Blaser R-93 Tactical

     Notes: This weapon generated a lot off interest when it was introduced in 1997, due to its quality; it was also designed using a host of suggestions from military and police snipers all over Europe and North America.  (The design of the R-93 Tactical actually generated nine separate new patents.) 

     The R-93 Tactical (also known as the R-93 LRS-2) has a number of unusual features: the receiver, stock, and forestock are made of an almost solid piece of composite material; the barrel is of chrome-moly steel, cold-forged, and impregnated with deep-penetrating nitrogen gas to retard rusting.  The barrels for most of the non-magnum calibers are 24.7 inches long; for the .300 Winchester Magnum and 6mm Norma Benchrest, the barrel is 25.6 inches; and for the .338 Lapua Magnum chambering, the barrel is 27 inches long.  The barrels are deeply-fluted to reduce weight and promote cooling.  The bolt handle does not need to be rotated to be actuated; it is simply pulled straight back, unlocking and locking automatically, with two chamber vents being provided if a case head failure occurs. 

     The bipod normally provided with the R-93 Tactical is a Harris lightweight-type, but this may be removed and replaced with a normal fore-end or even a foregrip if desired. The sight mount is a MIL-STD-1913 rail; no iron sights are provided.  The buttplate is adjustable for height, length and angle, the cheekpiece is adjustable for height and position upon the stock, and the bipod is adjustable for height and cant.  The trigger is match-quality, two-stage, and is adjustable for pull, takeup, overtravel, and three directions of position.  With the exception of the .338 Lapua Magnum version, any chambering available to the R-93 Tactical can be fired from the same rifle simply by changing the barrel, bolt head, and magazine.  (Versions of the R-93 Tactical which fire .338 Lapua Magnum are designed specifically for that round, and the operating parts are not interchangeable with other R-93 Tactical rifles.)  These caliber changes are can be accomplished  without changing the zero of whatever sights are mounted; the only changes the sniper might have to make are to account for the different calibers.

     The ammunition feed for the R-93 Tactical positions the rounds directly in line with chamber, which increases reliability and means that the rifle does not need a feed ramp.  The stock is made from one piece of molded synthetics; in addition to the bipod groove on the fore-end, the rear of the stock has a retractable monopod.

     The R-93 Tactical is based on two earlier designs: The R-93 UIT Standard, a match rifle with a single-shot action, and the R-93 CISM, a bolt-action match rifle.  Both of these weapons use a normal flash suppressor instead of a muzzle brake, have normal sight mounts instead of a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and use set triggers.  The bipod is usually metal instead of composite.

     The R-93K Bullpup is a bullpup version of the R-93 Tactical above, designed to provide a barrel that is actually longer than that used in the standard R-93 in a compact weapon.  The muzzle brake is somewhat more substantial than on the R-93, and there is a carrying handle with a MIL-STD-1913 rail on top.  The furniture is all polymer and not subject to weather conditions.  The design has its drawbacks: the magazine capacity is greatly reduced and the bolt handle is in a very awkward position (directly beside the firer's shoulder), requiring all but the most flexible snipers to take the weapon off the shoulder to cycle the bolt.  Despite this it is used by many members of German Police SRT units and is popular with German hunters. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is a virtually unknown weapon in the Twilight 2000 World; those few that exist are found primarily among some police departments and military organizations.  Versions chambered for 5.56mm NATO and .300 Winchester Magnum are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline. Except for some very few proof of concept models, the R-93K Bullpup does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes:  The Blaser R-93 Tactical is rapidly becoming one of the world’s most popular sniping rifles, for those who can afford the cost.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

