Smith & Wesson No 3

     Notes: Originally a blackpowder revolver, the No 3 made the leap into a smokeless powder revolver in the late 1880s.  The No 3 was a break-open design first introduced in 1870, and designated by Smith & Wesson’s new designation system for handguns.  Even so, it was often called the Model 1870.  It’s most well-known for its use by Jesse James and some others of his gang, as well as its use by Bob Ford to kill Jesse James.  (He had made a secret deal with Missouri governor to shoot Jesse for $10,000, a small fortune in those days; it is little-known that Jesse himself gave Ford the revolver as a gift.)  The No 3 was nickel-plated and had barrel lengths from 3.5 to 8 inches, with 6.5 inches being the most common. It had simple square-notch rear and blade front sights.  They were fixed, not adjustable, and not removable except by a very competent gunsmith.  When the rounds were expended, the revolver used a top-break system to open it, and the shells were extracted from the chambers to allow them to be easier to remove.  They were not ejected, though many movies and TV shows use modern reproductions or even altogether different revolvers that use case ejectors.  The No 3 also had no rod ejector.  The rounded butt was later carried over to the Model 36 Chief’s Special and later revolvers, both Smith & Wessons and others. Though the .44 American was the most common chambering, the .44 Russian was also a common chambering.  (The two rounds are almost a ballistic match, and identical in game terms for stopping power.) The No 3 was replaced by the Smith & Wesson Single-Action Army revolver in 1878; years later, the No 3 was discontinued – kept in production as long as it was only by user demand, and at a lower production rate.  Today, the No 3 is a hot collector’s item.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

No 3 (3.5” Barrel)

.44 American

1.14 kg

6 Cylinder

$159

No 3 (5” Barrel)

.44 American

1.22 kg

6 Cylinder

$172

No 3 (6.5” Barrel)

.44 American

1.3 kg

6 Cylinder

$187

No 3 (8” Barrel)

.44 American

1.38 kg

6 Cylinder

$202

No 3 (3.5” Barrel)

.44 Russian

1.17 kg

6 Cylinder

$162

No 3 (5” Barrel)

.44 Russian

1.25 kg

6 Cylinder

$177

No 3 (6.5” Barrel)

.44 Russian

1.33 kg

6 Cylinder

$192

No 3 (8” Barrel)

.44 Russian

1.41 kg

6 Cylinder

$207

No 3 (3.5” Barrel)

.45 Smith & Wesson Schofield

1.06 kg

6 Cylinder

$194

No 3 (5” Barrel)

.45 Smith & Wesson Schofield

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$209

No 3 (6.5” Barrel)

.45 Smith & Wesson Schofield

1.2 kg

6 Cylinder

$225

No 3 (8” Barrel)

.45 Smith & Wesson Schofield

1.27 kg

6 Cylinder

$240

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

No 3 (3.5” Barrel, .44 American)

SAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

8

No 3 (5” Barrel, .44 American)

SAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

No 3 (6.5” Barrel, .44 American)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

18

No 3 (8” Barrel, .44 American)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

22

No 3 (3.5” Barrel, .44 Russian)

SAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

8

No 3 (5” Barrel, .44 Russian)

SAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

No 38.5” Barrel, .44 Russian)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

No 3 (3.5” Barrel, .44 Russian)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

21

No 3 (3.5” Barrel, .45)

SAR

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

7

No 3 (5” Barrel, .45)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

12

No 3 (6.5” Barrel, .45)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

17

No 3 (8” Barrel, .45)

SAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

21

 

 

Smith & Wesson 10 Military & Police

     Notes:  This weapon began as simply the “Military & Police Model” in 1899, and production continued until 1942 with over 800,000 built and sold.  After World War 2, production resumed as the Model 10, and it continues to this day.  It was made in at least 5 barrel lengths, with 3” and 5” barrels being the most popular, and 2.5-inch barrels being relatively rare.  Since the Model 10 was originally a post-World-War-2 version of the prewar .38 Military & Police Victory model, the Model 10 was chambered for .38 Special.  The Model 10 was still often called the Military & Police model until the early 2000s, then the new semiautomatic M&Ps were introduced.  Nonetheless, the modern Model 10 began production in 1946 and it is still in production in several forms.

 

The Basic (and some not-so-basic) Model 10

     The Model 10 was built on a K frame, with either a round or square butt.  Early postwar makes used a round front sight forged as a part of the barrel and a square notch rear sight; the front sight was changed after a few years to a 0.1-inch-wide ramp, and in 1961, a 0.125-inch-wide ramp.  Barrels were 2, 4, 5, or 6 inches long and pinned; 3-inch barrels were also available by special order (until the late 1990s, when they were discontinued), and special contracts (generally by police departments) could be had with 2.5-inch barrels.  Barrels were normally tapered, but some 2.5-inch, 3-inch, and 4-inch barrel versions had heavy barrels. Frames are slightly different between tapered and heavy-barreled versions. The grips are walnut Magna style grips with checkering.  Early production versions had a 0.265-inch checkered hammer and a serrated trigger of the same width.  Later versions use a smooth 0.312-inch-wide trigger and a 0.265-inch service hammer.

     As you might think of a revolver that was in production for such a long time, The Model 10 has several iterations and subtypes.  The Model 10-1 was the first Model 10 to have the 4-inch heavy barrel; this began production in 1959, and it was the only regular production heavy-barrel Model 10 – other heavy barrel versions were generally by special order or used on special editions.  Various minor mechanical changes occurred over the years, including the front sight change listed above with the Model 10-3, a change to smooth walnut grips in 1968, the changed to a screw-in instead of pinned barrel in 1982, the change in the production line to all-blued finishes in 1992, optional synthetic grips in 1993, the square butt and tapered barrel changed to a straight barrel in 1995, and finally the addition of an included trigger lock in 1997 and an internal key locking system with the Model 10-14 in 2002.

     In addition, a plethora of special versions and editions were made in small lots.  A Brazilian Police contract in 1994 produced a Model 10-10 with a 3-inch heavy, full-lugged barrel, a full-length extractor rod, and a round butt.   Five were built for evaluation by the Taiwanese Government for their police forces; these were Model 10-10s chambered for .32 H&R Magnum, a 4-inch full-lug barrel and fixed sights (unlike the target sights normally found of revolvers firing .32 H&R Magnum.  The Taiwanese passed on this revolver, however, and they were returned to the US and placed on the market as a Limited Edition.  Today, the real-world price is astronomical.

     The Model 10 Lew Horton Special is a limited edition; these were built on both Models 10-7 and 10-9.  This line was manufactured in 2001. The square-butt frame is color case-hardened, and the rest is blued.  The grip plates are checkered walnut (there are rumors of round-butt Lew Horton Specials, but they seem to be exceeding rare).  The barrel is an unusual length for a Model 10 at 4.25 inches.

     The Model 10-13 1899 Commemorative is an exceedingly rare version; only 34 were built in 2002-2003 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Military & Police model (in 1999).  This version was built as closely to the original 1899 version as possible, including the deep blued finish, the square-butt checkered walnut grips, old-style hammer and trigger (though the trigger guard is a MIM trigger).  It comes in a special presentation case.  Most were actually sent to the gun shop at J&G Rifle Ranch in Arizona; this appears to have been an accident, though Smith & Wesson did not ask for the weapons back, and allowed J&G to sell them.  The barrel is a 4-inch tapered barrel, with a round front sight blade forged with the barrel, and a square notch rear sight.  Like the original, the 1899 Commemorative has a floating firing pin.  Like the original, the 1899 Commemorative can fire .38 Special or .38 Long Colt.

