Savage 21

     Notes: The Savage Model 21 (also known as the Model 1921) was designed specifically to compete with the Winchester Model 12 shotgun, which was at the time enjoying phenomenal success in the hunters’ market.  It was possibly Savage’s first shotgun produced for commercial sales; at the time (1921), Savage was almost exclusively a rifle-making company, with a few pistol designs also on the market.  The Model 21 in fact looked virtually identical (externally) to the Winchester 12, though internally it was quite different and thus avoided any patent snares.  Unfortunately, Savage was not known for its shotguns at the time; since they were essentially an unknown quantity to fowlers, most of them stuck with Winchester shotguns, and the Savage 21 (and the mater Model 28) were by comparison dismal failures.  Today, they are mostly forgotten weapons.

     The Savage 21 was, like most shotguns of the period, constructed mostly of steel metalwork, with a walnut stock and pump lever.  The standard barrel was 30 inches with Full Choke, but barrels of 26, 28, and 32 inches could also be had, as well as Modified Choke or Cylindrical Choke; a riot/home defense version was also available, with a 20-inch barrel, Cylindrical Choke, and a solid aiming rib atop the barrel.  (For those who are wondering, Improved Cylinder Choke was virtually unknown until the early 1930s, and these Savage shotguns never had them, nor was it unusual that they didn’t have them.)  The chokes were fixed and had to be bought or ordered with the choke the shooter desired; there were no interchangeable choke kits (these were also quite unusual in shotguns at that time).  The Savage 21 came in Grades A, B, C, D, and E; A-grade was a basic no-frills field gun, B-grade added a solid aiming rib atop the barrel, and C-grade was the riot/home defense version described above. The D-grade was a trap version, with a stock of fancy-grade walnut that had more drop at the heel than the other grades, as well as a raised cheekpiece.  The stock also had a straight wrist, instead of the pistol-grip-wrist of the other grades.  (Straight wrists were common on trap guns of the period.)  Atop the barrel was either a ventilated or solid aiming rib.  They had exclusively 30-inch barrels, and almost all of them had Full Chokes.  The Model 21 D-grade also was one of the first shotguns which used overbored barrels.  The E-grade was also called the Model 21 Tournament Grade; it was a shotgun which was made to order, complete with measurements made to fit specific shooters.  The stock was of the finest American walnut available, with fine hand checkering on the wrist (which could be straight or pistol grip-type, according to the wishes of the buyer).  The pump lever could also be ribbed or fine checkered.  A Monte Carlo-type stock could be ordered for the E-grade, or any of the other stocks available to the Model 21 could be used.  The E-grade had a ventilated sighting rib atop the barrel with a bead at the end of the rib.  (All the grades are effectively identical for game purposes, though of course they are quite different in real life.)

     The Model 21 had a tang-mounted safety; it also had a pump-slide lock inside the trigger guard.  Internally, the Savage 21 is quite different from the Winchester 12 (though in a few cases, the parts are actually interchangeable with those of the Winchester 12).  Disassembly in particular is nothing like that of the Winchester 12, and the internal action, particularly the feed mechanism, is also quite different.

     In 1927, Savage made some improvements internally to the Model 21, producing the Model 28.  The differences were quite subtle, and even Savage didn’t make much of the changes in their literature.  The primary differences noticeable in the Model 28 are in the fore-end; takedown of the pump slide and magazine tube became much easier (and more reminiscent of the Winchester 12; in fact, it is quite easy to interchange the pump slide and magazine tube of the Savage 28 and Winchester 12).  In addition, the underside of the Model 21’s receiver is squared-off, while that of the Model 28 has rounded edges and excess metal has been removed, giving the underside of the receiver a V-shaped appearance.  The Model 28 came in the same grades as the Model 21; in addition, there was a Model 28-3, which was an E-grade with an engraved receiver and various other ornamentations.  In real-life terms, the Model 28 was actually less expensive than the Model 21, a rarity at that time, considering the rampant inflation of the period.  Though the Model 28 versions have somewhat different weights than the Model 21s, they shoot the same for game purposes.

