Ruger 10/22

     Notes:  This is a popular sporting rifle in the US, Canada, and Europe. It was introduced in 1964, with a stock of American beech, but a version appeared in 1989 with a walnut stock (the 10/22R).  It is drilled and tapped for a scope mount, which is normally furnished with the rifle.  The 10/22 has been updated throughout the years, and accessory kits have been made by many dealers.  It is possible to get synthetic stocks, folding stocks, pistol grip stocks, bullpup stocks, etc.  There are rumors of it being used with a silencer by assassins, and it is definitely used with a silencer for game culling.  There are whole books about modifying the 10/22, including making it into a fully-automatic version!

     In 1966, a Sporter version appeared, this version is identical to the standard 10/22 for game purposes, but has a Monte Carlo stock and no barrel band on the fore-end.  It was built until 1971, replaced by the Deluxe Sporter.  Another version which appeared in 1966 is the 10/22RBI International; this version has a Mannlicher-style stock and fore-end which extends to the muzzle, but is also identical to the standard 10/22 for game purposes.  At first, the International had a polished beech stock and came in stainless steel or blued versions, but in 1995, checkering was added to the pistol grip wrist and fore-end.

     In 1992, a stainless steel weatherproof version was introduced; this version, the K-10/22RB, has a laminated beech stock.  In 1997, a similar weapon, but with a black Zytel plastic stock, was introduced, called the K-10/22RP.  Another similar model, the 10/22RP, was introduced in 1999; this also has a Zytel stock, but has blued metalwork.  The K-10/22RB is identical to the standard 10/22 for game purposes; the two plastic-stocked versions are identical for game purposes.

     In 1996, a target/varmint version was introduced; this version, the 10/22T, has a heavy match-quality cold-forged barrel and no iron sights.  The barrel of this version is also longer at 20 inches (as opposed to the 18.5-inch barrel of most other versions).  A stainless steel version followed in 1999 (the K-10/22T).  Another version of the varmint/target, the K-10/22TNZ, has stainless steel metalwork, and the wooden stock is skeletonized with a true pistol grip.  It weighs slightly less than the standard varmint/target version. 

     The Ruger 10/22 Magnum is a version of the 10/22 Carbine firing .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire, introduced in 1999.  It is basically similar to the 10/22 except for the changes necessary to chamber and fire .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire, but these changes were quite great in order to keep the basic package similar in external appearance, and virtually the entire mechanism is different.

     In 2005, a rifle version of the 10/22 was released by Ruger.  The new hardwood stock is made for larger people, the buttplate is straight instead of curved, and there is no barrel band.  The barrel is a full 20 inches, and the receiver is made from cast aluminum.  The sights are changed to reflect the greater range.  The Ruger 10/22 Rifle is equipped with a Weaver-style scope base.

     Added to the Ruger line in 2006, the Ruger 10/22 Compact is a version of the 10/22 which is smaller and with a shorter barrel than even the 10/22 Carbine.  There is no word as yet as whether there will be versions in stainless steel, with synthetic stocks, etc., but the basic version recently announced has hardwood stock designed with a shorter length of pull, making it suitable for adults as well as children.  The buttstock is also of reduced width, and the fore-end is likewise narrower.  The 10/22 Compact is equipped with iron sights that have high-visibility fiberoptic inlays, and it is also drilled and tapped for a Weaver-style scope mount or rings. 

     In 2009, The Model 10/22 Tactical Target was introduced.  This version is sort of dressed up to look like a sort of faux tactical marksman’s rifle, but those same attributes make it an excellent target rifle as well as very good for taking out varmints.  The Tactical Target uses a Hogue synthetic stock and is equipped with a 16.125-inch extra-heavy profile barrel tipped with a target crown.  Atop the receiver is a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and underneath the front of the handguard is a lightweight Harris-type bipod that is adjustable for cant and height.  The working parts, especially the hammer, is designed for a fast lock time for quick follow-up shots.  The barrel is attached by a V-block system that is secured by two screws, and can be quickly removed.  (Whether a suppressed barrel is in the works is something I haven’t been able to find out, but presumably easy barrel changes are the object of this type of barrel attachment.)

     In 2011, the Ruger 10/22 Takedown was introduced.  Essentially the same as a standard 10/22, the Takedown comes apart just ahead of the barrel nut and the handguard underneath it.  It is synthetic stocked, with bight stainless steel for the external metalwork and barrel.  Despite the breakdown ability, the 10/22 Takedown can be put back together and retain any zeroes of iron sights or telescopic sights.  The barrel is 18.5 inches, and the receiver topped by a Weaver rail. Development of the rifle was difficult; engineers find it relatively easy to design a takedown rifle from scratch, but turning a solid rifle into a takedown rifle is rather difficult.  Most of the differences in the 10/22 Takedown are changes in weight and buttons to break down the rifle.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Ruger 10/22 Magnum, 10/22 Rifle, 10/22 Compact, the versions with Zytel stocks, and the target/varmint versions are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ruger 10/22 Carbine