     The Model 10 US Park Police Bicentennial Commemorative Is essentially a Model 10-11 with a 4-inch heavy barrel, a lanyard ring, and smooth Goncalo Alves grips.  It has engraving on the sides of the frame and on the barrel, with the etchings filled with gold.  One side place has a US Park Police Bicentennial badge. Only 30 were made, and each came in a presentation box.  For game purposes, it is identical to a Model 10-1.

     Numerous other commemorative versions were made; some 30 such special versions were built over the years.

 

The Model 11 Military & Police

     This is essentially the same revolver as the Model 10, but chambered for .38 Smith & Wesson (which the British call the .38/200).  The Model 11 was primarily manufactured for British Commonwealth countries, and they also appear in former British colonies as they were issued in those countries as well.  Almost 600,000 were built; though some were sold in the US, they are primarily found outside the US.

     The Model 11 used the K frame with a square butt and Magna-style checkered grips (though early models have smooth walnut grips).  Most have a lanyard ring.  Early versions were finished in bright blue; most, however, have a sandblasted parkerized finish.  Those made by Smith & Wesson are serial-numbered concurrently with the Model 10; some, however, were built by license or without one and have their own serial numbers, if any.  Most Model 11s have British proof markings.  The Model 11s had a 4, 5, or 6-inch pinned tapered barrel; the 5-inch barrel is the most numerous.  Originally, the Model 11 had a square notch rear sight and a round front sight forged integrally with the barrel; later models had ramp front sights like those of the Model 10.  Though some were sold in the US, the Model 11 never appeared in any Smith & Wesson catalog.  The Model 11 and its predecessor was manufactured from 1938-1965, though some shipping dates were as late as 1970. Some minor engineering changes were made over time, and the Model 11 went from a Model 11-1 to 11-4.  Few special models were made.

     One of the few special Model 11s made was the Model 11-4 for the South African Police.  Markings differed, and the revolvers were sold to South Africa through Jonas Arms & Aircraft, which was being used as a cutout company.  For the most part these are standard Model 11-4s.  They used checkered Magna-type square butts, with a lanyard ring.  The revolvers were all blued in finish, and all have 5-inch barrels.  For game purposes, they operate as a standard 5-inch-barrel Model 11.

 

The Model 12 Military & Police Airweight

     The Model 12 is essentially a Model 10 built on a light alloy version of the K frame (both round and square butts were used).  Initial test models also had an alloy cylinder, but the light alloys of the time were not sufficiently strong to handle the firing of a .38 Special cartridge, and very few got out of the factory.  (In real world terms, Model 12s with an alloy cylinder will fetch double the normal price for a Model 12, but Smith & Wesson strongly suggests that the owner does not fire the weapon, as the cylinder can crack or even burst.)  Finishes are blued or nickel-plated, with checkered walnut Magna grips.  The pattern of sights, triggers, and hammers follows that of the Model 10, changing over time. Barrel lengths have a bit of mystery behind them – Smith & Wesson catalogs indicate that the Model 12 was available with 2, 4, 5, or 6-inch pinned barrels, but it appears that the 5 and 6-inch barrels were never actually placed into production, as none have ever been seen.  (I put them in the charts below anyway as a “what if.”)  The version of the K frame used, called the KA frame, was originally a bit thinner than the steel of the Model 10, but in 1984 the thickness of the frame metal was increased to match that of the Model 10.  It should also be noted that the grips from a standard K frame will not fit on a Model 12 made before the advent of the Model 12-4.

     The Model 12 is often confused with an older Smith & Wesson revolver, the M-13 Aircrewman, as they look similar.  The Model 12 was produced from 1952 to 1986.

     Special versions of the Model 12 include 18 Model 12-2s produced for the French Police, with a manual safety latch added that locks the hammer and trigger.  These revolvers had 2 or 3-inch barrels, a round butt, and a blued finish.  For game purposes, they are otherwise the same as Model 12s of the appropriate barrel length.

     Some 1500 were bought in 1958 by the Swedish Air Force with 2 or 4-inch barrels, and otherwise identical to standard Model 12s of the appropriate barrel lengths, except for the markings.  A few rare versions built in 1953 have a wide hammer, but again are otherwise the same as standard Model 12s for game purposes.

 

The Model 13 Military & Police Heavy Barrel

     The original impetus for the design and production of the Model 13 came from the New York Police Department in 1974, who wanted a version of their Model 10s that fired the .357 Magnum cartridge.  Several other law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, issued them as standard sidearms. The Model 13 appears very much like the Model 10, and is all steel and is almost always blued.  The frame is the same K frame, with a round butt on the version with a 3-inch barrel and a square butt for the versions with a 4-inch barrel.  Both have Magna-style grips and counterbored cylinders (a measure that decreases felt recoil, but is unfortunately not quantifiable in Twilight 2000 v2.2 rules; in addition, the counterboring was discontinued in 1982 with the Model 13-3).  The cylinder of the Model 13 is longer than that of the Model 10 to accommodate the longer .357 Magnum ammunition; however, like almost all .357 Magnum revolvers, the Model 13 can also fire .38 Special ammunition.  Sights are the same as those on later production Model 10s.  1994 brought a change to synthetic grips, and in 1995, the square butt was discontinued (though not the 4-inch barrel). In 1997, the 3-inch barrel was discontinued, and Master trigger locks were included with all new purchases.  In 1999, the Model 13-5 was introduced with increases in the reliability of the lockwork; however, few were produced, as the Model 13 was discontinued later that year. The Model 13 is essentially a Model 10-6 modified for the .357 Magnum cartridge.

     Some special versions of the Model 13 were produced, including a DAO version for the RCMP that is otherwise identical to a standard Model 13 for game purposes.  Some Model 13-1s, Model 13-2s, and Model 13-3s are found with bobbed hammers instead of the standard side hammer.

     400 Model PC-13 Lew Horton models were produced in 1995.  This version had a 3-inch heavy barrel with four Magna ports at the end of the barrel.  The sights were designed especially for this version, but otherwise still consisted of a fixed notch rear sight and a ramp front sight.  The PC-13 used the same boot grips called “Secret Service Boot Grips,” and were of soft rubber with an ergonomic shape.  The hammer was bobbed and the action was DAO.  Finishes were uniformly blued.  The extractor rod was full length and fully shrouded, and the trigger had an overtravel stop.

     A small quantity of Model 13-4s were chambered for .38 Special only for use by certain elements of the Thai Police.  These versions had a serrated frontstrap and backstrap, but they are hidden under Uncle Mike’s synthetic grips over a round butt.  These are otherwise identical to Model 10s with 3 or 4-inch barrels for game purposes.

