Smith & Wesson 39 Series

     Notes:  Immediately after World War 2, Carl Hellstrom (the president of Smith & Wesson at the time) saw the large number of automatic pistols used by both sides during the war and saw that the American public would be fascinated by them.  He thus designed the Smith & Wesson 39 and insisted it be marketed, despite the fact that previous Smith & Wesson automatic pistols had been dismal commercial failures.  The 39 seemed to also be a failure until the late 1950s, and in 1967, the Illinois State Police became the first police agency to equip with the Model 39.  There was some small use by US personnel in Vietnam, and then the US Navy modified the Model 39 into a silenced weapon (the Mk22 Mod 0 “Hush Puppy”).  Most Model 39s are made of blued or phosphated steel, but Model 439 variant uses a carbon finish, and the Model 639 variant is made of stainless steel.  Virtually all subsequent Smith & Wesson pistols can trace their ancestry more or less to the Model 39.

     The first Model 39 was manufactured from 1954-1966.  It has a steel frame and slide, but the barrel is fairly short at 4 inches, and it is a light weapon.  Civilian versions have walnut grips; military versions (known as the Model 41, and not to be confused with the .22 Long Rifle-firing Model 41) have black plastic grips.  From 1958-1959, the military version was also manufactured in a single-action version, and called the Model 44.  (Before that, another single-action version was made – the Model 40 – but at the time, police and the military showed no interest, and only 10 Model 40s were built.)  All three have an adjustable rear sight, and all three are identical for game purposes. 

     The Model 39-1 is also nearly identical, but has a light alloy frame.  It was manufactured until 1971.  The Model 39-2 is a Model 39-1 with a modified extractor for more reliable functioning, and it was manufactured until 1982.  The Model 439 began as simply a re-named Model 39-2, but it was later modified with an ambidextrous safety and squared trigger guard.  The Model 539 is a Model 439 totally in steel, and is otherwise identical to the Model 39 for game purposes.  The Model 639 was the long-awaited civilian stainless steel version; early models had a round trigger guard, but later versions had a squared trigger guard, and it was produced until 1988.

     In 1988, the Model 539 was modified further into the Model 3904.  The weapon was given an ambidextrous safety, a beveled magazine well, and a wrap-around grip of Delrin rubber.  It can be had with either an adjustable or fixed rear sight.  The 3904 remained in production until 1990.  The 3906 is the successor to the Model 639; it is very similar to the 3904, except for the stainless steel construction and a Novak Lo-Mount sight (after 1989).  It too remained in production until 1990. 

     The Model 3913 is a compact version of the Model 3904, with a Novak rear sight and a wrap-around Xenoy grip.  It has an ambidextrous safety.  The name was changed to the Model 3913 TSW (Tactical Smith & Wesson) in 1998, but it is still the same weapon, with the addition of tritium inlays for the sights and a mounting rail under the frame for lights or aiming modules.  The Model 3913LS (Lady Smith) is also similar, but is finished in gray for the frame and stainless steel for the slide, and has a Delrin grip and a non-ambidextrous safety.  The Model 3914 is a Lady Smith with a blued finish and more rounded contours; it is not called the Lady Smith, but is basically the same weapon.  (There is also a 3914LS version, identical to the 3914 except for the inscriptions on the slide.)  The Model 3953 is the Model 3913, but was re-named in 1998 and changed to double-action-only operation; the Model 3954 is the same weapon with a blued finish.  All of these are identical to the Model 3913 for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Models 3953 and 3954 do not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 39

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

8

$238

S&W 39-1

9mm Parabellum

0.72 kg

8

$239

S&W 3904

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

8

$239

S&W 3906

9mm Parabellum

0.89 kg

8

$238

S&W 3913

9mm Parabellum

0.7 kg

8

$234

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 39

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 39-1

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 3904

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 3906

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 3913

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson 41 Series

     Notes: Though prototypes of this pistol existed as early as 1947, the Smith & Wesson 41 did not actually go into production until 1957.  The version that then went into production did so only on a small scale; it was a version with a 7.5-inch barrel and a muzzle brake.  Shooters went wild for the new weapon, and production was exponentially increased.  In 1959, a lightweight version was introduced with a 5-inch barrel, and versions without the muzzle brakes were also introduced (these had plastic grip plates).  A less-well-known version of this pistol was the Model 46, built for the USAF as a match pistol; it had a 5-inch or 7-inch interchangeable barrel.  In 1960, a version in .22 Short chambering called the Model 41-1, with an aluminum-alloy slide, but it was not very popular (though production continued at a low rate until 1973). 

