Smith & Wesson 31 Regulation Police

     Notes: The Model 31 is based on an earlier revolver, the Model 30 Hand Ejector (which was in turn based on the earlier M-1903 Hand Ejector), and was built on the new (at the time) I-Frame starting in 1948, and continuing until 1991.  The Model 31 was, early in production and issue, referred to as the .32 Regulation Police, though this term properly refers to a pre-war Smith & Wesson revolver in the same caliber but the same general design as early Model 31 production versions. Finish was blued or nickel-plated, and the revolver had a rounded butt with walnut grips.  The Model 31-1 was a version of this revolver based on the J-Frame instead of the old (by then) I-Frame; it was built from 1960-76.  The Model 31 Regulation Police Target was a rare variant of the Model 31 (only 200 built); it had an adjustable target-style rear sight, but is otherwise identical to the standard Model 31 with a 4-inch barrel for game purposes.  Original barrel lengths available were 1.25, 2, 3, 3.25, 4, and 4.25 inches; in 1957, barrel lengths were standardized at 2, 3, and 4 inches, with the 4-inch barrel being dropped from production in 1978.  (The Models 31-2 and 31-3 were thus produced only with 2 or 3-inch barrels, and Model 31-1s were produced only with 2, 3, and 4-inch barrels.) Original barrels were pinned, but in 1982, the pinning of the barrel was deleted, and in 1988 with the Model 32-2, a new yoke retention system and radius stud package increased safety of the unpinned barrel. Finishes were blued or nickel-plated; the original front sight was a rounded half-moon shape; in 1957, this was changed to a 0.1-inch wide serrated ramp. The Model 31 had a square-notch rear sight; this was originally a bit narrow, but the notch width was increased to 0.125 inches in 1990 (the Model 31-3).  The grips were originally checkered walnut grips with Smith & Wesson medallions set within them; the checkering was dropped in 1968.  The original frame used was the I-Frame, but with the Model 31-1 in 1961, the base frame of the Model 31 was changed to the slightly-larger J-Frame, with weight going up somewhat.  In all almost incarnations, the Model 31 remained a light revolver for the most part suitable for short-range self-defense work or as an undercover weapon, though one of the early versions with a 4.25-inch barrel was almost a creditable combat weapon.

 

The Model 331Ti Chiefs Special Airlite Ti

     In 1999, the Model 31 was reintroduced as the Model 331Ti , or the .32 Magnum Chiefs Special Airlite Ti.  The Model 331Ti was produced until 2003. Though the basic form of the Model 331Ti was along the same lines as the Model 31, the frame of the Model 331Ti is of light alloy, with a cylinder of titanium alloy, resulting in a very lightweight revolver. All barrels for the Model 331Ti were 1.875 inches; a 3-inch-barrel version was planned, but never produced.  Sights are fixed front and rear; on prototypes and the very early production models, the front sight was pinned; however, few were built, and fewer sold, as the pinned front sights tend to produce an aiming error even when lined up properly. The barrel and shroud are not attached to the frame in the normal manner for Smith & Wesson revolvers, requiring the use of a special wrench for removal, attachment, or adjustment. The trigger is a wide, smooth combat trigger, and the hammer checkered.  The grips may be Uncle Mike’s Boot Grip or a DymondWood grip. (The Model 332Ti with the DymondWood grip is a bit lighter than the same weapon with an Uncle Mike’s Boot Grip; in game terms, they shoot identically, but in real terms, the Uncle Mike’s Grip is more comfortable to shoot.)  The finish is matte stainless with a dark gray cylinder (due to the titanium alloy).  The Model 331-1Ti was supposed to be the 3-inch-barrel “target” version, with micrometer-adjustable rear sights and a match-quality barrel; this version was never actually produced (though prototypes were made), but I have included it below as a “what-if.”  It would have entered production in 2000 if production had actually occurred. The Model 331-2Ti, which replaced the standard Model 331Ti in production, is the same weapon in game terms except that it has an internal lock that may be locked and unlocked with a key inserted into the side of the frame; this lock blocks the movement of both the hammer and trigger.  The Model 331-3Ti was supposed to be a version of the Model 331-2Ti with a 3” match barrel and a micrometer-adjustable rear sight; again, only prototypes were built and for game purposes, it is identical to the 331-1Ti “what-if” detailed presented below.  Model 331s were a bit unusual in that they were designed specifically .32 H&R Magnum, and small internal cylinder shaping differences will not allow them to accept .32 Smith & Wesson rounds.

 

The Model 432PD Magnum Chiefs Special Airweight

     In 2004, another version, the Model 431PD, also called the .32 Magnum Chiefs Special Airweight, was introduced.  Though the base was the Model 31, and it was built on the same three-frame-screw J-Frame, the Model 431 is a very different revolver.  It is chambered for the .32 H&R Magnum, and .32 Smith & Wesson Long will not fit into the cylinders.  Weight is substantially reduced from the Model 31 though the used of an alloy frame, though virtually all of the rest of the revolver is carbon steel.  Finish is normally matte blued, but some had a matte stainless finish. The barrel is a short 1.875 inches; the barrel shroud is light alloy, though it has a stainless steel liner.  The grips may be checkered walnut, or a wrap-around rubber boot grip.  The weapon was manufactured only until 2005, but sold until 2006; it was the last Chiefs Special produced in .32.  The resemblances to the Model 331-1Ti are obvious.

 

Special Versions

     In 2000, a version of the Model 331Ti, the Model 331Sc Chiefs Special Airlite Sc, was shown at the NRA 2000 show, along with a similar model, the Model 332Sc Airlite Centennial Sc (below).  However, the Model 331Sc failed to appear in Smith & Wesson’s catalogs, and officially, none were ever sold. The Model 3321c shown at the NRA 2000 show had a scandium alloy frame, and a cylinder made mostly of scandium alloy, and some parts of the cylinder made of aluminum.  Other parts are made of steel.  The revolver had a satin black finish and a Hogue Bantam rubber monogrip.  Barrel length was 1.875 inches. The Model 331Sc was very light in weight and had correspondingly heavy recoil.  However, the Model 331Sc never made it to the market, though again it is rumored that a few leaked out.

     A rare version of the Model 31, the Model 631 Magnum Target Stainless, was produced for most of 1990, but never after that, and only 5474 were produced.  As can be inferred from the name, the Model 631 is made almost entirely of stainless steel, with a matte finish.  Four versions of the Model 631 were produced.  One is a version with a 2-inch barrel and fixed sights.  Another has a four-inch barrel with a micrometer-adjustable rear sight, a narrow aiming rib, and a ramp front sight which has a red stripe on the slope of the ramp. The Model 631 LadySmith is essentially the same as the 2-inch Model 631 for game purposes; it has rosewood stocks, and is laser-etched with “LadySmith” on the sideplates.  A fourth version (called a “Kit Gun” version) has interchangeable 2-inch and 4” barrels, a round butt, the ramp front sight in a insert so that it can be replaced or removed, a micrometer-adjustable rear sight, a satin stainless finish, and a wider, serrated trigger.  Only 40 of these were built; they are identical to the standard Model 631s for game purposes. A sort of fifth version exists; this can have a 2-inch or 4-inch barrel, but is professionally finished in matte black.  This version was never in the Smith & Wesson catalogs; however, there are a substantial number of them and they all carry Smith & Wesson logos.  It is a mystery who finished them, but the finish is tough, rust-resistant, and definitely a professional job.  For game purposes, however, they are identical to standard Model 631s.  It should be noted that of all these versions of the Model 631, the LadySmith began production first, with the 4-inch barrel version being next, the standard 2-inch barrel version after that, and the Kit Gun being the last, near the end of the production run. It should also be noted that the 2-inch barrel version is also rather rare, with only 190 produced. Model 631s otherwise all have Goncalo Alves walnut combat grips with Smith & Wesson medallions, a smooth combat trigger which is wider than on most other members of the Model 31 family (except for the Model 631 Kit Gun), and a wide, serrated hammer.

      Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 331Ti (and Model 331Sc) and the Model 431PD are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 31 (1.25” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.45 kg

6 Cylinder

$99

Model 31 (2” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.48 kg

6 Cylinder

$107

Model 31 (3” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.5 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 31 (3.25” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.51 kg

6 Cylinder

$120

Model 31 (4” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.52 kg

6 Cylinder

$127

Model 31 (4.25” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.53 kg

6 Cylinder

$130

Model 31-1 (2” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.54 kg

6 Cylinder

$107

Model 31-1 (3” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.56 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 31-1 (4” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.59 kg

6 Cylinder

$127

Model 331Ti (Uncle Mike’s Grip)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.34 kg

6 Cylinder

$116

Model 331Ti (DymondWood Grip)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$116

Model 331-1Ti (Uncle Mike’s Grip)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.36 kg

6 Cylinder

$128

Model 331-1Ti (DymondWood Grip)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.34 kg

6 Cylinder

$128

Model 331Sc

.32 H&R Magnum

0.3 kg

6 Cylinder

$118

Model 431PD

.32 H&R Magnum

0.34 kg

6 Cylinder

$116

Model 631 (2” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum and .32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.62 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 631 (4” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum and .32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.72 kg

6 Cylinder

$137

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 31 (1.25”)

DAR

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

1

Model 31 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 31 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 31 (3.25”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 31 (4”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

Model 31 (4.25”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

8

Model 31-1 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 31-1 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

5

Model 31-1 (4”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

Model 331Ti/Sc

DAR

2

Nil

0

7

Nil

2

Model 331-1Ti

DAR

2

Nil

1

7

Nil

5

Model 431PD

DAR

2

Nil

0

7

Nil

2

Model 631 (2”, .32 Magnum)

DAR

2

Nil

0

4

Nil

2

Model 631 (2”, .32 Model Long)

DAR

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

2

Model 631 (4”, .32 Magnum)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Model 631 (4”, .32 Model Long)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

 

Smith & Wesson 32

     Notes: Also known as the .38/.32 Terrier or the .38 Regulation Police (carryovers from its previous designations not often used today, and reflecting its heritage as a Model 31 up-sized to .38 Smith & Wesson caliber).  The Model 32, though produced from 1948-1974, was not produced in the large numbers that other Smith & Wesson models were built (though over 68,000 were built); these were primarily used by police in their early years, and sold to civilians starting in the 1960s (including ex-police revolvers).  The Model 32 is very light, even in its Model 32-1 J-Frame version (earlier models used the I-Frame).  The Model 32 had black rubber grips originally, but in 1968, this was changed to checkered walnut.  Both had a Smith & Wesson logo medallion on the left side of the grip. Finished were blued or nickel-plated.  The thumb safety shape was changed three times during production.  The original-production Model 32 had five screws holding the frame together; with the change to the J-Frame, this went from five, to four, and finally to three screws.  All Model 32s used a 2-inch pinned barrel.

