Kharkov 2S1 (SO-122) Gvozdika

     Notes:  This Russian 122mm self-propelled howitzer was first seen in a parade in Poland in 1974, and for that reason, is often called the M1974 in the West.  The Russian designation is SO-122 or SAU-122, but it more commonly known to its crews as the Gvozdika (Carnation).  It was sold far and wide, and current and former users number nearly 40, from Russia herself to Vietnam (though some users have as little as one example).  The 2S1 has seen combat in Chechnya, by Iraqi forces in the Gulf War and the 2003 invasion as well as new-purchase examples for the New Iraqi Army, by the Serbians in the Yugoslavian Civil War and the Kosovo intervention, in the 2008 South Ossentia War, by the Libyans (on both sides) in the Libyan Revolution, and currently in the Syrian Civil War (or free-for-all, as it seems to be).

     The 2S1 is the modified hull of an MT-LB (the ACRV), lengthened by one roadwheel, topped with a large, low turret armed with a modification of the 122mm D-30 howitzer.  In this role, the gun is useful for direct as well as indirect fire, though lack of armor in the chassis limits itís survivability as a direct-fire vehicle. An autoloader is installed, and this limits the necessary crew to four, though two other troops can fit inside if they stay out of the way.  8 rounds are carried on the left and right of the sidewalls; these are normally unusual rounds (such as HEAT) or rounds longer than normal length. The remaining 24 are carried in the ready position; the loader must still load the rounds manually into the breech, but there is a breech elevator and a power rammer and flicker. For longer bombardments or ammo replenishment, the 2S1 if fed through a rear hull door and put into their places by the gunner and loader. Computers and radios are limited and an FDC is required for proper operation of the 2S1, though the 2S1 does have an indirect fire computer and a very basic mapping module with equally basic inertial navigation.  The driver and the gunner have night vision equipment, and the commander has a primitive CITS, enabling the 2S1 to be used as a tank destroyer (though it does not normally carry the ammunition mix to function as a tank destroyer for long; normally, only two special rounds were carried, and these were normally CLGPs).  As issued, there is no commanderís machinegun, though examples in South Ossetia often have one mounted on a pintle. The D-30, as mounted on the 2S1, has a large double baffle muzzle brake and a fume extractor. The gun has a depression limit of -3 degrees and an elevation limit of +70 degrees.

     As a member of the ACRV family, it is mechanically almost identical to the ACRV and has the same engine and manual transmission.  The engine is the YaMZ-238N turbocharged diesel with an output of 240 horsepower.  (This was replaced in the early 1990s with an upgraded version of the same engine, but developing 300 horsepower.) The suspension can be raised and lowered, to hide in hull-down positions, clear intervening terrain, or lock the suspension down to allow it to be air-delivered. The 2S1 can be made amphibious with very little preparation (less than 2 minutes).  It travel over deep snow, mud, beach sand, swamps, etc, using wide 670mm tracks which can be fitted; the normal ones are 400mm wide. During these forays into rough terrain, only 30 rounds for the main gun are normally carried.  24 rounds are in ready racks; 16 more are carried on the sides of the turret basket. Empty cartridge cases are ejected outside of the turret.  An unusual feature of the 2S1 is itís suspension height; designed for airdropping, itís suspension can be lowered to the point that all roadwheels, return bogie, and sprocket are all on the ground.

     There is a driverís hatch on the front deck, and commander and loaderís hatches on the turret deck. There is a large door in the rear of the hull to resupply the vehicle with ammunition; this has a single firing port at the center, carried over from the ACRV. The crew has an NBC Overpressure system to protect them. A long stowage box is mounted on the left side of the turret.

     The Polish use an updated version of the 2S1 designated the 2S1T Gozdzik; this has a TOPAZ digital fire control system, including a GPS receiver with inertial navigation backup, full mapping computer, an indirect fire computer, and a small laptop to allow the Gozdzik to essentially act as its own FDC, taking instructions directly from FIST teams and even units in the field (if the person calling for fire has the necessary skill). The Gozdzik has the newest digital military radios, including two long range radios that are data-capable. It also has the upgraded engine.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

2S1 Gvozdika

$434,162

D, A

600 kg

15.7 tons

4+2

13

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G)

Shielded

2S1 Gvozdika (Engine Upgrade)

$459,396

D, A

700 kg

15.7 tons

4+2

13

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G)

Shielded

2S1T Gozdzik

$917,953

D, A

540 kg

16.35 tons

4+2

15

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G), Thermal Imaging (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

2S1 Gvozdika

115/81

32/22/3

550

83

Trtd

T4

TF6  TS4  TR3  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S1 Gvozdika (Engine Upgrade)

137/96

38/27/4

550

111

Trtd

T4

TF6  TS4  TR3  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S1T Gozdzik

133/93

37/26/4

550

111

Trtd

T4

TF8  TS6  TR4  HF10  HS5  HR2

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S1 Gvozdika

+1

Basic

122mm L/40 2A31 Howitzer

40x122mm

2S1T Gozdzik

+2

Fair

122mm L/40 2A31 Howitzer

40x122mm

 

Uraltransmash 2S3 (SO-152) Akatsiya

     Notes:  The 2S3, also known as the SO-122 and CO-122, was introduced at about the same time as the 2S1, first appearing to the West in 1973, and thus often known to NATO as the M1973.  However, it had been in development since 1967 and 1971 in service. The 2S3 can be mistaken at first glance for the American M-109, though the gun is longer than a stock M-109; according to some sources, the 2S3 was developed in response to the M-109.  Some 33 countries use the 2S3 Ė including seven at the OPFOR at the US National Training Center.  They have taken part in combat in Afghanistan, the Tajikistani Civil War, both Chechen Wars, the South Ossetia intervention, the Libyan Civil War, and the Syrian Civil War. The 2S3 was produced until 1993.  The 2S3 is in use by some 20 countries; the Russians still use the latest versions, but still have about 1600 earlier versions in storage.  The Russian Naval Infantry is the single largest user of the 2S3 series.  The variants in use by Russia include the 2S3M, 2S3M1 and 2S3M2, depending upon the level of the unit in question. Though the 2S3 is being replaced by the 2S19, it does not appear that the Russians intend to replace all of them, especially in the face of continual upgrades. The Chinese also use a modified form of the 2S3, the Type 83, but this is handled on the Chinese SP Artillery web page, as it is sufficiently different.