     In 1963, a version with a heavy 5.5-inch barrel (with no muzzle brake) was produced.  This model has a far better front sight than earlier models, and a micrometer rear sight was added.  This sight does not move with the slide.  The barrel of this version can be easily replaced with a 7-inch or 5-inch heavy barrel.

     By 1990, only the 5.5” and 7-inch heavy barrel versions were still being produced. 

     This did not sit well with the shooting public, and in 1994, the Model 41 was brought back as the Model 41 (New Model).  The grip plates are of hardwood, the rear sight is a Millet micrometer sight, and the pistol is drilled and tapped for a telescopic sight.  It comes only in a 5.5-inch or 7-inch heavy barrel version.  The receiver is grooved to accept barrel balance weights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 41 (1st Model)

.22 Long Rifle

1.32 kg

10

$203

S&W 41 (2nd Model)

.22 Long Rifle

1.13 kg

10

$129

S&W 46 (5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.13 kg

10

$129

S&W 46 (7” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.15 kg

10

$150

S&W 41-1

.22 Short

1.04 kg

10

$114

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.14 kg

10

$131

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 5.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.16 kg

10

$135

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 7” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.25 kg

10

$152

S&W 41 (New Model, 5.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.16 kg

10

$135

S&W 41 (New Model, 7” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.25 kg

10

$152

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 41 (1st Model)

SA

1

Nil

1

1

Nil

14

S&W 41 (2nd Model)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

S&W 46 (5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

S&W 46 (7”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

S&W 41-1

SA

-2

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 5.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 41 (3rd Model, 7”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

S&W 41 (New Model, 5.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 41 (New Model, 7”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Smith & Wesson 59/5900

     Notes:  This is a modified Model 39; changes include a straight backstrap and thinner checkered black plastic grips.  However, the biggest change was a wider, squared off grip, to accept a high-capacity 14-round magazine.  It took some time, but the Model 59 became one of Smith & Wesson’s best selling pistols.  A version of the Model 59 was also modified for silenced use in the same manner as the Hush Puppy, to provide SEALs with silenced high-capacity weapon pistol.  As with the Model 39, a carbon steel version (the 459) and a stainless steel version (the 659) were also made. 

     The basic Model 59 is an enlarged version of the Model 39, with a wider grip to accommodate a double-stack 14-round magazine.  The Model 59 came out in 1971 in a blued finish, but in 1972 a nickel-plated finish version was added.  The Model 59 has an alloy frame, and was manufactured until 1982. 

     The Model 459 is a version of the Model 59.  It has an alloy frame with a blued finish (a small amount were made with a nickel-plated finish), and nylon grip plates.  The buyer could choose between a fixed and adjustable rear sight, and a single or ambidextrous safety.  Until 1984, the Model 459 has a rounded trigger guard, but this was replaced with a squared trigger guard thereafter.  This version was built until 1987.  The Model 559, introduced a year later in 1980, is a steel-frame version of the 459 with a blued finish, and is somewhat heavier.  The Model 659 was introduced in 1982 and is the stainless steel version of the 559; it is identical to the 559 for game purposes.  The Model 659 was produced until 1989.

     In 1968, Smith & Wesson started what was then a top-secret project: the Model M59-WOX-13A.  (This is otherwise identical to the Model 39 for game purposes.)  This weapon was designed for the US Marines, but some were given to the Navy, fitted with a silencer kit, modified for use with subsonic ammunition, and became the Mk22 Mod 0 “Hush Puppies” (elsewhere in these pages). 

     The Model 5903 is a newer version of the 459, introduced in 1990.  The alloy frame has a faux stainless-steel finish and a stainless steel slide.  It began manufacture with either a fixed or adjustable rear sight available, but in 1993 a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight was also made available.  Also made available in 1993 was wrap-around Xenoy grip and ambidextrous safety.  The Model 5903 is identical to the Model 459 for game purposes.  In 1990, a small amount (1500) of compact versions of the Model 5903 were made, called the Model 5903-SSV.  The Model 5903 TSW is another subtype of the 5903; this version is a double-action model introduced in 2000, with a Novak sight, tritium sight inlays, and a rail under the frame for mounting lights or aiming modules.  Some other similar models include the 5924, a blued 5903 with a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight (introduced and withdrawn in 1990); the 5943, a double-action-only version of the 5903 (a 5943-SSV version was also made, identical to the 5903-SSV for game purposes) that was introduced and withdrawn in 1991.  A Model 5943 TSW was produced, identical to the Model 5903 TSW for game purposes; it was introduced in 2000.