     Both the Model 21 and 28 were able to shoot a very wide variety of loads and shells; 2.5-inch and 2.75-inch shells could be fired from these shotguns, as well as 2.625-inch shells, which were rarities even then.  They could fire slugs as well as shot of widely different weights and propellant charges; one company rep even demonstrated the Model 21 with a load of mere sand!  It is a mystery to most shotgun experts as to why the Savage 21 and 28 did not sell better; it is widely regarded as the better shotgun, and was also (in real-life terms) far less expensive at the time than the Winchester 12.  Nevertheless, while the Model 21 and 28 sold less than 20,000 units, the Winchester 12 sold almost 150,000 units in the same time period, and more later on.  Most old Savage 21s and 28s from that time period are still perfectly shootable, though they are considered by most to be “shootable collectibles.”  Regardless of why, Savage stopped production of the Model 28 in 1934.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Savage 21 (20” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.23 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$808

Savage 21 (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.33 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$838

Savage 21 (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.37 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$848

Savage 21 (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.4 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$858

Savage 21 (32” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.44 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$869

Savage 21 Trap

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.57 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$863

Savage 28 (20” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.2 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$808

Savage 28 (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.3 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$838

Savage 28 (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.34 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$848

Savage 28 (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.37 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$858

Savage 28 (32” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.41 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$869

Savage 28 Trap

12 Gauge 2.5”, 2.625”, and 2.75”

3.53 kg

7 (2.5”), 6 (2.625”), 5 (2.75”); Tubular

$863

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Savage 21 (20”, 2.5”)

PA

4/1d6x24 of 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

38

Savage 21 (20”, 2.625”)

PA

4/1d6x24 of 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

39

Savage 21 (20”, 2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

43

Savage 21 (26”, 2.5”)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

50

Savage 21 (26”, 2.625”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Savage 21 (26”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

57

Savage 21 (28”, 2.5”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

55

Savage 21 (28”, 2.625”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

57

Savage 21 (28”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

62

Savage 21 (30”, 2.5”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

59

Savage 21 (30”, 2.625”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

61

Savage 21 (30”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

Savage 21 (32”, 2.5”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

64

Savage 21 (32”, 2.625”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

66

Savage 21 (32”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

6

Nil

72

Savage 21 Trap (2.5”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

59

Savage 21 Trap (2.625”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

61

Savage 21 Trap (2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

 

Savage 30

     Notes: First appearing in 1958 in 12 gauge as a long-barreled sporting shotgun, the Model 30 later appeared in 20 gauge and .410 gauge.  The design was also licensed by Springfield and sold by them as the Model 67, and by Stevens (which itself later became a subsidiary of Savage Firearms) as the Model 77, both of which were nearly identical to the Savage 30.  Therefore, this particular shotgun can also be found with names like the Savage-Stevens 77 and Savage-Stevens 30.  For the most part, the Savage, Springfield, and Stevens guns were virtually identical in appearance and functioning (differences were mostly cosmetic and related to the finish) and may be regarded as identical for game purposes. As with most shotguns of this time period, metalwork was largely steel, feed was by a 4-round tubular magazine, and woodwork was of mid-quality walnut.  Barrels were 26, 28, or 30 inches; choke was fixed, but barrels could be ordered with Cylindrical, Modified, or Full Choke.  Sling swivels were optional.  Original models had no sights of any kind, but later an optional front bead was added near the muzzle.

     After the Savage-Stevens merger, the company produced a 20-inch-barrel police version, the Model 69R (also known as the Police Riot Gun), and a military version, the Model 77E.  Both of these were virtually identical, with the Model 69R having a shiny finish for its metalwork, while the Model 77E had dull metalwork.  The Model 77E at first got no military orders, but the US military found itself short of shotguns early in the Vietnam War, particularly for issue to militia and village defense forces loyal to the South Vietnamese government.  In addition, some troops purchased the Model 77E on their own dime for use in Vietnam.