 

2S3

     The 2S3 is based on the heavier chassis of the same type as used on the SA-4 Ganef SAM system, but has six rather than seven roadwheels.  The engine is a V-59 turbocharged diesel developing 520 horsepower, coupled to a semi-automatic transmission. The chassis have wide tracks for optimum performance in rough terrain, though not as wide as true rough-terrain tracks.  The vehicle has six roadwheels, with different spacing between the roadwheels than on the SA-4 Ganef chassis.

     The driverís compartment is at the front right, with the engine and radio equipment to his left. To the right side of the rear is a large hatch for crew entry and exit and ammunition resupply; this has a small vision block in it. On the left turret deck is a manually-rotating cupola for the commander, with all-around vision blocks and one block with a night channel; this hatch also has equipment to allow its pintle-mounted machinegun to be aimed and fired with the hatch closed.  On the turret deck on the opposite side of the turret is a loaderís hatch with vision blocks to the right side and forward.

     The main gun is a short-barreled howitzer with a maximum elevation +63 degrees and depression of -4 degrees.  The gun was developed from the D-22 and is differs primarily in having a large muzzle brake, two recuperators above the main gun, and a fume extractor.  The 2S3 has a manually-operated brace on the glacis to support the gun during travel. The commanderís weapon is almost always a PKM which, as stated above, can be aimed and fired (but not reloaded) with the hatch closed. Computers and radios are limited and an FDC is required for proper operation of the 2S3, though the 2S3 does have an indirect fire computer and a very basic mapping module with equally basic inertial navigation.  ROF is 2.6-3.5 rounds per minute maximum depending on the rounds fired; though for a sustained bombardment 4 rounds per minute is the normal ROF.  The gun is capable of firing small-yield nuclear shells, but it is well known, even amongst the crews, that the crew firing the round will receive radiation and overpressure effects from the round, as well as a small amount of thermal pulse. (The vehicle is protected from EMP.) The gunsight is a combination of a periscopic indirect fire sight and a telescopic direct fire sight.

     The 2S3 has self-entrenching equipment which allows the 2S3 to dig itself a hull-down fighting position in soil in 20-40 minutes, depending on how hard-packed the soil is.  There are large hatches on the rear of the hull and on the right side of the turret; the door on the side of the turret is primarily for ammo case ejection and replenishment, while the door on the hull is both used for replenishment and for crew ingress and egress.

     The crew has hatches for the commander and loader on the turret roof and for the driver on the front left deck in addition to the hatches already stated.  The commanderís machinegun may be aimed and fired (but not loaded) from under armor, and the commander may tap into the vehicleís fire control and has the same stabilization as the vehicle itself.

     Early in development, the 2S1 was found to have an unacceptable level of gas contamination from the gun, and the Army did not accept the new vehicle for a year.  This delayed the initial operational deployment from 1969 to 1973.

 

2S3M

     The 2S3M differs primarily in the main gun, which is three calibers longer; ammunition stowage, which is increased to 46; a new autoloader, which feeds the gun from a 12-round autoloading drum; and the ability to use the Krasnopol CLGP.

 

2S3M1

     The 2S3M1 is a 2S3M with full datalink capabilities and computer capabilities which allow it to function as its own FDC.  This includes inertial navigation and a mapping computer.  They can also take directly from FIST instruction or function as a coordinated whole through an FDC.  The 2S3M1 has radar and IR absorbent/reflective paint; this is little actual protection, though it gives enemy gunners targeting the 2S3M1 with IR, Thermal, FLIR, or radar-based weapon a -1 to hit.

 

2S3M2

     This is a 2S3M1 with a modernized automatic digital fire control system, including more compact computers and a laser rangefinder with ballistic computer for use by the main gun and commanderís machinegun in direct fire.  The 2S3M2 can use GLONASS satellites, and feed the results to the navigational and mapping computer.  The 2S3M2 has a new gun barrel which is L/39.  The 2S3M2 has a system similar to the US Blue Force/Red Force tracker, along with a vehicle state computer.

 

2S3M2-155

     Built primarily for export, this is a 2S3M2 equipped with M-385 155mm L/39 howitzer.  It can fire all but the latest Western and Chinese 155mm rounds.  It is otherwise for game purposes like the 2S3M2.  This has been shown at some international arms shows on and off since 2000.

 

2S3M3

     This version of the 2S3M2 was still experimental as of 2018; the primary difference is the installation of a version of the 2A33M which can fire most of the more powerful rounds that the 2S19 is capable of firing.  Tests among possible customers have generally been good, but some shots with more powerful rounds have given the breech block and barrel root cracks.  The 2S3M3 was designed primarily to keep the 2S3 relevant, particularly among export customers.

 

Vehicles

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

2S3

$538.603

D, A

800 kg

27.5 tons

6

25

Passive IR (D, G, C), WL/IR Searchlight (C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

2S3M

$674,498

D, A

713 kg

28.78 tons

6

25

Passive IR (D, G, C), WL/IR Searchlight (C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

2S3M1

$1,280,548

D, A

628 kg

28.88 tons

6

28

Passive IR (D, G, C), WL/IR Searchlight (C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

2S3M2

$1,439,840

D, A

538 kg

29.24 tons

6

21

Passive IR (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

2S3M2-155

$1,463,067

D, A

508 kg

29.27 tons

6

21

Passive IR (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

2S3M3

$1,583,824

D, A

538 kg

29.24 tons

6

21

Passive IR (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Image Intensification (G, C)

Shielded

 

Vehicles

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

2S3

136/95

38/26

830

193

Trtd

T4

TF5  TS4  TR3  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S3M

133/93

37/25

830

197

Trtd

T4

TF5  TS4  TR3  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S3M1

133/93

37/25

830

198

Trtd

T4

TF5  TS4  TR3  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S3M2

132/92

37/25

830

199

Trtd

T4

TF6Sp  TS5Sp  TR3  HF9Sp  HS4Sp  HR2*

2S3M2-155

132/92

37/25

830

199

Trtd

T4

TF6Sp  TS5Sp  TR3  HF9Sp  HS4Sp  HR2*

2S3M3

132/92

37/25

830

199

Trtd

T4

TF6Sp  TS5Sp  TR3  HF9Sp  HS4Sp  HR2*

 

