ROMARM Model 89

     Notes:  This Romanian self-propelled howitzer is basically the turret of the 2S1 fitted onto the chassis of a modified MLI-84 IFV.  The resulting vehicle is lighter than the 2S1, somewhat cheaper, and better able to travel on the flimsy roads and bridges often found in Romania, as well as better handling on the mountain paths in southern Romania.  It has not been exported as of yet, nor has it been offered for export.  The Romanians are in the process of replacing the Model 89 with true 2S1s, and only 18 Model 89 of the original 42 remain in service today.

     The 2S1 turret fits perfectly into the MLI-84ís turret ring, though the 2S1 turret itself is a bit larger than that of the MLI-84.  The 2A31 122mm gun itself is not the same as on the 2S1, but is a Romanian ground-mounted gun that has several common components with the 2S1ís 2A31 gun.  The gun itself is actually a gun/howitzer, meaning that the gun has deliberately low depression and can function as a tank destroyer as well as a howitzer.  The gun on the Model 89 has a semiautomatic autoloader, meaning that the loader must affix the fuzes and place the round in the autoloading train for loading into the breech; the breech block is also semiautomatic, and the loader must close the breech.  The Model 89 seems almost to be optimized for the tank destroyer role, as the fire control suite is marginally more advanced than the indirect fire computer. Max Depression is -3 degrees with elevation +70 degrees. A Model 45 normally carries a few antitank rounds (about 10% of its total), but mostly carries howitzer-type rounds. The gun turret has 360 degree rotation and can also fire from any angle.  The Model 45 does not normally have a commanderís machinegun, though an optional one it figured into the entry.  The commander has a manually-rotating cupola, with all-around vision blocks and a night channel is borrows from the gunner.

     Following the BMP-1 design, the MLI-84 has a driverís hatch on the front right hull, and commanderís and gunnerís positions in the turret; the turret has one hatch for the commander.  All three have night vision equipment. The Model 89 has a new engine, the Perkins CV-8V-1240 DTS supercharged diesel developing 360 horsepower; this is larger and heavier, but is more powerful than standard BMP-1 engine, and is also uprated slightly from the MLI-84ís engine.  The fitting of its engine and the associated automatic transmission required rebuilding and enlarging of the engine compartment.  The increase in the length of the hull also allowed small fuel tanks to be incorporated into the walls, increasing the fuel capacity.  The gaps between the roadwheels are also wider. Unfortunately, the suspension is still of the conventional torsion bar type with shock absorbers only on the first and last roadwheels on each side, so the ride can be even rougher than that of the BMP-1.  The heavier weight of the Model 89 also reduced its amphibious capability; it is slow in the water, and freeboard is greatly reduced.  The crew and passenger are protected by a fire detection and extinguishing system, and the commander also has access to a Geiger counter and chemical agent detector, which can be operated with hatches closed.

     The Model 89 retains the MLI-84ís doors in the rear, but has no firing ports.  From the 2S1 turret, the Model 89 inherits the long equipment box on the left side of the turret.  This is large enough to carry ancillary equipment for the Model 89, and little more.  At the rear of the turret are slotted covers used to retract a portion of the suspension during swimming and fording operations.  This of course requires that the turret be squared up with the front when swimming and fording deeply. The Model 89 has an NBC overpressure with a collective NBC backup.  As intimated above, the Model 89 is amphibious, and has waterjets and bilge pumps.  The Model 89 does require an FDC, though it does have one short-range and one long-range secure radio, both with data capability.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

$288,780

D, A

500 kg

17.5 tons

5

14

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

157/110

40/28/11

600

134

Trtd

T4

TF10  TS6  TR6  HF8  HS4  HR4

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Fair

122mm L/40 D-30 Howitzer, NSVT (C)

40x122mm, 500x12.7mm

*Chassis deck armor is 3; Turret deck armor is 5.

 

ROMARM ATROM

     Notes: The ATROM is an export version of the Israeli ATMOS truck-mounted howitzer.  Though the design work was done in Israel, the modifications and construction, as well as some Romania-specific modifications, were done in Romania.  The ATROM is therefore a Romanian vehicle, with the Israelis having finished their assistance with the program.  Though Romania not had any export interests, the Israelis have offered the upgrade package.

     The ATROM uses a MAN 2886 LF-24 turbocharged diesel, developing 360 horsepower, and coupled to a Steyr VG 1600/3000 automatic transmission.  The suspension is 6x6. The howitzer is essentially a ground-mounted howitzer modified for installation on the rear of a truck, and lowered to the ground before firing.  Two spades are also lowered before firing, to stabilize the truck chassis, over and above the recoil mechanism in the howitzer itself.  A departure from the standard ROMAN 26.360 DFAEG chassis is an armored cab, able to stop shell splinters and most small-medium small-arms rounds.  However, during a fire mission, four out of the five crewmembers are at the gun in the rear, which has no armor protection (the driver normally stays at his station).  The cab has an NBC overpressure system, as well as air conditioning and heating.  The vehicle is equipped with a 10kW APU for engine-off operations.

     The gun fires any of the Western 155mm shells, and has an automatic rammer which decreases crew fatigue, especially during long bombardments.  The ATROM also is equipped with a computerized fire control system, an inertial navigation system with mapping computer module and long-range data-capable radios.  An artillery ballistic computer, along with a laptop and other components, gives the ATROM the ability to act has its own FDC.

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological*

$956,345

D, A

500 kg

20.06 tons

5

18

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor*

131/91

33/23

500

133

Trtd

T4

TF5  TS3  TR2

 

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

+2

Fair

155mm L/52 Soltam Howitzer, NSVT (C)

28x155mm, 500x12.7mm

*Hull armor on the ATROM is a bit complicated.  The armor figures listed above are largely for the vehicleís cab.  The fighting compartment is open, and therefore offers little protection; however, the rear half of the vehicle, where the ammunition is stored, is contained within AV2 lockers that can also protect the crew if they crouch behind it, or offer some protection when returning fire with their small arms.  The cabís roof has AV4, as does the floor; in fact, the floor of the entire vehicle has an AV of 4.

**The Radiological protection listed above is for the cab only.  The Radiological rating in the fighting compartment is ďOpen.Ē