 

The Model 332Ti Airlite Centennial

     From 1999-2003, the Model 332Ti Airlite Centennial was produced (and in 2004, removed from the company’s catalogs).  This is built on the standard J-Frame, but the frame is of light alloy, the cylinder of titanium alloy parts, and the rest of steel. Perhaps the biggest change from the Model 32 is the change to .32 H&R Magnum chambering, making it essentially a lightly-larger Model 331Ti. The barrel is 2 inches, with fixed sights and a decent barrel shroud; the barrel and shroud are not attached to the frame in the normal manner for Smith & Wesson revolvers, requiring the use of a special wrench for removal, attachment, or adjustment.  (Those rare Model 332Tis with pinned front sights were originally prototypes; few were built, and fewer sold, as the pinned front sights tend to produce an aiming error even when lined up properly.) The trigger is a wide, smooth combat trigger, and the hammer checkered.  The grips may be Uncle Mike’s Boot Grip or a DymondWood grip. The Model 332Ti with the DymondWood grip is a bit lighter than the same weapon with an Uncle Mike’s Boot Grip. Most had a matte stainless finish with a dark titanium cylinder, but some 100 with a blue finish (except for the cylinder) were produced for export.  In 2001, the Model 332-1Ti replaced the Model 332Ti in production; this is the same as the Model 332Ti, but has an internal locking system that allows the user to lock the hammer and trigger by the use of a special key inserted in the side of the frame.  (It could be an interesting play point if a PC finds a Model 332-1Ti that is locked, and has no key…)

     In 2000, a version of the Model 332, the Model 332Sc Centennial, was shown at the NRA 2000 show.  However, the Model 332Sc failed to appear in Smith & Wesson’s catalogs, and officially, none were ever sold. The Model 332Sc shown at the NRA 2000 show had a scandium alloy frame, and a cylinder made mostly of scandium alloy, and some parts of the cylinder made of aluminum.  Other parts are made of steel.  The revolver had a satin black finish and a Hogue Bantam rubber monogrip.  Barrel length was 2 inches. The Model 332Sc was very light in weight and had correspondingly heavy recoil.  However, the Model 332Sc never made it to the market, though again it is rumored that a few leaked out. It is presented here as more of a “what-if” than anything else.

 

The Model 432PD Magnum Centennial Airweight

     Introduced in 2004, the Model 432PD is essentially slightly-different version of the Model 431PD.  It is also known as .32 Magnum Centennial Airweight. The barrel is 2 inches; the frame is still light alloy, but the cylinder is carbon steel instead of titanium.  Like the Model 331Ti, the Model 432PD requires a special barrel tool. Most were produced with a blued finish, and equipped with a Hogue Bantam monogrip.  The trigger is smooth, but a bit narrower than that of the Model 431PD, and the hammer is fully internal (the Model 432PD cannot be thumb-cocked.).  The Model 432PD was produced only until 2005, but sold by Smith & Wesson into 2006.

 

The Model 632 Magnum Centennial Airweight Stainless

     The Model 632 Magnum Centennial Airweight Stainless was a small-production-run version of the Model 32, produced from 1991-92, and was the first version of the Model 32 produced after the original Model 32’s production ended.  Despite the name, the frame is in fact of light alloy, though it has a faux matte stainless finish.  Most of the other parts are in fact stainless steel, including the cylinder and barrel.  The Model 632 uses a wide combat trigger and a fully concealed hammer.  The Model 632 was produced in 2-inch-barrel and 3-inch-barrel versions, though the 3-inch barrel was dropped from production shortly before production of the Model 632 ended (though both versions remained in Smith & Wesson’s catalog until 1993). The 2-inch-barrel version had smooth walnut grips, while the 3-inch-barrel version was made with Uncle Mike’s Santoprene grips. The sights consists of a fixed notch rear and a serrated ramp front.  In approximately 2009 (I have not yet been able to determine the exact year of introduction), Smith & Wesson put a version of the Model 632 on the market chambered for .327 Federal (a small-caliber magnum round).  Two iterations of this version of the Model 632 are available: the Model 632-1, which has a 2.125-inch full-lug barrel, fixed front and rear sights (with the rear notch being tritium-lined and the front having a tritium inlay for night use), but most other construction details similar to the original Model 632. The Model 632-2 PowerPort is almost a different animal; it has a 3-inch full-lug ported barrel, sights consisting of a high serrated and pinned front ramp and a micrometer-adjustable rear, and a small, flat, exposed hammer.  Both of these iterations have Uncle Mike’s rubber grips, though of different types for each, and both may be finished in satin stainless or blued.  In addition, unlike the rest of the Model 32 series, the Model 632-1 and 632-2 are made of all stainless steel (except for the grips).

 

The Model 032 Centennial Airweight

     The Model 032 Centennial Airweight (note the “0” in front of the “32”) is a version of the Model 32 produced in 1992 only, with only 180 produced.  It is somewhat of a mystery; it never appeared in any of Smith & Wesson customer catalogs, but was sold in gun shops and from dealer’s catalogs, and was definitely a Smith & Wesson product.  The frame is of light alloy, while most of the rest of the Model 032 is made from stainless steel.  The finish, however, is generally flat or matte blue (with rare examples of polished blue finishes).  The Model 032 has a round butt with Uncle Mike’s combat grips.  The trigger is somewhat wide, but smooth; the hammer is fully concealed.  The rear sight is a fixed square notch, while the front sight is a serrated ramp.  The barrel is 2 inches. It is believed that the Model 032s produced were made from cosmetically imperfect Model 632 parts, as some parts have blemishes, scratches, grind marks, and other such problems, though they are not always visible when the Model 032 is fully assembled.  As a firearm, the Model 032 is not a sub-standard or inferior weapon – it’s just cosmetically imperfect.  Ironically, it’s rarity means that the Model 032 will generally fetch a higher real-world price today than will a standard Model 632, despite the cosmetic imperfections. For game purposes, the Model 032 is identical to the Model 632 with a 2-inch barrel.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 332Ti (and Model 332Sc) and Model 432PD are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor are the Models 632-1 and 632-2.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 32

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.48 kg

5 Cylinder

$113

Model 32-1

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$113

Model 332Ti (Uncle Mike’s Grips)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.34 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 332Ti (DymondWood Grips)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 332Sc

.32 H&R Magnum

0.29 kg

6 Cylinder

$119

Model 432PD

.32 H&R Magnum

0.38 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 632 (2” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum and .32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.44 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

Model 632 (3” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum and .32 Smith & Wesson Long

0.5 kg

6 Cylinder

$128

Model 632-1

.327 Federal

0.65 kg

6 Cylinder

$126

Model 632-2

.327 Federal

0.69 kg

6 Cylinder

$162

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 32/Model 32-1

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

3

Model 332Ti

DAR

2

Nil

0

7

Nil

2

Model 332Sc

DAR

2

Nil

0

8

Nil

2

Model 432PD

DAR

2

Nil

0

6

Nil

2

Model 632 (2”, .32 Magnum)

DAR

2

Nil

0

5

Nil

2

Model 632 (2”, .32 Model Long)

DAR

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

2

Model 632 (4”, .32 Magnum)

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 632 (4”, .32 Model Long)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 632-1

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 632-2

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 33

     Notes: The Model 33 was known as the .38 Regulation Police in its pre-World War 2 incarnation.  In fact, initial production has the words “Regulation Police” stamped on them, but this was replaced with “Model 33” in late post-war production. It was produced from 1949-1974, but in ever-decreasing numbers due to police and the general public’s preferences changing to more powerful revolver ammunition like the .38 Special and .357 Magnum.  The Model 33 was initially based on the I-Frame, but in 1961 this was changed to a J-Frame base. Initial sights were a fixed square notch rear and a round half-moon front; the front sight was later changed to a serrated ramp.  The barrel was a 4-inch pinned barrel. The Model 33 has walnut grips; initially, these had Smith & Wesson medallions set in the grips surrounded by a diamond-shape, but the diamond around medallion was deleted in 1968 during a general program to reduce production costs.  Despite the long barrel, general construction was light, along with the weight; this construction was largely of carbon steel, with a blued finish.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 33

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.51 kg

5 Cylinder

$135

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 33

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

10

 

Smith & Wesson 34

     The Model 34, also known as the .22/.32 Kit Gun early in its production (from its pre-war guise), was originally produced using the I-Frame, and changed to the J-Frame in 1960 as the Model 34-1 (which is in game terms identical to the standard Model 34).  In both cases, the Model 34 is essentially a rimfire revolver on a frame normally used for heavier .32 and .38 pistols, resulting in a rather stable firing platform.  The Model 34 was produced from 1953-1991, enjoying a long production run.  The Model 34 uses a micrometer-adjustable rear sight and a ramp front sight which looks higher than it actually is, although in 1972, 15 were produced with fixed rear sights (with 4-inch barrels) in response to a specific request by an unnamed buyer.  Of these 15, only four were actually assembled and shipped; what happened to the parts for the other 11 is unknown, though the parts of the revolver were probably used in other Model 34s, minus the fixed rear sight.  2-inch-barrel models were also produced in some numbers with fixed sights for use as police training guns. The Original triggers were of normal width and serrated; later, this was changed to a wide, smooth combat trigger.  Barrels are 2 or 4 inches; most will be found with pinned barrels, but in 1982, the pinning was discontinued in favor of a barrel design that did not use pinning.  Finishes are blued or nickel-plated, except for the hammer, which is color-case hardened.  Grips are of smooth walnut; originally, these had Smith & Wesson medallions with a diamond around them, but the diamond was discontinued in 1968.  Other improvements, introduced in 1988, gave the Model 34 an improved cylinder yoke and ejection rod.  This was the Model 34-2, which is in game terms identical to the standard Model 34.

     The Model 35 uses the Model 34 as a base, but is designed for target shooting, and does not have any provisions for interchanging barrels (and the Model 34 cannot use the Model 35’s barrel).  The Model 35 has a 6-inch pinned match-quality barrel with a Patridge front sight and a micrometer rear sight.  It uses checkered walnut grips with the Smith & Wesson logo surrounded by a diamond in each side of the grip; in addition, the grips had a squared-off bottom, and could be had in several widths in accordance with the buyer’s wishes.  Smith & Wesson was also willing to install different sights upon request.  The Model 35 used the early serrated trigger, and a wide, checkered hammer.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 34 (2” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.62 kg

6 Cylinder

$66

Model 34 (4” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.68 kg

6 Cylinder

$86

Model 35

.22 Long Rifle

0.71 kg

6 Cylinder

$106

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 34 (2”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

3

Model 34 (4”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Model 35

DAR

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

Smith & Wesson 36 Chiefs’ Special

     Notes:  This weapon was first shown to the public at a police officer’s conference in Colorado in 1950; the officers themselves gave the weapon the name “Chiefs’ Special.”  It was the first of their small J-Frame revolvers.  Production began in 1951 and ended in 2000, except for certain special versions; however, production of the Model 36-1 picked up again in 2004 and continues today. The Model 36 became popular with undercover police officers and higher-ranking officers due to its small size. They are made of carbon steel. Most have a blued or nickel-plated finish, and smooth walnut round-butt grips, with the Smith & Wesson logo. A few have nickel-plated frames and blued barrels and cylinders, nickel-plated barrels and blued frames, or some other combination of this. In 1994, the grips were changed to Uncle Mike’s rubber grips. Early production models had fixed rear sights and a half-moon front sight, but in 1952 the Model 36 acquired a serrated ramp front sight and a fixed square notch rear sight; in addition, 1740 were produced with micrometer-adjustable target sights starting in 1991.  Early versions had a relatively narrow serrated trigger, but this was later changed to a wide, smooth combat trigger.  Early versions used a 2-inch or 3-inch pinned barrel, but in 1967, the advent of the Model 36-1 introduced a 3-inch heavy barrel.  In 1975, all Model 36s were built with heavy barrels, and in 1982, the use of a pinned barrel was discontinued.  In 1995, the 3-inch barrel versions were removed from production.  However, the Model 36 does appear in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 catalogs, though I have not been able to discover exactly when they were placed back into production; they are a part of Smith & Wesson’s Classic Collection, and are largely the same except for a marginally-shorter 1.875-inch barrel.  They are designed for the firing of +P loads. (This is the Model 36-7.)

