Feather USA RAV-9/RAV-45

     Notes: This is a pistol-caliber carbine designed for both plinking and hunting.  It is the big brother to the RAV-22 (US Small Caliber Rifles).  The magazines for the 9mm version are modified Uzi magazines, plus a special 10-round version made during the Brady Gun Ban period; the magazines for the .45 ACP model are modified Thompson stick magazines, plus special 10 and 20-round magazines.  The weapon is largely made from aluminum alloy, with a stainless steel barrel and polymer grips (and in the fixed-stock version, the stock).  The stock may be a fixed AR-15-type, a sliding M-4-type, or a sliding wire stock. The barrel may or may not have a flash suppressor or muzzle brake. (Add $5 for the version with a flash suppressor; the version with a muzzle brake has its own lines on the tables below.)   The barrel may have a barrel shroud, handguards, or be left bare.  The rifle carbine is drilled and tapped to accept virtually any sort of optics/accessory mount, including a MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rail.  The barrel may be heavy or standard; the heavy barrels versions may or may not have a Harris-type bipod.  The RAV-9 and RAV-45 may be broken down for storage; removing the barrel takes a minute, the stock another minute, and the bipod (if present) another minute.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These carbines do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RAV-9 (Fixed Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.27 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$289

RAV-9 (Folding Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.27 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$309

RAV-9 (Heavy Barrel, Fixed Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.3 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$318

RAV-9 (Heavy Barrel, Folding Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.3 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$338

RAV-9 (High Accuracy, Fixed Stock)

9mm Parabellum

3.14 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$722

RAV-9 (High Accuracy, Folding Stock)

9mm Parabellum

3.14 kg

10, 20, 25, 32

$742

RAV-45 (Fixed Stock)

.45 ACP

2.52 kg

10, 20, 30

$368

RAV-45 (Folding Stock)

.45 ACP

2.52 kg

10, 20, 30

$388

RAV-45 (Heavy Barrel, Fixed Stock)

.45 ACP

2.55 kg

10, 20, 30

$377

RAV-45 (Heavy Barrel, Folding Stock)

.45 ACP

2.55 kg

10, 20, 30

$397

RAV-45 (High Accuracy, Fixed Stock)

.45 ACP

3.48 kg

10, 20, 30

$802

RAV-45 (High Accuracy, Folding Stock)

.45 ACP

3.48 kg

10, 20, 30

$822

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RAV-9 (Fixed Stock)

SA

2

Nil

5

1

Nil

38

RAV-9 (Folding Stock)

SA

2

Nil

3/5

1

Nil

38

RAV-9 (Heavy, Fixed Stock)

SA

2

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

RAV-9 (Heavy, Folding Stock)

SA

2

Nil

3/5

1

Nil

40

RAV-9 (High Accuracy, Fixed Stock)

SA

2

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

(High Accuracy, Bipod)

SA

2

Nil

5

1

Nil

52

RAV-9 (High Accuracy, Folding Stock)

SA

2

Nil

3/5

1

Nil

40

(High Accuracy, Bipod)

SA

2

Nil

3/5

1

Nil

52

RAV-45 (Fixed Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

40

RAV-45 (Folding Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

3/5

2

Nil

40

RAV-45 (Heavy, Fixed Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

43

RAV-45 (Heavy, Folding Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

3/5

2

Nil

43

RAV-45 (High Accuracy, Fixed Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

43

(High Accuracy, Bipod)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

1

Nil

56

RAV-45 (High Accuracy, Folding Stock)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

43

(High Accuracy, Bipod)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

1

Nil

56

 

Feather USA RAV-22

     Notes: This is a lightweight carbine designed primarily for plinking or varmint hunting, and for people who want a futuristic/cool-looking weapon to do it with.  The RAV-22 is a semiautomatic carbine built primarily of aluminum alloy and with a variety of folding stocks and barrels, including a sliding wire stock and standard barrel or heavy bull barrel; a Carr sliding tactical stock (similar to that of the M-4) and standard or heavy bull barrel; and a version with a sliding wire or Carr stock, heavy bull barrel, and a Harris-type bipod.  All of these versions are drilled and tapped for the attachment of any sort of scope, optics, or accessory mount, including the MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The RAV-22 may be broken down for storage; removing the barrel takes one minute, the stock another minute, and (if present) the bipod takes another minute.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This carbine does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RAV-22 (Standard Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.36 kg

