, and the interior of the receiver, the bolt, the extractor, and the bolt handle are coated to ensure smooth operation.  The bolt handle is oversized and has a 70-degree throw. The bolt disassembly tool is stored in the bolt shroud. The barrel ranges from 20-26 inches, and is medium contour, threaded at the muzzle for muzzle brakes or suppressors (or flash suppressors, if you want that on such a rifle). For game purposes, the stats below are with a muzzle brake.  Barrels can be changed, but this requires an ESY: Gunsmith roll and about 15 minutes. The barrel is composed of cold hammer-forged 4140 chrome/moly steel, with 5R rifling, minimum headspace, and a centralized chamber. The handguards allow for a free-float barrel. Above the receiver is a 20 MOA MIL-STD-1913 rail with four screws, allowing for better elevation and windage corrections.  The trigger is a Ruger Marksman Adjustable trigger, and has an externally-adjustable pull weight from 2.25-5 pounds; the tool to do this is stored in the bolt shroud, and is the same tool as used to remove the bolt handle. A short section of rail is mounted under the front of the handguards to allow for the mounting of a bipod.

     The receiver is sort of strange; it is in three pieces, with hex screws securing them together.  The “lower” receiver is made from aircraft-grade 7075-T6 aluminum and are Type III hard coat anodized.  The “upper” is made from CNC-machined pre-hardened 4140 chrome/moly steel.  The stock is a Ruger Precision MSR stock with QD sling attachments and a very short length of MIL-STD-1913 rail at the toe, allowing the attachment of a monopod.  The stock is adjustable for length of pull as well as cheek height.  The butt has a thick recoil pad and the entire stock folds to the left for transport (you could conceivably fire with the stock folded, but accuracy would greatly suffer).  The stock attaches to a removable AR-dimension tube, and any AR-compatible stock could be substituted.  The magazine well is large enough and contoured to allow it to be used as a brace when firing.  Magazine compatibility includes AICS, M-110, SR-25, and MagPul-style magazines.  Depending on their condition and who made them, some M-14 magazines will also fit an RPR.  The grip is a standard AR-type grip, and allows an extended reach, especially to the safety above and in front of it. Any AR-compatible grip may be substituted.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ruger Precision Rifle (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

6.45 kg

5, 10, 20

$2370

Ruger Precision Rifle (24” Barrel)

6.5mm Creedmoor

6.85 kg

10

$2151

Ruger Precision Rifle (26” Barrel)

.243 Winchester

6.99 kg

10

$2132

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ruger Precision Rifle (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

80

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

101

Ruger Precision Rifle (6.5mm)

BA

4

1-2-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

94

With Bipod

BA

4

1-2-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

123

Ruger Precision Rifle (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

6/8

2

Nil

91

With Bipod

BA

3

2-Nil

6/8

1

Nil

118

 

Savage Model 10 LE Series

     Notes:  The Savage 10 LE series is based on Savage’s Model 10/110 series of hunting rifles, but redesigned for use police (and to some extent military) snipers.  The Model 10FP versions presented here are “tactical sniper rifles,” meant to be lightweight, portable, and easily disassembled and reassembled, so that it can be put in the trunk of a car.  Each is redesigned to be more accurate and stable, with greater tolerances and accuracy than the Savage 10/110 series sold to civilians.  All use a heavy steel match-quality barrel which is free-floating and button rifled, as well as target-crowned.  All have a bedding system for the action called Dual Pillar Bedding, where the aluminum pillars are molded in pairs directly into the stock for extra stability and durability.  None have open sights, but sight mounts vary by the model of the rifle.  They are all equipped with Savage’s AccuTrigger system, which may be adjusted for pull weight to as little as 1.5 pounds of pressure and incorporates safety mechanisms which make the trigger unit and rifle extraordinarily safe. 