     The Model 77E in particular, and even to some extent the Model 69R, suffered from one large complaint – the small size of its tubular magazine.  In addition, there were also complaints that both weapons were a bit too long, particularly the Model 77E.  This resulted in the Savage 69-RXL, unfortunately not introduced until 1982.  Also known as the Stevens 68-RXL, the Model 69-RXL shortened the barrel to 18.24 inches, extends the magazine to near the end of the muzzle, adds a ventilated rubber recoil pad, strengthens the receiver and bore to allow the use of 3-inch shells, and makes the bead front sight standard.  The optional sling swivels also became standard, and were in addition made quick-detachable.  The barrel generally has a fixed Cylindrical choke.  Metalwork finish is dull metal or Parkerized, and the wooden stock is usually finished dark.  Today, the Model 69-RXL is in use by many police departments in the US, and is considered a substitute standard in the US military.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Savage 30 (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.07 kg

4 Tubular

$838

Savage 30 (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.1 kg

4 Tubular

$848

Savage 30 (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.13 kg

4 Tubular

$858

Savage 30 (26” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

2.95 kg

4 Tubular

$641

Savage 30 (28” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

2.98 kg

4 Tubular

$651

Savage 30 (30” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.01 kg

4 Tubular

$662

Savage 30 (26” Barrel)

.410 Gauge 2.75”

2.77 kg

4 Tubular

$372

Savage 30 (28” Barrel)

.410 Gauge 2.75”

2.8 kg

4 Tubular

$382

Savage 30 (30” Barrel)

.410 Gauge 2.75”

2.83 kg

4 Tubular

$393

Savage 69R/77E

12 Gauge 2.75”

2.88 kg

4 Tubular

$802

Savage 69-RXL

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

2.95 kg

7 Tubular

$931

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Savage 30 (26”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

57

Savage 30 (28”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

62

Savage 30 (30”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

Savage 30 (26”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

5

Nil

48

Savage 30 (28”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

52

Savage 30 (30”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

56

Savage 30 (26”, .410 GA)

PA

3/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

7

3

Nil

32

Savage 30 (28”, .410 GA)

PA

3/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

7

3

Nil

35

Savage 30 (30”, .410 GA)

PA

3/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

7

3

Nil

38

Savage 69R/77E

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

43

Savage 69-RXL (2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

39

Savage 69-RXL (3”)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

44

 

Savage 77E

     Notes: A long-unsung hero of the Vietnam War, the Model 77E was one of the standard shotguns of that conflict, used by MPs, security forces, and even some personnel such as platoon sergeants and special ops units.  Though designed to be a police riot gun, it saw much more service in the military, in Vietnam, the US, and other world postings. Between 1963 and 1964 some 60,920 were built and delivered to the US military, A further “emergency” order was made in late 1964, for a total of 1980 shotguns.  771 of these were provided to the ARVN. The M-77E was relatively inexpensive, and proved useful in the jungle.

     Complaints by flak-jacket-clad shooters led to the stock being sawed off by 0.62 inches.  This led to further complaints from those not wearing body armor, and later, a screw-on stock extender was devised that allowed the M-77E to be brought back to the original LOP. Unlike most US military shotguns, the M-77E had a thick recoil pad; the stock and pump slide were made of varnished beech, painted black. The stock was cheap and not too strong; a strong butt-stroke against an enemy often required a stock replacement.  Savage responded by shipping the Army and Marines lots of extra stocks. The stock has a deep semi-pistol grip. The trigger guard was also made of weak alloy and broke often.  As replacement trigger guards were in short supply, armorers often resorted to taking one off of an M-77E not being used or making them from scratch.  Metal finish was Parkerized black.  A few were experimentally fitted with bayonet lugs, but as bayonets on shotguns were little used, the experiment came to a halt, and the bayonet lugs removed.  The crossbolt safety was on the left front of the trigger guard, a very ergonomic position.

     The Savage 77Es were regarded as less-desired brothers to the Ithaca 37 and Winchester Model 12.  Most were sold into civilian and police service after Vietnam, where their shortcomings were not as deleterious.  They are now considered collectors’ items.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Savage 77E

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.08 kg

5 Tubular

$857

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Savage 77E

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

5

Nil

43

 

 

Scattergun Technologies Border Patrol Remington 870

     Notes: This is another version of the Remington 870 that has been improved by a third party.  Scattergun Technologies has Trak-Lok ghost ring rear sight and a ramp front sight with a tritium insert for night work.  The stock is synthetic, and the action is modified for extra smoothness.  The magazine spring is extra heavy duty stainless steel to allow for extended period of loading without wearing out the spring from compression.  The safety is larger than normal to allow easier manipulation.    The standard Border Patrol Remington 870 has an 18-inch barrel, but another version, the Entry Model, has a 14-inch barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Border Patrol Remington 870