8, 16, 20

$250

RAV-22 (Heavy Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.38 kg

8, 16, 20

$259

RAV-22 (High Accuracy)

.22 Long Rifle

1.98 kg

8, 16, 20

$683

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RAV-22 (Standard Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

3/4

1

Nil

35

RAV-22 (Heavy Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

3/4

1

Nil

37

RAV-22 (High Accuracy)

SA

1

Nil

3/4

1

Nil

37

RAV-22 (High Accuracy, Bipod)

SA

1

Nil

3/4

1

Nil

48

 

Federal Engineering XC-220

     Notes:  This is a futuristic-looking rifle with all-steel construction.  The XC-220 can be easily disassembled and was often seen in B-movies simulating a high-tech weapon.  The XC-220 has a scope mount.  The muzzle brake, though functional, is largely superfluous due to the light caliber of the XC-220; however, there is almost no muzzle blast whatsoever.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

XC-220

.22 Long Rifle

3.4 kg

28

$263

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

XC-220

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

34

 

FIE Black Beauty

     Notes:  This is a semiautomatic rifle made from highly polished black nylon. The weapon is grooved for a scope mount, and has friction-free parts that require no lubrication. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Black Beauty

.22 Long Rifle

1.8 kg

14 Internal

$257

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Black Beauty

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

 

Harrington & Richardson Model 60

     Notes: This was an attempt to turn the abortive Reising submachinegun into a civilian rifle.  The caliber remained unchanged, but the stock was changed to a more conventional pistol grip wrist half-stock, and the barrel was lengthened to 18.3 inches.  A spring-leaf sight was attached to the rear of the receiver, but the front sight was the same as that of the Reising submachinegun.  The Model 60 was produced for less than two years from 1944-46 and was not successful; they are exceedingly rare collectors’ items these days. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 60

.45 ACP

3.22 kg

12, 20

$378

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 60

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

44

 

Harrington & Richardson Model 65

     Notes: This is basically a .22 Long Rifle-firing M-1 Garand, used as a training rifle by the US Marines for a short time during World War 2.  It was also sold on the civilian market as the General.  It had a 23-inch heavy barrel and a detachable magazine.  The Model 150 Leatherneck was a more realistic trainer; it had a 22-inch normal barrel and a magazine restricted to 5 rounds.  (The Model 151 was a minor variant of the Model 150 – it had an adjustable Redfield rear sight instead of the simple peep sight of the rest of the series.)  The Model 165 Leatherneck was primarily built for the civilian market, and had a standard 23-inch barrel and a 10-round magazine.  Available until 1961, the Model 165 also had the Redfield rear sight.

     Max Atchisson, who had designed the Model 65, also had another brainstorm – conversion of the Model 65 to a selective fire weapon.  Essentially, it was primarily one of those projects Mr. Atchisson often did just for the heck of it, and he only made three of them.  The resulting weapon was so light in weight that it could be used as a small-caliber submachinegun – yet with the folding bipod (which he also added just for the heck of it), it could be used as an automatic rifle trainer.  However, he never intended to sell the design to anyone; it was just an experiment for fun.