R-93 UIT Standard

7.62mm NATO

7.7 kg

1-I

$1235

R-93 CISM

7.62mm NATO

8.13 kg

10

$2328

R-93 Tactical

5.56mm NATO

6.66 kg

10

$1830

R-93 Tactical

6mm Norma Benchrest

6.89 kg

10

$1923

R-93 Tactical

.243 Winchester

7.01 kg

10

$2036

R-93 Tactical

7.5mm French Service

7.47 kg

10

$2534

R-93 Tactical

7.62mm NATO

7.3 kg

10

$2575

R-93 Tactical

.300 Winchester Magnum

7.78 kg

10

$2866

R-93 Tactical

.338 Lapua Magnum

8.25 kg

10

$3319

R-93K

5.56mm NATO

5.87 kg

3

$1841

R-93K

6mm Norma Benchrest

6.07 kg

3

$1933

R-93K

.243 Winchester

6.27 kg

3

$2046

R-93K

7.5mm French Service

6.99 kg

3

$2545

R-93K

7.62mm NATO

6.9 kg

3

$2486

R-93K

.300 Winchester Magnum

7.35 kg

3

$2878

R-93K

.338 Lapua Magnum

7.86 kg

3

$3331

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

R-93 UIT Standard

SS

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

83

R-93 UIT Standard (Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

108

R-93 CISM

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

92

R-93 CISM (Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

119

R-93 Tactical (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

1

Nil

83

R-93 Tactical (5.56mm, Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

1

Nil

108

R-93 Tactical (6mm)

BA

3

2-Nil

8

1

Nil

91

R-93 Tactical (6mm, Bipod)

BA

3

2-Nil

8

1

Nil

119

R-93 Tactical (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

83

R-93 Tactical (.243, Bipod)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

108

R-93 Tactical (7.5mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

101

R-93 Tactical (7.5mm, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

131

R-93 Tactical (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

99

R-93 Tactical (7.62mm, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

129

R-93 Tactical (.300)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

2

Nil

105

R-93 Tactical (.300, Bipod)

BA

5

1-2-3

8

1

Nil

137

R-93 Tactical (.338)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

3

Nil

121

R-93 Tactical (.338, Bipod)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

1

Nil

157

R-93K (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

1

Nil

78

R-93K (5.56mm, Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

1

Nil

101

R-93K (6mm)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

86

R-93K (6mm, Bipod)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

111

R-93K (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

2

Nil

78

R-93K (.243, Bipod)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

1

Nil

101

R-93K (7.5mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

95

R-93K (7.5mm, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

123

R-93K (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

93

R-93K (7.62mm, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

120

R-93K (.300)

BA

5

1-2-3

7

2

Nil

100

R-93K (.300, Bipod)

BA

5

1-2-3

7

1

Nil

130

R-93K (.338)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

114

R-93K (.338, Bipod)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

148

 

H&K MSG-90 

     Notes: In the mid-1980s, Heckler & Koch began development of an upgraded PSG-1.  Originally, the new rifle was to be called the PSG-3, but the name was later changed to the MSG-90.  The MSG-90 is basically a PSG-1 built using the latest materials and construction techniques, such as a cold-forged tempered barrel, a reduced (but fixed) trigger pull, a smaller padded stock that is adjustable for length and the height of the cheekpiece, and a MIL-STD-1913 rail able to take virtually any sort of optic or accessory.  The trigger is also wider for a better grip for the trigger finger.  A standard bipod replaces the tripod of the PSG-1, but this bipod is attached to an internal T-rail, allowing it to be easily detached and replaced with a sling swivel or some other accessory.  A (rather long) flash suppressor is fitted to the end of the barrel.  The firing selector was made ambidextrous.  The MSG-90 has no iron sights; the standard sight for the weapon is the same 10x42 Hensoldt sight fitted to late-model PSG-1s. 