12 Gauge 3”

3.64 kg

7 Tubular

$944

Entry Model Remington 870

12 Gauge 3”

3.4 kg

5 Tubular

$923

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Border Patrol Remington 870

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

43

Entry Model Remington 870

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

5

4

Nil

30

 

Serbu Super-Shorty

     Notes: This is basically a Mossberg Maverick pump-action shotgun, with pistol grip, cut down into a scattergun.  It is believed to be the shortest production shotgun available.  Though the extremely short barrel (only 6.5 inches) severely limits range and also allows only a very small tubular magazine underneath, the weapon has become popular among curio collectors and has some applications in close-assault situations.  The Super-Shorty has a folding foregrip which is also used to actuate the pump action.  Serbu will also make one of these based upon the Mossberg 500 or 590 upon request; the results are largely the same.  The finish is Mil-Spec manganese phosphate.  It would behoove the user to load an additional round into the chamber, as the magazine capacity is so small.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is an extremely rare weapon in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Super-Shorty

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

2.5 kg

2 Tubular

$742

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Super-Shorty (2.75”)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

3

5

Nil

8

Super-Shorty (3”)

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

3

5

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson 916

     Notes: The Model 916 was an early smith & Wesson shotgun, manufactured for them by Nobel Shotgun Company (not to be confused with Dynamit Nobel).  Three versions were available: the Slide Action with Fixed Barrel, the Eastfield, and the Model 916T.  The Slide Action with Fixed Barrel (to distinguish it from the Model 916T, which has interchangeable barrels) has an absolutely huge amount of barrel lengths and gauges and shell lengths, though the 16 gauge version is rumored only and if it exists, is very rare. In addition, the chokes are fixed and may be Full, Improved Cylinder, or Cylinder. The gun has a pistol grip wrist.  The barrel may be plain or have a ventilated sighting rib.  It was offered from 1972-78. The stock and slide are walnut and the metalwork is blued steel.

     The Model 916 Eastfield has a plain or barrel with a ventilated sighting rib, comes in 12, 16, or 20 gauge 2.75" or 3" shells and has a recoil pad.  Only a 28-inch barrel is available.

     The Model 916T has user-interchangeable barrels, of various lengths and fixed chokes.  The barrel may or may not have ventilated sight ribs, or rifle sights and rifled barrels. Some of these shotguns were given 8-round extended tube magazines for police use; these cost $5 more. For game purposes, it is otherwise identical to the Slide Action with Fixed Barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 916 (18" Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.29 kg

5 Tubular

$854

Model 916 (20" Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.33 kg

5 Tubular

$864

Model 916 (26" Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.55 kg

5 Tubular

$895

Model 916 (28" Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.59 kg

5 Tubular

$905

Model 916 (30" Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.63 kg

5 Tubular

$915

Model 916 (18" Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.16 kg

5 Tubular

$723

Model 916 (20" Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.2 kg

5 Tubular

$734

Model 916 (26" Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.41 kg

5 Tubular

$764

Model 916 (28" Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.45 kg

5 Tubular

$774

Model 916 (30" Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.49 kg

5 Tubular

$784

Model 916 (18" Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.07 kg

5 Tubular

$640

Model 916 (20" Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.11 kg

5 Tubular

$650

Model 916 (26" Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.31 kg

5 Tubular

$681

Model 916 (28" Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.35 kg

5 Tubular

$691

Model 916 (30" Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.39 kg

5 Tubular

$701

Model 916 Eastfield

12 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.79 kg

5 Tubular

$986

Model 916 Eastfield

16 Gauge 2.75” and  3"

3.65 kg

5 Tubular

$849

Model 916 Eastfield

20 Gauge 2.75" and 3"

3.59 kg

5 Tubular

$766

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 916 (18", 12 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

5

Nil

38

Model 916 (18", 12 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

5

Nil

43

Model 916 (20", 12 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x38 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

43

Model 916 (20", 12 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x38 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

49

Model 916 (26", 12 GA, 2.75")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

57

Model 916 (26", 12 GA, 3")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

65

Model 916 (28", 12 GA, 2.75")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

62

Model 916 (28", 12 GA, 3")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

70

Model 916 (30", 12 GA, 2.75")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