     The Model 5904 is also an updated 459, introduced in 1988.  It has a slightly larger magazine capacity and a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight (after 1993).  A very small amount of this model was produced in 9x21mm and sold only on the Italian market.  A double-action-only version of the 5904, known as the Model 5944, was produced from 1991-1992.

     The Model 5905 was a very limited version of the series, with a blued steel frame and slide, and Novak Lo-Mount rear sight.  It was manufactured only in 1991, in very small numbers.  Before this, however, the 5906 was produced; this was a stainless steel version with a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight.  As with the Model 5904, a small amount were produced chambered for 9x21mm and sold exclusively on the Italian market.  The 5905 and 5906 are identical for game purposes.  The Model 5906-M (Military) was introduced in 2000; it has a stainless steel frame and slide, with a dark Melonite composite coating.  It has an ambidextrous decocker, a Novak triple-dot sight, wrap-around Xenoy grips, and a double-action operation.  The Model 5906 TSW is as the other TSW series pistols, but based on the 5906, with a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight, tritium sight inlays, double-action operation, and a rail under the frame for accessories.  The Model 5926 was built from 1990-1993, and is a 5906 with a decocker, a Novak rear sight, and a wrap-around Xenoy grip. 

     The Model 5946 is a double-action-only version of the Model 5906. It has significant changes, such as a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight and Xenoy wrap-around grips, and is substantially heavier than the 5906.  There is also a TSW version of the 5946.

     The Model 69xx series is a development of the Model 59 series.  The first of these, the Model 669, is a compact version of the Model 659.  It is a double-action pistol with a shorter grip and shorter barrel.  It has a light alloy frame.  The rear sight is adjustable, but only laterally.  The grips are of wrap-around Delrin.  The Model 669 debuted in 1986, but was discontinued in 1988.  The Model 669 was succeeded by the Models 6904 and 6906.  The 6904 is similar to the 669, with a blued slide and blued alloy frame, but it has a fixed rear sight and the wrap-around grip is made of Xenoy.  It is 1 millimeter longer (but not in the barrel), and slightly heavier.  The 6906 is also similar, but the slide is of stainless steel and the frame has a stainless-steel-like finish.  The rear sight is also a Novak Lo-Mount, with optional tritium inlays.  The 6904 was manufactured until 1997; the 6906 until 2000.  Both are identical for game purposes.

     The Model 6924 is a 6904 with a decocker, and with a Novak rear sight with tritium sight inlays.  The 6926 is the same, but based on the 6906.  The 6944 is a 6904 with double-action-only operation and a Novak rear sight.  The 6946 is the same as the 6944, but based on the 6906.  All are identical to the Model 6904 for game purposes.

     Alert fans of the X-Files TV series may have noticed that Agent Fox Mulder uses the Model 659, while Agent Dana Scully uses the smaller Model 639.  However, neither were ever FBI issue; apparently, those two broke FBI regulations and bought their own weapons for use while on duty!

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The following weapons of this series do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline: Model 5903 TSW, Model 5943 TSW, Model 5906-M, Model 5906 TSW, Model 5946 TSW.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 59

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

14

$239

S&W 459

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

14

$239

S&W 559

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

14

$238

S&W 5903-SSV

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

14

$234

S&W 5903 TSW

9mm Parabellum

0.82 kg

15

$239

S&W 5904

9mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

15

$239

S&W 5904

9x21mm

0.83 kg

15

$256

S&W 5906

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

15

$238

S&W 5906

9x21mm

0.89 kg

15

$255

S&W 5906-M

9mm Parabellum

1.06 kg

15

$238

S&W 5906 TSW

9mm Parabellum

1.09 kg

15

$238

S&W 5946

9mm Parabellum

1.06 kg

15

$238

S&W 5946 TSW

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

15

$238

S&W 669

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

12

$234

S&W 6904

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

12

$234

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 59

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 459

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 559

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 5903-SSV

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

S&W 5903 TSW

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 5904 (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 5904 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 5906 (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 5906 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 5906-M

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 5906 TSW

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 5946

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 5946 TSW

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

S&W 669

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

S&W 6904

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson 61

     Notes: This is a set of related Smith & Wesson pistols that share the same basic design, though they may differ widely in size, shape, and purpose.  They were the first commercial small-caliber designs that Smith & Wesson made after the Model 41, debuting in 1970 with the Model 61.