     The Model 10FP is the “base” rifle of this series; it has a 20-inch barrel and an overall length of only 40 inches.  The stock is of black or sort of a gray-green synthetic, and includes molded-in mounts for both a sling and a bipod (normally not included with the rifle, however).  The scope mounts are basically designed for US and Canadian-built telescopic sights that are normally used by police snipers and for civilian-type scopes; the mounts are also designed to be rock-solid.  A MIL-STD-1913 rail can also be attached and normally comes when the rifle is bought. The Model 10FP is a simple and lightweight, yet fairly-accurate rifle for its short barrel length, but is primarily designed for situations where sharpshooting is required, but the situation does not call for a professional sniper or time does not permit one to arrive on the scene in time.  The Model 10 Precision Carbine is slightly longer at 40.5 inches, but it is lighter in weight; it also uses a Savage AccuStock in a Digital Green Camo pattern.  The Model 10FCPM McMillan is the same, but uses a lightweight McMillan A-5 fiberglass stock overlaid with synthetic material that is stippled on the grip areas, and a rubber recoil pad.  The barrel is also longer at 24 inches.  The Model 10FCP HSP (HS Precision) is identical for game terms, but uses a black synthetic HS Precision tactical stock.  The Model 10FCM Scout Rifle is kitted out with a forward-mounted scope, a short 20.5-inch barrel, an Accustock, and Ghost-Ring iron sights.  It also has sling swivels and a bipod, but not a recoil pad.  It is light in weight and quick into action.

     The Model 10FCP-K is similar to the Model 10CPM, but is equipped with a lightweight black synthetic AccuStock with a recoil pad; it has a barrel 24 inches long and tipped with a muzzle brake. The Model 10FCP-K comes in two calibers.  The Model FLCP-K is a left-handed version of the FCP-K. The Model 110FCP-K is also similar to the Model 10FCP-K, but has a long action in order to chamber Magnum rounds.

     The Model 10FCP-SR is essentially a standard sniper rifle, but its stock is camouflaged in a variety of patterns – Tan Digital Camo, matte black, and Realtree Camo.  The 24- inch barrel is a heavy profile, fluted, specially-bedded barrel, which is also slotted and has a light muzzle brake at the muzzle. Bridging the receiver and raised somewhat is a MIL-STD-1913 rail. The magazine is enlarged to a large degree.  Exposed metalwork is carbon steel in matte black.  The Model 10FCP-SR has a AccuTrigger adjustable pack and an AccuStock with the ability to make adjustments in the length of pull, as well as cheek adjustments, and being folding as well. 

     The FLCP-K is in many ways a smaller-caliber version of the Model 10FCP-SR, but has no AccuStock.  Though a member of the LE family, is resembles more a varminter than a police rifle.  However, the rifle has no iron sights, though it is drilled and tapped for scope mounts.The 24-inch barrel has a bull, fluted barrel, and is equipped with a threaded barrel normally occupied with a large muzzle brake.

     The Model 10FCM Scout appears to be a civilian rifle, but is in fact designed for law enforcement marksmans’ needs (though it is available to civilians as well).  This version has a deeper pistol grip wrist than Model 10/110 civilian designs, a synthetic stock (matte grayish-brown or black in color), a matching recoil pad on the butt, and checkering on the fore-end grip panel and on the pistol grip wrist. Atop the rifle, forward of the receiver in the scout position, is a MIL-STD-1913 rail, which Savage will outfit with any scope desired. Drilling and tapping for other scope types is also included.  It may or may not be equipped with Savage’s AccuStock, depending upon the buyer’s wishes.  The rail can be equipped with a BUIS, and there is a ghost-ring type front sight.  The barrel is short but of high-quality, lending itself to stalking and tracking exercises as well as a marksman’s rifle.  The 7.62mm Kalashnikov chambering is a recent addition.

     The Model 10FPFC (Folding Choate) is the same action and barrel on a Choate folding stock of black synthetic material with a pistol grip instead of a simple wrist.  The stock has a rail underneath that can mount a bipod or other type of accessory (though it is not a MIL-STD-1913 rail).  Like the Model 10FP, is also has molded-in mounts for a scope or scope rail and for sling swivels.  The stock includes ventilated rubber recoil pad and an adjustable cheekpiece, and a mount for a support monopod.  The barrel is blued and has a target crown, and the bolt handle is oversized for ease of use. 

