DeGroat M-20 Recoilless Rifle 

     Notes:  The M20 entered US Army service in 1945 and was obsolete by the 1970s.  It can still be found in service with many nations, including Thailand.  It is fired from a tripod (40.05 kg). 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-20 Recoilless Rifle

75mm

85.1 kg

2.13 meters

$3650

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

HE

75mm

10 kg

$300

HEAT

75mm

10 kg

$450

WP

75mm

10 kg

$600

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-20

5

200

1670

HE

C7  B20

4C

 

5

200

1670

HEAT

C5  B10

39C

 

5

200

1670

WP

C2  B15

Nil

 

Kroger/Musser M-18A1

     Notes:  Entering service with the US Army in 1946, this recoilless rifle was replaced by larger weapons in the 1960s.  It remains in service with a number of countries, including Thailand.  Recoil on the M18A1 is relatively light, and the weapon can be shoulder-fired, although a tripod or vehicle mount (NMT) is preferred. 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-18A1 Recoilless Rifle

57mm

(Basic) 22.04 kg, (Tripod) 13.36 kg

1.56 meters

(Basic) $2250, (Tripod) $675

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

M-307A1 HEAT

57mm

2.48 kg

$112

M-306A1 HE

57mm

2.48 kg

$74

M-308A1 WP

57mm

2.48 kg

$149

T-25E5 APERS

57mm

2.51 kg

$377

Type 36 HE

57mm

2.54 kg

$76

Type 7 HEAT

57mm

2.44 kg

$110

Italian HE-PFF

57mm

2.64 kg

$79

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-18A1(Bipod/Tripod)

1

115/170

Nil/940

M-307A1 HEAT

C3  B10

27C

 

1

115/170

Nil/940

M-306A1 HE

C4  B15

2C

 

1

115/170

Nil/940

M-308A1 WP

C2  B10

Nil

 

1

115/115

Nil

T-25E5 APERS

B10x25

1-Nil

 

1

115/170

Nil/940

Type 36 HE

C5  B15

2C

 

1

115/170

Nil/940

Type 7 HEAT

C3  B10

39C

 

1

115/170

Nil/940

Italian HE-PFF

C4  B20

1C

 

Picatinny Arsenal M-20A1 3.5” Rocket Launcher 

     Notes:  Nicknamed the Super Bazooka, a smaller version of this weapon (the 2.36” M-1A1) served with fame during World War II.  The 3.5” version was designed in response to North Korean T-34 tanks during that war.  The Bazooka has an extremely short range and requires considerable courage to use effectively, and usually has little effect on modern vehicles.  It is no longer in service with any major army but can be found in use by smaller armies, most notably by fighters in Lebanon, where any weapon is better than none.  Over the years, many new rounds have been developed in an attempt to turn the Bazooka into an effective weapon.

     Swatklip of South Africa designed a variant of the Super Bazooka which was fed by snap-on rear sections that effectively, in game terms, doubled the ROF.  Game statistics are the same, but ammunition is limited to the equivalent of M-28 HEAT , HEDP-FRAG, Illumination, and M-29 HEDP, and the redulting modified Super Bazooka cannot be fired with any other ammunition.

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-20A1

89mm

5.5 kg

1.55 meters

$775

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

CHM-81 HEAT

89mm

2.3 kg

$57

FIM Smoke

89mm

2.7 kg

$46

FIM CHEM

89mm

2.7 kg

$92

Hydroar HEAT

89mm

4 kg

$104

M-28 HEAT

89mm

4.05 kg

$109

M-29 HEDP

89mm

4 kg

$90

NR-415 HEAT-FRAG

89mm

4 kg

$125

Mecar LR HEAT

89mm

2.7 kg

$68

Portuguese HEDP

89mm

4 kg

$87

RJ 3.5AE APAC HEDP-FRAG

89mm

4 kg

$96

Swatklip ILLUM

89mm

2.97 kg

$113

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-20A1

2

115

Nil

CHM81 HEAT

C9  B30

82C

 

2

55

Nil

FIM Smoke/CHEM

C2  (B10)

Nil

 

2

85

Nil

Hydroar HEAT

C8  B30

64C

 

2

45

Nil

M-28 HEAT

C5  B25

29C

 

2

45

Nil

M-29 HEDP

C8  B30

17C

 

2

85

Nil

NR-415 HEAT-FRAG

C6  B38

51C

 