     The Model 61 Pocket Escort is a tiny automatic pistol designed for self-defense.  It was designed to be cheap and easily concealable, basically a “Saturday Night Special” type of firearm.  It was available in blued or nickel-plated finishes and black or white plastic grip plates.  Production stopped in 1973.

     The next small-caliber model was introduced in 1987, the Model 422.  Two versions were made: the Model 422 Field with a fixed sight and black plastic grip plates and blued finish, and the Model 422 Target, with an adjustable rear sight, walnut grip plates, and a stainless steel finish.  Both could have either a 4.5-inch or 6-inch barrel.  Both are identical for game purposes.  Initial models had a magazine capacity of 10 rounds, but in 1992, this was increased to 12 rounds.  Production stopped in 1996.

     In 1989, the Model 622 was introduced.  This weapon is similar to the Model 422, but has a light alloy frame finished to look like stainless steel, and a stainless steel slide.  Like the Model 622, this pistol changed to a 12-round magazine in 1992, but this reverted back to a 10-round magazine in 1996 with the advent of the Brady Gun Bill.  Field and Target versions were produced.  Production stopped in 1996.

     In 1996, the Model 622 VR was introduced.  The “VR” stands for “Ventilated Rib,” and refers to the sighting rib above the front portion of the slide.  The Model 622 VR has an alloy frame and an adjustable rear sight.  Most have black plastic grip plates, but a few were built with walnut grip plates.  Only 6-inch barrel versions were made, and no provision was ever made for a 12-round magazine.  Within months of being introduced, it was withdrawn.  For game purposes, it is identical to the Model 622 with the 6-inch barrel.

     The Model 2206 was introduced in 1990 as a totally stainless steel version of the Model 622.  It was originally available in 4.5-inch and 6-inch barrel versions, but only 6-inch barrel versions were made after 1993.  Three versions were built: the standard 2206 (identical to the Model 622 for game purposes); the Model 2206 Target with match-quality barrels and a micrometer rear sight, and the Model 2206 Target Match with an ergonomic grip, adjustable hand support, micrometer rear sight, and heavy match barrel.   Production of all 2206’s stopped in 1996.

     The Model 2213 Sportsman Stainless is an update of the Model 61 Pocket Escort, introduced in 1991.  The barrel is an inch longer than the Model 61, but it is not physically much bigger than the Model 61.  The Model 2214 is similar, but the 2214 has an alloy frame and a blued finish.  Manufacture of the 2213 and 2214 stopped in 1997.

     The Model 22A Sport is basically a very large version of the Model 2214.  It has an alloy frame and blued finish and comes in barrel lengths of 4, 5.5, or 7 inches.  The grip is made of polymer.  A version of the Model 22A is the Model 22A Target; this version has a bull barrel with 5.5 inches.  Both versions have an adjustable rear sight.

     The Model 22S Sport is a variant of the Model 22A Sport, introduced in 1997.  The slide is of stainless steel; the frame is of light alloy, finished to look like stainless steel.  It is a much heavier weapon than the Model 22A, but is otherwise similar.  A Target version also exists.  It is still in production.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 61

.22 Long Rifle

0.49 kg

5

$74

Model 422 (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.62 kg

10 (later 12)

$124

Model 422 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.65 kg

10 (later 12)

$139

Model 622 (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.62 kg

10 (later 12)

$125

Model 622 (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.65 kg

10 (later 12)

$140

Model 2206 Target (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.05 kg

10

$125

Model 2206 Target (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.11 kg

10

$141

Model 2206 Target Match (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.06 kg

10

$127

Model 2206 Target Match (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.12 kg

10

$143

Model 2213

.22 Long Rifle

0.51 kg

8

$82

Model 2214

.22 Long Rifle

0.4 kg

8

$83

Model 22A Sport (4” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.79 kg

10

$120

Model 22A Sport (5.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$135

Model 22A Sport (7” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.94 kg

10

$150

Model 22A Target

.22 Long Rifle

1.11 kg

10

$138

Model 22S Sport (5.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.16 kg

10

$135

Model 22S Sport (7” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.19 kg

10

$150

Model 22S Target

.22 Long Rifle

1.36 kg

10

$138

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 61

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

3

Model 422 (4.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Model 422 (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Model 622 (4.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Model 622 (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Model 2206 Target (4.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Model 2206 Target (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Model 2206 Target Match (4.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Model 2206 Target Match (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