 

The Model 64: The Military & Police Stainless

     Introduced in 1970, The Model 64 is essentially a Model 10 built from stainless steel.  It still uses the K frame, with the 2-inch barrel version having a round butt and the 4-inch version having a square butt.  In 1974, a heavy-barreled 4-inch version was introduced along with a 3-inch heavy barrel version with a square butt.  All had checkered walnut grips and the later versions of the Model 10 trigger, hammer and sights.  The heavy-barreled version has a somewhat heavier frame that is not compatible with other Model 64s.  Model 64s with round butts were given serrated frontstraps and backstraps in 1996, but they were discontinued 18 months later.  In 1970, Smith & Wesson introduced a version of the Model 64 with a tapered instead of heavy barrels. Other technical and mechanical changes were made over the years, including the deletion of square butts from 1995-1996.  In 1997, Master trigger locks were sold with every Model 64; in 2002 with the 64-7, internal locks with a key were put into the Model 64.  In 1998, a slight change was made to the frame design, a floating firing pin was added, and other changes were made to the internal lockwork.

     The Model 64 was initially made for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol. In 1973, a special version was made by Smith & Wesson for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol a commemorative version; the best patrolmen were issued these, and many of those patrolmen used them as service weapons.  This was the Model 64-1, with 750 produced in 1973.  This version had a 4-inch heavy barrel, and was designed to use both .357 Magnum cartridges and .38 Special cartridges.  Smith & Wesson had a sort of ulterior motive for producing this lot for the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, in addition to the special issue; the Model 64-1 served as a field test for what became the Model 65 later in that year.

     Most other “special” versions of the Model 64 were minor variations of standard Model 64 types; some differed only in their markings, bearing markings that identified their issue to whatever force or group to whom they were made for.  Some more readily-identifiable versions were the Model 64-3 made for the Georgia Parole Board; it was a Model 64-3 with a 3-inch heavy barrel, but with a round butt instead of the standard square butt.  A batch of Model 64-4s were built for the Brinks Armored Car Company; these had 2-inch standard barrels, but were DAO in operation.  Only 150 of these were built.

     The New York Police Department made heavy use of the Model 64; their version was called the Model 64 NY-1.  The NYPD versions came in all barrel lengths available for the Model 64, either with standard barrels or tapered barrels.  Despite being used in decent numbers by the NYPD, officers using the Model 64 had to buy them themselves instead of having them issued.  The Model 64 NY-1 were designed to operate in DAO or DA action, selectable by the individual officer.  Initially, the finish was brushed stainless steel so that they would non-reflective.  Unfortunately, with normal wear and tear, the brushing of the finish would wear off and the revolver become shiny again.  Later Model 64 NY-1s had a frosted stainless steel finish that was able to stand up to wear.  Variations on where the serial number was stamped also appear; originally, these were on the butt inside of the grips and the cylinder cut-out.  A short time later, the NYPD asked Smith & Wesson to additionally etch the serial number on the left side below the cylinder.  Many officers installed non-standard wooden or rubber grips on their Model 64 NY-1s. The Model 64 NY-1 was the last revolver authorized for duty use by NYPD officers; in 1993, the standard duty sidearm was changed to the Glock 17.  However, some older officers continued to use their Model 64s in the line of duty, and some officers who had bought versions with 2 or 3-inch barrels often use them as a backup or concealed carry gun.  Between 1987 and 1993, when the transition to Glocks was being made, some officers re-sold their Model 64 NY-1s, sometimes after changing the lockwork back to SA/DA operation.  The majority, however, were sold back to Smith & Wesson, who gave them a credit on whatever Smith & Wesson firearm or other equipment they might want to buy.  Smith & Wesson then removed the serial numbers; etched new markings on the revolvers, upgraded them to Model 64-4s, and put them on the market.

 

The Model 65: The Military & Police Heavy Barrel Stainless

     Based on the Model 13 (and what Smith & Wesson learned from the Model 64-1), the Model 65 was designed to fire .357 Magnum as well as .38 Special.  The Model 65 looks for the most part like a stainless steel Model 13, but it does not have an extractor shroud.  The Model 65 uses a wide combat trigger and service-width hammer.  Barrels are pinned and either 3-inch heavy barrels or 4-inch heavy barrels.  The grips are of checkered walnut, and the 3-inch-barrel version uses a round butt while the 4-inch-barrel version uses a square butt.  The cylinders are counterbored and the sights are the same as on Model 13.  The standard Model 65s were built from 1972-2004.  As with other Smith & Wesson revolvers, the Model 65 went through various changes to the design.

     Special versions of the Model 65 included the Model 65 F Comp, made for Lew Horton distribution and built by the Smith & Wesson Performance Center.  The Model 65 F Comp was built with a 3-inch heavy full-lug barrel, a compensator at the end of the barrel, a dovetailed front sight with a tritium inlay and an aiming dot, ergonomic rubber grips, and a contoured cylinder latch.  The Model 65 F Comp was produced for a limited run of 300 in 1993.

     The Model 65 .357 HunterSmith is for the most part like a standard Model 65 with a 3-inch barrel, but the barrel is full-lug and has rubber grips made by Uncle Mike’s.  In addition, all markings are laser-etched.

     A very limited run of ten Model 65s were built in 1998 for an unknown buyer.  These had a 3-inch barrel, a chromed trigger, a bobbed hammer, and Morado combat wooden grips on a square butt.  The action is also DAO.  However, for game purposes, this is otherwise the same as a 3-inch-barrel Model 65.

     An unusual version of the Model 65 was built for limited issue to Massachusetts State Police officers.  This was based on the Model 65-2, but had a 3-inch standard-profile barrel instead of a heavy barrel.  Except for weight and cost (in game terms), this is for game purposes the same as a standard 3-inch Model 65.

     For a short time, the US Customs service used a Model 65-3 with a 3-inch barrel and a bobbed hammer instead of the service hammer.  For game purposes, however, it is otherwise the same as a standard 3-inch-barrel Model 65.

     The Model 65 LadySmith (or Model 65LS) is perhaps the subtype of the Model 65 that has seen the most sales and distribution.  There are numerous differences between the basic Model 65 and the LadySmith, though it uses the same basic K frame as the rest of the Model 65 series.  Finish is frosted stainless steel, the round butt has laminate rosewood grips. The trigger is the wide service trigger, but with beveled edges.  The hammer is a standard service hammer, though it is not serrated.  Sights are standard for a Model 65.  The barrel is a standard 3-inch heavy barrel.  The LadySmith, however, is somewhat lighter than its counterparts; however, it otherwise performs the same in game terms as a standard 3-inch Model 65.  Production lasted from 1991-2004.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 10 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.74 kg

6 Cylinder

$146

S&W 10 (2.5” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.76 kg

6 Cylinder

$151

S&W 10 (2.5” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.77 kg

6 Cylinder

$152

S&W 10 (3” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.8 kg

6 Cylinder

$156

S&W 10 (3” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.81 kg

6 Cylinder

$157

S&W 10 (4” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.86 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

S&W 10-1

.38 Special

0.87 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 10 (5” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.89 kg

6 Cylinder

$176

S&W 10 (6” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$186

S&W 10-10 (Brazilian)

.38 Special

0.82 kg

6 Cylinder

$158

S&W 10-10 (Taiwanese)