     Beginning in 1985, the Model 36LS (LadySmith) was produced.  This version could be had with a 2-inch standard barrel or a 3-inch heavy barrel.  The 2-inch-barrel version has round-butt handguards, while the 3-inch-barrel version has square-butt checkered combat grips, both of walnut. In both cases, the grips are ergonomically-designed for smaller hands. The 3-inch barrel version of the LadySmith was discontinued in 1992. The LadySmith was produced until 1999, except for a small amount produced in 2001 with an internal key-locking system that blocked the hammer and trigger.  The LadySmith was strengthened in construction, allowing it to fire +P rounds.

     A small run of Model 36s were also produced in 1997, strengthened for .357 Magnum.  These were made with both 2-inch and 3-inch heavy barrels.  These versions never appeared in any catalogs, and their existence was known only by word-of-mouth. However, in 1996, a version with a similar strengthened frame was built for a short production run, designed for use with .38 Special +P ammunition.  This version had a 2-inch heavy barrel.  Production of this version began in August of 1996; from September of 1996, a Master trigger lock was included with purchase.  This +P version is the same in game terms as the 2-inch-barrel Magnum version, except that it cannot fire .357 Magnum ammunition.

     The Model 36-6 Target Variation was built for a small production run in 1989, with a total of 615 produced.  This version had a 3-inch heavy full-lug target-quality barrel, a micrometer-adjustable rear sight, and a drift-adjustable front sight.  The Model 36-6 had a blue glass bead finish, a ribbed barrel, and a front sight ramp on a ramp base.

 

The Model 50 Chiefs’ Target Special

     The Model 50 Chiefs Target Special was a development of the Model 36, produced from 1955-75.  37 were shipped in 1978, after even official sales had stopped (these all had 2-inch heavy barrels and square butts), however, and in 1989, production picked up again for a very short production run of a version with a 3-inch heavy full-lug barrel, called the “Chiefs Special Target” instead of “Chiefs Target Special.”  (However, it is, for game purposes, identical to the standard Model 36-1 with a 3” barrel). Total production of all versions was small, believed to be approximately 2136 revolvers total. For the most part, it was not really a “target” weapon; the Model 50 is more of an “enhanced accuracy” version of the Model 36.  Most Model 50s are actually marked “Model 36,” “Model 36-1,” or have no designation markings at all, with the rest being marked “Model 50.”  Most had 2-inch or 3-inch pinned heavy barrels, though a very small number were produced with 6-inch barrels.  The grips are walnut Magna grips, which may have either square or round butts; they have Smith & Wesson medallions set in them with a diamond around them.  They have a narrow service-type hammer and a narrow serrated trigger; some have a wide target-quality trigger.  Most have a blued finish, but a very few were nickel-plated.  All versions have a micrometer-adjustable rear sight; the 2-inch-barrel version has a standard serrated front ramp sight, while the 3-inch-barrel and 6-inch-barrel versions have their ramp sights set on a base, making them a bit higher than the 2-inch-barrel version.  Some versions, primarily those of later production, have the rear sight notch outlined in white and the ramp’s rear painted with high-contrast red.  Unusually, despite being an official Smith & Wesson model, the Model 50 was never cataloged as such, instead being found listed as a version of the Model 36 or 36-1, and they are often referred to as the Model 36 Chiefs Target Special.

 

The Model 60 Chiefs’ Special Stainless

     The Model 36 is an updated version of the Model 36 Chiefs’ Special, with a stainless steel frame with a satin finish.  It was built on the round butt J Frame. Originally, the Model 60 had checkered walnut Magna grips, but in 1994 the buyer could choose from one of several Uncle Mike’s rubber grips as well as checkered or smooth Magna grips.  The original hammer and trigger were a serrated standard combat trigger and hammer.  Introduced in 1965, and produced until 1999, this is the first production example of a stainless steel revolver offered by Smith & Wesson.  Sights consisted of a trough rear sight and a low ramp front sight.  The barrel is 2-inch or 3-inch pinned barrel that has a full lug and is a heavy barrel in the case of the 3-inch version; in 1994, the 2-inch barrel was extended by 3mm, done more to simply production methods than anything else. For game purposes, this 3mm lengthening has no effect.

     In 1989, Smith & Wesson introduced the Model 60 LadySmith; in a different variation, it is still in production today (in a different variation).  The primary difference are rosewood grips which are ergonomically designed for smaller hands.  The barrels available for the LadySmith were a 2-inch underlugged barrel or a 3-inch heavy barrel.  The sights were standard Model 60 sights. This version of the LadySmith is the Model 60-6.

     In 1994, Smith & Wesson brought out a new, updated version of the Model 60 LadySmith.  This is the version that Smith & Wesson makes today, and it is designated the Model 60-9LS. It is based on the J Magnum Frame and can fire Magnum and +P rounds. It also has a wider combat trigger.  Grips were originally Uncle Mike’s Combat Grips, but the Model 60 LadySmith can since 1996 also be had with smooth rosewood grips.  The hammer is flat-faced; the LadySmith has a floating firing pin.  The barrel can be an underlugged 3-inch barrel with either adjustable or fixed rear sights; or a version with a shrouded and underlugged 2.125-inch barrel and fixed-only sights.  In either case, the LadySmith has a low ramp front sight. In 1997, another version of the LadySmith was introduced; this is virtually identical to the 1994 LadySmith, but is designed only for .38 Special rounds (including +P rounds).  This .38 Special-only version was discontinued in 1999. It was designated the Model 60-10LS.

     In 1996, production of the standard Model 60 was changed to one based on the J Magnum Frame (becoming the Model 60-9), with the attendant increases in weight and size and able to fire Magnum and +P rounds.  Most other details are the same as the standard Model 60, though a small amount (171) of versions with 3-inch barrels were made with micrometer-adjustable rear sights and heavy, target-quality barrels.  The Model 60-9 version is often known as the Model 60 Magnum Chiefs’ Special Stainless.

     In 2005, the Model 60-18 was introduced; though it is still being produced today, it is still considered a Limited Edition.  The Model 60-18 has a 5-inch two-piece target-quality heavy barrel, an extractor shroud, a micrometer-adjustable rear sight, a front sight with an orange fiberoptic insert, and rosewood grips with finger grooves.

     2005’s Model 60 Trail Gun has a full 5-inch barrel, adjustable rear target-type sights, oversized rosewood grips with finger grooves, and with precision fit and finish (which is of stainless steel with a satin finish).  It is designed for defense against wild animals, hence its name, and since it is meant for long-distance carry, is surprisingly light in weight.

     In 2005, all Model 60s in production acquired Smith & Wesson’s internal locking system.

 

The Model 360Sc Magnum Chiefs’ Special Airlite Sc

     Based on the J Magnum Frame, the Model 360Sc is largely a Model 60-9 with a scandium-alloy frame and a titanium-alloy cylinder.  This version has a small stainless steel “flame shield” above the cylinder-barrel gap, as the scandium alloy proved to be slightly vulnerable to the flame and gases escaping from there when .357 Magnum rounds are fired, possibly weakening the topstrap.  Sights are a trough rear and a pinned serrated front ramp.  The hammer is a standard service-type hammer design, but the trigger is a wide target trigger.  The finish is matte stainless with a medium-gray cylinder; grips are Hogue Bantam grips.  The barrel is 1.875 inches, shrouded, and underlugged.  The Model 360Sc (and PD) were first shown at the SHOT show in 2000, and appeared in Smith & Wesson’s catalogs in late 2001; however, production did not actually begin until January 2002.

     The Model 360 also comes in a PD (Personal Defense) version. For the most part, the Model 360PD is the same as the Model 360Sc, however, there are several important differences.  The finish of the Model 360PD is flat black.  When shown at 2000’s SHOT Show, the Model 360PD hat a front ramp sight finished in bright red, but when production actually started, the Model 360PD has a red fiberoptic Hi-Viz sight for its front sight.  The standard Model 360PD has the same barrel configuration as the Model 360Sc, but a second variation of the Model 360PD (the Model 360-1PD) comes with two barrels, the standard one and a 3.125-inch barrel which is underlugged and heavy, but not shrouded. The Model 360-1PD has a micrometer-adjustable rear sight and an orange fiberoptic Hi-Viz front sight. The Model 360-1PD uses an Uncle Mike’s Combat Grip.

     It is noteworthy that for all variations of the Model 360, Smith & Wesson does not recommend using less than 120-grain bullets, and the revolvers are marked as such on right side of the barrel.

 

The Model 460 Performance Center Airweight

     Not to be confused with the Model 460XVR, the Model 460 is a .38 Special-firing variant of the Model 60.  It was built only in 1994, and only 450 were built.  It is based on a J Centennial Frame with a round butt.  The frame is of aircraft-quality aluminum alloy, with most other metal parts being made of steel.  The hammer is fully concealed, and the trigger is a smooth, wide combat trigger.  Finish is blued, with Eagle Secret Service grips.  Sights consist of a notch rear and low ramp front and are fixed.  The barrel is 2 inches and heavy, but is also Mag-Na-Ported.

 

Special Versions

     One example of a special version of the Model 36 was produced for an unknown buyer; it had no special designation, and carried the same serial number as a regular version of the Model 36.  This example had a 2-inch heavy barrel, a target-quality trigger and hammer, a round butt, and blued finish.  It’s most unusual feature was the chambering -- .22 Long Rifle instead of .38 Special.  This item was shipped to its buyer in August of 1963.

     The Model 36-6 Target Variation was built for a small production run in 1989, with a total of 615 produced.  This version had a 3-inch heavy full-lug target-quality barrel, a micrometer-adjustable rear sight, and a drift-adjustable front sight.  The Model 36-6 had a blue glass bead finish, a ribbed barrel, and a front sight ramp on a ramp base.

     Other versions produced after the official cessation of production (and before its reintroduction as a Classic revolver) included the Model 36 Gold of 2002, which had the internal locking system.  The hammer, thumbpiece, extractor rod, and trigger were “gold” in color – actually, the “gold” was titanium titride.  This version was built for distribution by TALO.  In 2005, the Texas Hold ‘Em version was produced for a limited run; this had a polished blue finish, imitation ivory grips, and 24-karat gold-plated engraving.  (The Texas Hold ‘Em was shipped with playing cards and poker chips with the Smith & Wesson logo.)  In 2006, a special run of 225 were produced with a full nickel-plated finish.  All three of these had 2-inch heavy barrels, and are for game purposes identical to the Model 36-1 2-inch-barrel version.