.22 Long Rifle

2.27 kg

10

$235

Ruger K-10/22 Carbine

.22 Long Rifle

2.14 kg

10

$245

Ruger 10/22T Rifle

.22 Long Rifle

3.4 kg

10

$260

Ruger K-10/22T Rifle

.22 Long Rifle

3.22 kg

10

$270

Ruger K-10/22TNZ Rifle

.22 Long Rifle

3.2 kg

10

$260

Ruger 10/22 Magnum

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.95 kg

9

$256

Ruger 10/22 Rifle

.22 Long Rifle

2.27 kg

10

$251

Ruger 10/22 Compact

.22 Long Rifle

2.09 kg

10

$215

Ruger 10/22 Tactical Target

.22 Long Rifle

3.12 kg

10

$640

Ruger 10/22 Takedown

.22 Long Rifle

2.12 kg

10

$246

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ruger 10/22 Carbine

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

38

Ruger K-10/22 Carbine

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

38

Ruger 10/22T Rifle

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

43

Ruger K-10/22T Rifle

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

43

Ruger K-10/22TNZ Rifle

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

43

Ruger 10/22 Magnum

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

47

Ruger 10/22 Rifle

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

41

Ruger 10/22 Compact

SA

1

Nil

4

1

Nil

34

Ruger 10/22 Tactical Target

SA

1

Nil

4

1

Nil

36

With Bipod

SA

1

Nil

4

1

Nil

46

Ruger 10/22 Takedown

SA

1

Nil

5*

1

Nil

38

*The 10/22 Takedown can be reduced to a package with a Bulk of 3, but it cannot be fired in this state.

 

Ruger M-44 Deerfield

     Notes: The M-44 carbine, also known as the M-99-R, was introduced in 1959 as essentially a scaled up version of the 10/22.  Modifications were fairly heavy, primarily to accommodate the larger round, and mostly revolving around the locked-breech action required to fire the much more powerful round.  The original M-44 used simple open sights in addition to being drilled and tapped for a telescopic sight.  The stock was of birch and used a semi-pistol grip and a half-length fore-end (a “half-stock”).  In 1962, Ruger added the name “Deerstalker” to the M-44, but as Ithaca also began selling a modified shotgun with the same name, Ruger changed the name of the M-44 to the Deerfield after a short patent fight.  The Deerfield is otherwise largely made of steel and works by gas operation.  The barrel is 18.5 inches, and feed is from a tubular magazine inside the fore-end.  (The M-44 is not able to chamber .44 Special rounds.)   In 1962, the rear sight was also changed to a folding leaf sight.

     Various special editions and deluxe models were also built, with enhancements ranging from gold-plated triggers and trigger guards, barrel bands, etc. to full special editions such as the much engraved “Anniversary Model” of 1985.  Some other notable special editions include the M-44 Deluxe Sporter (also known as the M-44-DSP) built from 1963-71, which had a Monte Carlo-type cheekpiece as well as sling swivels on the stock.  The M-44 Sporter (M-44-RS) of 1961-78 was essentially the same, but used a simple aperture sight (which was adjustable).  Built in very small numbers from 1964-71, the M-44 International (also called the M-44-X and M-44-RSI) used a full-length Mannlicher-type stock.  All of these special models are identical to the standard M-44 for game purposes.

     Production of the original M-44 Deerfield stopped in 1985, but it began again in 2000, under the designation of the M-99/44 (or simply M-9944) Deerfield.  It is essentially a modernized version of the M-44; the most noticeable change is the stock.  This stock is still a semi-pistol grip half-stock which is made from conventional hardwood but finished to look like fine, weatherproofed walnut; it also has a synthetic instead of a hard rubber or metal buttplate.  Also immediately noticeable is a synthetic heat shield on the right side of the fore-end.  The sling swivels have been replaced by quick-release versions, and the front sling-swivel mount can also take a limited amount of light bipods.  The rear sight is a folding aperture sight with more adjustability than the original M-44, and the front sight is a protected gold bead.  The drilling and tapping can take a greater variety of scope mounts and rings, though they are specifically designed to fit Ruger’s own line of mounts and rings the best.  (The M-99/44 is even sold with Ruger scope rings, which can take most civilian scopes sold today.)  Internally, the safety has been changed to shotgun-style crossbolt safety, and feed is from a removable rotary magazine instead of a tubular magazine.  Production of the M-99/44 stopped again in 2005, but started again in 2007.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-99/44 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-44 Deerfield

.44 Magnum

2.84 kg

4 Tubular

$429

M-99/44 Deerfield

.44 Magnum

2.61 kg

4

$422

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-44 Deerfield

SA

4

1-2-Nil

5

3

Nil

62

M-99/44 Deerfield

SA

4

1-2-Nil

5

3

Nil

62

 