Model 916 (30", 12 GA, 3")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

76

Model 916 (18", 16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

35

Model 916 (18", 16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

5

Nil

40

Model 916 (20", 16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

5

Nil

39

Model 916 (20", 16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

5

Nil

44

Model 916 (26", 16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

5

Nil

59

Model 916 (26", 16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

5

Nil

52

Model 916 (28", 16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

56

Model 916 (28", 16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

64

Model 916 (30", 16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

61

Model 916 (30", 16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

69

Model 916 (18", 20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

32

Model 916 (18", 20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

36

Model 916 (20", 20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

36

Model 916 (20", 20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

41

Model 916 (26", 20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

48

Model 916 (26", 20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

5

Nil

55

Model 916 (28", 20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Model 916 (28", 20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

59

Model 916 (30", 20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

56

Model 916 (30", 20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

64

Model 916 Eastfield (12 GA, 2.75")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

62

Model 916 Eastfield (12 GA, 3")

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

70

Model 916 Eastfield (16 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

4

Nil

56

Model 916 Eastfield (16 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

64

Model 916 Eastfield (20 GA, 2.75")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Model 916 Eastfield (20 GA, 3")

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

59

 

Smith & Wesson 3000

     Notes: Though Smith & Wesson is largely out of the shotgun game these days, for a while they offered combat shotguns to police.  One of these shotguns was the Model 3000.  The Model 3000 is a basic sort of pump-action shotgun for the most part, except for the side-folding Choate stock with a substantial recoil pad.  The Choate stock is also unusual in that is has almost no rattle when folded, a problem that is otherwise common in side-folding stocks.  The finish is parkerized.  The Model 3000 is very durable and was well-thought of by its users; many are still in operation today.

     An early version of this shotgun was called the Model 1000P, it did not have the folding stock, but otherwise was identical to the Model 3000.  Not to be confused with the Model 1000 Autoloader above.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 3000

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.35 kg

5 Tubular

$901

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 3000

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

38

 

Winchester 12

     Notes: The Winchester Model 12 was originally conceived to be both a hunter’s weapon and to also come in separate versions for police and military use.  They were also intended to improve upon and correct deficiencies found in earlier Winchester pump-action shotguns.  The original Winchester 12 was produced in 12 gauge with steel metalwork and barrels of 26, 28, and 30 inches, but quickly other gauges were added.  In addition, Winchester built the Model 12 only as a Field version, but other versions were later added – Fancy, Skeet, Trap, Tournament, Featherweight, and the Heavy Duck Gun.  Most of these weapons, except the Featherweight and Heavy Duck Gun, varied only in (by Twilight 2000 standards) minor details, such as the sights, the choke on the barrels, and the finish and wood used.  Manufacture of the Model 12 began in 1912 and continued until 1965; manufacture began again in 1972, but finally ended for good in 1980.

     The Winchester 12 was machined out of solid steel forgings, making for a strong, relatively-heavy weapon, but one that is so sturdy in its construction that they will still function relatively flawlessly today.  It also meant that the Model 12 was difficult, time-consuming, and expensive (in real-life terms) to produce.  The exposed bolt and hammer of most previous Winchester pump-action shotguns was eliminated.  More positive and passive safeties were added.  The difficult pump slide cycling of many previous Winchester pump-action designs was likewise eased significantly.  Despite the cost and complexity, the Winchester 12 was a shotgun well-liked by its users, though it has since been surpassed by shotguns of more modern design.

     Two major variants of the Winchester 12 existed.  The Featherweight was a shorter, lighter version, with a 22-inch barrel and lighter wood and metalwork.  The Heavy Duck Gun was introduced in 1935, with a 30 and 32-inch barrels (until 1948 when the 32-inch barrel was discontinued).  They had the ability to chamber 3” shells, but were made only for 12 gauge ammunition. They used stainless steel barrels instead of the nickel steel barrels of other Model 12s.  The stocks were built of fancy-grade wood with a recoil pad on the butt, checkering on the pistol grip wrist and pump slide, and various carvings and engravings.  Trap and Pigeon models were also built, differing primarily in the chokes of the barrels and barrel sighting ribs.