     Several special versions of the Model 60 were built.  In 1990, a special production run was made of the Model 60, which had a 3-inch underlugged barrel, a pinned front sight with a black finish, and a black-line adjustable rear sight.  The grips are Uncle Mike’s Santoprene Grips.  This version is rated for +P ammunition and it had a target-quality hammer and a widened serrated trigger.  Though originally meant to be a limited edition, this version was made a standard production version in 1992.

     In 1993, a short production run (300) of the Model 60 Carry Comp was built by the Performance Center for distribution by Lew Horton.  This version had a 3-inch underlugged barrel with Mag-Na-Porting, an adjustable rear sight, and a dovetailed ramp front sight.  Finish was frosted stainless steel, and the grips could be laminated rosewood or pearl-inlaid white synthetic.  The butt was a round butt.  The Model 60 Carry Comp could fire +P rounds. The Model 60 Lew Horton Special was a similar revolver, but designed for Magnum rounds.  They had either rosewood burgundy grips, which, upon buyer’s request, could be custom fitted to the customer.  The other option for this version was Uncle Mike’s Combat Grips.

     Several “Special Editions” were made by Smith & Wesson, either made for specific police departments (and in a couple of cases, foreign police departments) or as commemorative pieces.  These versions differed primarily in the markings, grips, or the variations of the stainless steel finish they had; some were also specially engraved.  Some also had trigger or hammer differences. For game purposes, they are identical to standard Model 60s.

 

 

     Twilight 2000: In the Twilight 2000 timeline, the Model 36 was never reintroduced, either in its current form or the special production versions.  The Magnum versions of the Model 36 were produced only in very small numbers (perhaps 30 at most).  They were to be shipped directly to buyers, but only 10 were actually shipped, with the war interrupting the rest; in addition, 5 are known to have gone to the military here and there in the Continental US.  The rest, presumably, were stolen by marauders from the Smith & Wesson factory or are still there.  Few Model 60-9s exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline; the Models 60-18 and Trail Gun do not exist, nor does any iteration of the Model 360.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 36 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 36 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.55 kg

5 Cylinder

$156

Model 36-1 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.6 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 36-1 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.61 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 36 (Special Version)

.22 Long Rifle

0.42 kg

5 Cylinder

$66

Model 36-4 LadySmith (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.58 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 36-5 LadySmith (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.65 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 36 Magnum (2” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.67 kg

5 Cylinder

$159

Model 36 Magnum (3” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.75 kg

5 Cylinder

$168

Model 36-6

.38 Special

0.59 kg

5 Cylinder

$160

Model 50 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.62 kg

5 Cylinder

$150

Model 50 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.65 kg

5 Cylinder

$160

Model 50 (6” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$190

Model 36-7

.38 Special

0.55 kg

5 Cylinder

$144

Model 60 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 60 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.62 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 60-9 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.61 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 60-9 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.69 kg

5 Cylinder

$168

Model 60-6 LadySmith (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.57 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 60-6 LadySmith (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.65 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 60-9 LadySmith (2” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.63 kg

5 Cylinder

$159

Model 60-9 LadySmith (3” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.72 kg

5 Cylinder

$167

Model 60-10 LadySmith (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.6 kg

5 Cylinder

$148

Model 60-10 LadySmith (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.69 kg

5 Cylinder

$156

Model 60-9 “Target”

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$169

Model 60-18

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.79 kg

5 Cylinder

$190

Model 60 Trail Gun

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$188

Model 360Sc/PD (1.875” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.38 kg

5 Cylinder

$161

Model 360PD (3.125” Barrel)

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.41 kg

5 Cylinder

$172

Model 460

.38 Special

0.45 kg

5 Cylinder

$172

Model 60 Carry Comp

.38 Special

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$182

Model 60 Lew Horton Special

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.76 kg

5 Cylinder

$192

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 36 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 36 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 36-1 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 36-1 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 36 (Special Version)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

4

Nil

3

Model 36-4LS

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 36-5LS

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 36 Magnum (2”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 36 Magnum (2”, .357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 36 Magnum (3”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 36 Magnum (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 36-6

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 50 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 50 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 50 (6”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

12

Model 37-7

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 60-9 (2”, .357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-9 (2”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-9 (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

5

Model 60-9 (3”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 60-6 LadySmith (2.125”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-6 LadySmith (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 60-9 LadySmith (2.125”, .357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-9 LadySmith (2.125”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-9 LadySmith (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 60-9 LadySmith (3”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 60-10 LadySmith (2.125”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60-10 LadySmith (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 69-9 “Target” (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 69-9 “Target” (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

5

Model 60-18 (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

11

Model 60-18 (.38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

10

Model 60 Trail Gun (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

10

Model 60 Trail Gun (.38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

9

Model 360Sc/PD (.357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 360Sc/PD (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 360PD (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

7

Nil

5

Model 360PD (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

4

Model 460

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 60 Carry Comp

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

Model 60 Lew Horton Special (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

4

Model 60 Lew Horton Special (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 37 Chiefs’ Special Airweight

     Notes: The Model 37 grew out of the Model 36; it is essentially the same basic design, made with a lighter frame of light alloy.  Production of the Model 37 started in 1951, with production ending in 2005, and the Model 37 being dropped from Smith & Wesson’s catalog in 2006.

     The Model 37 was originally made also with a cylinder of light alloy (which I included below for completeness), but it quickly became apparent that the alloy cylinder could not stand up to prolonged use of .38 Special ammunition, and in most cases the alloy cylinders eventually cracked.  (The GM will have to adjudicate this if a PC finds a Model 37 with an uncracked cylinder; I suggest a 1% chance of cracking per full cylinder fired, modified by how many rounds have already been fired and how old the revolver is – such a Model 37 will not have been built any later than 1951). Some 3777 Model 37s were made with an alloy cylinder. Shortly after production began, the alloy cylinder was replaced with a steel cylinder, and customers whose alloy cylinders had cracked were given new replacement steel cylinders.  Finish is blued or nickel-plated (with some being two-tone); in 1992, a matte blue finish and a satin nickel finish were introduced. The Model 37 had grips made of checkered walnut with Smith & Wesson medallions in them, and with a square or round butt depending upon the wishes of the buyer; in 1994, the grips were replaced with wrap-around rubber grips.  The original hammer and trigger were of the relatively-narrow “service” type, with the trigger being serrated.  The trigger was later changed to a wider smooth combat trigger, and at about the same time, the trigger guard was enlarged and the grip lengthened.  Sights are fixed, with a square notch rear and a serrated ramp front.  Barrels were either 2 or 3 inched and a pinned barrel was used until 1982; however, in 1988 the 3-inch-barrel version was dropped from production.

     Variations of the Model 37 include a rare “Target” version, with a 3.5” target-quality barrel and a micrometer-adjustable rear sight.  Only 312 were built from December of 1954 and October of 1955.

     A large order was made by Japan in 2000; however, before delivery, a large portion of the order was cancelled.  These were placed on the US market in 2001 as the Model 37-2, and the only differences were an Uncle Mike’s Combat Grip and a lanyard ring on the butt.  Other than the weight, for game purposes, they are identical to the standard Model 37, though they were built only with the 2-inch barrel (but see below).

     In 1993, the frame was changed to a J-Magnum frame, which allowed the firing of +P loads.  This was the Model 37-3 (and of course was produced only with a 2-inch barrel).  In 2005, a small amount of Model 37-2s were built with a DAO action and a bobbed hammer, meant for concealed carry; they are otherwise identical to the standard Model 37-2 for game purposes.  From 2004-2005, a small amount of Model 37-2s were also produced with a 1.875-inch barrel, again a nod to concealed carry.  Firing characteristics for game purposes are identical to the Model 37-2 with a 2-inch barrel.

     The Model 337Ti inherited the Model 37’s mantle, in a way; production began at the end of 1998, and ended in 2004.  The design is largely the same as the Model 37-3, with a light alloy J-Magnum frame; however, the cylinder is made of titanium alloy. The barrel also has a barrel shroud of light alloy, surrounding a steel barrel liner.  Finishes can be faux stainless steel, matte stainless steel, brushed stainless steel, or blued; all have the symbol of the titanium atom etched into the frame behind the cylinder (as do all Smith & Wesson revolvers with a titanium alloy cylinder.  As with all “Ti” revolvers, the cylinder is a light matte gray.  The grips may be DymondWood grips or Uncle Mike’s Combat Grips; with the Uncle Mike’s grips making the Model 337Ti a little heavier.  The standard barrel for the Model 337Ti is 1.875 inches, stiffened a little by the barrel shroud and the fully-shrouded ejector lever lug.  The sights consist of a trough rear sight cut into the top of the frame above the cylinder, and a low front ramp in black (changed to high-contrast red in 2000’s Model 337PD variation, which is otherwise identical to the standard Model 337Ti). In 2002, the Model 337PD got an internal locking system, actuated with a key inserted into the butt, becoming the Model 337-2PD (but otherwise identical to the Model 337Ti for game purposes).

     In 1999, several variations of the Model 337Ti were introduced.  The Model 337-1Ti Kit Target gun has as a standard a 3.125” target-quality barrel (with the same shroud and lug), but can also take the 1.875-inch barrel of the standard Model 337Ti (though a special tool is necessary for the barrel change).When using the 1.875-inch barrel, the Model 337-1Ti (and its successors) are identical in weight and firing characteristics as the standard Model 337Ti. In 2002, this became the Model 337-3Ti, which is identical for game purposes except that it has the internal locking system.  All these Kit Target guns have a micrometer-adjustable white-outlined rear sight, and a high-viz front green fiberoptic inlay in its front ramp site.

     Introduced in 1989 as a special production version (with 560 produced in 1989), the Model 637 Chiefs Special Airweight Stainless is still in production today in its Model 637-2 and 637-3 iterations. The format once again is basically the same format as its Model 37 father, with the frame of light alloy and a cylinder, working parts, and barrel of stainless steel (though the barrel shroud and sights are of light alloy).  The frame is clear anodized fused, but overlaying this is a finish which is also a layer of light alloy-base, but appears to be matte stainless steel.  The cylinder is actually stainless steel with a frosted finish.  The original grips were checkered walnut Magna grips (with the customary Smith & Wesson medallions), The 1989 version had a wide, smooth combat trigger, but a relatively narrow service hammer with serrations. The original version was known to be available (through advertisements in magazines and word-of-mouth), but it never appeared in Smith & Wesson’s catalogs.  The magazine advertisements said the barrel length was 2 inches, and what official Smith & Wesson data that was released gave the barrel length at 1.875 inches, but the true barrel length is 1.86 inches.  (The current catalog calls the barrel 1.87 inches in length.) This barrel platform is stiffened somewhat by the thick barrel shroud.  Sights are fixed, with a trough rear and a low-ramp front.