Ruger Mini-14 Target Rifle

     Notes: Due to be introduced in 2006, the Mini-14 Target version is, as the name suggests, a highly-modified version of the Mini-14 assault rifle designed for target shooting and precision hunting.  The Target version has a new stock black-laminated hardwood, with a unique shape including a cheek swell, deep pistol grip wrist, a grip for the non-firing hand, and a thick non-slip rubber recoil pad.  The barrel is of stainless steel and is longer and heavier than the standard Mini-14 barrel; it is a bull barrel 22 inches long.  At the muzzle one may attach removable counterweights of varying sizes, attached with Allen screws.  There is no flash suppressor or muzzle brake, but the muzzle is target crowned.  The receiver is also of stainless steel, and the weapon has no iron sights, instead having Ruger’s integral scope mount. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This rifle does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mini-14 Target

5.56mm NATO

4.26 kg

5

$696

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mini-14 Target

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

67

 

Ruger PC-4/9

     Notes: These carbines are designed for use as self-defense weapons by campers and other casual users, normally against wildlife.  They are small carbines using pistol caliber cartridges, and in fact may use the same magazines as Ruger P-series pistols. They have several safeties and will not fire if dropped or bumped accidentally. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is a popular weapon in Central and South America as well as the US and Canada; in fact, it has even been found in the possession of Yanamamo natives deep in the Amazon basin.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PC-4

.40 Smith & Wesson

2.89 kg

10, 11

$319

PC-9

9mm Parabellum

2.89 kg

10, 15

$282

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ruger PC-4

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

38

Ruger PC-9

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

36

 

Ruger SR-556

     Notes: Introduced in late 2009, the SR-556 is basically an AR done better – more refined and more reliable.  Chief among the improvements is the rifle’s operation; the SR-556 uses a short-tappet gas piston system rather than the Stoner direct gas impingement system, which greatly reduces fouling and the stoppages fouling causes.  The SR-556 is designed for use by police and civilians, and is now sold as a semiautomatic rifle, with no plans for any sort of future automatic version; Ruger has in fact made sure that conversion to automatic fire is difficult if not impossible.  The barrel is a strong Chrome-Moly Vanadium steel alloy barrel, and has a tight twist rate of 1:9.  The 16.12-inch barrel is tipped with a birdcage-type flash suppressor which is Ruger-designed, and differs greatly in appearance from the standard A2 flash suppressor.  The handguards are made by Troy and are pinned to the upper receiver; the barrel is essentially free-floating.  The handguards have 4-point MIL-STD-1913 rails, and the upper receiver also has a monolithic (the rail is integral with the upper receiver) MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The SR-556 comes with flip up iron sights that attach to the MIL-STD-1913 rails, with the front sight being a post inside of “rabbit ears” like those of an AK.  The rear sight, also made by Troy, is on an elevating post and is adjustable in a manner similar to that of an AR-15A2. 

     The gas piston system has a gas regulator with four positions, and thus operation can be adjusted depending upon the ammunition being used and the cleanliness of the rifle at the time.  The operating rod and its piston are not designed to be disassembled by the user, and Ruger says that no such maintenance is necessary.  The bolt carrier group is made in one piece and is chrome-plated for reliability.  The bolt carrier group also has a number of features to further increase reliability, such as a flared rear, a turned-down gas key area, and a rubber O-ring around the extractor spring (something I would love, since the number one problem I have experienced with the AR is extraction failure).  Trigger action is regarded as unusually smooth and crisp, though it is a standard AR-type trigger group; this is probably due to factory tuning.  Two versions of the SR-556 are currently available: one with a fixed stock, and one with an M-4-type collapsible stock.

     Ruger has also introduced a rimfire version of the SR-556; while it largely uses the same parts and part of the action of the SR-556 (suitably-modified for the new cartridge), the action is in fact an adaptation of the action of the Ruger 10/22.  This means that while Ruger sells standard magazines for the SR-22, any magazine, even aftermarket ones, that fit into a Ruger 10/22 will fit into an SR-22. The outer part of the receivers (upper and lower) appear a bit more blocky than the SR-556, and the MIL-STD-1913 rail above the receiver is a little longer as it extends to the rear a bit more (made possible by the lack of a need for the AR-type charging handle at the rear of the receiver.  The charging lever is on the right side with the ejection port.  The SR-22 comes standard with an M-4-type sliding stock, though there is no recoil buffer in it.  The pistol grip is a Hogue rubber ergonomic grip.  The handguards are round, aluminum, and ventilated with rows of holes at the 2 o’clock, 4-o’clock, 8 o’clock, and 10 o’clock positions.  The 16.123-inch barrel is tipped with a standard AR-type flash suppressor, the same as used on the SR-556 and Mini-14.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR-556 (Fixed Stock)

5.56mm NATO

3.6 kg

10, 20, 30

$576

SR-556 (Folding Stock)

5.56mm NATO

3.6 kg

10, 20, 30

$596

SR-22

.22 Long Rifle

2.95 kg

10

$245

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR-556 (Fixed Stock)

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

42

SR-556 (Folding Stock)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

42

SR-22

SA

1

Nil

4/6

1

Nil

33