     The Model 10FPXP (also known as the Model 10FPLE2A) is the next step up, still meant to be a tactical sniper rifle which is readily portable, but providing more accuracy and more bells and whistles.  The M-10FPXP uses a McMillan A3 stock, adjustable for length of pull, has an adjustable cheekpiece, a padded buttplate adjustable for length of pull and height (each in very small increments) a bipod adjustable for height, and an adjustable version of the Model 10FP’s scope mount; Savage will also build the Model 10FPXP can to almost any stock measurements and tastes.  The AccuTrigger unit is even more adjustable than the standard AccuTrigger, with additional adjustments available to length of travel and the angle of the trigger.  The sheer number of adjustments that can be done have made the M-10FPXP very popular with the growing number of female law enforcement snipers.  The barrel is basically the same as that of the Model 10FP, but lengthened to 24 inches.  The Model 10FCPXP-HS is similar, but uses an HS Precision black synthetic tactical stock and a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver.  Though chambered for only one caliber, it is much lighter than the equivalent Model 10FPXP.

     The Model 110PXP (also known as the Model 110FPXP-LEA or Model 110PXP-LEA) is sort of the “deluxe” version of this series; though still said by Savage to be a tactical sniper rifle, it is more akin to a “real” sniper’s weapon, and is more for use by trained marksmen and snipers.  The most striking feature of the M-10FPXP-LEA is its Choate Ultimate Sniper stock, a skeletonized Rynite stock designed by Choate and retired Special Forces Major John Plaster.  The stock is virtually unaffected by weather conditions, and has a stippled surface that allows a good grip.  The stock can take almost any color imaginable, even to the point of taking spray paint if necessary.  (The base colors available are black, OD Green, and woodland camouflage.)  The stock has an adjustable cheekpiece, can take spacers, and has a buttplate with an adjustable elevation screw on the toe of the butt to make height changes.  The buttplate is also padded.  The rifle comes with a MIL-STD-1913 rail to allow it to operate with the maximum range of optics and accessories.  (The standard scope sold with this rifle is Leupold’s Vari-X III 4.5-10x, a scope very popular with the police departments in the US.)  The Model 110PXP is also sold with a Harris-built bipod, adjustable to minute degrees for height and cant.  The barrel is a full 26 inches, and has a deeper target crown.  The Model 110PXP comes in long or short-action versions, and in several calibers.

     Two of the newest versions of this rifle are the Model 10BAS-K and the Model 10BAT/S-K.  Though they are in fact Model 10s at their core, they look quite different than other rifles of the Model 10 line.  They are designed to be tactical sniper rifles or for use by designated marksmen.  The Model 10BAS-K has an upper and lower receiver of high-strength aluminum; though this keeps the weight down, other components still combine to make the Model 10BAS-K a rather heavy rifle.  The squared handguards are of polymer, and underneath is a recessed MIL-STD-1913 rail meant primarily for the attachment of bipods or aiming accessories.  (The standard bipod is a Harris light bipod, adjustable for height and cant.) The sides of the handguards also have MIL-STD-1913 rails.  The upper receiver is equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail that expends from the rear of the receiver to the end of the handguards; no iron sights are provided.  The 24-inch barrel is of heavy profile and fluted; it is also tipped with a compact muzzle brake.  The stock is based on an M-4-type sliding stock, but has an adjustable cheekpiece, a compartment on the right side for batteries for optics, and the butt has a recoil pad. (If the buyer desires, this stock can be replaced by any HS Precision, Choate, or McMillan stock, but the stock mentioned above is standard.)  The Model 10BAS-K has a true pistol grip; it is also borrowed from the M-4, but also has a hand stop at the bottom which is adjustable for angle.  The entire rifle is of black polymer or dark, matte-blued metal.

     The Model 10BAT/S-K is for the most part the same as the Model 10BAS-K, but the stock is replaced with a more complex sliding stock that is skeletonized and is adjustable for length of pull, angle of the butt, drop, and has an adjustable cheekpiece that is adjustable for height and angle.  Both are identical in Twilight 2000 v2.2 game terms, except for the cost.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These rifles do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 10FP

5.56mm NATO

3.86 kg

5

$995

Model 10FP

7.62mm NATO

5.24 kg

4

$1628

Model 10 Precision Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

4

$1066

Model 10 Precision Carbine

7.62mm NATO

4.32 kg

4

$1700

Model 10FPFC

7.62mm NATO

4.76 kg

4

$2217

Model 10FCPM

7.62mm NATO

4.54 kg

4

$1743

Model 10FCP-SR

7.62mm NATO

3,97 kg

10

$1892

Model 10FLCP-K

5.56mm NATO

4.04 kg

4

$1314

Model 10FLCP-K

7.62mm NATO

4.47 kg

4

$1947

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (Fixed Stock)