     Though production was only for a few months in 1989, the Model 637 was reintroduced in 1996 as the Model 637-1, and as stated above, is still in production today.  The Model 637-1 has the same format, fit, and finish as the Model 637, but numerous small changes were made, as well as a change in grips to rubber Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips.  The grips are on a round-butt frame, but the grips are thickened at the bottom and have a square butt.  The hammer has a flat face, and the firing pin is inside of the frame.  The hammer and trigger are of the same width and external design, but they are made of stronger stainless steel and are actually partially hollow (called an MIM trigger and hammer).  Due to the stronger steel used, the partially-hollow interior does not compromise the strength of those parts.  The cylinder is slightly longer than the Model 637 (15mm longer), because the longer cylinder essentially acts as a short barrel extension and works better with +P loads.  The flutes on the cylinder are wider and slightly deeper than on the Model 637 version.  The front sight gained a black stripe along the rear face of the front sight. As with the Model 637, the barrel length is advertised (and cataloged) at 2 inches, has an official company length of 1.875 inches, and is actually 1.86 inches long.  The frame is just a thicker than on the Model 637; this, along with stronger steel for the cylinder, gives the Model 637-1 the ability to fire +P loads.  In 1997, the Model 637-1 began shipping with a Master trigger lock included; in 2002, this was changed to an internal locking system actuated with a key inserted into the side of the frame. (This is the Model 637-2.)  From 2005-2006, the Model 637-2CT was sold; this is a standard Model 637-2, but the grip includes a Crimson Trace Lasergrip laser aiming module.

     In 2009, the Model 637-3 was introduced; this too is still in production.  The Model 637-3 has a 2.5-inch barrel with a fully shrouded ejector rod, and this is lengthened into a nearly-full-length lug, further stabilizing and stiffening the barrel platform.  The Model 637-3 sells with Tuff Quick Strips; these can be used with earlier Model 37 versions, and allow the loading of three rounds into the cylinder at once while the strips themselves are lightweight and semi-flexible (enough to curve around the cylinder).  A Model 637-3CT is also made, similar in concept to the Model 637-2CT above. Except as noted above, construction of the Model 637-3 is the same as the Model 637-2.

    

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 37-2 and Model 37-3 are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor are the Models 637-2 and 637-3 or any version of the Model 337Ti.  The Model 637-1 is a relatively rare item, with production ending at perhaps 2000 examples, and perhaps half of those actually having been shipped to customers.  (The Model 637-1 never appeared in stores in the Twilight 2000 timeline.)  None were shipped with Master trigger locks.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 37 (2” Barrel, Alloy Cylinder)

.38 Special

0.3 kg

5 Cylinder

$149

Model 37 (3” Barrel, Alloy Cylinder)

.38 Special

0.35 kg

5 Cylinder

$159

Model 37 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.35 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 37 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.41 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 37 Target

.38 Special

0.43 kg

5 Cylinder

$163

Model 37-2 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.38 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 37-2 (1.875” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.37 kg

5 Cylinder

$145

Model 37-3

.38 Special

0.39 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 337Ti (DymondWood Grip)

.38 Special

0.32 kg

5 Cylinder

$148

Model 337Ti (Uncle Mike’s Grip)

.38 Special

0.34 kg

5 Cylinder

$148

Model 337-1Ti (3.125” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.37 kg

5 Cylinder

$162

Model 637

.38 Special

0.38 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 637-1/2

.38 Special

0.42 kg

5 Cylinder

$152

Model 637-2CT

.38 Special

0.47 kg

5 Cylinder

$552

Model 637-3

.38 Special

0.45 kg

5 Cylinder

$155

Model 637-3CT

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$555

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 37 (2”, Alloy Cylinder)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 37 (3”, Alloy Cylinder)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

4

Model 37 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 37 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

4

Model 37 Target

DAR

2

Nil

1

7

Nil

6

Model 37-2 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 37-2 (1.875”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 37-3

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 337Ti (DymondWood Grip)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 337Ti (Uncle Mike’s Grip)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 337-1Ti (3.125”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

8

Nil

5

Model 637

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 637-1/2

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

3

Model 637-2CT

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

3

Model 637-3/3CT

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 38 Bodyguard Airweight

     Notes: The Model 38 was produced from 1955-1999. The Model 38 is actually considered by Smith & Wesson to be a member of the Chiefs Special series, and is essentially a Model 37 suitably modified for concealed carry and meant primarily for use by bodyguards and undercover police as well as civilian self-defense.  As a result, the Model 38 is largely dehorned, including a shrouded hammer, a trough rear sight and low-profile front ramp sight, and an ejection rod whose end snaps into a latch/clip (though it is not actually shrouded, the latch does keep the ejection rod from hanging up during a draw while not adding too much weight to a revolver where grams are important).  The frame is of light alloy, but most of the rest of the metalwork is steel.  Factory grips found are generally either walnut Magna grips or a version of Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips (1994 or later) which are further abbreviated in length.  (The grip in either case is rather short, to keep down the dimensions of the revolver.)  For most users, the Magna grips were preferred, as they slide better during a draw then rubber grips and they are not nearly as wide as the Uncle Mike’s grips. Finishes were originally blued or nickel-plated, or a combination finish with a nickel-plated cylinder with the rest being blued.  (A batch made for the Michigan State Police in 1969 had a stainless steel-plated cylinder with the rest being blued.) In 1993, options for a matte blued or satin nickel finish were added. The trigger is a wide, smooth combat trigger, and the hammer is a standard-width service hammer; though it is shrouded, just enough is exposed to allow thumb-cocking (with practice). Virtually all Model 38s had a pinned 2-inch barrel, but a very few rare examples were built with a 3-inch barrel (also pinned).

     Various improvements over the years improved the yoke retention system (the Model 38-1) and gave the Model 38 a narrower front sight (the Model 38-2).  These two are identical to the standard Model 38 for game purposes.  In 1997, the Model 38-3 came to market; this had a partially-hollow MIM trigger and hammer (again, to save grams on weight), the frame was changed to a J-Magnum frame base which allowed the firing of +P rounds, the internal lockwork was improved, and the Model 38-3 was shipped with a Master trigger lock which was included in the purchase price. The Model 38-3 was built only with a 2-inch barrel.

     In 1989, the Model 638 Bodyguard Airweight Stainless was introduced.  As with the Model 38, the Model 638 was based on the J Frame, and in overall fit and form mostly conforms to that of the Model 38.  However, the grip has some small ergonomic improvements (mostly in the area of where the thumb on the firing hand goes), and of course, the Model 638 has a stainless finish (most were finished in satin stainless, but some were made bright stainless). Over the stainless finish, the frame has a clear anodized fuse coating. As sold in 1989, the Model 638 was available only with Magna grips.  The 1989 production version also had a slightly shorter barrel than the Model 38, at 1.875 inches.  This original production run lasted for most of 1989, but only 1200 were produced; it was considered by Smith & Wesson at the time to be a limited edition.  A few months into production, the Model 638 became the Model 638-1 when the front sight was widened somewhat.

     In 1996, the Model 638 was reintroduced due to popular demand.  Again, it was originally considered a limited edition, though production continues to this day. This new version, the Model 638-2, had a J-Magnum-based frame rated for +P loads.  Other changes were made, including widening the hammer somewhat and giving it a flat face (it can still be thumb-cocked, but it’s more difficult than on a Model 38), and replacing the Magna grips with Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips.  The hammer and trigger are of the MIM-type.  From 1997-2002, the Model 638-2 was shipped with an included Master trigger lock. In 2002, an internal locking system was added, making it the Model 638-3 (for game purposes, identical to the Model 638-2).  In 2008, the Model 638 was further modified into the Model 638-3CT, which has a Crimson Trace Lasergrip containing a laser aiming module on the upper right grip.  Almost immediately, several distributors and gunsmiths began offering versions of the Model 638-2 and Model 638-3 with Mag-Na Porting added to help control barrel rise.  This was not a Smith & Wesson option, but it became a very common modification to the Model 638-2 and 638-3.

     In roughly 2005 (I have not been able to determine the exact date), the Model 438, also known as the Model 438Sc, was introduced. This has scandium-alloy frame of high strength.  The only factory finish was matte black.  The other characteristics of the Model 438 are identical to the Model 638-3, including the weight and barrel length, and for game purposes, the Model is 438 is identical to the Model 638-3 in characteristics and firing tables.

     In 2010, what is currently the ultimate iteration of the Model 38 was introduced – The Bodyguard 38.  The form is a bit different – the hammer is shrouded during part of the firing cycle and when it is carried, though it becomes exposed during firing and it can be thumb-cocked; a low-profile claw atop the hammer (when it is at rest) aids with this.  The big thing that distinguished the Bodyguard 38, however, is the frame composition – it is steel-reinforced polymer (except for the topstrap, which is light alloy).  The cylinder is stainless steel, and the barrel has a stainless steel insert surrounded with a light alloy barrel shroud.  The ejector rod is also shrouded and serves as a strengthening function for the barrel.  The frame is otherwise a special version of the J Frame – made of polymer, but strong enough to handle +P loads.  The sights consist of a trough rear and a low blade front, and the barrel is 1.9 inches.  The frame is matte black; the rest of the revolver is finished in matte black with a PVD anti-corrosion coating. Finally, the Bodyguard 38 has an integral Insight Laser pointer, though it is mounted in a separate housing at the top of the frame behind the cylinder.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: In the Twilight 2000 timeline, The Model 38-3, 683-3, and Bodyguard 38 are not available.  The Model 638-2 is a relatively rare revolver, with about 150 produced, though they did make it to gun shops.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 38 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.4 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 38 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.41 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 38-3

.38 Special

0.45 kg

5 Cylinder

$154

Model 638

.38 Special

0.38 kg

5 Cylinder

$145

Model 638-2

.38 Special

0.43 kg

5 Cylinder

$152

Model 638-3CT

.38 Special

0.48 kg

5 Cylinder

$552

Model 638-2/3 w/Porting

.38 Special

0.43 kg

5 Cylinder

$177

Model 638-3CT w/Porting

.38 Special

0.48 kg

5 Cylinder

$577

Bodyguard 38

.38 Special

0.41 kg

5 Cylinder

$546

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 38 (2” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 38 (3” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

4

Model 38-3

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 638

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 632-2/3CT

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 638-2/3 w/Porting

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 638-3CT w/Porting

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Bodyguard 38

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

 

Smith & Wesson 40 Centennial

     Notes: Also meant as a revolver for concealed carry, bodyguard carry, or undercover police, the Model 40 was in many ways similar to the Model 38, though it was JC-Frame-based, and therefore did not have the “saddleback” at the rear of the frame; this is called the “Centennial” frame.  The hammer was also almost fully concealed, and thumb cocking is very difficult; even experienced users could find thumb-cocking difficult, especially with the flat-topped hammer that barely peeks out from the frame.  Construction is of carbon steel. The Model 40 is unusual for a revolver in that it has a grip safety; a pin was sometimes supplied to lock down the grip safety, but more often, the Model 40 was sold without one.  (Later versions of the Model 40 do not have the grip safety.) Sights consisted of trough rear and a low, narrow ramp front.  The trigger is a “service trigger” – narrow and serrated.  The barrel was 2 inches, with an extremely rare 3-inch barrel-version being made.  The Model 40 was capable of firing +P loads. The standard finish was blued with checkered (or sometimes smooth) walnut Magna grips; a very rare variation had nickel-plated external metal (except the trigger) and faux ivory grips.  The Model 40 was produced from 1952-1974.  During its production run, the base Model 40 itself changed very little.