.32 H&R Magnum

0.78 kg

6 Cylinder

$138

S&W 10 Lew Horton Special

.38 Special

0.87 kg

6 Cylinder

$169

S&W 10-13 1899 Commemorative

.38 Special or .38 Long Colt

0.85 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

S&W 11 (4” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.86 kg

6 Cylinder

$134

S&W 11 (5” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.89 kg

6 Cylinder

$144

S&W 11 (6” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.92 kg

6 Cylinder

$154

S&W 12 (2” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.51 kg

6 Cylinder

$147

S&W 12 (4” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.55 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 12 (5” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.57 kg

6 Cylinder

$177

S&W 12 (6” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.58 kg

6 Cylinder

$187

S&W 12-4 (2” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.54 kg

6 Cylinder

$147

S&W 12-4 (4” Barrel)

.38 Smith & Wesson

0.58 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 13 (3” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.88 kg

6 Cylinder

$168

S&W 13 (4” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$178

S&W PC-13

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$204

Model 64 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.85 kg

6 Cylinder

$146

Model 64 (2” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.89 kg

6 Cylinder

$147

Model 64 (3” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.95 kg

6 Cylinder

$157

Model 64 (4” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.95 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

Model 64 (4” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.99 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

Model 64-1

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$178

Model 65 (3” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.88 kg

6 Cylinder

$168

Model 65 (4” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$178

Model 65 F Comp

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.06 kg

6 Cylinder

$218

Model 65 HunterSmith

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.92 kg

6 Cylinder

$168

Model 65 (Massachusetts)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.87 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

Model 65 LadySmith

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.87 kg

6 Cylinder

$168

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 10 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

2

S&W 10 (2.5”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

3

S&W 10 (2.5” Heavy)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

3

S&W 10 (3”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

S&W 10 (3” Heavy)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

S&W 10 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

S&W 10-1

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

S&W 10 (5”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

9

S&W 10 (6”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

12

Model 10-10 (Brazilian)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Model 10-10 (Taiwanese)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

Model 10 Lew Horton Special

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

S&W 10-13 1899 Commemorative (.38 Special)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

S&W 10-13 1899 Commemorative (.38 Long Colt)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 11 (4”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 11 (5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

S&W 11 (6”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

15

S&W 12 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

2

S&W 12 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

6

Nil

7

S&W 12 (5”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

6

Nil

9

S&W 12 (6”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

6

Nil

12

S&W 13 (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

5

S&W (3”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 13 (4”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 13 (4”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W PC-13 (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W PC-13 (.38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 64 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

S&W 64 (2” Heavy)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

S&W 64 (3” Heavy)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 64 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 64 (4” Heavy)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 64-1 (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 64-1 (.38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 65 (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

5

S&W 65 (3”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 65 (4”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 65 (4”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 65 F Comp (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 65 F Comp (.38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 65 HunterSmith (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 65 HunterSmith (.38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 14/15/16/17 Masterpiece

     Notes: As the name would indicate, this is a K-frame revolver designed for sport and target shooting.  When it appeared in 1947, it was known as the K-38 (denoting its .38 caliber), but the name was changed to the Model 14 in 1957.  Most Model 14s are blued, but a small number were nickel-plated.  Most also have 6-inch barrels, but some were built with 8 3/8-inch barrels starting in 1959.  The Model 14 has an adjustable rear sight and walnut grips; in addition, the trigger is adjustable for overtravel and the hammer is target-quality.  The rear-sight is micrometer-adjustable.  The backstrap and frontstrap are both serrated for a surer grip, as is the trigger face.

     Variants include the Model 14-5, with a version with a 6-inch heavy barrel, and a small run of the Model 14-2 with a 4-inch heavy barrel and more bells and whistles (1040 were built for the Dayton Police Department).  A very small run of Model 14-1s were made for the US Air Force shooting team at Lackland AFB in San Antonio, with 4-inch barrels and slightly modified front sights.  In 1960, six were built chambered for .38 Smith & Wesson for the HH Harris Company, but returned a few months later.  A rare variant also exists with a 5-inch barrel.  Another version, the Model 14 Masterpiece Single Action, is a single-action version of the Model 14 Target Masterpiece, produced only from 1961-62 with a 6-inch barrel.  Other than being single action, it is identical to a standard Model 14 for game purposes.

     The Model 14 was manufactured until 1982, but production resumed in 1991.  This later model was produced only with a 6-inch barrel, and with a smooth trigger face.  The grips of this model are smooth combat-contour wooden grips, as opposed to the checkered Magna grips on the original.  This version was built until 1999.

     The Model 15 Combat Masterpiece (also known as the K-38 Masterpiece in pre-1957 production) was a version of the Model 14 meant for everyday use instead of target shooting.  The basic design was the same as the standard Model 14, but the Model 15 was first introduced with 2 and 4-inch barrels (and a rare 5-inch barrel version), with 6 and 8 3/8-inch barrels not being offered until 1986. In 1988, the 2 and 8 3/8-inch barrels were withdrawn from the market, followed by 6-inch barrels in 1992.  The sights used were a Baughman Quick Draw front sight with a micrometer-adjustable rear sight.  The original production versions had Magna-type grips, with smooth triggers on all but the 6 and 8 3/8-inch barrel models (which had serrated triggers).

     Variants of the Model 15 include a version of the Model 15-6 with a 4-inch heavy barrel, produced for the Washington DC police.  A version of the Model 15 with a 2-inch heavy barrel was also produced in small numbers.  Production of the Model 15 completely stopped in 1999.

     The Model 67 Combat Masterpiece is basically a stainless steel version of the Model 15.  It was introduced in 1972 and was produced only with a 4-inch barrel.  It has an adjustable rear sight, and until 1994 had a walnut grip (this was replaced rubber Hogue grip thereafter).  The ejector bar is unusual in that it does not have a shroud.

     The Model 16 (K-32) Masterpiece is for the most part the same as the Model 14, but is chambered for .32 Smith & Wesson Long cartridges.  Most of the features of the Model 16 parallel those of the Model 14, and it is built to match the weight of the Model 14.  The Model 16 was built primarily with a 6-inch barrel; 4-inch barrels were available but rare, but available, and that version of the Model 16 was designated the Model 16 Combat Masterpiece.  The original Model 16 was built from 1947-74, but was reintroduced as the Model 16-4 in 1989 chambered for .32 H&R Magnum. The Model 16-4 had barrel length choices of 4, 6, and 8 3/8 inches and wore Goncalo Alves combat grips.  The 4 and 8 3/8-inch barrels were discontinued in 1992, and production stopped altogether in 1993.

     The Model 17 was, again, basically the Model 14 in a smaller caliber – in this case, .22 Long Rifle.  The Model 17 series proved to be quite popular, leading to an initial production run that stretched from 1946 to 1989.  Original manufacture was primarily with a 6-inch barrel, with a 5-inch barrel being very rare.  In 1958, an 8 3/8-inch barrel was added to the line, and in 1986 a 4-inch heavy barrel was added.  Production halted in 1989, but with a few improvements including a full-lugged barrel, picked up again in 1990, stopping again in 1996.  In 1996, all Model 17s were replaced in production by the Model 17-8, which used a 10-round aluminum alloy cylinder and was drilled and tapped for a scope mount.  Only a 6-inch barrel version of the Model 17-8 was built, and production stopped in 1999. 