7.62mm NATO

3.02 kg

4

$1726

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (Folding Stock)

7.62mm NATO

3.02 kg

4

$1804

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (Fixed Stock)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.86 kg

4

$1456

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (Folding Stock)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.86 kg

4

$1552

Model 10FCP-K

5.56mm NATO

2.98 kg

4

$1084

Model 10FCP-K

7.62mm NATO

4.04 kg

4

$1793

Model 110FCP-K

.25-06 Remington

3.22 kg

4

$1632

Model 110FCP-K

.300 Winchester Magnum

4.08 kg

4

$2663

Model 10 FCP-SR

7.62mm NATO

3.97 kg

10

$1892

Model 10FPXP

5.56mm NATO

4.88 kg

5

$1694

Model 10FPXP

7.62mm NATO

6.62 kg

4

$2339

Model 10FCPXP-HS

7.62mm NATO

4.99 kg

4

$2328

Model 110PXP

5.56mm NATO

5.1 kg

5

$1777

Model 110PXP

.25-06 Remington

5.78 kg

5

$2238

Model 110PXP

7mm Remington Magnum

6.12 kg

3

$2471

Model 110PXP

7.62mm NATO

6.92 kg

4

$2405

Model 110PXP

.30-06 Springfield

7.23 kg

4

$2688

Model 110PXP

.300 Winchester Magnum

7.33 kg

3

$2767

Model 10BAS-K

7.62mm NATO

6.08 kg

10

$2425

Model 10BAT/S-K

7.62mm NATO

6.08 kg

10

$2450

Model 10FCM Scout (Fixed Stock)

7.62mm NATO

3.02 kg

4

$1726

Model 10FCM Scout (AccuStock)

7.62mm NATO

3.02 kg

4

$1804

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 10FP (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

67

Model 10FP (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

75

Model 10 Precision Carbine (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

65

Model 10 Precision Carbine (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

Model 10FPFC

BA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

3

Nil

74

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

2

Nil

96

Model 10FCPM

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

96

Model FCP-SR

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/8

3

Nil

98

Model FLCP-K (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

1

Nil

82

Model FLCP-K (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

98

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (7.62mm NATO, Fixed)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

72

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (7.62mm NATO, Folding)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

4

Nil

72

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (7.62mm Kalashnikov, Fixed)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

73

Model 10FCM Scout Rifle (7.62mm Kalashnikov, Folding)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

4

Nil

73

Model 10FCP-K (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

79

Model 10FCP-K (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

96

Model 110FCP-K (.25-06)

BA

4

1-2-3

8

3

Nil

84

Model 110FCP-K (.300)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

96

Model 10FPXP (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

82

(With Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

1

Nil

106

Model 10FPXP (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

98

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

127

Model 10FCPXP-HS (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

96

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

125

Model 110PXP (5.56mm)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

2

Nil

89

(With Bipod)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

115

Model 110PXP (.25-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

80

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

104

Model 110PXP (7mm)

BA

4

1-2-3

8

3

Nil

106

(With Bipod)

BA

4

1-2-3

8

1

Nil

138

Model 110PXP (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

106

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

137

Model 110PXP (.30-06)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

96

(With Bipod)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

125

Model 110PXP (.300)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

3

Nil

110

(With Bipod)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

1

Nil

143

Model 10BAS-K

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/8

2

Nil

96

(With Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/8

1

Nil

125

 

Springfield M-1C/M-1D

     Notes: This is basically an M-1 Garand battle rifle that has a match-grade barrel, smoothened action, a flash hider added, and a mount for a telescopic sight.  In addition, there is a raised cheek pad; in addition, on many of these rifles, there are stock spacers to allow the weapon to be fit to individual requirements.  Once the standard US Army sniper rifle, the M-1D was last used in large numbers by US forces early in the Vietnam War.  The M-1C and M-1D differ primarily in the scope used.  The scopes were in fact the biggest problem with these weapons; the mounts were designed specifically for scopes of 2.2x to 2.5x power, and this hurt long-range accuracy.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-1D is by 2000 primarily found in the hands of Third World snipers or civilian hunters, and was also issued to militia snipers equipped by both MilGov and CivGov, after reconditioning.  The biggest change was, of course, the limiting sight mounts; some were even fitted with Picatinny Rails.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is a popular collectors’ item, and can sometimes fetch high prices.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1C/D