 

The Model 340Sc Magnum Airlite Sc Centannial

     The Model 340Sc Magnum Airlite Sc Centennial and Model 340PD (sometimes called the Model 340ScPD) are very light versions of the Model 40, based on the J-Magnum Frame (though in the form of the Model 40’s frame), and also designed to fire Magnum ammunition. (It should be noted that due to the light weight, recoil is brutal with or without Magnum ammunition.)  Production began in 2001 and continues today. As the name would indicate, the frame is of scandium alloy; in addition, the cylinder is made of titanium alloy.  Finishes for the frame are stainless steel-plated (with a matte finish); the cylinders are matte gray. The grips are Hogue Bantam rubber grips.  The sights consist of a trough rear sight and pinned front low-profile ramp.  The barrel is 1.875 inches, with a scandium barrel shroud and a shrouded full-length ejector rod.  Original production, done for the last few months of 2001, shipped with a Master trigger lock; in 2002, this was changed to an internal key lock.  It should be noted that the Model 340Sc is not meant to be fired with less than 120-grain bullets; lighter bullets tend to move forward out of the cartridge case during firing, but too early due to the light weight of the Model 340Sc, leading to jams. (This is in fact marked on the barrel, laser-etched like the rest of the markings.)

     The Model 340PD is essentially the same weapon, with a matte black finish for the frame, a squared-off area in front of the trigger guard for the index finger of the non-firing hand when a two-handed grip is used, and a front sight “bar” which is set with either a red or green fiberoptic tube, making is one of Smith & Wesson’s “Hi-Viz” sights.  For game purposes, the Models 340Sc and 340PD are identical.

 

The Model 640 Centennial Stainless

     The Model 640 Centennial Stainless is different in many ways from the Model 40, but nonetheless retains its basic Model 40 heritage.  The Model 640 was produced from 1989-1996; Though the frame looks like a JC Frame, it is actually a J Frame shaped into the same form as the JC frame (except for the round butt). All parts except for the grips are of stainless steel, and the Model 640 is rated for +P loads.  (In 1994, a production error led to some Model 640s being marked as “Airweight” on the barrel; these were sold with the erroneous markings and fetch a decent real-world price today as collector’s items.)  The hammer, unlike on the Models 40 and 340, is fully concealed and the Model 640 cannot be thumb-cocked.  The sights consist of a square notch rear sight and a serrated ramp front sight.  Two barrel lengths were available: 1.875 inches and 3 inches, though the 3-inch barrel length was discontinued in 1993. The 1.875-inch-barrel version was made with Goncalo Alves wooden grips; the 3-inch-barrel version was made with Morado wood grips. A small amount were made for the NYPD with a barrel length of 2.125 inches for an unconfirmed purpose, though some reports say that this barrel length was issued to some undercover police officers who needed a little more power than the 1.875-inch barrel, but still needed a measure of concealability.

     In 1995, the Model 640-1 Magnum Centennial Stainless was introduced, and is still in production today.  Again, the Model 640-1’s frame is shaped to the same form as the JC frame, but the Model 640-1 is actually based on a J-Magnum Frame with a round butt. The grips are Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips. The hammer is almost fully concealed, but it can be thumb-cocked with practice (it has a flat face that is almost flush with the frame). The rear sight is the same square notch sight as on the Model 640, but the front sight is a pinned ramp sight finished in matte black.  The barrel length is 2.125 inches. Starting in 1997, a special version of the Model 640-1, the Model 640-2, started production.  This was small-scale production for the NYPD, and this production run stopped almost completely in the early 2000s, when the NYPD switched to pistols as standard issue.  Production of the Model 640-2, however, continues on a very small scale for the NYPD, where it is still used in some situations.  The Model 640-2 is essentially the same as the Model 640-1, but is rated only for a maximum of .38 Special +P rounds.  For game purposes, the Model 640-2 fires like a Model 640-1 with .38 Special rounds, though the price is different. In 2003, both were given Smith & Wesson’s internal locking system; the Model 640-1 was redesignated the Model 640-3 and the Model 640-2 was redesignated the Model 640-4.  The Model 640-5 (the current production model) shoots almost like the Model 640-1 and construction is virtually the same as the Model 640-3 and the Model 640-5 has the standard sort of front rear sights.  However, the rear sight notch is tritium-lined, as is the rear of the ramp of the front sight.  These sights are also dovetailed in, and can be adjusted for drift or even removed and replaced with certain optics that take a dovetail mount, or sight mounts that take a dovetail mount. The Model 640-5 is therefore largely the same except as noted above; it is also quite a bit lighter than the Model 640-1, despite the addition of a fluted barrel shroud. The Model 640 can be loaded with full-moon clips, to quicken reloading; current versions of the Model 640-5 sell with a few of these clips. The Model 640-5 was introduced in 2006 or thereabouts (I have not been able to find the exact year of introduction).

     Model 640-5s are also available with a combination and checkering on the grips.  Though the real-life price is more, for game purposes, this version of the Model 640-5 is identical to the standard Model 640-5.

 

The Model 640 Performance Center Versions

     A number of Model 640 versions were made by Smith & Wesson’s Performance Center.  The Model 640 Carry Comp was produced only in 1993 for distribution by Lew Horton, with 300 being built.  The Model 640 Carry Comp was made with 2-inch ported barrels.  The front sight is a dovetailed ramp, drift-adjustable and removable; the rear sight is the standard square notch sight.  150 of the Model 640 Carry Comps were made with rosewood grips; the other 150 were made with Badger mother-of-pearl inlaid finger grips.

     The Model 640 Paxton Quigley was a limited-issue revolver, and was shipped with markings on the revolver and letter of authenticity from Paxton Quickly, the author of Armed and Female. 250 of these revolvers were made in 1994, and distributed by Lew Horton.   The barrel is 2.625 inches, tipped with a permanently-attached compensator (instead of being ported).  The front sight is the standard fixed square notch, but the front sight is dovetailed and specially-tuned by the Model’s Performance Center. The grips are of laminated wood stylized with a mother-of-pearl inlaid heart.  The Paxton Quigley is designed for .38 Special, but cannot take +P loads.

     The Model 640 RSR Special of 1996 was designed for use with both .38 Special rounds and .357 Magnum rounds.  The barrel is 2.125 inches and Magna ported. The grips were walnut Heritage Combat grips, and unusually, the cylinder used on the RSR Special was not fluted as on other members of the Model 40 family (and most revolvers).  The Model 640 is, of course, built largely from stainless steel; most of the external metalwork is finished with glass bead blasting, but the trigger is chrome-plated.  The rear sight is a fixed square notch, and the front sight is a pinned ramp finished in matte black.

     The Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp (also known as the Model 640 Centennial PowerPort) was produced for a very limited production run in 1996.  Though similar in many ways to the Carry Comp, there are also several differences.  The Lew Horton J-Comp is designed to fire Magnum ammunition, and has a 2.125-inch barrel with the same porting as on the Carry Comp.  The front sight is a black post with a tritium inlay, while the rear sight is a fixed, black outlined, square-notch sight. The grips are rubber Pachmayer Decelerator grips.  The entire J-Comp is specially-tuned for fit, finish, and accuracy by the Performance Center. It is known that the Smith & Wesson Performance Center chambered one Lew Horton J-Comp in .38 Super as an experiment; the disposition of this revolver is unknown, but I have included it below as a “what-if.”

     The Model 640 Lew Horton Quadport is mostly the same as the J-Comp, but the porting done was a special version of Magna Quadporting designed for this revolver at the request of Lew Horton and Smith & Wesson.  Most features are the same as on the J-Comp, but the rear sight is a trough sight which is wider than the standard Smith & Wesson trough sight, and the front sight is a low ramp with a tritium inlay.

 

The Model 940 9mm Centennial Stainless

     Perhaps the most unusual version of the Model 40 is the Model 940 9mm Centennial Stainless.  Built from 1991-98 is relatively low numbers, the Model 940 chambers an unusual round for a revolver, the 9mm Parabellum round.  For this reason, the Model 940 was sold with several full-moon clips, which allowed the cylinder to hold the non-rimmed 9mm Parabellum rounds, and must be used with the Model 940 (or the rounds will simply fall out of the cylinder).  Model 940s came with a standard matte stainless steel finish (and are in fact made of stainless steel).  Sights consist of standard square notch fixed rear sights and a serrated front ramp.  The hammer is fully concealed; it cannot be thumb-cocked.  Barrels were either 2 inches or 3 inches.  The grips are Uncle Mike’s Santoprene Combat grips.

     In 1994, a small amount of a Model 940 variant, the Model 940 Special, was built.  Though it was called the Model 940, is very different from the standard Model 940, with only the frame, grips, and finish being the same.  The Model 940 was built as a limited-edition pistol for distribution by Lew Horton, and is in fact Lew Horton’s design; 300 were made.  This experiment was built with a 2-inch ported barrel and a dovetailed black front sight post. The round the Model 940 Special fires is the .356 Team Smith & Wesson round, a sort of short magnum round which is hot-loaded in its short case.  (The Model 940 Special will also fire 9mm Parabellum rounds, though again the use of a full-moon clip is required.) Also known as the “Pocket Rocket,” the Model 940 will today fetch a decent real-world price on the market.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The following Model 40 versions are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline: The Model 340 (Sc or PD), the Model 640-3, Model 640-4, and the Model 640-5. The Model 640-1 is a rather rare weapon, and the Model 640-2 much more rare.  The RSR Special is also very rare, with only about 30 being made and perhaps half of those actually being shipped.  The Lew Horton J-Comp and the Quadport are also rather rare, with perhaps a total of 50 being made, and only three-quarters of them being shipped out to their buyers. (The disposition of the one .38 Super-firing Model 640 J-Comp is unknown.) Other versions, including special versions, completed production and shipping.