Vehicles

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S3

+1

Basic

152mm L/27 2A33 Howitzer, PKT (C)

35x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S3M

+1

Basic

152mm L/30 2A33M Howitzer, PKT (C)

46x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S3M1

+2

Fair

152mm L/30 2A33M Howitzer, PKT (C)

46x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S3M2

+3

Fair

152mm L/39 2A33M2 Howitzer, PKT (C)

46x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S3M2-155

+3

Fair

155mm L/39 M-385 Howitzer, PKT (C)

46x155mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S3M3

+3

Fair

152mm L/39 2A33M3 Howitzer, PKT (C)

46x155mm, 1500x7.62mm

 

Uraltransmash 2S5 Giatsint-S

     Notes:  This 152mm self-propelled howitzer has been in Russian service since 1972.  It looks very much like a smaller version of the SO-203, or for that matter, the US M-110.  It was developed at the same time as the 2A36 Giatsint-B towed 152mm gun/howitzer.  Currently, it is used by Russia, Ethiopia, Belarus, and Ukraine (who inherited theirs from the Soviet Army) and by Finland, the Soviet Unionís only customer of the 2S5.  This vehicle is known as the Telak 91 in Finnish service. The 2S5 is notable in that it can fire 0.1-2 kT nuclear rounds.  Russian forces used the 2S5 in the First and Second Chechen Wars, and the Ukrainian forces are currently using it in their war with the Russians.

     The 152mm 2A37 howitzer  (a variant of the ground-mounted 2A36 field gun) is one of the first long-barreled 152mm howitzers employed by the Russian Army.  It is capable of firing virtually any 152mm round in the Russian inventory, except for some of the most up-to-date CLGPs.  The maximum depression is -2.5 degrees; maximum elevation is +58 degrees.  It is actually capable of direct fire and has a limited traverse of 15 degrees to each side; HEAT rounds were designed for the 2S5 and 2A36.  Elevation is relatively low at +58 degrees; depression is -2.5 degrees. The gun does not have a full autoloader, but it does have a loading assist device, including a lifting device to the breech and a power rammer.  The howitzer is mounted in an open position on the rear deck of the vehicle; when firing, a spade is lowered in the rear and front to brace the vehicle.  The 2S5 can actually carry the respectable amount of 30 rounds onboard for the howitzer, including fuzes and charges. Secondary armament consists a light machinegun in an OHWS-type mount; the commander can aim and fire (but not load) the machinegun with the hatches closed. The aiming device is actually the same as used on the BM-21 MLRS, the D726-45 Mechanical Sight consisting of a PG-1M panorama and OPChM-91A Optical Sight.

     Nominally, the 2S5 has a crew of seven; however, only five ride in the 2S5 when traveling; the other two ride in the ammunition supply truck and get on the gun when pulled into a combat position.  When traveling, the vehicle commander is seated in a raised superstructure behind the driver, and has a cupola with a machinegun and a white light/IR spotlight. The driver is on the front right of the vehicle, in front of the commanderís position.  The other crewmembers are seated in the rear of the vehicle when traveling and have a ramp in the rear face.  When the weapon is in action, the gunner sits to the left of the gun, with a shield to his front only.  The driver and commander have IR vision blocks for their positions; the commanderís position also has a searchlight, which can be operated with hatches closed.  Three minutes are required to bring the gun into action, and three more to take the gun out of action. The gun has a nominal fire rate of 5-6 rounds per minute.

     Of course, crew protection, especially when in firing position, is the 2S5ís weak point.  When in action, there is no protection for any of the crewmembers, with the exception of the AV2 gun shield to the front of the gunner.  When traveling, the four crewmembers inside have a maximum of 15mm of steel armor; from some angles, small arms can penetrate the 2S5. (Of course, this is better than the supply trucksÖ) The crew has an NBC overpressure system, but a vehicular collective NBC system is essentially impossible to implement on such a vehicle.  There is a machinegun at the commanderís hatch, and there are racks for an SA-14 SAM and an RPG-7 Rocket Launcher.

     The engine of the 2S5 is the same V-59 turbocharged diesel as on the 2S3, developing 520 horsepower, coupled to a semi-automatic transmission.  There are shock absorbers on the first two and last two roadwheels, leading to a reasonably comfortable ride. The chassis is the Krug chassis, used for many medium and some heavy antiaircraft missile systems.  The 2S5 has a manual transmission, though it has conventional controls.  The 2S5 is air-transportable, can be transported as a sling load under a heavy-lift helicopter, and is air-droppable.

 

The 2S5M

     The Russians have recently been updating their 2S5s, replacing the analog and manual electronics with a digital fire control suite, GLONASS land navigation system, the Russian version of a Blue Force/Red Force tracker, and a vehicle state computer.  This results in a complete electronics suite similar to that of the 2S3M2.  The electrical system has also been upgraded to handle the extra load, new radios have been installed, and a 5-compartment fire detection and suppression has been installed.  These upgraded vehicles are for the small amount of 2S5s still in the Russian military as well as the export market.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

2S5

$492,078

D, A

500 kg

28.2 tons

5

23

Passive IR (D, C), WL/IR Searchlight (C)

Shielded**

2S5M

$1,098.594

D, A

430 kg

28.48 tons

5

26

Passive IR (D, C), WL/IR Searchlight (C)

Shielded**

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

2S5

134/94

37/26

400

193

Trtd

T8

TF1  TS1  TR1  HF8  HS3  HR2

2S5M

133/93

37/26

400

195

Trtd

T8

TF1  TS1  TR1  HF8  HS3  HR2

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S5

None

None

152mm 2A37 L/54 gun/howitzer, PKT (C)

30x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

2S5M

+2

None

152mm 2A37 L/54 gun/howitzer, PKT (C)

30x152mm, 1500x7.62mm

*The Turret AVs are for the gun itself.  The crew has no actual protection when on the gun, other than the gunnerís gun shield.