     The operation of Max Atchisson’s conversion uses basically the same operation as the standard Model 65, only slightly modified to produce selective fire.  A whole set of larger magazines were made for the weapon, mostly by modifying other magazines (and sometimes by soldering two together); in addition, Atchisson designed his modified weapon to feed from the drum magazines of the American-180 submachinegun.  The long bolt of the base Model 65 means that Atchisson’s modified weapon has a relatively slow rate of fire, and even when set on automatic, one can easily squeeze off single shots or short bursts with a little practice.  Atchisson’s modification used a micrometer-adjustable rear aperture sight and a standard Model 65 front sight; in addition, it is drilled and tapped for a scope mount.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 65

.22 Long Rifle

4.08 kg

10

$292

Model 150

.22 Long Rifle

3.29 kg

5

$276

Model 165

.22 Long Rifle

3.49 kg

10

$286

Atchisson Model 65

.22 Long Rifle

3.6 kg

10, 20, 30, 177 Drum, 275 Drum

$802

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 65

SA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

47

Model 150

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

45

Model 165

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

46

Atchisson Model 65

5

1

Nil

5

1

1

47

With Bipod

5

1

Nil

1

1

1

61

 

Harrington & Richardson Model 360 Ultra

     Notes: This efficient and easy to take care of rifle was quite popular in its day (1965-78 in production).  It was originally known as the Model 308, denoting its caliber of 7.62mm NATO (.308 Winchester), but the name was changed when an option of a .243 Winchester chambering was added in 1967.

     The Model 360 used a very efficient method of gas operation, with a rotating bolt.  Metalwork was largely of steel, with various finishes available.  The stock had a half-length fore-end tipped with a rosewood cap and a pistol grip wrist.  The comb of the stock was of a roll-over design with a hard rubber buttplate.  The rear sight was a ramp-type Williams design.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 360 Ultra

.243 Winchester

3.38 kg

3

$746

Model 360 Ultra

7.62mm NATO

3.91 kg

3

$1035

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 360 Ultra (.243)

SA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

60

Model 360 Ultra (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

72

 

Harrington & Richardson Model 700

     Notes: At the time of its inception (1977), this was the only US-built semiautomatic rifle to chamber the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire cartridge.  It has a walnut-stock with a pistol grip, a rollover comb, and a squared fore-end.  The barrel was 22 inches long, and the rear sight was a simple, though adjustable, folding rear notch-type sight.  It was unfortunately made in too small numbers to achieve very great market penetration, despite critical acclaim; .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire ammunition was also somewhat expensive at the time, and the Model 700 was withdrawn after 6 years without many being built.

     A deluxe version, the Model 700DL, was also built; this version used select walnut stocks with checkering on the pistol grip wrist and fore-end.  It is identical to the standard Model 700 for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 700

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.95 kg

5, 10

$292

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 700

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

57

 

Harrington & Richardson Model 800 Lynx

     Notes: This simple rimfire autoloader had less than two years of production from 1958-60 before it was abandoned.  It was basically a standard sort of rimfire rifle, with a half-stock and a Monte Carlo comb.  The comb sloped upwards towards the butt, giving it a sort of “straight-line” recoil path and making it somewhat easier to use with low-profile optics.  The barrel was 22 inches long, and the sights consisted of a rear spring-leaf and elevator and a front blade.  In a market saturated with such rifles, it did not do well, and was withdrawn in 1960. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 800 Lynx

.22 Long Rifle

2.72 kg

5, 10

$276

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 800 Lynx

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

45

 

Hi-Point 995/4095 Carbines

     Notes: These two carbines are similar in form; they are carbines firing pistol cartridges and made mostly of high-impact polymers.  They are fed from magazines that fit into the pistol grip (though they are not pistol magazines), and are designed to use a wide variety of optical accessories or laser pointing modules.  The carbines are considered to have excellent accuracy and workmanship, but they are not necessarily pretty weapons.  The 4095 carbine is slightly larger and heavier, with a somewhat longer barrel; both come with a removable compensator, but this does not really affect recoil that much (in game terms).  Both are rated for the firing of +P and +P+ ammunition (including the type of +P+ loads sold only to law enforcement and military concerns).  Depending on the sight mounts that are ordered by the buyer (they may range from none other than iron sights to a MIL-STD-1913 rail), the Hi-Point Carbines may mount a variety of optics and scopes.

     ATI makes the HIP Proline Package for the Hi-Point carbines; this consists of a skeletonized stock joining the pistol grip to the stock, a MIL-STD-1913 rail that spans from the upper receiver to the end of the handguard, 2-inch long side MIL-STD-1913 rails for the handguards, and a 6-inch-long MIL-STD-1913 rail on the bottom of the handguard.  This package adds 0.3 kg to the weight of the weapon and 0.05% to the cost.