.30-06 Springfield

5.33 kg

8 Clip

$1471

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1C/D

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

74

 

Springfield M-21

     Notes: The M-21 began life as the M-14 National Match Rifle, a weapon based on a modified M-14 battle rifle to be used for competition shooting by soldiers.  The potential as a sniper weapon quickly became obvious, and further modifications resulted in the M-21.  The M-24 is basically an M-14 that has been reworked by Springfield Armory (the original manufacturers of the M-14) and the US Army to be highly accurized, with a match barrel, a walnut stock impregnated with glass resin to resist warping, a reworked, smoother action, and of course, a mount for a telescopic sight or night vision sight.  For almost 30 years, the M-21 was the standard US Army sniper rifle; the Marines also made use of small numbers of them. The M-21 was largely replaced by the M-24 starting in 1988. 

     The M-21, despite the long length of its use, had a number of limitations: the scope mount could take only a limited number of sights, the mount itself tended to be easily knocked out of alignment, it was not issued with a bipod (requiring one to be added later), and the work required to build and maintain an M-21 was expensive and time-consuming. The M-21 could also be a real bear to zero, though this is primarily due to the design of the scope issued with the M-21. In addition, semiautomatic sniper rifles are generally not as accurate as bolt-action rifles.  There were a number of differences between M-14s and M-21s, even though at first glance they look the same.  They are, as noted above, accurized and reworked for extra accuracy.  Barrels were typically made especially for the M-21, and the barrel is a National Match-quality barrel. The steel stock liner used on the M-14 was not used on the M-21, as the liner was an adaptation to strengthen the stock for use with rifle grenades.  M-21 barrels have better bedding than the M-14, and the action is also more solidly-mounted in the M-21. The gas block is different, being “unitized,” as again firing rifle grenades from an M-21 is not required, and the modified gas block makes the M-21 more accurate. The interior surfaces of the flash suppressor are reamed out slightly more than on an M-14. The front sight blade is narrower on an M-21, and the rear iron sight is twice as adjustable.

     However, starting in Panama in 1989, it became increasingly apparent that a sniper team’s spotter needed a better weapon than the M-16A2s with low-power scopes that they used at the time; the spotter needed a weapon with greater close to medium-range firepower than the bolt-action M-24, but one that is still useable as a sniper rifle when necessary.  Springfield responded with the M-21 Tactical Rifle.  This version of the M-21 uses essentially the same glass resin-impregnated walnut stock as the old M-21, but this stock is modified to have an adjustable cheekpiece and a rubber recoil pad.  The barrel is still match-quality, but is heavier than that of the original M-21, and are built by Douglas, Hart, or Krieger.  They are made of stainless steel with a matte anticorrosion finish and are 22 inches long and tipped with the standard M-21 flash suppressor.  The trigger is a two-stage model.  A Harris lightweight bipod adjustable for height and cant have been added.  The M-21 Tactical Rifle uses the Springfield Third Generation scope mount (designed to be able to mount all US Army, most US military (or other branches), and most NATO-compatible optics.  The telescopic sight provided with the M-21 Tactical Rifle is the Springfield Government Model 4-14x scope. Some M-21s fielded in Iraq and Afghanistan give the M-21 a MIL-STD-1913 rail, though this places the scope in a more forward position due to the M-21’s design and most snipers don’t appreciate that.  Some are equipped with the MARS rail, which further increases the flexibility with night vision optics, but places the sights higher than most snipers like, as they must hold their head off the stock of the rifle instead of getting a good cheek weld. (If equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail; add 1% to the cost and 0.01 kg to the weight.)

     In addition, large amounts of standard M-21s were taken out of storage and used in Afghanistan; some are still being used there, though they are being rebuilt as fast as possible to the Tactical Rifle standard. Those in service today often sport MIL-STD-1913 rails for optics as well as bipods, though loosening of the sight base screws is still a problem.  There is a considerable movement in the US Army to rebuild some M-21 Tacticals to be chambered in .300 Winchester Magnum, but the project, christened the M-21E, has a rather low priority; I have not been able to discover whether any of them have actually been fielded.  The M-21 is today considered an interim solution to the shortage of sniper rifles and longer-range marksman’s rifles, and it is regarded as being near the end of its service life.