**This protection, as well as the NBC Overpressure system, apply only when the crew is inside the vehicle, if the crew is working the gun, they are not so protected.

 

Uraltransmash 2S7 (SO-203) Pion

     Notes:  This is the heaviest self-propelled howitzer employed by the Russian Army.  It is normally a front-level asset, used for heavy bombardment of high-priority enemy fortified positions and heavy enemy troop concentrations, and to support large attacks.  Since it was first identified by the West in 1975, it is also known as the M1975. It is estimated that over 1000 have been built; most have been retained by the Russian Army, but five former Soviet Republics and Slovakia inherited the gun from the Russians or the former Czechoslovakian Army.  Slovakia is known to have only two, neither of which are in active service, but kept in operational shape.  Poland formerly used the 2S7, but in 2006 they sold them back to the Russians.  The rest of the countries that have them do not keep them in operational status, using them as museum pieces or having scrapped them.  The Russians used some in the invasion of Afghanistan and is still using them in their war in Ukraine; the Georgians used six of them against the Russians during the war of 2008.  (Interesting note Ė these 2S7s were originally meant for the Russians to use against the Georgians, but the Georgians captured them and their ammunition when they entered the country on the railroad. They never gave them back after the war.)  Other countries which have them in active inventory include Angola, Azerbaijan, North Korea, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.  None have used them in actual warfare.  Belarus has 36 kept in working condition, but in reserve.  It is notable that, while marketed for a few years, it has not been seen on the international marketplace in about a decade.

     The 2S7 uses a lengthened T-80 chassis as a base, with some components of the T-72 and some components of the Krug chassis system.  An almost unarmored chassis; the purpose is to move the massive gun around, and they were never expected to be anywhere the front lines.  Huge spades are lowered at the rear before the gun is raised into firing position.  The 2A44 203mm gun is mounted on a turntable at the rear of the 2S7; the gun has a limited traverse of 15 degrees to each side. Maximum elevation is 60 degrees, while maximum depression is 0 degrees. (Despite the minimum elevation, no provision has been made to give the 2S7 direct-fire capability.)  The rounds are specialist rounds designed for the 2S7, and they include nuclear rounds with yields of 0.1-2 kilotons. Only four rounds are carried on the 2S7; the rest are carried on at least two heavy trucks for ammunition supply.  The four carried are for immediate-response fire missions.  The crew is nominally 14, including ammunition bearers, but seven are carried on those trucks, with the other seven carried in the ammo vehicles. (Often, only one ammo truck is used, as the 2S7ís firepower is not often called upon.) A trackway can be extended to the loader from the supply vehicles. The gun has an elevating mechanism to the breech, a power rammer, and a mechanism to insert the round into the breechway, ready for the rammer. Normal rate of fire is 1.5 per minute, though this can be doubled, considering this hard work for that period.  5-6 minutes are required to make the 2S7 ready for action (assuming all seven vehicle crewmembers work to do so), and 3-5 minutes are required for the 2S7 to come out of action and be ready to travel.  An interesting feature of the 2S7ís gun is a firing alarm Ė the blast and noise of the gun actually produced a large amount of overpressure in the general area, and troops in the area must take cover when each shot is fired.  (The alarm sounds five seconds before the shot until the shot is actually fired.)  The gun is equipped with a loading assistance basket, but not a full autoloader, though it does have a power rammer. The sights are essentially the same set as those of the 2S5.

     Other weapons normally carried by the 2S7 is a light machinegun, which can be placed on a pintle at the commanderís position, but is not normally mounted.  An SA-16s are also carried in case of air attack, along with three reloads; an RPG-7 is also normally carried in case of armor attack, along with six reloads.

     When the crew is operating the howitzer, it does not have any protection from attack, and there is no Kevlar shield set as there is on the similar US M-107 and M-110 self-propelled howitzers.  The 2S7 is normally followed around by a variety of command and resupply vehicles; most of these are heavy trucks or vehicles based on the MT-LB, PTS-M or PTS-2, or AT-T, and these normally include one or two FDC vehicles and command vehicles. It does have an NBC Overpressure system when the hatches are closed, but they rely on individual masks when on the crew and firing the 2S7.  Electronics-wise, the 2S7 has two long-range, one medium-range, and one short-range radio. A basic fire control gun-laying computer and a basic inertial navigation with a mapping module.

     Using a T-80 as a base, the 2S7 used a gas turbine V-46-1 engine, developing 780 horsepower (many of the improvements later carried out consisted solely of a change of the engine with a turbocharged diesel developing the same horsepower, but taking up less space. The 2S7 also carries an 18.6-kilowatt APU to power the systems when the engine power is off. Fuel consumption of the engine is huge, making the APU mandatory.

 

The 2S7M Mialka

     Like most other Russian self-propelled artillery vehicles, the Russians have in recent years updated their 2S7s to the 2S7M standard.  The 2S7M has a new fire control suite, land navigation suite with GLONASS receiver and an inertial navigation backup, fire control computers allowing it to act as its own FDC (though there is still usually an actual PDC vehicle to coordinate fires from a wide area and a variety of support sources), a BMS with vehicle state computer, and a general laptop containing primarily firing tips and procedures and technical information on the 2S7M and its associated vehicles.  However, the 2S7M also has a full autoloader fed by an eight-round magazine, which increases the ROF to 2.5 rounds per minute.  The 2S7M has also been given an uprated version of the 2S7ís engine, the V-46-I, which develops 840 horsepower and is turbocharged.  The new autoloader also means that the vehicle crew is reduced by one, with the space occupied by former crewmember now occupied by the four more rounds that the 2S7M carries onboard.  When firing, the assistant gunner usually stays in the vehicle, managing the fire control computers and associated radios; in addition, the commander usually stays inside the vehicle managing the radios and fire orders and assisting with the computers.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though the 2S7 is capable of firing nuclear weapons, and there were a few recorded incidents of this being done during the Twilight War, Russian commanders were either loathe doing that (as some of the thermal, radiation, and fallout effects could engulf the gun position) or did not have many of them.