     Based on user experience (particularly US Marine Corps scout-snipers and FAST teams, and the German GSG-9 and KSK), Heckler & Koch made some improvements to the MSG-90, producing the MSG-90A1.  It is somewhat heavier, but has a number of new changes to the bipod, stock, and the barrel.  The barrel now sports a full muzzle brake; this brake can be removed to reveal threads for a suppressor.   The iron sights have been put back on the weapon to allow for emergencies, and these iron sights are micrometer-adjustable.  The MSG-90A1 can use the 50-round drum of the G-8 battle rifle (though reportedly few units ever actually use this capability).  At the rear of the ejection port, a small brass deflector has been added, to correct a small problem with case ejection (sometimes hot cases would end up going down the shirts of shooters of the MSG-90).  In USMC service, this weapon is known as the MSG-90-DMR (Designated Marksman Rifle). 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The MSG-90A1 went into limited use by the Germans, but the USMC never received theirs, making do with the standard MSG-90.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MSG-90

7.62mm NATO

6.4 kg

5, 20

$1930

MSG-90A1

7.62mm NATO

6.67 kg

5, 20, 50D

$1976

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MSG-90

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

85

MSG-90 (Bipod)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

111

MSG-90A1

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

86

MSG-90A1 (Bipod)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

112

 

H&K PSG-1

     Notes: The PSG-1 is a semiautomatic sniper rifle meant for use by military and police forces alike.  It uses Heckler & Koch’s famous roller-locking system, and claims of accuracy are superb.  A special system provides for silent bolt operation (though not a silenced shot).  The scope mount is designed specifically for use on the PSG-1; and essentially makes the telescopic sight (now typically a 10x42 Hensoldt, though earlier models used a 6x42) an integral part of the rifle.  The length and height of the stock, and the drop of the butt are all adjustable.  The trigger is not adjustable, but has a variable width.  The barrels are described as being “greater than match-quality,” are heavy almost to the point of being bull barrels, and have a polygonal cross-section, with a 25.6-inch length. Instead of a bipod, the PSG-1 normally uses a precision miniature tripod (though it can also use a variety of bipods).  In many ways, the PSG-1 is a highly reworked and accurized G-3 battle rifle.  The PSG-1 has been in service for nearly as long as the G-3 itself, but is today thought to be too heavy for a military sniper’s weapon of its caliber, despite the great accuracy of which it is capable and the rock-solid platform which that weight provides.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though a lot of newer sniper rifles were available to the German Army in the Twilight War, over 75% of sniper rifle kills by the German Army were still made by the PSG-1. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: As newer weapons became available to the German Army, PSG-1s began flooding the police and military markets.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PSG-1

7.62mm NATO

8.1 kg

5, 20

$1913

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PSG-1

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

95

PSG-1 (Tripod/Bipod)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

124

 

H&K SL-9SD

     Notes: This Heckler and Koch-made suppressed sniper rifle is based on the civilian SL-8 rifle (itself a version of the G-36, redesigned to comply with the 1994 Brady Crime Bill in the US).  Heckler and Koch decided to design new ammunition from scratch instead of attempting to use a silencer with bullet wipes to slow the bullet, since this leads to rapid wear of the silencer.  The cartridge is a hollowpoint 7.62x37mm subsonic round, and the weapon is redesigned for this larger-caliber round.  Noise from this rifle is Class III noise as defined in Merc: 2000.  The SL-9SD has an adjustable stock, adjustable cheekpiece, and adjustable trigger.  By 2002, the SL-9SD was still considered a developmental weapon, and distribution was in very small numbers, ostensibly for combat testing only. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes:  This weapon is not available in the Twilight 2000 World.

     Merc 2000 Notes: As Notes, but there are many more reports of its usage. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SL-9SD

7.62mm Oberndorf Subsonic

4.6 kg

10

$2294

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SL-9SD

SA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

52

SL-9SD (Bipod)

SA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

67

 

Mauser SP-66

     Notes: This is a German sniper rifle found alongside the PSG-1 in German service and in the service of 12 other countries. The SP-66 is a commercial Mauser match rifle (the Model 66S Super Match) equipped with a very effective flash hider, adjustable stock, and a night sight mount. The SP-66 is built to a pattern normally used with target rifles, including a short action, and the lack of a bipod.  The stock is made of fine, sealed walnut and has a thick recoil pad.  The telescopic sight normally issued with the SP-66 is a Zeiss Diavari ZA 1.5-6x. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon was very common in the Twilight War, especially in Central America, South America, and Africa; in Europe, they made mostly been replaced by more modern weapons. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: As Notes, but most European militaries and police departments had replaced them with more modern weapons.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mauser SP-66