 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 40 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.64 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 40 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.66 kg

5 Cylinder

$156

Model 340Sc

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.34 kg

5 Cylinder

$162

Model 640 (1.875” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.6 kg

5 Cylinder

$144

Model 640 (2.125” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.61 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 640 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.64 kg

5 Cylinder

$154

Model 640-1

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$158

Model 640-2

.38 Special

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 640-5

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.65 kg

5 Cylinder

$160

Model 640 Carry Comp

.38 Special

0.65 kg

5 Cylinder

$171

Model 640 Paxton Quigley

.38 Special

0.73 kg

5 Cylinder

$202

Model 640 RSR Special

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.71 kg

5 Cylinder

$172

Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.79 kg

5 Cylinder

$220

Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp

.38 Super

0.79 kg

5 Cylinder

$187

Model 640 Lew Horton Quadport

.38 Special and .357 Magnum

0.79 kg

5 Cylinder

$296

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 40 (2” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 40 (3” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 340Sc (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 340Sc (.357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 640 (2.125”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 640 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

4

Model 640-1 (.38)/640-2 (.38)/640-5 (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 640-1 (.357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 640-5 (.357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 640 Carry Comp

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

Model 640 Paxton Quigley

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

3

Model 640 RSR Special

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp (.38 Special)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

2

Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp (.357 Magnum)

DAR

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

2

Model 640 Lew Horton J-Comp (.38 Super)

DAR

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

4

Model 640 Lew Horton Quadport (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

2

Model 640 Lew Horton Quadport (.357)

DAR

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

2

 

Model 42 Centennial Airweight

     The Model 42 was essentially a version of the Model 40 with a light alloy frame (called the JCA Frame); the form of the Model 42 is essentially the same as the Model 42.  Most production Model 42s had an alloy frame and most of the other parts steel; 37 of the initial production version were also manufactured with an alloy cylinder, but encountered the same cylinder cracking problems as the Model 37.  The hammer was fully concealed and not thumb-cockable and the trigger is a relatively narrow serrated combat trigger.  The rear sight is a trough-type sight; the front sight is a serrated ramp.  One example is known to have been shipped to HH Harris (a firearms expert) in the early 1960s; this had a rear micrometer-adjustable sight. The barrel was 2 inches and pinned.  The backstrap had that unusual grip safety. Finishes are blued or nickel-plated.  Blued examples were made in twice the number of nickel-plated versions. A small number were made with a nickel-plated barrel and cylinder and grip safety, and a blued frame and front sight. Grips were either checkered walnut or smooth walnut, according to the wishes of the buyer. Production went from 1952-74. In 1953, the Centennial Airweight was tested by the US Navy as a possible pilot’s and aircrew’s weapon; this version was hammerless, had a frame of aircraft-quality aluminum, and an alloy cylinder made of much stronger alloy than earlier versions; grips were of checkered hard rubber. Unfortunately, it was not chosen for US Navy service, and the examples made for testing now reside in a museum near China Lake and in Smith & Wesson’s own museum.  One of them is known to have been “shot out” (the barrel’s rifling is almost nonexistent and the cylinder does not lock up properly due to marathon firing tests).

     The Model 42’s design changed very little during production and the Model 42 designation was used throughout its production. In an unusual case of serial numbering, Model 42s were numbered concurrently with the related revolver, the Model 40 (see above), and between the Models 40 and 42, 30,000 were built. It should be noted that the Model 42 is not rated for +P rounds.

 

The Model 342Ti Airlite Ti Centennial

     Instead of the JCA Frame, the Model 342Ti is based on a version of the J Magnum frame, though shaped in form to look like the Model 42’s JCA frame.  Though the Model 342Ti is rated by Smith & Wesson to fire +P loads, some shooters have reported a problem when firing +P ammunition: due to the light weight of the Model 342Ti, a heavy lead bullet fired using a +P propellant load can cause the other bullets to become unseated from the crimp of the round, and when they reach firing position, the bullet moves forward and gets stuck in the barrel/cylinder gap, and firing it can cause the lead bullet to expand and get stuck to the point that it takes intervention by a gunsmith. It was produced from 1998-2004. The frame is still made of light alloy, but the cylinder is of titanium alloy; the barrel shroud is also of light alloy.  Operation is DAO. The 1.875-inch barrel itself is a stainless steel liner for the barrel shroud and not a complete barrel by itself. The barrel liner can be removed for maintenance or adjustment, but this takes a special tool that is normally sold with the Model 342Ti. Finishes could be clear satin stainless, but much more rarely, was blued.  The Model 342Ti has a wide, smooth combat trigger, a fully-concealed hammer (not thumb-cockable). Sights consist of a trough rear and a black ramp front. Grips could be DymondWood grips or Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips (with the version with Uncle Mike’s grips Making the Model 342Ti a bit heavier).In 2001, the internal locking system was added to the Model 342Ti, making it the Model 342-1Ti.

     At the beginning of 2000, the Model 342PD (sometimes called the Model 342TiPD) personal defense version was introduced.  For the most part, the differences are cosmetic, and the Model 342PD is identical to the Model 342Ti with Uncle Mike’s grips for game purposes.  The finish for the Model 342PD is matte black with the medium gray of the standard Smith & Wesson titanium-alloy cylinder.  The front sight is a ramp finished in high-contrast red.  The grips on the Model 432PD are Hogue Bantam wooden grips.    In 2001, the Smith & Wesson internal locking system was added, making it the Model 342-2PD.

     A very limited-edition version, the Model 342 Red Bangers Special, was produced for a few months in 2002.  This is essentially a variation of the Model 342-2PD, with Ahrends Cocobolo grips, an orange Hi-Viz fiberoptic front sight, and of course, the Smith & Wesson internal lock.  For game purposes, the Red Bangers Special is identical to the standard Model 342Ti with DymondWood grips.

 

The Model 442 Centennial Airweight

     The Model 442 was introduced in 1993, and remains in production to this date. Like the Model 342Ti, the Model 442 has DAO operation. The Model 442 is based on a J Frame that is shaped to the same form as the rest of the Model 42 series; however, the use of a J Frame base means that the Model 442 is slightly larger than other members of the Model 42 family.  For the most part, the form, fit, and function is like that of the Model 342Ti, though the Model 442 lacks the Model 342Ti’s titanium-alloy cylinder; the cylinder of the Model 442 is carbon steel, along with most other parts other than the frame.  The Model 442 was built only with Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips (at first). Unlike the Model 342Ti, the Model 442 is not rated for +P loads. The Model 442 has a 1.875-inch barrel with a carbon steel barrel liner.  Finishes are matte blued or satin nickel.

     The Model 442-1 introduced a stronger frame and cylinder, which made firing +P loads possible.  This was done by basing it on the J Magnum frame instead of the J Frame.  The Model 442-1 replaced the Model 442 in production in 1996; in 2001, it became the Model 442-2 with the addition of an internal lock, and the Model 442-2 also acquired a MIM trigger and hammer.  In 2004, the Uncle Mike’s grips were replaced with Ahrens wooden grips.  In 1997, the satin nickel finish option was deleted, and no longer offered by Smith & Wesson.

     10 versions of the Model 442 were made with a modern light alloy cylinder for the US Secret Service.  They have a matte or polished blued finish with rubber Eagle grips.  Some were made with fluted cylinders, and some with non-fluted cylinders.  They have special serial numbers and no other markings of any kind.  This version of the Model 442 is actually lighter than the Model 342Ti due to the light alloy cylinder and lighter-but-stronger alloy of the frame.  Unlike other Model 442s, this version is in fact rated for +P loads.  Though these revolvers are products of the Smith & Wesson Performance Center, but they have never been sold to anyone else and no more have been built.  Though they have no official special designation, they are unofficially called Model 442 Ultralights.

     In 2002, a special version was offered by Mag-Na-Port; it is essentially a standard Model 442-2 with a Mag-Na-Ported barrel.  Another special version, the Model 442 Street Fighter, was offered by Weigand Pistolsmiths.  This had tritium-inlay night sights instead of standard sights, but is otherwise identical in game terms to the Model 442-2.

 

The Model 642 Centennial Airweight Stainless

     The Model 642 was originally produced as a limited edition from 1990-92, then brought back in 1996; it is still being manufactured today. It is based on the J Frame; the frame is made from light alloy, though most of the rest of the metal parts of the revolver are of stainless steel, and even the frame has (along with the rest of the revolver) a frosted stainless steel finish.  The version produced in the 1990-92 time period had Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips, a wide combat trigger, a fully concealed hammer, and a trough rear sight combined with a low serrated ramp front sight.  The barrel in this time period could be 2 or 3 inches long; the 2-inch-barrel version was shrouded in light alloy.

     The Model 642 was reintroduced in 1996 as the Model 642-1, based on the J Magnum Frame, and capable of firing +P loads.  Being based on the J Magnum Frame, the frame is a bit larger and the revolver heavier in general.  The hammer is internal, and the hammer actuates a floating hammer instead of contacting the primer directly.  The trigger and hammer are of the MIM specification.  The only barrel originally available was a 1.86-inch barrel, later, a 2.5-inch barrel was added. Both are shrouded in light alloy, and both use DAO operation. The Model 642-1 was originally shipped with a Master trigger lock; this was replaced in 2002 with Smith & Wesson’s internal lock (making it the Model 642-2). A LadySmith version of the Model 642-1 (and eventually the Model 642-2) was made; this was largely identical to the standard Model 642-1, but used narrow Ace Grip laminated rosewood grips.  It used a 2-inch barrel, but is otherwise identical to the Model 642-1.  In 2005, a Crimson Trace LaserGrip was added to the Model 642-2, making it the Model 642 CT.  The Model 642 CT was made only with the 2.5-inch barrel.

     Many post-production versions were modified by Mag-Na-Port, giving the Model 642-1 a ported barrel to cut recoil.  Rumors state that some LadySmiths were also given Mag-Na-Ports, but this is only a rumor; of course, I had to include it below.

     The Model 042 is sort of an odd bird.  Sometimes also called the Centennial Airweight, the Model 042 was introduced at gun shows in 1992 as the beginning of a new line of alloy-frame Centennials.  As such, it predates the actual beginning of the Centennial line, the Model 640, and was designated a Centennial Airweight before the Model 642 was called that.  It had a DAO action with a wide combat trigger and a completely concealed hammer.  Finishes were matte or polished blue, with Uncle Mike’s Combat Grips.  The frame was light alloy, but most of the rest of the metalwork is carbon steel.  Sights consist of a fixed square-notch rear and a serrated ramp front.  It does not have a grip safety, though it does have the floating firing pin and a flat-faced hammer (very difficult to thumb-cock).  The barrel is two inches and shrouded. The Model 042 is not designed for +P loads. Though most are marked “MOD 042,” some are actually marked “MOD 642,” and this is overstamped over the original markings.  The Model 042 is believed to be a transition model; it is speculated that the Model 042s’ finishes were poor in application, and that they were in fact blued two times.  Regardless, the Model 042 never appeared in any catalog, though some were released for national sales. For game purposes, the Model 042 is identical to the Model 642 with a 2-inch barrel.