     Merc 2000 Notes: The size and expense of operating the Pion meant that it was rarely used.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological**

2S7 Pion

$593,596

D, A

500 kg

46.5 tons

7

37

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

2S7M Mialka

$1,569,845

D, A

469 kg

46.63 tons

6

26

Passive IR (D, C), WL Spotlight (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

2S7 Pion

124/87

34/24

500

231

Trtd

T6

TF2  TS1  TR1  HF4  HS3  HR2

2S7M Mialka

131/92

36/25

500

311

Trtd

T6

TF2  TS1  TR1  HF4  HS3  HR2

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S7 Pion

None

None

203mm L/56.2 2A44 Howitzer, PK, SA-16, RPG-7

4x203mm, 1500x7.62mm, 3xSA-16 SAMs, 6xRPG-7 Rockets

2S7M Mialka

+2

None

203mm L/56.2 2A44 Howitzer, PK, SA-16, RPG-7

8x203mm, 1500x7.62mm, 3xSA-16 SAMs, 6xRPG-7 Rockets

*The Turret AVs are for the gun itself.  The crew has no actual protection when on the gun, other than the gunnerís gun shield.

**The crew has complete NBC protection when in the vehicle, including NBC Overpressure.  When they are manning the gun, they have none of the protection the vehicle affords.

 

Uraltransmash 2S19 Msta-S

     Notes:  This replacement for the SO-152 was first seen in 1989 in Russia, and is perhaps the first Russian SP artillery piece that is not named after a flower (Msta is the name of a river in Western Russia, popular with fishers and vacationers).  Operators consist primarily of Russia and former Russian Republics, along with Ethiopia, Venezuela, and Morocco.  (Morocco attempted to buy these vehicles ďon the sly;Ē though the sale was found out, how many Morocco bought is unknown.) Though development of the 2S19 began in 1980 under the project name Ferma (as Obíyekt 316), new developments in military vehicle design and ordnance led to continual upgrades, and production did not begin until 1989.  The 2S19 was used in combat in the Second Chechen War, and continues to be used by both sides in Russiaís incursion into Ukraine.

     The 2S19 is based on the combined chassis of the T-80 and T-72; it has a version of the T-80ís hull, but the latest T-72ís engine. Armor is considerably lessened, but as SP artillery units generally stay out of combat, this is accessible.  The armor of the 2S19 is, however, much better than most SP artillery of its generation. The howitzerís nomenclature is the 2A64, and is essentially an SP version of the Msta-B ground-mounted howitzer.  Before firing, a dozer blade may be lowered to stabilize the vehicle; this blade can also dig emplacements.  The gun can be fired without this stabilization, but the rocking of the 2S19 can become quite severe, possibly causing crew injury.  The gun is capable of firing all known 152mm ordnance, including specialist rounds like the Krasnopol CLGP (and the Krasnopol-M, which fits in the autoloader), as well as tactical nuclear rounds. Elevation maximum is +68, with a depression maximum of -4 degrees.  In a nod to this, a minimum of two HEAT rounds for the main gun are carried. The howitzer has a fume extractor.

     The 2S19 has a semi-automatic gun laying system; once the crew knows the targetís position and its own position, it can fire further fire missions on the same target or targets within 2 kilometers without further input from an FDC.  The gun has an autoloader which feeds from six five-round magazines in the rear of the turret.  A further 20 rounds are carried in various areas around the turret and towards the back of the vehicle; these normally carry unusual or little-used types of ammunition or rounds that are not the right size to fit into one of the autoloader magazines.  Nominal rate of sustained fire is 6-8 rounds per minute; this rate can be doubled for up to 10 minutes, with each member of the crew tiring as if heavy work was performed.  The 2S19 has an inertial navigation system, but not with a fully-computerized navigation/mapping module, It does carry several long-range and medium-range data-capable radios.

     The engine used, as stated above, is a version of one used on a variant of the T-72. The engine is a V46-6 turbocharged diesel, developing 780 horsepower; it has an automatic transmission and conventional driving controls. The 2S19 can lay a smoke screen by injecting diesel fuel into its exhaust. The engine is a multifuel engine, capable of running on diesel, gasoline, alcohol, AvGas, JP4, JP5, and JP8. The 2S19 is not amphibious, but is capable of deep-fording (basically up to the just below the hatchway of the driver).  A 16 kW APU is installed for operation with the engine switched off; this runs off of vehicle fuel tanks and can use the same fuels as the 2S19 (assuming the proper modifications have been made.

     Appearance is basically similar to other SP artillery vehicles of its generation, with a very large turret and relatively small hull. When in an emplaced position, the resupply vehicles will generally bring out extra personnel for loading and handling ammunition, and trackways and conveyor belts are also normally carried by resupply vehicles. Resupply can be done through the rear of the turret or the back door in the hull (also for crew ingress and egress).

     The driver sits in the front left, with the large turret in the center of the vehicle.  The gunner is on the left side of the turret and the commander on the right.  The commander has a heavy machinegun mount by his hatch that may be aimed and fired from within the vehicle.  Ammunition for this gun is extremely limited, and it is primarily a defensive weapon.  The crew has an NBC Overpressure system with a vehicular NBC backup. The 2S19 also has a 16kW auxiliary power unit that allows the vehicle's radios and gun mechanisms to be powered without running the engine. 

 

The 2S19M1

     Introduced in the early 1990s, the 2S19M1 had an upgraded electrical system as well as a GLONASS system (with the inertial navigation kept as a backup) and a full land navigation and mapping computer.  It also has fully-automatic gun laying, and no longer requires the use of an FDC (though one is often used for full coordination with other units and support vehicles and aircraft).  The gun was also rebarreled to L/54.  The 2S19M1 has been re-engined with a V-84A turbocharged diesel developing 840 horsepower (though the same APU was kept).

 

The 2S19M1-155

     As might be surmised from the designation, this export model, introduced to the international marketplace in 2006, is equipped with a modified M-835 155mm gun with a barrel length of L/52. The Russians will fit Western fire control, computers, and GPS to the vehicle as desired.  Otherwise, only the changes necessary to use the 155mm gun and ammunition have been made to the vehicle and its electronics. Thusfar, no sales have been made.