     The Model 17 .224 Harvey Kay-Chuk was a rare variant of the Model 17 (only 30 built), chambered for the wildcat round of the same name, and with a 6-inch barrel.  This Model 617 Masterpiece Stainless was introduced in 1990 as a stainless steel version of the old Model 17.  It is available in three barrel lengths, and in 1996, got an upgrade to a 10-round cylinder.  Up until 1991, the Model 617 did not have a barrel shroud that ran the entire length of the barrel; however, after 1991, the barrel shroud was made as long as the barrel and acted as a barrel balance counterweight.  The Model 617 originally had walnut grips, but in 1994 this was replaced with a soft rubber grip. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 14 (5” Barrel)

.38 Special

1.06 kg

6 Cylinder

$176

S&W 14 (6” Barrel)

.38 Special

1.09 kg

6 Cylinder

$186

S&W 14 (8.375” Barrel)

.38 Special

1.2 kg

6 Cylinder

$210

S&W 14-2 (4” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

1.04 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 14-5

.38 Special

1.1 kg

6 Cylinder

$188

S&W 15 (2” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$146

S&W 15 (4” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

S&W 15 (5” Barrel)

.38 Special

0.99 kg

6 Cylinder

$176

S&W 15 (6” Barrel)

.38 Special

1.02 kg

6 Cylinder

$186

S&W 15 (8 3/8” Barrel)

.38 Special

1.12 kg

6 Cylinder

$210

S&W 15 (2” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$146

S&W 15-6 (4” Heavy Barrel)

.38 Special

0.97 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 67

.38 Special

1.08 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

S&W 16 (4” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

1.03 kg

6 Cylinder

$127

S&W 16 (6” Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long

1.09 kg

6 Cylinder

$148

S&W 16-4 (4” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum

1.03 kg

6 Cylinder

$137

S&W 16-4 (6” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum

1.09 kg

6 Cylinder

$157

S&W 16-4 (8 3/8” Barrel)

.32 H&R Magnum

1.2 kg

6 Cylinder

$182

S&W 17 (4” Heavy Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.04 kg

6 Cylinder

$87

S&W 17 (5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.06 kg

6 Cylinder

$96

S&W 17 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.09 kg

6 Cylinder

$106

S&W 17 (8 3/8” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.2 kg

6 Cylinder

$131

S&W 17-8

.22 Long Rifle

1.05 kg

10 Cylinder

$108

S&W 17 .224 Harvey Kay-Chuk

.224 Harvey Kay-Chuk

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$132

S&W 617 (4” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.07 kg

6 Cylinder

$86

S&W 617 (4” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.09 kg

10 Cylinder

$88

S&W 617 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$106

S&W 617 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.21 kg

10 Cylinder

$108

S&W 617 (8.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$131

S&W 617 (8.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.33 kg

10 Cylinder

$133

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 14 (5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

S&W 14 (6”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

S&W 14 (8 3/8”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

S&W 14-2 (4” Heavy)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 14-5

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 15 (2”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

S&W 15 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 15 (5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

S&W 15 (6”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 15 (8 3/8”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

17

S&W 15 (2” Heavy)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

2

S&W 15 (4” Heavy)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 67

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 16 (4”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 16 (6”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 16-4 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 16-4 (6”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

S&W 16-4 (8 3/8”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

19

S&W 17 (4” Heavy)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

S&W 17 (5”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

S&W 17 (6”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

S&W 17 (8 3/8”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

15

S&W Harvey Kay-Chuk

DAR

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

S&W 17-8

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

S&W 617 (4”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

S&W 617 (6”)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

S&W 617 (8 3/8”)

DAR

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

15

 

Smith & Wesson 19 Combat Magnum

     Notes:  The Smith & Wesson was introduced to compete with the Colt Python in 1955.  Until the Model 19, conventional wisdom said that only large, heavy, slab-framed revolvers could contain the power of a .357 Magnum cartridge.  Smith & Wesson came up with a new mix of steels to contain the pressures.  One of the first government customers was the FBI.  The FBI quickly discovered that the barrels of their new revolvers wore quickly when used exclusively with Magnum rounds, and began to use a mix of .38 Special, .38 Special +P, and .357 Magnum rounds, depending on circumstances.  Another big customer was the California Highway Patrol.  For a short time, they were also available in Europe; these were sold under the Walther name.  Model 19 production itself ended in late 1999, though the 6-inch barrel version had been discontinued in 1996.

     In general, the Model 19 is built on the Target model of Smith & Wesson’s K-Frame (though it is slightly more beefy in the yoke area).  The first production batch had a 4-inch ribbed barrel, with a micrometer-adjustable rear sight and a Baughman Quick Draw ramp-type front sight.  6-inch and 2.5-inch barrels were introduced in 1963, and later very rare versions had 3-inch and 5-inch barrels.  In the years of 1963 and a bit later, a Patridge front sight replaced the Baughman sight.  Several triggers became available: a service trigger, a wider smooth combat trigger, and an even wider target trigger with an optional trigger stop.  Hammers were target quality, and wither semi-wide or wide.  Grips could be standard-sized or oversized, usually made from checkered walnut.  Later sight options included a red-ramp front sight and a red-outlined rear sight.  Versions with a 2.5-inch barrel could also have a rounded grip and a shrouded ejector rod.  Backstraps of all versions are grooved for an improved grip.  Many police departments and some other organizations used Model 19s that had some custom variations.  (Most of these minor variations are identical for game purposes.)  Model 19s were typically blued, but there were also many with nickel-plating and even some two-toned finishes.

     The Model 66 Combat Masterpiece Stainless is a stainless steel version of the Model 19.  It was introduced in 1970 only in a 4-inch-barrel version, but in 1974 a 2.5” barrel version was added, followed in 1978 by a version with a 6-inch barrel.  The Model 66 has an adjustable rear sight and counterbored cylinders (though this practice was discontinued in 1982 as being unnecessary).  In 2001, a version with 3.25-inch barrel and Hi-Viz sights was added to the line.  The Model 66 was equipped with Goncalo Alves target grips and a shrouded ejector rod.  Like the Model 19, most variations of the Model 66 are minor for game purposes.  Some notable exceptions are the RSR model, which had a 3-inch Magna-Ported barrel, a bead-blasted finish, and blackened sights.  The Super K is similar, but also has Performance Center-tuned action and trigger stop, a contoured barrel, and a white synthetic grip.