 

The Model 942 Prototype Airweight 9mm Centennial

      The Model 942 was built as a Test & Evaluation revolver by the Performance Center.  At least one was built and shipped to gunwriter Wiley Clapp in 1999 after testing by Smith & Wesson, who described as “an idea that has yet to catch on.  It is possible that as many as five were built, but their disposition today is unknown, and the other four may have been destroyed. It uses the frame of the Model 642-1, and as such is a light alloy frame with a stainless steel cylinder.  The hammer is fully concealed with a flat face, and is very difficult to thumb-cock.  The trigger is a wide, smooth combat trigger.  Sights consist of a square notch rear and a serrated front ramp.  The barrel is a 2-inch ported barrel which has a light alloy shroud. The finish was satin stainless steel, with Uncle Mike’s Santoprene Combat Grips.  The Model 942 used full moon clips for use with the 9mm Parabellum ammunition; without them, the rounds will simply fall through the cylinder.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: No version of the Model 342 is available in the Twilight 2000 timeline. Model 442 construction was cut short; though production numbers were about half the book total, they are still fairly common, especially in the US, Mexico, and Canada.  The Model 442-1 barely made it out of Smith & Wesson’s doors; some 200 were built, almost all of them shipped, and they were available in some gun shops starting in late 1995. The Mag-Na-Ported Model 442 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline, though most gunsmiths with the right manual or knowledge can make similar modifications.  The Model 642 produced from 1990-92 was manufactured and shipped normally; the Model 642-1 actually began production in 1994 in the Twilight 2000 timeline, and is also fairly common; though versions with a 2.5-inch barrel are unknown (again, a competent gunsmith could give the Model 642-1 a different barrel).  The LadySmith is a rarer version of the Model 642; only 100 were produced and shipped before the November Nuclear Strikes and the dissolving of the nation.  The Model 642CT is unavailable in the Twilight 20000 timeline, as is the Model 942.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 42 (Alloy Cylinder)

.38 Special

0.33 kg

5 Cylinder

$148

Model 42

.38 Special

0.37 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 42 (Navy Competition)

.38 Special

0.3 kg

5 Cylinder

$149

Model 342Ti (DymondWood grips)

.38 Special

0.32 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 342Ti (Uncle Mike’s Boot Grips)

.38 Special

0.34 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 442

.38 Special

0.45 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 442-1

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 442-2 (2004+)

.38 Special

0.47 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 442 Ultralight

.38 Special

0.31 kg

5 Cylinder

$149

Model 442-2 Mag-Na-Port

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$171

Model 642 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.48 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 642 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$157

Model 642-1/2 (1.86” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.52 kg

5 Cylinder

$146

Model 642-2 (2.5” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$152

Model 642 LadySmith

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$147

Model 642 CT

.38 Special

0.59 kg

5 Cylinder

$552

Model 642-1/2 Mag-Na-Port (1.86” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.52 kg

5 Cylinder

$172

Model 642-2 Mag-Na-Port (2.5” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$178

Model 642 LadySmith Mag-Na-Port

.38 Special

0.5 kg

5 Cylinder

$172

Model 942

9mm Parabellum

0.47 kg

5 Cylinder

$136

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 42 (Alloy Cylinder/Navy Competition)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 42

DAR

1

Nil

1

7

Nil

2

Model 42 (Navy Competition)

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 342Ti

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 442

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 442-1

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 442-2 (2004+)

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 442 Ultralight

DAR

1

Nil

1

8

Nil

2

Model 442-2 Mag-Na-Port

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 642 (2” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 642 (3” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

4

Model 642-1/2 (1.86” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Model 642-2 (2.5” Barrel)/642 CT

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

3

Model 642 LadySmith

DAR

1

Nil

1

6

Nil

2

Model 642-1/2 Mag-Na-Port (1.86” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 642-2 Mag-Na-Port (2.5” Barrel)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

3

Model 642 LadySmith Mag-Na-Port

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

Model 942

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 43 .22/.32 Kit Gun Airweight

     Notes: The “.22/.32” part of the designation of the Model 43 refer to the fact that the frame of the Model 43 are modifications of the J Frame version designed for use with .32 revolvers, called the JAT (J Alloy Target) Frame.  The “Kit Gun” designation refers to part of Smith & Wesson’s original advertisin for the Model 43 (and other revolvers of this period) – that a hunter or fisherman could carry such a small weapon around in his gear or tackle box and it wouldn’t take up much space or weight – carrying it around in his “kit.”  The Model 43 has both a wide combat hammer and a wide combat trigger; the front sight is a high serrated ramp and the rear a micrometer-adjustable sight, denoting that to some extent the Model 43 was designed as a target weapon.  In addition to the frame being of alloy, the cylinder is also alloy, but the alloy used is an aircraft-quality aluminum alloy and the cylinder is stronger than Smith & Wesson’s earlier attempts at an alloy-cylinder revolver.  The cylinder is also counterbored; though it has no effect in game terms, the real-world effect of this is to reduce recoil.  The barrels are pinned; most were built with 3.5-inch barrels, but a rarer version with a 2-inch barrel was made. Blued or nickel-plated finishes were offered; the nickel-plated finish was not introduced until 1958, and was a very scarce finish.  The Model 43 has walnut checkered Magna grips.

     Some sources state that Smith & Wesson made a rare version of the Model 43 chambered for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire.  This is unconfirmed, and they may in fact be aftermarket modifications.  Nonetheless, they are somewhat common, in both barrel lengths.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 43 (2” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.41 kg

6 Cylinder

$67

Model 43 (3.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.46 kg

6 Cylinder

$82

Model 43 (2” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

0.47 kg

6 Cylinder

$83

Model 43 (3.5” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

0.53 kg

6 Cylinder

$98

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 43 (2”, .22 Long Rifle)

DAR

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

3

Model 43 (3.5”, .22 Long Rifle)

DAR

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

6

Model 43 (2”, .22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

2

Model 43 (3.5” .22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 45 .22 Military & Police (Post Office)

     Notes: The Model 45 is sort of a rimfire version of several larger-caliber weapons, and was designed originally as a training weapon for several governmental agencies, such as US Post Office Security, the Coast Guard, and the Secret Service.  In addition, several police and sheriff’s departments used them as training guns.  Produced from 1948-1978, the Model 45 was built on the K Frame that many larger Smith & Wesson revolvers of the time used.  Except for special orders or aftermarket modifications, this is the only K Frame revolver chambered for .22 Long Rifle ammunition (the Model 48 could fire .22 Long Rifle, but was designed for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire).  The serial numbers of the Model 45 are concurrent with part of the serials for the Mode 10, Model 11, and Model 12, as these were the primary revolvers that the Model 45 was intended to emulate. Except for a tiny number, Model 45s were finished in matte blue, with checkered walnut Magna grips.  The hammer is easy to cycle, is checkered, and actually wider than the trigger (normally, this is the other way around).  The trigger is serrated, and the cylinders counterbored.  The rear sight was a fixed square notch, while the front sight was a serrated ramp, with the back of the ramp sometimes painted black. Most Model 45s used a 4-inch pinned barrel, though a small amount were made with 6-inch barrels.  Being based on a K Frame, the Model 45 is heavy for its caliber. Though the Model 45 never appeared n any official Smith & Wesson catalogs, and was for a long time never sold to civilians, they eventually made their way to the civilian market after they were phased out by the agencies that originally used them.

     Though there were few Smith & Wesson-built variations of the Model 45, some are worth a mention.  20 Model 45s were made specifically for the Boston Police Department in 1957; these had 6-inch barrels, had strengthened frames, slightly higher sights, and a special serial number range.  I have not been able to find out what the purpose of this special production run was.  In 1962, seven more special Model 45s were requested by the BPD from Smith & Wesson; at their base, these were similar to the previous special production run, but they were also finished in bright nickel, had PC grips, a semi-target hammer, and about half of these seven were specially engraved by Smith & Wesson.  Again, I have not been able to determine their purpose, but they sound like presentation or special duty weapons to me.  For game purposes, however, they are identical to the standard Model 45 (with a 6-inch barrel).  Another special run of 135 were built in 1978; these were matte blued and were made with both 4 and 6-inch barrels.  The thing that makes them unusual is the fact that they were made without any markings of any sort on any of their parts.  Their users are also unknown.  Again, for game purposes, they are identical to standard Model 45s.  The only official subtype was the Model 45-1, which did not have the trigger guard screw; 500 were built, but again are the same for game purposes as other Model 45s.  References to Model 45-1s and Model 45-3s exist in Smith & Wesson records, but they probably never existed and were probably designations reserved for developments of the Model 45 that never materialized.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 45 (4” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$86

Model 45 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.07 kg

6 Cylinder

$106

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 45 (4” Barrel)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Model 45 (6” Barrel)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

Smith & Wesson 48 Masterpiece Magnum Rimfire (K-22)

     The Model 48, also called the K-22 early in production (a carryover from its prewar name) began production in 1959 and was discontinued in 1986.  It was built as a target weapon, hence the long barrels, the serrated Patridge front sight on top of a short rib, and the micrometer-adjustable sight (some 4-inch-barrel examples had a Baughman Quick Draw sight instead, which also adjustable).The grips were checkered walnut Magna grips, with the frontstrap and backstrap also checkered.  The trigger could be a wide, smooth combat trigger (on 4-inch barrel examples) or a serrated service trigger.  The trigger in either case was adjustable for pull length and pull weight, and was of target-quality.  The hammer was likewise target-quality; the standard hammer has a width of 0.375 inches, but a 0.4-inch and 0.5-inch hammer could also be had.  Virtually all were finished in matte blue, but a very few were nickel-plated.  Barrels were 4, 6, or 8.375 inches and of target-quality.  Though the standard chambering was for .22 Winchester Magnum, an exchange cylinder could be had, allowing the Model 48 to fire .22 Long Rifle.

     The Model 648 is the stainless steel version of the Model 48.  It was introduced in 1989, with production continuing until 1994, then production picking up again in 2003-2005; there was also limited production in 1996.  (The Model 648, however, did not appear in Smith & Wesson consumer catalogs until 1991.) The basic frame style is the same as the Model 48, but the Model 648 is made almost totally of stainless steel with a satin finish.  Original grips were Goncalo Alves Combat wooden grips, though Hogue rubber grips were introduced just before production ended in 1994 on the Model 648-1 version.  The Model 648-1 also changed the rear sight to one that was a bit more exact in its settings, and also had some changes mechanically to improve reliability.  The limited-production version of 1996 was also a Model 648-1, but also had a MIM trigger and hammer.  2003’s Model 648-2 had a modified frame which was slightly lighter and had Smith & Wesson’s internal lock.  All versions of the Model 648 had a target-quality 6-inch barrel which was fully underlugged. They also had a micrometer-adjustable rear sight which could be flipped up into a short leaf, or down for the shooter to use a notch-type sight. The front sight was Patridge sight on a ramp base, finished in black. The Model 648 did not have interchangeable cylinders to allow it to fire .22 Long Rifle ammunition, and the cylinders are too long to allow .22 Long Rifle ammunition to be fired directly from them (though it will fit in the cylinders, firing it could be dangerous). For game purposes, all three are otherwise identical to the standard Model 648.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 48 (4” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire and .22 Long Rifle

1.02 kg

6 Cylinder

$103

Model 48 (6” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire and .22 Long Rifle

1.11 kg

6 Cylinder

$124

Model 48 (8.375” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire and .22 Long Rifle

1.22 kg

6 Cylinder

$148

Model 648

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

1.33 kg

6 Cylinder

$124

Model 648-2

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$124

.22 Long Rifle Exchange Cylinder

N/A

0.04 kg

N/A

$1

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire Exchange Cylinder

N/A

0.06 kg

N/A

$1

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 48 (4”, .22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

6

Model 48 (6”, .22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Model 48 (8.375”, .22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Model 48 (4”, .22 Long Rifle)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Model 48 (6”, .22 Long Rifle)

DAR

-1

Nil