 

The 2S19M2

     Introduced in 2013, the 2S19M2 is a marked improvement to the 2S19M1, having a new digital fire control system which increases ROF to 8-9 rounds per minute, or double that for short bursts.  The land navigation system has been improved with a more agile computer, allowing navigation to be computed on the fly at top cross-country speed. This improvement also speeds up coordinate input time, reducing the preparation to fire time by 30 seconds. There is the equivalent of a laptop computer, containing manuals, technical orders on the 2S19M2 and associated vehicles, as well as the rounds the gun uses, and is linked to the radios so that it can receive maps, plans, OPORDs, etc. Ė Essentially the equivalent of a BMS with vehicle state computers.

 

The 2S33 Msta-SM2

     This version is just getting into Russian service, entering LRIP in 2017, and with an uncertain future due to budgetary concerns; in 2016, the Russian Army ordered an initial batch of 30, but they have received only half of these as of late 2018.  The main gun has been replaced by a version called the 2A79, which can fire ammunition with more propellant charges and with a higher breech pressure, allowing for markedly-increased maximum ranges, such as the base rounds having a range of 40 kilometers versus the 25-kilometer range of the earlier 2S19 versions.  Assisting in this is a longer main gun, which also uses a heavier barrel with a more-efficient fume extractor.  The turret also has more efficient ventilators as well as an air conditioning system.  Additional attention is given to top-attack and mine/IED attacks.

 

The 2S30 Iset

     I have not been able to find out enough about this version to develop stats for it; as of late 2018 it is still in the preliminary stages of development.  Improvements are said to center around more efficient computers and a higher level of automation.  Some sources state that both domestic and export versions are being designed, the latter with 155mm guns. There are no stats below, and the entry is only here for completeness.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

2S19 Msta-S

$874,752

D, G, AvGas, A, Jet Fuel

500 kg

42 tons

5

25

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (C)

Shielded

2S19M1 Msta-S

$1,098,807

D, A

540 kg

42.24 tons

5

26

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (C)

Shielded

2S19M1-155 Msta-S

$1,119,247

D, A

502 kg

42.39 tons

5

27

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (C)

Shielded

2S19M2 Msta-S

$1,489,024

D, A

539 kg

42.25 tons

5

23

Passive IR (G, C), Image Intensification (D, G, C), Thermal Imaging (G), FLIR (C)

Shielded

2S33 Msta-SM2

$1,595,788

D, A

422 kg

42.72 tons

5

25

Passive IR (G, C), Image Intensification (D, G, C), Thermal Imaging (G), FLIR (C)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

2S19 Msta-S

134/94

37/26

1000

289

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6

2S19M1 Msta-S

142/99

39/28

1000

312

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6

2S19M1-155 Msta-S

141/99

39/28

1000

313

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6

2S19M2 Msta-S

142/99

39/28

1000

312

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6

2S33 Msta-SM2

140/98

39/28

1000

315

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S19 Msta-S

+2

Basic

152mm L/47 2A64 gun/howitzer, NSVT (C)

50x152mm, 300x12.7mm

2S19M1/M2 Msta-S

+2

Basic

152mm L/54 2A64M gun/howitzer, NSVT (C)

50x152mm, 300x12.7mm

2S19M1-155 Msta-S

+2

Basic

155mm M-835M howitzer, NSVT (C)

50x155mm, 300x12.7mm

2S33 Msta-SM2

+2

Fair

152mm L/60 2A79 gun/howitzer, NSVT (C)

50x152mm, 300x12.7mm

*Turret Roof AV is 5Sp.  Hull Roof AV is 5.  Hull Floor AV is 6Sp.

 

Uraltransmash 2S35 Koalitsiya-SV

     Notes: The 2S35 was first seen in rehearsals for the 2015 Moscow Victory Day Parade.  Despite this, the 2S35 is still in the preliminary stages of development, and specifications seem to change every few months.  Meant to be a partial replacement for the 2S19 and earlier vehicles, the 2S35 is not hitting the chronic Russian budgetary problems, and in any event is not expected to be in even LRIP until 2020.  Thus, only 12 have been delivered to Russian forces as of 2018. For the most part, the design is said to be revolutionary, using a modification of the 2S19ís turret on the chassis of a T-90 or T-14.  (And crazier ideas were also tried outÖ)  Current design work appears to center around the T-90 chassis topped with a greatly-enlarged 2S19 turret, possibly with a T-14 engine and transmission.  In addition, a special resupply vehicle is also believed to be in design.

     The 2S35 is probably equivalent to the 2S30 Iset in conception Ė a highly-automated, digitized, and computerized self-propelled artillery gun.  It appears to have taken several design cues from the defunct US Crusader SPH program, as the crew are seated on the front deck ahead of the turret in self-contained armored capsules, each with NBC Overpressure systems, space for rations and a ration heater, a small refrigerated water tun, and an amount of personal gear.  Other spaces in the hull contain bulkier personal gear for the crew, and there is a tunnel to allow crewmembers to go to the turret and service the gun, though fire missions themselves are done from within the crew capsules.  Each crew capsule has its own fire detection and suppression system, as well as NBC Overpressure system.  Both the gunner and commander have full gun firing controls, though in practice this job is normally split between the two or done solely by the gunner.  There is an RWS atop the turret mounting a Kord heavy machinegun; this is fed by a single long belt, has automatic jam clearing (under most circumstances) and is otherwise aimed and fired from the commanderís, gunnerís, or driverís positions, though normally the commander controls this RWS.  The crew can also enter the turret, and there is space and positions for them to fight from the turret if necessary.  Armor is somewhat heavier than on a 2S19, the in addition to the crew fire detection and suppression systems, there are such systems for the engine, transmission, engine, fuel cells, and two in the turret (concentrating on the gun and ammunition magazines).  Just to be sure, the 2S35 has five smoke grenade launchers on each side of the turret, and it can lay a thick, oily smoke screen by injecting diesel into its exhaust.