     The Winchester Model 12 was also produced in military and police versions.  Police versions differed little from their civilian counterparts, but were chambered only for 12 gauge and had 20-inch barrels (with 18-inch barrels an option).  They typically had dull, non-corrosive finishes and slightly-extended magazines, and were typically known as the Model 12 Police or Model 12 Riot Gun.  Military versions were much different from their civilian counterparts or even the police versions; they have standard barrel lengths of 18 inches, have a ventilated aluminum barrel shroud fitted above the barrel, and a bayonet lug under the barrel along with sling swivels.  Known to the US military as the M-12, they served as late as shortly after the Vietnam War, and were also issued in good numbers to friendly militia and irregular troops there.  Though they were in many ways an improvement over the M-1917 Trench Gun, the two continued to be manufactured and served alongside each other until World War 2.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Winchester 12 (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.91 kg

4 Tubular

$838

Winchester 12 (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.95 kg

4 Tubular

$848

Winchester 12 (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.99 kg

4 Tubular

$858

Winchester 12 (26” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.73 kg

4 Tubular

$718

Winchester 12 (28” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.77 kg

4 Tubular

$728

Winchester 12 (30” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.81 kg

4 Tubular

$738

Winchester 12 (26” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.61 kg

4 Tubular

$641

Winchester 12 (28” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.65 kg

4 Tubular

$651

Winchester 12 (30” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.69 kg

4 Tubular

$662

Winchester 12 (26” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.45 kg

4 Tubular

$545

Winchester 12 (28” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.49 kg

4 Tubular

$555

Winchester 12 (30” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.53 kg

4 Tubular

$565

Winchester 12 Lightweight

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.71 kg

4 Tubular

$812

Winchester 12 Lightweight

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.54 kg

4 Tubular

$692

Winchester 12 Lightweight

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.43 kg

4 Tubular

$616

Winchester 12 Lightweight

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.28 kg

4 Tubular

$519

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

4.24 kg

4 Tubular

$970

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (32” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

4.28 kg

4 Tubular

$980

Winchester 12 Police (20” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.84 kg

5 Tubular

$858

Winchester 12 Police (18” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.8 kg

5 Tubular

$847

M-12

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.86 kg

5 Tubular

$852

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Winchester 12 (26”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

57

Winchester 12 (28”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

62

Winchester 12 (30”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

Winchester 12 (26”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d4x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Winchester 12 (28”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d4x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

56

Winchester 12 (30”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d4x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

61

Winchester 12 (26”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

48

Winchester 12 (28”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Winchester 12 (30”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

56

Winchester 12 (26”, 28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 12 (28”, 28 GA)

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

47

Winchester 12 (30”, 28 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

50

Winchester 12 Lightweight (12 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

4

Nil

47

Winchester 12 Lightweight (16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 12 Lightweight (20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

40

Winchester 12 Lightweight (28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

3

Nil

36

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (30”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

67

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (30”, 3”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

76

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (32”, 2.75”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

72

Winchester 12 Heavy Duck Gun (32”, 3”)

PA

5/1d6x36 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

9

5

Nil

82

Winchester 12 Police (20”)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 12 Police (18”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

M-12

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

 

Winchester 97

     Notes: This was the first pump-action combat shotgun to achieve any sort of popularity – there were a few “combat” pump-action shotguns before it, but they were never popular with the troops.  The Model 97 was actually invented by John Moses Browning, and was hit first pump-action shotgun. It still holds its own when compared against modern pump shotguns, showing just how good the design was; almost any Model 97 is still in firing condition, even with modern ammunition and loads.

     The Model 97 has an exposed hammer, something that helped training troops familiar with double-barreled shotguns, though the hammer could easily get snagged.  The only safety on the Model 97 is a half-cock safety.  The Model 97 also does not have a trigger disconnect; therefore, the user could rapidly fire the gun by holding down the trigger and cycling the slide.  A shooter may use this features to get off four shots per round, but recoil is then increased by one. The metalwork of the Model 97 is of blued steel, and the complicated mechanism and receiver using primarily milled parts made is difficult, time-consuming, and expensive to produce, as well as to field strip.  The stock is walnut. Nonetheless, by the time production stopped in 1957, over a million had been manufactured.  A version of this gun became the M-1917 Trench Gun (q.v.), and it was also popular with the Texas Rangers, Border Patrol, and thousands of police departments across the country.  Straight Model 97s were also used by the US Military from World War I to Vietnam. Barrels for the Model 97 included 18 and 18.5-inch barrels.  A Trap version of the Model 97 was sold for a short time, with a 30-inch barrel.  It did not sell well, and is rather rare.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Winchester 97 (18” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.58 kg