     Like the Model 19, the Model 66 became quite popular with US police forces and civilians (and was also widely exported), and also saw some use by the US Navy’s NIS and NCIS.  Production stopped in 2004.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 19 (2.5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.89 kg

6 Cylinder

$162

S&W 19 (3” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.9 kg

6 Cylinder

$167

S&W 19 (4” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1 kg

6 Cylinder

$177

S&W 19 (5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.05 kg

6 Cylinder

$187

S&W 19 (6” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.18 kg

6 Cylinder

$198

S&W 66 (2.5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.03 kg

6 Cylinder

$162

S&W 66 (3.25” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.05 kg

6 Cylinder

$169

S&W 66 (4” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.07 kg

6 Cylinder

$177

S&W 66 (6” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.09 kg

6 Cylinder

$197

S&W 66 RSR Model

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.9 kg

6 Cylinder

$192

S&W 66 Super K

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$193

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 19 (2.5”, .357)

DAR

3

Nil

1

3

Nil

3

S&W 19 (2.5”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

3

S&W 19 (3”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 19 (3”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 19 (4”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 19 (4”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 19 (5”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 19 (5”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

S&W 19 (6”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

S&W 19 (6”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 66 (2.5”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

3

S&W 66 (2.5”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

3

S&W 66 (3.25”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 66 (3.25”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 66 (4”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 66 (4”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 66 (6”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

S&W 66 (6”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 66 RSR Model (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 66 RSR Model (.38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

S&W 66 Super K (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 66 Super K (.38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

4

 

Smith & Wesson 20

     Notes: This revolver was originally called the .38/44 Heavy Duty, and later renamed as the Model 20.  It was built for the .38-44 Smith & Wesson round, but also capable of firing the .38 Special round.  The Model 20 was based on the N-frame, a larger frame initially designed for the .44 Special round, which made the Model 20 heavy but very stable despite the more powerful rounds.  The Model 20 was typically made with a blued finish and had checkered walnut grips, though a nickel-plated finish was also available.  Several barrel lengths were available, with the 5-inch barrel being the most common.  The Model 20 was initially quite popular, but sales fell off quickly, and only 31,715 were built before production stopped in 1966.

     In 1930, police often felt they were outgunned with their .38 Special-firing revolvers as sidearms.  In response, Smith & Wesson developed the .38-44 round, also known as the .38 Super Police.  The .38-44 is essentially a hot-loaded .38 Special cartridge.  It was never a big seller, despite popularity with police of the time.

     Buyers quickly requested a version of the Model 20 with an adjustable rear sight.  This led to the introduction of the Model 23 Outdoorsman.  It was available only with a blued finish, but also had special checkered “Magna-Grips” which improved the shooter’s control of the revolver.  The Model 23 originally had a simple adjustable sight, but after World War 2, it was given a micrometer-adjustable sight.  It was officially available only with a 6.5-inch barrel, but rumors say 4 and 5-inch barrel versions were built in very small numbers.  They were built until 1942; Smith & Wesson took a pause in their production during the rest of World War 2, and production picked up again in 1949, this time with a ventilated sighting rib above the barrel (though about a quarter of the post-1949 guns were built from parts in storage and had no such rib).  The Model 23 is identical to the Model 20 for game purposes.

     The Model 21, introduced in 1950, was basically a Model 20 chambered for .44 Special instead of .38 Special.  The options in barrel lengths are identical, as are the sights, finish and basic form of the revolver; it can be mistaken for a Model 20 at first glance due to the resemblance.  As with the Model 20, the most common barrel length found was the 5-inch.  The Model 21 proved to be unpopular, probably because revolvers with better sights and lighter weight were already available, and because the .357 Magnum round was becoming much more popular with police and civilians alike.  Only about 1200 were built, though it was in production until 1966.  Due to the larger cylinders (and less metal as a result), the Model 21 is actually a little lighter than the Model 20.

     In 1950, Smith & Wesson took a route similar to that of the Model 23 and produced a version of the Model 21 with micrometer adjustable sights.  This was the Model 24.  It was designed specifically for target shooting, but more buyers used it for hunting and other outdoor use than for competition.  This is the revolver that Elmer Keith modified when he was developing the .44 Magnum round.  The Model 24 was made with 4, 5, and 6.5-inch barrels, but only the 6.5-inch versions were made in any large numbers.  Production of the Model 24 stopped in 1966; it was also manufactured briefly from 1983-84 with improved sights and improved manufacturing methods, and with the addition of a 3-inch barrel, but the public didn’t bite, and it was quickly discontinued again.  The 4. 5, and 6.5-inch versions are otherwise identical to the Model 21 for game purposes; the 3-inch barrel model has its own lines on the tables below.

     In 2004, the experts at Thunder Ranch redesigned the Model 21, calling the result the Model 21-4 Thunder Ranch Special.  Thunder Ranch, in addition to being a range and firearms academy, is well-known for its remakes and improvements of existing weapons.  It is designed especially for police officers, with a medium-sized, slim 4-inch barrel, fixed, low-profile sights, a trigger and hammer which falls between the service and target-type, and other improvements designed to ease use.  The grips are wooden Ahrends cocobolo grips, which are smooth and contoured to fit very comfortably in the hand.  The frame is a full-sized N-frame.  Virtually the entire weapon is of carbon steel which has been deeply blued. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 21-4 Thunder Ranch Special does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 20 (3.5” Barrel)

.38 Special or .38-44 Smith & Wesson

1.12 kg

6 Cylinder

$161

S&W 20 (4” Barrel)

.38 Special or .38-44 Smith & Wesson

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$166

S&W 20 (5” Barrel)

.38 Special or .38-44 Smith & Wesson

1.16 kg

6 Cylinder

$176

S&W 20 (6.5” Barrel)

.38 Special or .38-44 Smith & Wesson

1.2 kg

6 Cylinder

$191

S&W 20 (8.4” Barrel)

.38 Special or .38-44 Smith & Wesson

1.25 kg

6 Cylinder

$211

S&W 20

.45 Long Colt

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$256

S&W 21 (3.5” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.06 kg

6 Cylinder

$205

S&W 21 (4” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.07 kg

6 Cylinder

$210

S&W 21 (5” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.1 kg

6 Cylinder

$221

S&W 21 (6.5” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.14 kg

6 Cylinder

$236

S&W 21 (8.4” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$255

S&W 22

.45 ACP

1.08 kg

6 Cylinder

$204

S&W 22

.45 Long Colt

1.25 kg

6 Cylinder

$261

S&W 24 (3” Barrel)

.44 Special

1.05 kg

6 Cylinder

$200

S&W 21-4 TRS

.44 Special

1.02 kg

6 Cylinder

$210

S&W 22-4 TRS

.45 ACP

1 kg

6 Cylinder

$192

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 20 (3.5”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 20 (4”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 20 (5”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

S&W 20 (6.5”, .38)

DAR

2

Nil

2

3

Nil

13

S&W 20 (8.4”, .38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

S&W 20 (3.5”, .38-44)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

6

S&W 20 (4”, .38-44)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

8

S&W 20 (5”, .38-44)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 20 (6.5”, .38-44)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

15

S&W 20 (8.4”, .38-44)

DAR

2

1-2-Nil

2

3

Nil

20

S&W 20 (.45)

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

13

S&W 21 (3.5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

S&W 21 (4”)

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 21 (5”)

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

11

S&W 21 (6.5”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

15

S&W 21 (8.4”)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

20

S&W 22 (.45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

16

S&W 22 (.45 Colt)

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

5

Nil

14

S&W 24 (3”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 21-4 TRS

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 22-4 TRS

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

 

Smith & Wesson 25

     Notes: Also known as the “1955 Model .45 Target Heavy Barrel,” the Model 25 was originally produced in .45 ACP or .45 Auto Rim (a rimmed version of the .45 ACP round), and not produced in .45 Long Colt until 1977.  The original barrel length was 6.5 inches, with later versions having 4, 6, and 8 3/8-inch barrels, sometimes with muzzle brakes.  A rare variant has a 5-inch barrel.  Original sights consisted of an adjustable rear sight and a patridge front; later, the front sight was changed to a ramp with a red insert and the rear sight notch was given a white outline.  A variety of triggers, hammers, and mainsprings were also made. The original Model 25 was introduced in 1955, and was manufactured until 2001, when it was replaced by a new model. The new Model 25 keeps the old look, but is lighter and comes only in a 6-inch barrel version.  It is still in production; Smith & Wesson may be trying to see if consumers warm to it.