     The 2S35 essentially has a version of the 2S33ís electronics, fire control, BMS, and vehicle state suites, but on steroids.  They are designed to operate completely remotely, though they have backups in the turret.  The commander and the gunner have full fire control systems as well as the BMS, vehicle state, and gun state computers.  All three crewmembers have full access to the radios, as well as the navigation computers.  The commander also has access to a small computer with everything from technical manuals on the 2S35 to specifications on the ammunition and computer systems.  The driver actually has enhanced access to the navigation suite, giving information on the navigation parts of the BMS, full navigation with waypoints, friendly fuel and replenishment positions, and projected range with available vehicle fuel onboard.  The crew does not have to leave the vehicle if outside troops are available to replenish supplies and ammunition, as they are brought in through hatches in the rear of the hull and turret.  The crew has a full night vision and long-range day vision suite, including access to sensors in the turret and a backup camera for the driver.

     The gun, the 2A88, is fed by several autoloaders, and they are able to feed both normal and special rounds.  A new GPS-guided round is said to have been developed for the 2A88, which has a range of 70 kilometers.  The gun has a fire rate of 8 rounds per minute; increasing the rate of fire by doughty work of the crew is not possible, though MRSI fire is possible and an initial barrage of five rounds in ten seconds is also possible if the target coordinates are known when the 2S35 has come to a stop.  In a normal barrage, two bracing struts are lowered at the rear of the vehicle, though again those first five rounds may be fired without the struts.  The 2A88 is fed from fourteen 5-round magazines, with the autoloader also loading the charges.  The fuzes are affixed when the round is loaded, but electronically programmed by the fire control computers before firing.  The charges are ignited by an electrical system instead of a conventional primer system.

     The chassis is a modified form of that of the parent vehicle; Current 2S35s use the chassis of a T-90, with the primary modifications being to the electrical system and to the front of the hull to accommodate and protect the crew.  Currently, the 2S35 gets ammunition replenishment from an 8x8 military truck chassis, modified for the purpose.  A special reload vehicle is said to be in development, which will be used for the 2S35 and 2S19. The 2S35 has a self-entrenching blade at the front, which can also be used as a secondary stabilizing device during long bombardments. The entrenching blade can dig a hull-down position in 12-40 minutes, depending upon the terrain surface.

     The T-90 chassis is powered by a 1000-horsepower turbocharged diesel engine, an upgraded version of the V-84MS engine used in the T-90.  It is equipped with more shock absorbers than the standard T-90, to better allow the 2S35 to compute fire solutions on the move.  The vehicle is equipped with a conventional driver control setup, with ďT-BarĒ directional control column instead of a steering wheel.  The transmission is automatic with a manual backup, and the 2S35 has power steering and power brakes, as well as a power-assisted gear shifter (all of which have manual backups).  The driver in in the middle of the front hull in front of the turret, with the commander to the right and gunner to the left.  Only the commander and gunner have hatches; the driver works his way out of the driverís or gunnerís hatch.  In addition, there are two hatches in the turret roof (if occupied, normally by the commander and gunner), and the hatches in the hull and chassis rear, many for replenishment. Up to four conveyor belts may fitted to the 2S35 (two to the turret and two to the hull; in the case of external replenishment of ammunition, two loaders work to place the special fuzes on the rounds, put the rounds into the correct magazines, and put the charges in the right place for the autoloader to use them.  For operation without the engine on, a 20kW APU is fitted in the lower right rear of the turret.  This runs off the vehicular supply of diesel.

     The hull and turret can mount Kontakt-5 ERA, on the hull front, hull sides, and all sides of the turret as well as the front half of the turret roof.  The turret roof also mounts the Arena Active Protection System, which defends against incoming rounds.  As stated above, the crew capsules and turret have an NBC Overpressure system, as well as vehicular NBC backup to plug into.  The crew capsules and turret also have air conditioning and heating.

 

The 2S35-155 Koalitsiya-SV

     This is an export model armed with a 155mm L/52 howitzer, said to be derived from the design of one or more NATO countries, but domestically-produced without license.  Other than the changes required to convert the 2S35 to fire 155mm rounds (primarily in the fire control software, magazines, and autoloader), it is identical to the standard 2S35.

 

The 2S35M Ė A Koalitsiya on a T-14 Armata chassis

     ď2S35MĒ is not an official designation for this possible version of the 2S35; it is my own estimate as to what the vehicle would be called, and the game references to it.  Whether this version will ever built is in question; the Russians have enough of a budgetary problem introducing the T-14 Armata tank and to a greater extent, itís subtypes, and whether a 2S35 on a T-14 chassis is a serious question.  So far, as of late 2018, only one prototype has been built, and the Russian Military budget even limits the amount of testing that may be conducted with this prototype, as all new artillery efforts are based in the standard 2S35 and the T-14 tank, respectively.  The main difference between the T-90-based 2S35 and the T-14-based 2S35M would be the better armor protection in the hull and a slightly greater weight, as the T-14ís hull is slightly heavier than the T-90ís hull.  The front of the hull of the 2S35M mimics the crew capsules of the T-14.  The vehicle would also be faster and more agile, as the standard T-14 engine is much more powerful.

 

The Original Prototypical 2S35

     Russia displayed a totally different vehicle prototype in 2006, also called the 2S35 at the time.  This vehicle is sort of an upgraded 2S19 with some components of the 2S19 and the then-later 2S35; much of the fire control, navigation, BMS, vehicle state computers, and OWS are the same as on the 2S35.  However, this original 2S35 was fitted with a pair of 152mm 2A64M howitzers, which could be singly or two at a time.  The modified 2S19 was equipped with nine 5-round magazines and bins holding 15 more special-use rounds to be loaded manually.  The buffering of the guns when fired takes up much of the recoil, yet recoil was still considered excessive.  The crew is housed in the turret and hull; it does not have the crew capsules of the later ďrealĒ 2S35s.  Fire control software is updated to allow for the firing of two howitzers.  If one gun fails, the autoloader can use the ammunition magazines allotted to the other howitzer.  The guns did not fire at once; the firing is staggered by a few seconds to reduce system heat and turret fumes.  The guns can be depressed enough to allow direct fire; in such a case, one rounds hits (if a hit is rolled), and the other shot will hit within a circle 1d6 meters wide. In the end, it was decided that the kinks could not be worked out of the system in any reasonable period of time.  Another problem is tactical Ė if this kind of 2S35 is destroyed, two howitzers have been taken out, while with a single-howitzer system, only one gun is destroyed. Again, in the case of malfunctions, they will affect only one gun on a single-gunned SP howitzer instead of two.  Finally, it was not believed that a double-gun system would sell well on the international arms market.