5 Tubular

$797

Winchester 97 (18.5” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.6 kg

5 Tubular

$800

Winchester 97 (30” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.82 kg

5 Tubular

$858

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Winchester 97 (18” Barrel)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

Winchester 97 (18.5” Barrel)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

39

Winchester 97 (30” Barrel)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

6

Nil

67

 

Winchester 1200/1300

     Notes: The Model 1200 was introduced in 1964 as a less-expensive and lighter version of the Winchester 12.  This was achieved primarily by the use of a stamped aluminum receiver.  In addition, all of the internal parts were contained in the trigger assembly, which could be removed as one unit.  To help users deal with the heavier recoil caused by the lighter weight, a thick, ventilated recoil pad is on the butt.  The crossbolt safety was appreciated, but the trigger disconnect was not – no more rapid firing by simply holding down the trigger and cycling the slide.  The crossbolt safety was also not appreciated by some – many owners have replaced it with a toggle-type safety, and have found the safety of an M-1 Garand or M-14 work quite well for this purpose.)  The pump slide release is at the left rear of the trigger guard, which is a bit awkward for shooters not used to the Model 1200. Barrels for civilian models were 22, 26, or 28 inches (depending upon model, most of which are otherwise identical for game purposes).  Four gauges were offered.  Metalwork on the Model 1200 includes an aluminum receiver and tubular magazine (though the rest of the metalwork is steel); the stock and pump slide are of walnut, and a variety of sights are available, including a sighting rib.

     In the 1960s, Winchester (after its purchase by US Repeating Arms) decided to increase its market base for the Model 1200 by offering versions designed for police and military use.  These at first had the same aluminum receiver, but it was quickly found that the aluminum receivers used by Winchester could not hold up to military durability standards, and those that were built were quickly relegated to National Guard use, where they were eventually sold off to civilian police departments.  Winchester responded to the durability problem by offering two new versions of the Model 1200 – the Stainless Marine, the Stainless Police.

     Both the Stainless Marine and Stainless Police are essentially identical, sharing the same basic steel receivers, stainless-steel 18-inch barrels, and steel tubular extended magazines.  (Later, civilian versions were built, without the extended magazines.)  The Stainless Marine used a natural stainless steel finish; the Stainless Police had its external metalwork given a satin finish.  Both use synthetic furniture.  Some used by the military were also given a blued finish over the external metalwork; these are otherwise identical to the Stainless Marine for game purposes.  The Stainless Marine uses rifle-type sights; the Stainless Police uses a sighting rib with a bead at the front of the rib.  These shotguns saw a lot of use with the military (especially the US Coast Guard) and police until the late 1960s; many US police departments still have them, as do some National Guard units.  The civilian models are also still popular.

     Another popular model with the police and civilians is the Model 1200 Defender.  This version uses a black synthetic stockless configuration with a pistol grip.  The barrel length remains 18 inches, but the metalwork is uniformly blued, and the magazine is extended a little further.  It has no sights, nor any provision for mounting any.  A civilian version, the Camp Defender, was also built; this version was made in 20 gauge only and has a smaller magazine, but is otherwise identical.  The SXP Defender is essentially a Defender using more polymer, including a polymer stock pump slide, and using lighter-yet just as strong steel in its parts.  This makes it lighter than the standard Defender.  It has an Inflex recoil pad on the butt.  Barrel length is 18 inches.  The Black Shadow is more civilian-oriented and has a barrel length of 26 or 28 inches.

     In the late 1970s, Winchester decided made a few improvements to the Model 1200 series, and then renamed the whole series the Model 1300 series.  (They are identical to the Model 1200 series for game purposes.)  A budget-version (in real-life terms) of the Model 1300 was also built; this version, the Model 1300 Ranger, used less-expensive wood furniture, less expensive steel and aluminum in the metalwork (except for the working parts) and were limited to 4-round magazines.  They are otherwise identical to civilian Model 1200s for game purposes.