2

120

Nil

Mecar LR HEAT

C8  B30

64C

 

2

55

Nil

Portuguese HEDP

C10  B30

26C

 

2

85

Nil

RJ 3.5AE APAC HEDP-FRAG

C12  B35

35C

 

1

360

Nil

Swatklip ILLUM

C0  B970

Nil

 

Talley M-72 LAW Series

     Notes:  The LAW (Light Antiarmor Weapon) was designed in the mid-60s and has long been obsolete.  However, the LAW is still quite common throughout the world since mountains of them were distributed.  The M72-750 is a progressive improvement of the M-72 series using a faster rocket and heavier warhead, as well as an optional HE warhead.  The M-72 normally comes in a case of 15; the M72-750 comes in a case of 10 HEAT and 5 HE rockets.  The M72-750 had few sales. 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-72A2

66mm

2.36 kg (Complete)

655mm (Stowed), 893mm (Firing)

$240

M-72A3

66mm

2.5 kg (Complete)

665mm (Stowed), 899mm (Firing)

$250

M-72A4

66mm

3.45 kg (Complete)

775mm (Stowed), 980mm (Firing)

$280

M-72A5

66mm

3.45 kg (Complete)

775mm (Stowed), 980mm (Firing)

$290

M-72A6

66mm

3.45 kg (Complete)

775mm (Stowed), 980mm (Firing)

$270

M72-750 HE

66mm

4.4 kg (Complete)

724mm (Stowed), 942mm (Firing)

$280

M72-750 HEAT

66mm

4.4 kg (Complete)

724mm (Stowed), 942mm (Firing)

$290

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-72A2

0

55

Nil

HEAT

C4  B20

54C

M-72A3

0

70

Nil

HEAT

C4  B20

53C

M-72A4

0

90

Nil

HEAT

C4  B20

63C

M-72A5

0

90

Nil

HEAT-HE

C6  B22

53C

M-72A6

0

90

Nil

HEDP

C7  B25

24C

M72-750

0

155

Nil

HE

C8  B30

3C

 

0

155

Nil

HEAT

C4  B4

69C

 

Talley M-141 BDM

     Notes: The M-141 BDM (Bunker-Defeat Munition, formerly called the SMAW-D) is a one-shot LAW-type design weapon meant to provide an anti-fortification capability, primarily for the US Army, which was smaller than the full Mk 153 Mod 0 system but still had the same useful firepower against strongpoints and bunched-up troops.  The M-141 essentially uses the rocket and warhead of the Mk 153 Mod 0’s Mk 3 HEDP warhead and packages it into a lightweight, one-shot weapon.  The BDM was given the OK for production in 1994, but did not enter unit issue until 1999, and production was capped at the time at 6000 rounds, pending the development of a then-unspecified bunker-defeat munition. In light of the need for such a weapon in Iraq and later Afghanistan, the BDM was again put into production.  New to the M-141 is a version with the Mk 153 Mod 0’s NE warhead; this is the M-141 HIT (High Impulse Thermobaric) warhead.  The M-141 is a simple weapon using AT-4-like sights and otherwise kept as simple as possible, for use by any troop trained in its use; a number of night vision devices can also be mounted on a bracket built into the tube.  Limited use is being made by the US Marines, but the primary user is the US Army; the Lebanese Army also uses the M-141.

     The current BDM shares the same massive backblast as the Mk 153 Mod 0.  A version is being designed using the CS warheads being designed for the Mk 153 Mod 1, but these have been just as heavily-delayed as those for the SMAW II.  I have designated these the M-141A1, but these are not official designations.

     It should be noted that the rationale behind having a separate system for bunker-defeat munitions and anti-armor munitions has been challenged several times, and that it would be more cost-effective to procure variants of the AT-4, which is already in the US Army inventory.  I agree with this, but only time will tell.  One should never underestimate groupthink and the military-industrial complex, as well as our legislators’ willingness to spread the defense dollars around despite what is called for by efficiency.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Limited numbers of the SMAW-D were available for the Twilight War, but only with the Mk 3 HEDP warhead.