Model 2213

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

5

Model 2214

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

5

Model 22A Sport (4”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Model 22A Sport (5.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Model 22A Sport (7”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Model 22A Target

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Model 22S Sport (5.5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Model 22S Sport (7”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Model 22S Target

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

10

 

Smith & Wesson 99

     Notes:  This is described by the company as a hybrid pistol – in this case, a hybrid of US and European pistol design.  It is basically an Americanized Walther P-99.  Modifications include a .40 Smith & Wesson version, a .45 ACP version, the lack of a hooked trigger guard, addition of a decocking bar, and a “chamber loaded” indicator that can be both seen and felt.  The sights have tritium inlays.  They are double-action-only weapons.  They have 3 interchangeable backstraps to allow for shooters with different-sized hands.  The barrel of the 9mm S&W 99 is four inches long, but the .40 S&W-firing version’s barrel is 4.125 inches long, while the .45 ACP version has a 4.25-inch barrel.

     The S&W 990L Compact is a pistol that is designed to be useful to those who don’t normally carry firearms, such as those who require one for self-defense.  The idea is to make a pistol with decent power, but small and light enough that it won’t be onerous for the untrained to carry.  For the same reason, the S&W 99 Compact is designed to be easy to shoot, maintain, and get a first shot off.  The S&W 99 Compact is fashioned mostly out of polymer.  The barrel for all calibers is 3.5 inches.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 99

9mm Parabellum

0.72 kg

10, 16

$238

S&W 99

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

10, 12

$314

S&W 99

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

9

$401

S&W 990L

9mm Parabellum

0.65 kg

10

$233

S&W 990L

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.66 kg

8

$307

S&W 990L

.45 ACP

0.66 kg

8

$393

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 99 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 99 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

S&W 99 (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

S&W 990L (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 990L (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 990L (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

Smith & Wesson 645/745/945 Series

     Notes: Public demand led to the development of this series; the American appetite for the .45 ACP round could not be denied.  Smith & Wesson began experiments with .45 ACP-firing pistols in 1984, and produced their first one, the Model 645, in 1985.  The series is basically a .45 ACP version of their 9mm Parabellum weapons.  They typically have a wider grip than equivalent Colt designs, allowing more rounds to be carried in the magazine, and they are normally double-action weapons.  They generally have a coned muzzle instead of a separate barrel bushing.  Like many Smith & Wesson models, each variant was generally in production for only a few years.

     The Model 645 was introduced in 1985, and produced until 1988.  It has a stainless steel frame and slide, an ambidextrous safety/decocker, a squared trigger guard, and black plastic grip plates.  The Model 745, built from 1986-1990, was a single-action target version of the Model 645, with a match barrel, Novak sight (an adjustable rear sight was optional), an adjustable trigger stop, and walnut grip plates.  It does not have ambidextrous controls, but does have a half-cock safety. 

     When Smith & Wesson changed its numbering system, one of the first in this series was the 4505; this is essentially the 645 with only the safety catch ambidextrous and a blued finish.  A Novak Lo-Mount rear sight was installed on a small number of 4505s.  It was produced only in 1991.  The 4506, has  stainless steel finish, a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight, and a Xenoy wrap-around grip.  After 1998, the 4506 had a squared trigger guard.  It was produced from 1988-2001.  The 4505 and 4506 are a bit heavier than the 645, and both are identical for game purposes.

     Some other similar to the 4505 (identical for game purposes) are the 4526, a stainless steel weapon without a manual safety and with a decocker on the left side, built only in 1991; and the 4546, a double-action-only version of the 4506, built only in 1991.

     The Model 4513 TSW was a compact version fitted with the TSW kit: light alloy frame, ambidextrous safety, Xenoy wrap-around grips, tritium inlays for the sights, no hammer spur, and a rail under the frame for accessories.  It was introduced in 2000, and is still being manufactured.  The 4553 is a similar weapon, but from an earlier series, it was introduced in 1999 and is still in production. 