     Production of all versions of the Model 1300 except civilian versions was dropped in 1986. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Winchester 1200 (22” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.3 kg

5 Tubular

$872

Winchester 1200 (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.37 kg

5 Tubular

$892

Winchester 1200 (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.41 kg

5 Tubular

$902

Winchester 1200 (22” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.15 kg

5 Tubular

$751

Winchester 1200 (26” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.22 kg

5 Tubular

$771

Winchester 1200 (28” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.26 kg

5 Tubular

$781

Winchester 1200 (22” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.05 kg

5 Tubular

$674

Winchester 1200 (26” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.12 kg

5 Tubular

$694

Winchester 1200 (28” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.16 kg

5 Tubular

$704

Winchester 1200 (22” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

2.92 kg

5 Tubular

$577

Winchester 1200 (26” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

2.99 kg

5 Tubular

$597

Winchester 1200 (28” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.01 kg

5 Tubular

$607

Winchester 1200 Stainless Marine

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

3.13 kg

7 Tubular

$940

Winchester 1200 Stainless Police

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

3.18 kg

7 Tubular

$940

Winchester 1200 Stainless Civilian

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

3.15 kg

5 Tubular

$939

Winchester 1200 Defender

12 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

3.07 kg

8 Tubular

$835

Winchester 1200 Camp Defender

20 Gauge 2.75” and 3”

2.49 kg

5 Tubular

$645

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.4 kg

5 Tubular

$892

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.47 kg

5 Tubular

$912

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 2.75”

3.51 kg

5 Tubular

$922

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.25 kg

5 Tubular

$781

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.32 kg

5 Tubular

$801

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28” Barrel)

16 Gauge 2.75”

3.36 kg

5 Tubular

$811

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.15 kg

5 Tubular

$704

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.22 kg

5 Tubular

$724

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28” Barrel)

20 Gauge 2.75”

3.36 kg

5 Tubular

$734

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.02 kg

5 Tubular

$607

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.09 kg

5 Tubular

$627

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28” Barrel)

28 Gauge 2.75”

3.11 kg

5 Tubular

$637

Winchester Defender

12 Gauge 3”

2.95 kg

5 Tubular

$939

Winchester Black Shadow (26” Barrel)

12 Gauge 3”

3.18 kg

5 Tubular

$980

Winchester Black Shadow (28” Barrel)

12 Gauge 3”

3.29 kg

5 Tubular

$990

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Winchester 1200 (22”, 12 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

5

Nil

47

Winchester 1200 (26”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

57

Winchester 1200 (28”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

5

Nil

62

Winchester 1200 (22”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 1200 (26”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

52

Winchester 1200 (28”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

5

Nil

56

Winchester 1200 (22”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

40

Winchester 1200 (26”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

48

Winchester 1200 (28”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Winchester 1200 (22”, 28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

3

Nil

36

Winchester 1200 (26”, 28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 1200 (28”, 28 GA)

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

47

Winchester Stainless Marine (2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

Winchester Stainless Marine (3”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

43

Winchester Stainless Police (2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

Winchester Stainless Police (3”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

43

Winchester Stainless Civilian (2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

38

Winchester Stainless Civilian (3”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

4

Nil

43

Winchester Defender (2.75”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

5

6

Nil

32

Winchester Defender (3”)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

5

6

Nil

36

Winchester Camp Defender (2.75”)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

4

6

Nil

27

Winchester Camp Defender (3”)

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

4

6

Nil

30

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22”, 12 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

7

4

Nil

47

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

57

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28”, 12 GA)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

62

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

52

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28”, 16 GA)

PA

4/1d6x28 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil or Nil

8

4

Nil

56

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

40

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x20 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

48

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28”, 20 GA)

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

8

4

Nil

52

Winchester 1300 Ranger (22”, 28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

6

3

Nil

36

Winchester 1300 Ranger (26”, 28 GA)

PA

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

43

Winchester 1300 Ranger (28”, 28 GA)

PA

4/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

7

4

Nil

47

Winchester Defender

PA

4/1d6x24 or 2d6x4

2-3-Nil/Nil/1-Nil

6

4

Nil

36

Winchester Black Shadow (26”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-3-Nil/Nil/1-Nil

7

4

Nil

65

Winchester Black Shadow (28”)

PA

5/1d6x32 or 2d6x8

2-4-Nil/Nil/1-Nil

8

5

Nil

70