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-141

83mm

7.26 kg

813mm

$360

M-141 HIT

83mm

9.11 kg

813mm

$641

M-141A1

83mm

8.01 kg

813mm

$372

M-141A1 HIT

83mm

9.81 kg

813mm

$679

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-141

0

85

Nil

Mk 3 HEDP

C10  B32

41C

M-141 HIT

0

80

Nil

Mk 80 NE

C65  B40

23C

M-141A1

0

100

Nil

Mk 31 HEDP

C12  B32

49C

M-141A1 HIT

0

95

Nil

Mk 81 NE

C65  B40

23C

 

Talley/Nammo Mk 153 Mod 0 SMAW

     Notes:  The Shoulder-Mounted Assault Weapon (SMAW) is based partially on the Israeli B-300 and partially on a McDonnell Douglas development for the US Marines.  Originally, the US Army was also participating in the program, for use by the Rangers, Special Forces, and other special ops units; however, they decided to go with the M-3 version of the Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle.  Their designation would have been the M-12, had they adopted it.  Though the US Army ultimately decided against the SMAW, some 150 launchers were borrowed by the US Army during Desert Storm for use by Rangers, Special Forces, and Delta; there are rumors that more were borrowed during Operation Iraqi Freedom, and that the Army may be considering the SMAW as an issue weapon. In addition to the US Marines, the SMAW is used by Taiwanese Marines and the Lebanese Army. The SMAW has been in use by the US Marines since 1984.

     The SMAW comes in the form of a two part unit, with a forward epoxy/fiberglass launch tube which also has a firing grip and forward grip.  Near the end of the launch tube portion is a shoulder stop, and the tube also has an extendible bipod for use when prone or in a standing position where the gunner can rest the weapon on something in front of him.  A round of ammunition in a disposable tube is snapped into the rear of the launch tube, and at this point an electrical connection is made between the firing grip and the round of ammunition.  A safety lever is then switched on and the weapon can be fired.  However, the firing grip also has a selector; this allows the gunner to instead fire a round of special 9x51mm ammunition which is ballistically matched to the characteristics of the rocket round.  The shooter can use this spotting rifle to improve his aim; for every hit he makes on his target before his rocket shot, he gets a +1 to hit with his rocket shot, to a maximum of +3.  The spotting rifle is fed by a 6-round magazine; a magazine for the spotting rifle is clipped to each of the rocket rounds when they are issued. The spotting rifle is similar to that used on the British LAW-80, as it was adapted from that weapon; the ammunition is identical. The firing tube also has a telescopic sight with a magnification of x3.8, and includes an illuminated aiming stadia for night and day use. This sight can be removed and replaced with most US and NATO night vision devices.

     The rockets have spring-out fins which deploy after the round leaves the launcher.   There are several types available. The round below listed as “NE” stands for “Novel Explosive,” but it is a thermobaric round with further-enhanced blast features.  The HEAA (high-Explosive Anti-Armor) is simply another designation for a HEAT round. The FTG (Follow-Though Grenade) round uses an HEDP primary warhead with a behind-armor warhead which is smaller but has an extra fragmentation jacket. The SMAW has earned a dubious distinction on the battlefield – it is perhaps the loudest infantry-carried weapon, with a firing volume of 152.3 decibels, loud enough that the use of earplugs is recommended even in battle conditions when using the SMAW.  Backblast is a problem, enough that standard doctrine calls for no one to be within 100 meters and a 60-degree cone behind the SMAW when it is fired. The standard crew for a SMAW is two Marines; add two phases to the reload time if no assistant gunner is available.  In addition, without an A-gunner, the use of the spotting rifle is basically impossible for the gunner beyond the first shot if he is alone; this is because the spotting rifle is bolt-action and the gunner would have to take the launcher off his shoulder to cock it due to where it is located on the launcher – cocking is normally done by the A-gunner. 

     Talley and Nammo have responded to the US Marines request for a new version of the SMAW, tentatively to be called the Mk 153 Mod 1 SMAW II; the program itself is the FOTS (Follow-On to SMAW) program.  This version addresses a number of problem areas, such as the sights, which can be difficult to properly employ against moving targets.  Another problem is a tendency for the launcher to have a slight boresight problem when a round of ammunition is snapped in, which can affect the accuracy of the SMAW.  The spotting rifle is redesigned to make it more easily used by a lone gunner (he doesn’t have to take the launcher off his shoulder, but can make only one shot per two phases).  Perhaps the biggest change is the composition of the launch tube, which is a graphite/carbon fiber composite which not only has greatly-extended life span (the lifespan of a standard Mk 153 Mod 0 version is about 250 rounds) and is much lighter than the Mk 153 Mod 0.  The Mk 153 Mod 1 program is, however, far behind schedule; current estimates put first combat tests in late 2011, with production beginning in mid-2012. Current SMAW rockets will remain compatible with the SMAW II.