7.62mm NATO

6.12 kg

3-I

$1822

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mauser SP-66

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

110

 

Mauser M-86 

     Notes: The Mauser M-86 was developed as an alternative to the SP-66.  It uses the same short-throw bolt, and a different stock that is ventilated to dissipate heat from the barrel.  The Model 86 also features a large detachable box magazine, a useful feature for law enforcement (change from high penetration to low penetration rounds quickly) and military snipers (rapid reloads).  The trigger is fully adjustable, and the stock’s length and cheekpiece are more adjustable.  The barrel is 28 inches long, plus a muzzle brake nearly an inch long, and the barrel is fluted to decrease weight and increase cooling.  The Model 86 is a little longer, and a little lighter than the SP-66, and comes in both wooden and synthetic stocks; the synthetic stocks are of the thumbhole-type, while wooden stocks use a deep pistol-grip-type wrist.  Backup iron sights are an option, but not standard equipment.  Two other variants are available: the Mauser M-86M, which fires .300 Winchester Magnum ammunition, and the M-86SR (Specialty Rifle), which uses a suppressed barrel and fires 7.62mm ammunition. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This was another common weapon in the Twilight War, found in many parts of the world.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-86 (Wooden Stock)

7.62mm NATO

5.24 kg

9

$2493

M-86 (Fiberglass Stock)

7.62mm NATO

5 kg

9

$2503

M-86M (Wooden Stock

.300 Winchester Magnum

5.79 kg

9

$2853

M-86M (Fiberglass Stock)

.300 Winchester Magnum

5.53 kg

9

$2863

M-86SR (Wooden Stock)

7.62mm NATO or NATO Subsonic

5.76 kg

9

$3293

M-86SR (Fiberglass Stock)

7.62mm NATO or NATO Subsonic

5.33 kg

9

$3303

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-86 (Wood Stock)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

128

M-86 (Wood Stock, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

161

M-86 (Fiberglass Stock)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

116

M-86 (Fiberglass, Bipod)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

150

M-86M (Wood Stock)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

128

M-86M (Wood, Bipod)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

165

M-86M (Fiberglass Stock)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

138

M-86M (Fiberglass, Bipod)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

174

M-86SR (NATO, Wood Stock)

BA

4

2-Nil

10

2

Nil

107

M-86SR (NATO, Wood, Bipod)

BA

4

2-Nil

10

1

Nil

134

M-86SR (Subsonic, Wood)

BA

3

1-Nil

10

2

Nil

79

M-86SR (Subsonic, Wood, Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

10

1

Nil

98

M-86SR (NATO, Fiberglass)

BA

4

2-Nil

10

2

Nil

107

M-86SR (NATO, Fiberglass, Bipod)

BA

4

2-Nil

10

1

Nil

134

M-86SR (Subsonic, Fiberglass)

BA

3

1-Nil

10

2

Nil

79

M-86SR (Subsonic, Fiberglass, Bipod)

BA

3

1-Nil

10

1

Nil

98

 

PzB-38/PzB-39

     Notes:  The PzB-38s round combined an 8mm Mauser bullet with a much larger 13mm cartridge shell.  The result was a small but fairly heavy bullet that flew at a very high velocity to achieve penetration by a principle similar to modern sabot rounds.  The bullet used a core of armor-penetrating steel combined with a small capsule of tear gas; the tear gas portion was entirely useless, as the capsule seldom ruptured as it was supposed to, and the amount of tear gas was so tiny as to have negligible, if any, effects.  (It may be safely ignored for game purposes.)  The PzB-38 was a single-shot rifle using an operation more akin to artillery pieces than to rifles, with a breech block rather than a conventional bolt action. 