     The Model 4516 is a compact version of the 4506, with a frame and slide of stainless steel, Novak Lo-Mount rear sight, and wrap-around Xenoy rear sight.  It was introduced in 1991, and was produced until 1999.  In 1992, the trigger guard was squared, and it was then known as the 4516-1.  The 4536 is the same weapon without a manual safety and with a decocker; it was built only in 1991.  The 4556 is virtually identical, but from the 4500-series, and was built only in 1991. 

     The Model 4563 TSW is a mid-sized pistol with the TSW kit; it was introduced in 2000 and is still in production.  It has a light alloy frame.

     The Model 4566 is mid-sized version of the 4506, totally stainless steel and with a with a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight.  It was introduced in 1991 and is still in production, but in 2000 was given the TSW kit and renamed the 4566 TSW.  The Model 4567 is a 4566 with a blued slide, manufactured only in 1991.  The 4576 is a 4566 with a decocker, manufactured 1991-1992.  The Model 4583 TSW is virtually identical to the 4566 TSW, but is double-action-only and has a light alloy frame; it was introduced in 2000 and is still in production. 

     The Model 457 is another compact version, double-action and with a blued light alloy frame and blued steel slide.  It was introduced in 1996 and is still manufactured. 

     The Model 945 PC (Performance Center) is a target version manufactured by Smith & Wesson for the German company Akah.  It has a stainless steel frame and slide, a safety on the left side of the weapon, a match barrel, and a Bo-Mar micrometer rear sight.  It was manufactured only in 1999.

     Despite the similar name, the Micro 945 PC is quite different from the 945.  It is the smallest member of this series, with 3.25-inch barrel.  Smith & Wesson manufactured the Micro 945 for Camfour Distributors in 2001.  It is a single-action weapon with a light alloy frame and stainless steel slide, and a titanium barrel bushing.  It has a Novak Lo-Mount sight, Hogue laminated wood grip plates, and a grip safety with an extended beavertail.  The Micro 945 PC Black was manufactured for RSR Distributors in 2001; this version has a matte black coating and is slightly lighter.

     The Model 945-40 was produced for Sports South Inc.  It is similar to the Micro 945 PC, but is chambered for .40 Smith & Wesson.  The barrel is also longer at 3.75 inches.  The trigger has an adjustable trigger stop.

     The newest version of this series is the Model 457S; though based on the design of the Model 4516, the Model 457S is in fact much different than the 4516.  Introduced in 2005, the Model 457S uses a blockier slide, but the 457S has regardless been largely dehorned.  The ambidextrous manual safety is gone, replaced by a safety/slide catch on the left side. The slide of the 457S is constructed of stainless steel which is lighter, yet stronger than that used on the Model 4516, but the frame is alloy, and the dovetailed 3-dot sights are of plastic and dovetailed in (but otherwise fixed).  The trigger, hammer, and several internal parts are made using Metal Injection Molding instead of being machined or stamped.  The checkering on the front of the trigger guard is not found on the Model 457S, and the backstrap and grip plates are not as tightly checkered.  The action is DA/SA, and the barrel length is 3.75 inches.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The following weapons of this series do not exist: any TSW-series weapon, Model 457. Model 945 PC, Model Micro 945 PC, Model Micro 945 PC Black, Model 945-40, Model 457S

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 645

.45 ACP

1.06 kg

8

$407

S&W 745

.45 ACP

1.06 kg

8

$408

S&W 4505

.45 ACP

1.15 kg

8

$407

S&W 4513 TSW

.45 ACP

0.81 kg

7

$397

S&W 4516

.45 ACP

0.96 kg

7

$394

S&W 4563 TSW

.45 ACP

0.87 kg

8

$402

S&W 4566

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

8

$399

S&W 4586 TSW

.45 ACP

1.06 kg

8

$402

S&W 457

.45 ACP

0.82 kg

7

$397

S&W 945 PC

.45 ACP

1.15 kg

8

$409

S&W Micro 945 PC

.45 ACP

0.7 kg

6

$392

S&W Micro 945 PC Black

.45 ACP

0.68 kg

8

$392

S&W 945-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

7

$310

Model 457S

.45 ACP

0.79 kg

7

$397

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 645

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

S&W 745

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

S&W 4505

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

S&W 4513 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

S&W 4516

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4563 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

S&W 4566

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 4586 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 457

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

S&W 945 PC

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

S&W Micro 945 PC

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W Micro 945 PC Black

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 945-40

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

S&W 457S

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

 

Smith & Wesson 900 Series

     Notes: The 900 series is derived from the Model 59 series, especially the Model 5904. It enjoyed a good number of sales to US civilians and police forces, despite its shortcomings.  The 900 Series' magazines and magazine catch are ill formed, and a very hard smack is necessary to seat a magazine in the well.  Modifications can be made to alleviate this (Formidable: Small Arms (Pistol), or Easy: Gunsmith).  Complaints were also made about the shape of the safety/decocker, often cutting thumbs when used.  Again, this can be reshaped (Easy: Small Arms or Gunsmith).