     Along with the SMAW II, new rockets are being developed.  These rounds are of the CS (Confined Space) type, using the Davis Countershot Principle, and also have improved range and effects for all but the NE rounds. Both the SMAW and SMAW II will be able to use these rockets, but like the SMAW II itself, the in-service date for these new rounds has slipped considerably. 

     The designations I have used for the new rounds below are not official; they are used primarily for game convenience.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: In the Twilight 2000 timeline, large amounts of SMAW’s were also issued to US Army troops, especially in the Middle East, and generally not redesignated to the “M-12” designation.  They were also sold to Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Qatar, and the Israelis also used some to supplement their B-300’s. None of the new generation of rounds for the SMAW exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor does the NE round.

     Merc 2000 Notes: The Army began issuing the M-12 to the Rangers, Special Forces, 82nd Airborne, and 101st Air Assault in 2002; these were designated the M-12.

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

Mk 153 Mod 0 SMAW

83mm

7.5 kg

825mm (Stowed), 1380 meters (Firing)

$875

Mk 153 Mod 0 SMAW II

83mm

4.99 kg

825mm (Stowed), 1380 meters (Firing)

$919

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

Mk 3 HEDP

83mm

5.95 kg

$133

Mk 6 HEAA

83mm

6.4 kg

$172

Mk 7 FTG

83mm

7.1 kg

$193

Mk 80 NE

83mm

7.8 kg

$414

Mk 31 HEDP

83mm

6.7 kg

$145

Mk 61 HEAA

83mm

7.1 kg

$185

Mk 71 FTG

83mm

7.8 kg

$211

Mk 81 NE

83mm

8.5 kg

$452

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

Mk 153 SMAW

3

125

Nil

Mk 3 HEDP

C10  B32

41C

 

3

120

Nil

Mk 6 HEAA

C8  B30

76C

 

3

120

Nil

Mk 7 FTG

C7  B50

30C/5C

 

3

115

Nil

Mk 80 NE

C65  B40

23C

 

3

145

Nil

Mk 31 HEDP

C12  B32

49C

 

3

140

Nil

Mk 61 HEAA

C9  B30

93C

 

3

130

Nil

Mk 71 FTG

C8  B50

36C/7C

 

3

130

Nil

Mk 81 NE

C65  B40

23C

 

Uhl M-1A1 2.36” Rocket Launcher (Bazooka)

     Notes: The predecessor of the Super Bazooka below, the M-1A1 was one of the first antitank rocket launchers.  It was, unfortunately, unreliable and even dangerous to its shooter due to the ineffective warhead.  The warhead was small, but better than nothing, and had good success against light armor.  (There is even one recorded kill by a Bazooka against a Tiger tank, though I don’t know the story behind that one.)  The name “Bazooka” is due to the resemblance of the rocket launcher to a musical instrument played by a popular cartoon character of the time; he played an instrument he called a Bazooka.  The launcher was a simple tube with a pistol grip, forward handgrip, and shoulder stop, though in later versions the forward handgrip was eliminated, and the design simplified to facilitate rapid production.  By the time of its introduction, it was already fast becoming obsolete.  Though at first only HEAT rockets were produced for the Bazooka, HE and WP rockets were later made late in World War 2. The WP rockets could be dangerous to the firing team as the casing tended to rupture. By the Korean War, the M-1A1 was replaced by a heavier version, the Super Bazooka, below). The M-1A1 can still be found here and there in service, usually with insurgents and irregular forces.

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-1A1

60mm

5.8 kg

1.37 meters

$174

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

HE

60mm

1.55 kg

$23

HEAT

60mm

1.55 kg

$34

WP

60mm

1.55 kg

$44

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-1A1

1

64

Nil

HE

C4  B20

2C

 

1

64

Nil

HEAT

C2  B15

17C

 

1

64

Nil

WP

C2  B10

Nil

 

Watervliet M-27A1 

     Notes:  This recoilless rifle is easily confused with the lighter M-40A1 106mm recoilless rifle.  It is no longer in service with the US Army, but was adopted by several other countries, including Thailand.  It can be fired from a vehicle mount or a tripod (NHT).  The M-27A1 was a troublesome launcher which suffered from insufficient field testing.