     The Model 25 Mountain Gun is a light 4-inch-barrel version that uses thinner but stronger steel to reduce weight.  It uses a tapered barrel.  The butt is rounded and the grip is an Ahrends wood grip, with finger grooves.  The rear sight is adjustable, and the front sight can be removed and replaced with other types of sights. 

     The Model 625 is based on the existing Model 25 design. It uses lighter metals for many of its parts and has a polished or bead-blasted stainless steel finish.  The Model 625 could be had with a 3, 4, or 5-inch barrel and in either .45 ACP or .45 Long Colt, but all barrel lengths except the 5-inch barrel were dropped in 1992.

     The Model 625 Mountain Gun is a “backpack gun,” meant to be used on aggressive animals in the wilderness.  The standard Model 625 Mountain Gun fires .45 Long Colt through a 4-inch barrel. In 2001, a limited edition based on the Mountain Gun was also built by the Performance Center that fires .45 ACP ammunition through a 5.25-inch barrel, and called the Model 625 PC-2001.  Both of these revolvers have adjustable rear sights and Hogue rubber grips.

     The Model 625-6 was built primarily for export to Germany, with only about 50 sold in the US; it was built only in 1997.  The Model 625-6 was chambered for .45 Long Colt, with a 6-inch slab-sided barrel that is Mag-Na ported.  The Model 625-6 can accept a Weaver rail atop the revolver, and can be fitted with integral weights for better balance.

     The Model 625-6 V-Comp is a .45 ACP version with a 4-inch slabside barrel that has a removable muzzle brake at the muzzle.  The rear-sight is micrometer-adjustable, and the front sight is a red ramp; both are dovetailed in.  The Model 625-7 is of similar construction, but has a 6-inch Mag-Na ported barrel.

     The Model 625-10 is a new revolver from the Smith & Wesson Performance Center, introduced in 2004.  It is a snub-nosed revolver – perhaps it is better called a stub-nosed revolver, as the barrel is only a little over two inches long.  The Model 625-10 is an update of a revolver made before World War 2 called the Fitz Special.  It is designed to fit in a purse or waistband, or an ankle holster or even a pocket.  As the Model 625-10 fires .45 ACP ammunition, the revolver comes with full-moon clips to load the cylinders. 

     Another new Performance Center version, the Model 625JM, was introduced in 2005.  The “JM” stands for Jerry Miculek, a renowned revolver shooter, and is his personal design.  The Model 625JM uses a 4-inch barrel with rear adjustable sights and a front gold bead black partridge sight.  The revolver, firing .45 ACP, requires the use of full-moon clips; however, Jerry Miculek has devised tools called the Remooner and Demooner which speed loading and unloading of the clips into the revolver, and incidentally spare pinched fingers and ripped fingernails.  The Model 625JM is finished in matte bead-blasted stainless steel. The grips are of special fine wood.

     The Model 325PD picks on the trend of late for revolvers chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge.  The Model 325PD is a lightweight personal defense gun, small and concealable, yet still packing a punch.  The Model 325PD actually uses some of the technology developed by Jerry Miculek for the Model 625JM.  Since the .45 ACP cartridge is rimless, full-moon clips come with the revolver to allow the weapon to be loaded.  (Without them or half-moon clips, the .45ACP cartridge cannot be loaded into the revolver; they would fall out the other side of the cylinder.)  The frame is made from lightweight scandium.

     The Model 26 actually pre-dates the Model 25, and is also known as the 1950 Model .45 Target Barrel.  It was chambered for .45 ACP, like the Model 25, and is essentially the same weapon as the Model 25 but with a lighter, tapered barrel.  Most target shooters felt the Model 26 was too light and the barrel too light and though almost 2700 were built before the introduction of the improved Model 25, they did not sell well.  Most Model 26’s have 6.5-inch barrels, but some rare examples have 4 or 5-inch barrels.  Most finishes are blue, but some nickel-plated examples were made. Grips were mostly of checkered walnut. Production stopped in 1957, but the Model 26 was re-introduced in 1988 for a short time as the Model 26-1 Georgia State Patrol Commemorative.  This later version had a 5-inch tapered barrel, was chambered for .45 Long Colt, has an exclusively blued finish, and had a lanyard ring on the butt.  They had commemorative markings on the grips on each side.  Grips were smooth rosewood.  800 of these were built.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The new version of the Model 25 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, but the old version didn’t leave production, either.  The Model 625 Mountain Gun, Model 625-6, Model 625-6 V-Comp, Model 625 PC-2001, Model 625JM, and Model 625-10 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 25 (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.25 kg

6 Cylinder

$190

With Muzzle Brake

.45 ACP

1.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$241

S&W 25 (4” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.25 kg

6 Cylinder

$246

With Muzzle Brake

.45 Long Colt

1.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$297

S&W 25 (5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$200

With Muzzle Brake

.45 ACP

1.35 kg

6 Cylinder

$251

S&W 25 (5” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$256

With Muzzle Brake

.45 Long Colt

1.35 kg

6 Cylinder

$307

S&W 25 (6” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$210

With Muzzle Brake

.45 ACP

1.38 kg

6 Cylinder

$261

S&W 25 (6” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$266

With Muzzle Brake

.45 Long Colt

1.38 kg

6 Cylinder

$317

S&W 25 (6.5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$215

With Muzzle Brake

.45 ACP

1.39 kg

6 Cylinder

$266

S&W 25 (6.5” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.32 kg

6 Cylinder

$271

With Muzzle Brake

.45 Long Colt

1.39 kg

6 Cylinder

$322

S&W 25 (8.375” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.37 kg

6 Cylinder

$234

With Muzzle Brake

.45 ACP

1.44 kg

6 Cylinder

$285

S&W 25 (8.375” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.37 kg

6 Cylinder

$290

With Muzzle Brake

.45 Long Colt

1.44 kg

6 Cylinder

$341

New S&W 25

.45 Long Colt

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$266

S&W 25 Mountain Gun

.45 Long Colt

1.12 kg

6 Cylinder

$246

S&W 625 (3” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$180

S&W 625 (3” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$236

S&W 625 (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$190

S&W 625 (4” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.31 kg

6 Cylinder

$246

S&W 625 (5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.33 kg

6 Cylinder

$200

S&W 625 (5” Barrel)

.45 Long Colt

1.33 kg

6 Cylinder

$256

S&W 625-2 (3” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.08 kg

6 Cylinder

$180

S&W 625-2 (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

6 Cylinder

$190

S&W 625-2 (5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$200

S&W 625 Mountain Gun

.45 Long Colt

1.12 kg

6 Cylinder

$247

S&W 625 PC-2001

.45 ACP

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$204

S&W 625-6

.45 Long Colt

1.34 kg

6 Cylinder

$271

S&W 625-6 V-Comp

.45 ACP

1.35 kg

6 Cylinder

$216

S&W 625-10

.45 ACP

0.68 kg

6 Cylinder

$171

S&W 625JM

.45 ACP

1.22 kg

6 Cylinder

$191

S&W 325PD

.45 ACP

0.61 kg

6 Cylinder

$179

S&W 26 (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$190

S&W 26 (5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.15 kg

6 Cylinder

$200

S&W 26 (6.5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$215

S&W 26-1

.45 Long Colt

1.15 kg

6 Cylinder

$256

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 25 (4”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