     The M-25 is a limited-production sniper weapon produced for US Army Special Forces and Navy SEALS; it was actually developed by Springfield with the help of notes provided by the estate of the late Carlos Hathcock, perhaps the best sniper the US Marines have ever produced.  It is basically an M-21 sniper rifle revised to a new standard, and was at first called the "Product Improved M-21, or M-21 PIP."  The weapon uses a Krieger heavy match-grade 22-inch barrel tipped by a low-profile yet efficient muzzle brake designed by Hathcock before his death.  This muzzle brake can be removed, revealing threads which allow the attachment of most silencers and suppressors used by SOCOM.  The trigger is a match-quality trigger adjustable for pull weight and overtravel.  The stock is a specially-made McMillan stock, again designed using Hathcock’s notes; this stock is built of Kevlar-reinforced fiberglass, and has a rather unusual shape with a very low buttstock body and a semi-pistol grip.  Atop the buttstock’s body is comb with a highly-adjustable cheekpiece (adjustable both vertically and for position along the stock).  The buttplate is padded and is adjustable for length of pull, height, and angle. The M-25 uses a special gas piston which increases the reliability of the weapon while also reducing recoil somewhat.  The M-25 has no iron sights, but it is equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail for universal mounting of optics.  (Reputedly the standard scope for the M-25 is a 10x Bausch and Lomb of unspecified type, but SOCOM troops could and probably do mount whatever works best for the sniper and in the situation at the time.)  The M-25 is equipped with a Harris-type bipod adjustable for height and cant.

     The M-25 is not any sort of replacement for the M-24; it is made for a specific requirement for a light, high-capacity semiautomatic sniper rifle for SOCOM.  The first prototype M-25s (at that time called “XM-25”) were first used during Desert Storm, and they have seen a lot of use in Afghanistan, Iraq, and who knows where else.  It should also be noted that in many cases, the M-25 has been supplanted by the newer Stoner SR-25.

     Recently, the M-25 has also been sold in a modified form on the civilian market; in this guise, the M-25 is more commonly known as the White Feather (an homage to Carlos Hathcock’s trademark symbol).  The civilian version uses a different muzzle brake, and the stock is somewhat different in that it is not so minutely adjustable.  Iron sights are available at the buyer’s option.  They are normally sold only with 10-round magazines, but can accept 20-round M-14/M-21 magazines.  However, the White Feather also has something the military M-25 does not have – a signature block bearing Hathcock’s White Feather symbol and a facsimile of his signature.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-21 remained in large-scale issue, due to a lack of M-24s and other such weapons; the M-21 Tactical Rifle was in service in lesser numbers with the regular US Army, but rare in National Guard and Reserve units. The M-25 is even rarer; in fact, its official designation is still “XM-25,” and it never got wide issue, even amongst US special operations units.

     Merc 2000 Notes: Large numbers of M-21s were sold to various allies of and allies of allies of the US, but the M-21 Tactical Rifle was not, and the M-25 was certainly not.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-21

7.62mm NATO

5.11 kg

20

$1248

M-21 Tactical Rifle

7.62mm NATO

5.26 kg

10, 20

$1801

M-25

7.62mm NATO

5.76 kg

10, 20

$2087

M-21E

7.62mm NATO

5.73 kg

10

$2044

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-21

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

75

M-21 Tactical Rifle

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

78

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

101

M-25

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

80

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

103

M-21E

SA

5

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

85

With Bipod

SA

5

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

111

 

Springfield M-1903A4

     Notes: First used on a very limited basis by the US Army and Marines in World War 1, this weapon was the standard sniper rifle for the US Marines until long after the Korean War, and was even issued during the first part of the US involvement in Vietnam when supplies of the M-40 ran short.  The US Army had not issued them to its troops since the first part of World War 2.  Some of these weapons were sold to civilians, and some were even given to irregular forces equipped by the US as late as the 1980s.  The M-1903A4 is not a purpose-built sniper rifle; instead, M-1903s which shot especially well during testing were given drilling and tapping and a scope, and thus designated “M-1903A4.”