 

The 2S35-1 Koalitsiya-KSh Ė 2S35 on a budget

     The 2S35-1 truck-mounted Koalitsiya system was designed not only for lighter Russian independent brigades and divisions, but for export customers who want a world-leading artillery system, but canít afford the full 2S35.  The 2S35-1 uses the same 2A88 howitzer of the 2S35, along with most of the electronics, fire control, and navigation package, inside a reduced-size and reduced-armor turret and on an armored version of an 8x8 military truck. (The Russians will be flexible for export customers about the truck on which it will mount the turret, but the current version is based on the KamAZ-6560).  The turret keeps the basic form and internal configuration of the 2S35ís turret, including the autoloading system and replenishment system, But the size of the turret has been made smaller, primarily by reducing the amount of ammunition carried to 12 magazines of five rounds and to a smaller extent, rearrangement of internal equipment.  The gun system is, however, able to conduct all fire missions that can be done with the 2S35, and has all the internal equipment of the 2A88 system.

     The cab of the KamAZ truck has an enlarged cab containing the crew and the fire control system.  The cab is also equipped with several data-capable radios.  The cab is equipped with a vehicle state computer and a land navigation system, though not the BMS system of the 2S35.  Maximum rate of fire remains about 8 rounds per minute.  The 2S35-1 can be ready to dire within 90 seconds of a halt (if the target position is known before the halt and the gun may begin to slew into place before the truck is halted); in that time, the gun is laid on target, the autoloaders have indexed a magazine and loaded the first round, and struts have been lowered at each corner of the truck.  The gun can similarly be out of action and ready to travel in the same 90 seconds.  The crew does not have to leave the cab to conduct a fire mission, though if necessary, a fire mission can be conducted from within the turret.  Normally, the driver and commander sit in the front of the vehicle, while the gunner is in the rear of the cab.

     The cab is armored against even medium-caliber rifle bullets (such as those fired by most snipers) as well as shell splinters.  The cab (and the turret) are equipped with an NBC Overpressure system as well as a vehicular NBC backup. The cab and the turret are also radiologically-protected.  The cab doors are heavy enough that they require a hydraulic assist to allow the crew to open them.  The windows are some 12 centimeters thick, and have the same armor value as the face they are in.  The side windows cannot be rolled down.

     The KamAZ-6560 is a long-bed truck with four wheels on the front and four wheels on the rear.  The engine used on the 2S35-1 is a KamAZ-740 35-400, a turbocharged diesel capable of 400 horsepower.  The front bumper has a self-recovery winch with 200 meters of cable and a pull strength of 40 tons. The tires are run-flats and are puncture-resistant, and have central tire inflation.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

2S35 Koalitsiya-SV

$1,854,267

D, A

500 kg

55 tons

3

31

Passive IR (G, C), 2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Backup CCD Day/Night Camera (D)

Shielded

2S35-155 Koalitsiya-SV

$1,882,083

D, A

455 kg

55.19 tons

3

29

Passive IR (G, C), 2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Backup CCD Day/Night Camera (D)

Shielded

2S35M Koalitsiya-SV

$1,870,617

D, A

600 kg

58 tons

3

41

Passive IR (G, C), 2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G, C), FLIR (G, C), Backup CCD Day/Night Camera (D)

Shielded

2S35 (Original Prototype)

$1,517,038

D, A

349 kg

43.01 tons

4

26

Passive IR (G, C), Image Intensification (D, G, C), Thermal Imaging (G), FLIR (C)

Shielded

2S35-1 Koalitsiya-KSh

$1,450,907

D, A

422 kg

35 tons

3

19

Passive IR (G, C), 2nd Gen Image Intensification (D, G), Thermal Imaging (G, C), Backup CCD Day/Night Camera (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

2S35 Koalitsiya-SV

132/93

37/26

1200

373

Trtd

T6

TF35Sp  TS15Sp  TR10  HF45Cp  HS15Sp  HR12*

2S35-155 Koalitsiya-SV

132/93

37/26

1200

374

Trtd

T6

TF35Sp  TS15Sp  TR10  HF45Cp  HS15Sp  HR12*

2S35M Koalitsiya-SV

146/103

41/28

1200

446

Trtd

T6

TF35Sp  TS15Sp  TR10  HF55Cp  HS20Sp  HR14**

2S35 (Original Prototype)

140/98

39/27

1000

312

Trtd

T6

TF19Sp  TS10  TR8  HF24Sp  HS8Sp  HR6***

2S35-1 Koalitsiya-KSh

94/66

26/18

550

147

Trtd

W(5)

TF20Sp  TS10Sp  TR6  HF5Sp  HS4Sp  HR4****

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

2S35 Koalitsiya-SV

+2

Fair

152mm L/54 2A88 gun/howitzer, Kord (RWS)

70x152mm, 1500x12.7mm

2S35-155 Koalitsiya-SV

+2

Basic

155mm L/52 M-835M howitzer, Kord (RWS)

70x152mm, 1500x12.7mm

2S35M Koalitsiya-SV

+2

Basic

152mm L/54 2A88 gun/howitzer, Kord (RWS)

70x152mm, 1500x12.7mm

2S35 (Original Prototype)

+2

Fair

2x152mm L/60 2A79 gun/howitzer, NSVT (C)

50x152mm, 300x12.7mm

2S35-1 Koalitsiya-KSh

+2

None

152mm L/54 2A88 gun/howitzer, Kord (RWS)

60x152mm, 1500x12.7mm

*Hull and turret Roof AV is 7.  Floor AV is 7Sp.

**Hull Roof AV is 8Sp.  Turret Roof AV is 7.  Floor AV is 8Sp.

***Turret Roof AV is 5Sp.  Hull Roof AV is 5.  Hull Floor AV is 6Sp.

****Cab Roof AV is 4.  Turret Roof AV is 7.  Floor AV is 4Sp, except under the cab, where it is 5Sp.