     The PzB-38, while nearly useless (as were most antitank rifles) against the armor of the day, was an effective long-range sniping weapon.  It was also expensive and slow to manufacture, even in the small number that were built.  The PxB-38 was thus replaced in production by the simplified PzB-39.  This rifle dispensed with the recoiling barrel and semiautomatic breech, and using the pistol grip to open the breech instead of a separate handle.  Unfortunately, it was also more painful to fire, and Nazi snipers got a hold of the earlier PzB-38 whenever possible.

     During the invasion of Poland in World War 2, examples of ammunition for the Polish Wz-35 antitank rifle were captured.  This weapon fired a tungsten-cored AP round.  This round was reverse-engineered for use in the PzB-38 and PzB-39.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PzB-38

7.92mm Patronen

15.88 kg

1 Internal

$2142

PzB-39

7.92mm Patronen

12.35 kg

1 Internal

$2085

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PzB-38

SS

6

1-3-5

8/9

4

Nil

161

PzB-38 (Bipod)

SS

6

1-3-5

8/9

2

Nil

204

PzB-38 (AP)

SS

6

1-1-2

8/9

4

Nil

193

PzB-38 (AP, Bipod)

SS

6

1-1-2

8/9

2

Nil

245

PzB-39

SS

6

1-3-5

9/10

5

Nil

160

PzB-39 (Bipod)

SS

6

1-3-5

9/10

3

Nil

203

PzB-39 (AP)

SS

6

1-1-2

9/10

5

Nil

192

PzB-39 (AP, Bipod)

SS

6

1-1-2

9/10

3

Nil

243

 

PzB-41

     Notes:  At over 2 meters long, this is one of the largest shoulder arms ever manufactured.  It is based on an aircraft cannon that was designed for ground strafing in 1918, and was a distant kin to the Lahti m/39.  The mechanism is however far more complex than the Lahti, involving winding a crank and then cocking the weapon.  Recoil was brutal, but the range is very satisfying.  They were tested on the Russian Front, where they were quickly discarded as antiarmor weapons because their effectiveness vs. the T-34s that were becoming so common was nil.  The Italian Army used a number of them, but almost exclusively as sniping and antimaterial weapons.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PzB-41

20mm Long Solothurn

44 kg

5, 10

 

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PzB-41 (AP)

SA

15

2-2-2 (1/1/1/0)

14

6

Nil

144

PzB-41 (AP, Bipod)

SA

15

2-2-2 (1/1/1/0)

14

3

Nil

187

PzB-41 (HEI)

SA

C1  B6

-4C

14

6

Nil

108

PzB-41 (HEI, Bipod)

SA

C1  B6

-4C

14

3

Nil

140

 

H&K SL-9SD

     Notes: This Heckler and Koch-made suppressed sniper rifle is based on the civilian SL-8 rifle (itself a version of the G-36, redesigned to comply with the 1994 Brady Crime Bill in the US).  Heckler and Koch decided to design new ammunition from scratch instead of attempting to use a silencer with bullet wipes to slow the bullet, since this leads to rapid wear of the silencer.  The cartridge is a hollowpoint 7.62x37mm subsonic round, and the weapon is redesigned for this larger-caliber round.  Noise from this rifle is Class III noise as defined in Merc: 2000.  The SL-9SD has an adjustable stock, adjustable cheekpiece, and adjustable trigger.  By 2002, the SL-9SD was still considered a developmental weapon, and distribution was in very small numbers, ostensibly for combat testing only. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes:  This weapon is not available in the Twilight 2000 World.