     Gibbs Rifle Company currently manufactures a reproduction of the M-1903A4.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Most of the M-1903A4s used during the Twilight War were reconditioned examples given to local militia forces by both CivGov and MilGov. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is largely a collectors’ weapon. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1903A4

.30-06 Springfield

4.54 kg

5 Clip

$1984

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1903A4

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

81

 

Steel Core SC-76 Thunderbolt

     Notes: Though designed primarily with police in mind, the police using this rifle are meant to be at the apex of their skills – CT Response Units and suchlike.  The SC-76 is essentially a civilian rifle built to military specifications – it uses wear-resistant VDP coatings, reduced need for lubrication, designed for ergonomics, a short-travel firing pin for a short lock time, a short-throw bolt lever.  Stocks are skeletonized to an extent, but the stock has an adjustable LOP with a recoil pad, a retractable monopod, MIL-STD-1913 rails in abundance – atop the receiver the upper handguard, and the sides and lower handguards.  In addition, the stock folds to the right for transport. The construction materials are not disclosed to the public, but are of high-tensile steel.  The rear of the receiver and the end of the stock has a recoil bolt. The lower receiver is polymer.  Triggers are two-stage match-quality.

     The SC-76 was designed for both tactical and supertactical engagements, with barrels 20 inches and 26 inches available.  Both are tipped with big beefy muzzle brakes, but they are screw-on and can be replaced as necessary with most equipment of an alternate sort. .  They are match-quality, heavy and fluted.

     The SC-86 and SC-127 are designed for alternate cartridges.  They are designed primarily for long-distance marksman. The SC-86 uses a 28-inch barrel for its long barrel; the SC-127 has no short barrel, and has a barrel length of 30 inches.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SC-76 (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

6.81 kg

10

$2525

SC-76 (26” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

7.26 kg

10

$2725

SC-86 (20” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.65 kg

10

$3130

SC-86 (28” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

8.16 kg

10

$3397

SC-127

.50 BMG

15 kg

6

$8094

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SC-76 (20” Barrel)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

75

Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

98

SC-76 (26” Barrel)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7/8

2

Nil

106

Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7/8

1

Nil

137

SC-86 (20” Barrel)

BA

6

1-2-3

6/8

2

Nil

86

Bipod

BA

6

1-2-3

6/8

1

Nil

112

SC-86 (28” Barrel)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8/9

2

Nil

142

Bipod

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8/9

1

Nil

185

SC-127

BA

9

2-3-4

10/11

3

Nil

141

Bipod

BA

9

2-3-4

10/11

1

Nil

179

 

Surgeon Rifles XL

     Notes: The US Marines have known since Vietnam that they have needed a rifle with more punch than the 7.62mm NATO.  Later, they got .50 BMG-firing rifles like the Barrett M-82, but it was still known that the Marines needed something to bridge the gap between the 7.62mm NATO and .50 BMG.  Currently, the Marines are looking for that rifle, and one of the candidates is the Surgeon Rifles XL Remedy.

     The XL begins with a custom action by Surgeon Rifles.  The action is designed for extreme strength and great simplicity.  The receiver is made from hardened 4340 steel, and has an integral recoil lug and MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The bolt is of even more hardened 4140 steel, with the bolt handle root being a part of the bolt itself.  The bolt’s extractor and ejector eject spent cartridges low so that they do not bounce off of the scope or MIL-STD-1913 rail, and flutes on the bolt help make it self-cleaning of dirt and dust.  The trigger may be any of the trigger modules made by Remington, Shilen, of Jewell.  Surgeon Rifles use barrels of extreme quality made by Krieger, and are tipped by a SureFire muzzle brake.  This brake may be quickly removed and replaced by a silencer if necessary.  The barrel is pillar-bedded and free-floating. The stock is a McMillan A5, with an adjustable cheekpiece, spacers to adjust length of pull. And quick-detachable sling swivels.  The stock (and the metal) may be finished with virtually any color or pattern desired.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Remedy

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.34 kg

5

$3246

Scalpel

7.62mm NATO

5.9 kg

5

$2272

Razor (22” Barrel)

.22-250 Ackley Improved

4.48 kg

5

$1737

Razor (24” Barrel)

.22-250 Ackley Improved

4.54 kg

5

$1803

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Remedy

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

3

Nil

96

With Bipod

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

1

Nil

125

Scalpel

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

75

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

97

Razor (22”)

BA

3

1-1-Nil

7

2

Nil

70

With Bipod

BA

3

1-1-Nil

7

1

Nil

91

Razor (24”)

BA

3

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

78

With Bipod

BA

3

1-2-Nil

7

1

Nil

101