With Brake

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 25 (4”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

With Brake

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 25 (5”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

With Brake

DAR

2

Nil

2

3

Nil

14

S&W 25 (5”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

16

With Brake

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

16

S&W 25 (6”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

17

With Brake

DAR

2

Nil

2

3

Nil

17

S&W 25 (6”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

With Brake

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

S&W 25 (6.5”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

3

Nil

19

With Brake

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

3

Nil

23

S&W 25 (6.5”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

23

With Brake

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

S&W 25 (8.375”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

25

With Brake

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

25

S&W 25 (8.375”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

29

With Brake

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

29

New S&W 25

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

5

Nil

14

S&W 25 Mountain Gun

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

S&W 625 (3”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 625 (3”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 625 (4”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 625 (4”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 625 (5”, .45 ACP)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

S&W 625 (5”, .45 Colt)

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

16

S&W 625-2 (3”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

S&W 625-2 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 625-2 (5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

S&W 625 Mountain Gun

DAR

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

S&W 625 PC-2001

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

S&W 625-6

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

17

S&W 625-6 V-Comp

DAR

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

S&W 625-10

DAR

2

Nil

0

5

Nil

4

S&W 625JM

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 325PD

DAR

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

5

S&W 26 (4”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 26 (5”)

DAR

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

S&W 26 (6.5”)

DAR

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

S&W 26-1

DAR

2

2-Nil

1

5

Nil

13

 

Smith & Wesson 27

     Notes:  In the early 1930s, with organized crime on the rise, the police felt they needed a handgun firing a more powerful cartridge than the .38 Special or .38 Smith & Wesson that were common at the time in service revolvers.  Colt tried to interest law enforcement in the M-1911A1, but automatic pistols require more training to fire and maintain than a revolver, and are more expensive than their revolver counterparts.  Half-moon and full-moon clips tended to get lost, so non-rimmed cartridges were not desirable in a revolver either.  Therefore, Smith & Wesson lengthened a .38 Special cartridge and packed as much powder into it as they felt was safe.  They then married the cartridge to a heavy, slab-framed revolver they called the Model 27.  They added micrometer adjustable sights and different barrel lengths, and law enforcement went wild over it.  It was introduced in 1949.  The 3.5-inch and 5-inch barrels were discontinued in 1975, and in 1992, the 4-inch and 8.5-inch barrels were likewise discontinued.  However, in 1975, the Model 27 also acquired a wide target hammer, a trigger grooved to reduce slipping, Goncalo Alves grips, and a finely-checkered pattern atop the barrel to minimize reflections from the highly-polished blue or stainless steel barrel.  Production of the Model 27 finally ended altogether in 1994.

     The Model 627 was introduced in 1997 as the company’s first 8-round revolver.  To facilitate quicker reloading times, Smith & Wesson reintroduced the use of “moon clips.”  The weapon achieved some notoriety for its unconventional looks -- however, the 627 is a well-engineered and reliable revolver.  It acquired following with some wheelgun aficionados for its lack of felt recoil and its aesthetic qualities.  The first version, the Magnum Stainless, uses a 5” slab-sided tapered barrel.  At the front of the barrel is a mount for interchangeable front sights.  It is drilled and tapped for a scope mount.  The Magnum Stainless was a limited-run revolver, produced only until 1998.  In 1998, the Model 627 Hunter was introduced; this version has a 6-inch slab-sided heavy barrel which has Mag-Na ports, a front sight adjustable for drift and a micrometer-adjustable rear sight.  It comes with an integral Weaver mount for optics and interchangeable weights to adjust balance.  In 1998 only, the Model 627 Lew Horton Special was produced; this version has a specially-contoured, tapered 6.5-inch barrel, interchangeable front sights, and a widened, smooth trigger with an overtravel stop. The Model 627 Compact version features a short 2.625-inch barrel for compact carry.  The weapon is loaded using full moon clips and uses a unique ball and detent lock system; this eliminates the locking lug, and as such, reduces the need for a longer barrel.  The Model 627 Compact has a drift-adjustable front sight with a white post and a micrometer-adjustable rear sight with a red outline.  The Model 627-3 V-Comp Jerry Miculek Special has a 5-inch barrel with a removable compensator (with a screw-on cap to protect the end of the barrel when the compensator is not used), a widened smooth trigger with an overtravel stop, a target hammer, a drift-adjustable red ramp front sight and a micrometer-adjustable rear sight in black, and a specially-designed Hogue wooden grip. The Model 627-4 was introduced in 2002, and is chambered for .38 Super.  It has a 5.5-inch barrel with a removable compensator, an unfluted cylinder, and an adjustable rear sight.  It is drilled and tapped for a scope mount and the grips are a red, white and blue pattern designed by Jerry Miculek.  The Model 627-5 uses a 5-inch tapered and contoured barrel, an interchangeable front sight, a black blade rear sight, and Hogue rubber grips.

     The Model 327 is a new snub-nosed lightweight revolver built on the N-frame.  The Model 327 is built on a scandium-alloy frame, a stainless steel barrel with a titanium barrel shroud, and a high-capacity titanium cylinder.  The Model 327 can be loaded by hand, from speedloaders, or from moon clips.  If a moon clip is used, it will be ejected with the cases when emptying the revolver.  (A set of 6 full moon clips are included with the revolver.)  Naturally, the Model 327 is very light and the barrel quite short, and this affects the performance of the weapon.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 627 and 327 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 27 (3.5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$172

S&W 27 (5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.23 kg

6 Cylinder

$187

S&W 27 (6” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$198

S&W 27 (6.5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.29 kg

6 Cylinder

$203

S&W 27 (8.5” Barrel)

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.38 kg

6 Cylinder

$222

S&W 627 Magnum Stainless

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.25 kg

8 Cylinder

$190

S&W 627 Hunter

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.35 kg

8 Cylinder

$227

S&W 627 Lew Horton Special

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.36 kg

8 Cylinder

$204

S&W 627 Compact

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.07 kg

8 Cylinder

$158

S&W 627-3

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.33 kg

8 Cylinder

$238

S&W 627-4

.38 Super

1.22 kg

8 Cylinder

$210

S&W 627-5

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

1.26 kg

8 Cylinder

$189

S&W 327 Airlite Sc

.357 Magnum and .38 Special

0.59 kg

8 Cylinder

$160

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 27 (3.5”, .357)

DAR

3

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

S&W 27 (5”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 27 (6”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

S&W 27 (6.5”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

15

S&W 27 (8.5”, .357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

19

S&W 27 (3.5”, .38)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

S&W 27 (5”, .38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

9

S&W 27 (6”, .38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 27 (6.5”, .38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

13

S&W 27 (8.5”, .38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

S&W 627 Magnum Stainless (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 627 Magnum Stainless (.38)

DAR

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 627 Hunter (.357)

DAR

3

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

14

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