     Merc 2000 Notes: As Notes, but there are many more reports of its usage. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SL-9SD

7.62mm Oberndorf Subsonic

4.6 kg

10

$2294

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SL-9SD

SA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

52

SL-9SD (Bipod)

SA

3

2-Nil

7

1

Nil

67

 

Sommer & Ockenfuss Shorty Marksman

     Notes: Designed to be a sort of “pocket sniper,” the Shorty Marksman is a slide-action bullpup design. Unlike most slide-action weapons, there is no slide handle to reciprocate – the bolt is worked by sliding back and forth the pistol grip.  The Shorty Marksman uses as standard a 25.6-inch barrel; a silenced 17.7-inch barrel with a fixed silencer can be mounted.  Without the silencer, the barrel is free-floating; with the silencer, the silencer supports the barrel and it is no longer free-floating. Atop the receiver above the pistol grip is a short MIL-STD-1913 rail, enough for most scopes and optics.  The shell is primarily of composite; many other parts are of light alloy. The bipod folds frontward and is adjustable for height and cant; at the rear, a monopod is extendible. Sales did not go well for the Shorty Marksman; only 100 were built and they are much sought-after collector’s items these days.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Shorty Marksman (Standard Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

4.1 kg

6 Tubular

$3481

Shorty Marksman (Silenced Barrel)

7.62mm NATO Subsonic

8.15 kg

6 Tubular

$3924

Shorty Marksman (Standard Barrel)

.300 Winchester Magnum

4.44 kg

6 Tubular

$4205

Shorty Marksman (Silenced Barrel)

.300 Winchester Magnum Subsonic

8.49 kg

6 Tubular

 

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Shorty Marksman (Standard, 7.62mm)

PA

4

2-3-Nil

6

4

Nil

86

Bipod

PA

4

2-3-Nil

6

2

Nil

111

Shorty Marksman (Silenced, 7.62mm)

PA

3

1-Nil

9

2

Nil

34

Bipod

PA

3

1-Nil

9

1

Nil

44

Shorty Marksman (Standard, .300)

PA

5

1-2-3

6

4

Nil

83

Bipod

PA

5

1-2-3

6

2

Nil

108

Shorty Marksman (Silenced, .300)

PA

3

1-Nil

9

2

Nil

41

Bipod

PA

3

1-Nil

9

1

Nil

53

 

SS-41

     Notes:  This is a bit of a mystery weapon; very few German examples survived World War 2, and only a few were ever built in the first place.  There are few written records of them, and even fewer design notes.  It is not even certain where they were manufactured, for the surviving examples have very little markings of any sort.  The SS-41 is noted for its unusual mechanism; it is a bullpup bolt-action design where the entire pistol grip and trigger group are used as the charging handle.  The mechanism is very complicated and was apparently very difficult to manufacture, but was quite effective in lowering weight and the length of the rifle.  It is also very vulnerable to dirt in the mechanism.  The SS-41 fired the 7.92mm Patronen round, which was in very limited manufacture and even more limited issue. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SS-41

7.92mm Patronen

13.5 kg

6

$3713

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SS-41

BA

6

2-4-Nil

10

3

Nil

114

SS-41 (Bipod)

BA

6

2-4-Nil

10

2

Nil

148

 

Suhl SSG-82

     Notes: This rifle was designed and put into service shortly before the fall of the Iron Curtain.  There is much controversy as to which purpose the SSG-82 was to be put to – it has a short barrel for a sniper rifle at 23 inches, and it is chambered for 5.45mm Kalashnikov, hardly an optimum sniper round.  On the other hand, it is light and handy, and can be quite accurate over short ranges.  The SSG-82 appears to be an enlargement of the Thalman .22 rimfire target rifle, and looks similar to sniper and target rifles made by firms such as Mauser, Steyr, and Anschutz.  The mechanism is quite simple, and contained within a circular receiver.  The barrel is of heavy profile and cold hammer forged, increasing the accuracy of the rifle.  The stock is of dense, blonde-colored beech with a straight butt with a slightly-raised comb. At the butt is a rubber recoil pad, and several spacers can be placed or removed there to adjust length of pull.  The stock has a pistol grip which is almost a true pistol grip, but still joined to stock; it is known for its orthopedic shape.  The fore-end is fat-bellied and provides a good grip. The trigger is user-adjustable.  The standard scope is a ZF-4S 4x made by the Jena division of Carl Zeiss; though the mounts allow for some other Eastern Bloc scopes, some work will be required to mount other hardware.