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-27A1 Recoilless Rifle

105mm

165 kg

3.2 meters

$6050

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

HEAT

105mm

16 kg

$720

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-27A1

8

200

710

HEAT

C7  B15

56C

 

M-40A2 

     Notes:  This was once a widely used weapon as late as the Vietnam War, but is now in front-line service only in smaller armies and by Israel.  It did, however, in the hands of rebels, make a dent in Libyan Army armor in the recent fighting. Special units such as US Army Rangers also use it.  The M40A2 is commonly mounted on a light vehicle, but can also be mounted on a tripod.  It is equipped with a telescopic sight and a .50 spotting rifle.  A little-known fact is that the ammunition is not actually 106mm in caliber; it is 105mm (though not interchangeable with the M-27A1's ammunition), and the designation was changed to avoid confusion, and to increase user confidence over the troublesome M-27A1. 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-40A2 Recoilless Rifle

106mm

209.5 kg

3.4 meters

$8500

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

3A-HEAT-T

106mm

14.5 kg

$489

Chinese HE

106mm

21.6 kg

$324

Chinese HEAT

106mm

15.6 kg

$351

German HE-FRAG

106mm

8 kg

$120

Israeli I-HEAT

106mm

13.37 kg

$201

M-581 APERS

106mm

18.73 kg

$1405

M-344A1 HEAT

106mm

16.89 kg

$380

M-346 HESH

106mm

16.95 kg

$445

RAT-700 HEAT-T

106mm

15.7 kg

$530

Spanish M-DN-11 FRAG

106mm

16.4 kg

$246

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-40A2

7

320

2240

3A-HEAT-T

C15  B20

96C/120C

 

11

305

2140

Chinese HE

C22  B35

9C

 

8

320

2240

Chinese HEAT

C11  B20

73C

 

4

320

2240

German HE-FRAG

C15  B40

5C

 

7

350

2465

Israeli I-HEAT

C13  B20

99C

 

7

195

Nil

M-581 APERS

B30x65

1-Nil

 

8

320

2240

M-344A1 HEAT

C11  B20

78C

 

8

320

2240

M-346 HESH

C14  B25

62C

 

7

320

2240

RAT-700 HEAT-T

C15  B20

133C/173C

 

8

315

2210

Spanish M-DN-11 FRAG

C13  B38

5C

 

Watervliet M-67 

     Notes:  Designed as a readily portable antiarmor weapon (when the shortcomings of the Bazooka became apparent), the M-67 was replaced in the US inventory by the Dragon ATGM and in most other countries’ inventory by various missiles.  Available on the open market for years, many smaller armies still use it in 2000.  It is still used by Israel and was replaced in 1991 in US Army Ranger and Special Forces units by the Carl Gustav M-3.  The M-67 can be broken into two sections for transport. 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-67 Recoilless Rifle

90mm

16 kg

1.35 meters

$3250

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

APERS M-590

90mm

3.08 kg

$462

HE K-242

90mm

4.6 kg

$138

HEAT M-371A1

90mm

4.2 kg

$207

 

Weapon

Reload

Range

IFR

Round Type

Damage

Pen

M-67

2

90

Nil

APERS

B20x35

1-Nil

 

2

180

945

HE

C12  B35

7C

 

2

180

945

HEAT

C8  B15

65C

 

Watervliet M-202A1 Flash 

     Notes:  “Flash” is a common nickname given to this weapon by the troops who use it.  The US Army officially classifies it as a flame weapon.  It is found only in special units and certain National Guard units.  The M202 is and is somewhat dangerous to its gunners, since the WP filler is very volatile and the rockets are fragile.  HEAT and CHEM clips for this weapon are extremely rare, produced only on an experimental basis.  The weapon is automatic, firing one rocket per second unless the trigger is released. 

Weapon

Caliber

Weight

Length

Price

M-202A1

66mm

5 kg

827mm

$1000

 

Ammunition

Caliber

Weight

Price

CHEM

4x66mm

7 kg (Per Clip)

$102 (Per Clip)

HEAT

4x66mm

7 kg (Per Clip)

$148

WP

4x66mm

7 kg (Per Clip)

$194

 

Weapon

ROF

Reload

Range

IFR

Round

Damage

Pen

M-202A1

4

4

135

Nil

CHEM

C2  (B5)

Nil

 

4

4

135

Nil

HEAT

C4  B20

46C

 

4

4

135

Nil

WP

C2  B15

Nil