     Recently, Hi-Point introduced a tricked-out version in .45 ACP, called the 4595TS.  This version has a skeletonized stock with a solid cheekpiece and a buttplate adjustable for length of pull.  The cheekpiece looks adjustable, but isn’t. The top of the receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and a shorter length of rail is found underneath the fore-end.  On the sides are still shorter lengths of rail, and these are extra-wide so more accessories can be attached.  Most of the external construction is of polymer, and the pistol grip and trigger guard are of one piece with the rest of the lower receiver.  Left and right-handed shooters are accommodated by ambidextrous controls and a bolt handle that can be attached to for left or right side.  Unfortunately, the magazine release button is not in range of the hand on the pistol grip, an inconvenience.  The rear sight is an adjustable rear aperture sight in a ghost ring configuration and a tall triangular front sight post.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The 4095 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor does the 4095-Comp or the 995-Comp; the HIP Proline Package also does not exist, nor does the 4595TS.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Hi-Point 995

9mm Parabellum

2.61 kg

10

$284

Hi-Point 995 (Compensated)

9mm Parabellum

2.65 kg

10

$334

Hi-Point 4095

.40 Smith & Wesson

2.99 kg

10

$334

Hi-Point 4095 (Compensated)

.40 Smith & Wesson

3.04 kg

10

$384

Hi-Point 4595TDS

.45 ACP

3.18 kg

9

$378

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Hi-Point 995

SA

2

2-Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Hi-Point 995 (Compensated)

SA

2

2-Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Hi-Point 4095

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

42

Hi-Point 4095 (Compensated)

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

42

Hi-Point 4595TS

SA

2

2-Nil

5

2

Nil

42

 

IO STG-2000-C

     Notes: InterOrdnance was established in 1995, originally to import civilianized AK-47s and AKMs into the US from former East German stocks in Germany.  In their first decade of operation, they experienced major difficulties with the German end of their operation, a spurious but lengthy lawsuit versus the BATF over some imported L-1A1 rifles that the BATF claimed (incorrectly) didn’t adhere to US firearms laws, and exporters overseas that were basically selling them junk in some cases.  Despite these problems, they established a reputation as a source of quality civilianized AKs, and in 2005, reorganized as IO Incorporated. 

     The STG-2000-C is one of the current iterations of their AKs.  This rifle has an interesting history – it is based on the Wieger STG-940, which was a greatly-modernized version of the AKM that East Germany planned to put into production shortly before the fall of the Iron Curtain scuttled those plans.  The STG-2000-C uses polymers for the handguards (which are of a modern appearance and design), the ergonomic pistol grip, and the stock (which is also of a more modern design that is more ergonomic than that of the AK).  Partially to satisfy US firearms importation laws, but mostly to ensure product quality, the STG-2000-C is built almost entirely of parts made in the US.  The parts of which the STG-2000-C are of better quality than those of actual AKs, and a CNC scope rail is included for optics.  The 16.25-inch barrel is tipped with a birdcage A2-type flash suppressor, and the barrels are almost match-quality.  The STG-2000-C will accept almost any magazine that will fit into an AK or AK clone (of the appropriate caliber), but IO also makes polymer magazines for the STG-2000-C.  Chambering at present is only in 7.62mm Kalashnikov or a .22 Long Rifle-firing version, but IO recently told Small Arms Review that future plans for the STG-2000-C include 5.45mm Kalashnikov and 5.56mm NATO versions, and I have included speculative stats below.  The receivers, barrels, sights, and trigger groups are uniformly finished in black, but the polymer parts may be black, desert tan, or pink (the “Pink Lady” version).