      Currently, Century International Arms of the US is beginning to sell surviving SSG-82s on the international market.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SSG-82

5.45mm Kalashnikov

4.99 kg

5

$1011

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SSG-82

BA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

81

 

T-Gew M-1918

     Notes:  Mauser’s T-Gew (Tank-Gewehr) was an early attempt at an antitank rifle, and one of the few that had any sort of success at all, even if it was for only a very short time.  The T-Gew fired a massive 13mm round at a very high velocity, making the tanks of World War 1 and shortly after somewhat vulnerable to it.  The T-Gew set the pattern for later such attempts, though almost all of the later designs came too late to keep up with advances in armor design.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

T-Gew M-1918

13mm T-Patrone

17.69 kg

1 Internal

$1834

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

T-Gew M-1918

SS

9

2-3-4

11

5

Nil

166

T-Gew M-1918 (Bipod)

SS

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

215

 

Walther WA-2000 

     Notes: This is a German-built rifle originally designed a purpose-built sniper’s weapon, particularly those snipers requiring a compact, concealable weapon.  It is an unusual design for a sniper rifle, using a bullpup configuration.

     The WA-2000 uses a fluted free-floating barrel 25.59 inches long.  The barrel is not enclosed, but instead attached to the rest of the weapon using brackets.  This design allows the recoil forces to be delivered straight to the shooter’s shoulder, lowering barrel climb.  The stock is a combination of hardwood and composites, with an adjustable buttplate (with a rubber pad) and an adjustable cheekpiece.  The barrel is threaded; it is normally equipped with a long flash suppressor, but can have a muzzle brake which is designed for the specific caliber used, or even a suppressor.  The sight mount on early models is a claw-type, but the mounts can also be used to attach a variety of different fixtures, including a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The sheer amounts of adjustments that can be made in the rifle is staggering, making every weapon virtually individual for each sniper.  These adjustments include the aforementioned cheekpiece and buttplate (adjustable for length of pull, height, and to a small extent, angle), and a trigger which is minutely adjustable for length of pull, pull weight, angle, and length of takeup.  The bipod is adjustable for height and cant, and attached above the barrel on a rail.

     There are effectively two versions of the WA-2000.  The 1st generation rifles were available only in 7.62mm NATO and 7.5mm Swiss calibers.  2nd Generation rifles features a more robust gas system, a different flash suppressor, and added some more calibers. 

     The Achilles’ Heel of the WA-2000 is it’s real-life cost (especially in it’s native .300 Winchester Magnum caliber), and production stopped after 4 years and about 75-200 rifles (sources and publications differ wildly in the number of WA-2000s produced).  Another sore point is the weight of the WA-2000.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

WA-2000

7mm Mauser

7.77 kg

6

$1938

WA-2000

7mm Remington Magnum

7.91 kg

6

$2027

WA-2000

7.5mm Swiss

8.02 kg

6

$2050

WA-2000

7.5mm French Service

7.99 kg

6

$2024

WA-2000

7.62mm NATO

7.9 kg

6

$1984

WA-2000

.300 Winchester Magnum

8.3 kg

6

$2228

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

WA-2000 (7mm Mauser)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

78

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

1

Nil

101

WA-2000 (7mm Magnum)

SA

4

1-2-3

6

3

Nil

85

With Bipod

SA

4

1-2-3

6

1

Nil

106

WA-2000 (7.5mm Swiss)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

87

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

1

Nil

113

WA-2000 (7.5mm French)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

87

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

1

Nil

113

WA-2000 (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

85

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

1

Nil

110

WA-2000 (.300)

SA

5

1-2-3

6

3

Nil

88

With Bipod

SA

5

1-2-3

6

1

Nil

110