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

STG-2000-C

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30, 40

$813

STG-2000-C

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30

$567

STG-2000-C

5.45mm Kalashnikov

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30, 40

$516

STG-2000-C

.22 Long Rifle

3.18 kg

10

$226

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

STG-2000-C (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-Nil

6

4

Nil

47

STG-2000-C (5.56mm)

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

42

STG-2000-C (5.45mm)

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

46

STG-2000-C (.22)

SA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

34

 

Iver Johnson/AMAC “M-1 Carbines”

     Next: Iver Johnson Arms was established in 1871 in Massachusetts, and had a long firearms-making history before running into financial trouble, moving first to Arkansas in 1984 and then being bought out (including the name “Iver Johnson”) in 1987 by AMAC. Some of Iver Johnson’s best-selling modern rifle designs are a number of M-1 Carbine variants and copies, most of which differ in caliber or features (and some of which are simple licensed copies).  After the buyout by AMAC, AMAC continued to make some of Iver Johnson’s old line of firearms, including some of these M-1 Carbine variants, until it too went out of business in 1993.

     The JJ9MM is a version of the M-1 Carbine; it looks virtually identical externally to the standard M-1 Carbine, except for its magazine and somewhat shorter 16-inch barrel.  The JJ9MM was built in 1985 and 1986, and is chambered for 9mm Parabellum instead of .30 Carbine.  The JJ9MM has been copied often by other firearms makers, both with and without a license.  The JJ9MM has a hardwood stock of the same type as a standard M-1 Carbine and the metalwork is blued.  AMAC later built a version of the JJ9MM, called the Delta-786; it is virtually identical to the JJ9MM, but has a matte finish and darker-stained hardwood stock, and is a slight bit lighter.

     Iver Johnson also built a version of the M-1 Carbine which was basically a direct copy of the original M-1 Carbine, also in 1985 and 1986.  AMAC also built the Iver Johnson version of the M-1 and M-1A1, from 1988-93.  Both were capable of being fitted with a large number of aftermarket stocks and other modifications such as scope mounts, Weaver and MIL-STD-1913 rails, and suchlike.  The Iver Johnson version also came in a version chambered for the potent 5.7mm MMJ round (called the Spitfire), but this chambering is relatively rare.  AMAC versions used a slightly-better grade of wood, military-style peep sights, and could accept three sizes of magazines instead of two.  AMAC versions are generally known as the “M-30” or M .30.” Iver Johnson called their M-1 Carbine the PM-30, and their M-1A1 the SC-30.

     AMAC also built the Enforcer Pistol (also called the Enforcer Carbine and Enforcer Carbine-Pistol).  This is simply a version of AMAC’s M-1 Carbine with no buttstock, a full pistol grip, and an abbreviated 9.5-inch barrel.

     At the same time that Iver Johnson was building its other M-1 Carbine variants, it was building the US Carbine .22; this is essentially an M-1 Carbine chambered for either .22 Long Rifle or .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire.  These also look almost identical externally to a standard M-1 Carbine, except for the magazine and slightly longer 18.5-inch barrel.  AMAC also later built this model, but only for a few months in 1988.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

JJ9MM

9mm Parabellum

2.5 kg

20

$269

Delta-786

9mm Parabellum

2.4 kg

20

$269

PM-30

.30 Carbine

2.36 kg

15, 30

$311

PM-30 Spitfire

5.7mm MMJ

2.58 kg

15, 30

$470

SC-30

.30 Carbine

2.25 kg

15, 30

$341

M-30

.30 Carbine

2.3 kg

5, 15, 30

$311

M-30A1

.30 Carbine

2.2 kg

5, 15, 30

$341

US Carbine .22

.22 Long Rifle

2.26 kg

15

$235

US Carbine .22

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.29 kg

15

$256

Enforcer

.30 Carbine

1.79 kg

5, 15, 30

$230

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

JJ9MM/Delta-786

SA

2

Nil

5

1

Nil

35

PM-30/M-30

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

50

PM-30 Spitfire

SA

3

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

50

SC-30/M-30A1

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

50

US Carbine .22 (.22 Long Rifle)

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

38

US Carbine .22 (.22 Magnum)

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

47

Enforcer

SA

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

20