     The first version of the 900 series was actually the Model 909.  It is a medium-frame pistol with a light alloy frame and steel slide, finished entirely blued.  The magazine is a single-row magazine, but slightly larger in capacity than that of the Model 59.  The rear sight is fixed and the grips are wrap-around Xenoy.  The 909 was introduced in 1995 and produced until 1997.  The next version was the 908; it is a compact version of the 909, with a shorter barrel, shorter grip, and no exposed hammer spur.  It was introduced in 1997, and is still being manufactured.  The Model 910 came out the same year as the 908; it is the Model 909 with a wider grip to accommodate double-row magazines. 

     The Model Super 9 is based on the 5906 and is designed for sport shooting.  It has the longest barrel of the series at 5 inches, has a micrometer adjustable rear sight, and is available in three calibers, including the proprietary .356 TSW (Team Smith & Wesson).  The barrels and parts are interchangeable to allow the Super 9 to fire any of these three calibers.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Of all these pistols, only the Model 909 exists, and it is very rare.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 909

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

9

$239

S&W 908

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

8

$234

S&W 910

9mm Parabellum

0.81 kg

10, 15

$239

S&W Super 9

9mm Parabellum

1.11 kg

15

$248

S&W Super 9

9x21mm

1.15 kg

15

$265

S&W Super 9

.356 TSW

1.16 kg

15

$269

Super 9 Parts Kit

N/A

0.99 kg

N/A

$197

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 909

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 908

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

S&W 910

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Super 9 (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

Super 9 (9x21mm)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Super 9 (.356 TSW)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

 

Smith & Wesson 952 Stainless

     Notes: This is a new-old pistol – it was introduced in early 2005, but it is basically a reincarnation of the old Smith & Wesson Model 52 target pistol.  Designed by the Smith & Wesson Performance Center, the Model 952 is not only a very attractive pistol, it is also functional and accurate, meant primarily for competitions, but also applicable for service use.  The balance of the weapon is superb despite the long, match-quality barrel, and the checkered wooden grips fit in the hand so well it almost seems to many shooters that the Model 952 was made for their hand.  The front strap is grooved, and the backstrap is also checkered.  The trigger is single-action.  The Model 952 has a safety lever at the rear of the slide which puts a steel bar between the firing pin and hammer.  The weapon also has a grip safety linked to a passive firing pin safety.  The trigger pull is very light and crisp, with no creep.  The rear sight is a Wilson fully adjustable match sight, and the front sight is a square post-type blade.  The Model 952 is compatible with virtually any sort of 9mm Parabellum ammunition, including +P loads.  The pistol is deliberately built heavy to help control recoil, being largely constructed of heavy-gauge stainless steel.  Construction tolerances are very tight, and even shaking the pistol vigorously does not produce any rattles.  Many of the operating parts are also coated with titanium or tungsten to guard against wear and provide increased smoothness of operation. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 952

9mm Parabellum

1.16 kg

9

$249

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 952

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Smith & Wesson 1000 Series

     Notes: These pistols were designed for use with the 10mm Colt cartridge.  They are based on the Model 4506, but retooled for the new caliber.  These pistols were first requested by the FBI, who wanted something much more effective than its Smith & Wesson 13 Military & Police revolvers.  Therefore, the first version built was the Model 1076-FBI, which has an ambidextrous safety, a special trigger group, an enlarged trigger guard, a beveled magazine well, a three-dot sight system, and a decocker on the left side of the frame.  The FBI originally ordered 10,000 of the Model 1076-FBI, but later cut the order to 2,400, delivered in 1993. 

     The second model built was the 1006, designed for civilian sales, and introduced in 1990.  This weapon has most of the features of the 1076-FBI, except for the special trigger group, beveled magazine well, and the ability to use double-stack magazines.  It is made from stainless steel.  Production of this weapon stopped in 1992.  The Model 1026 was also introduced in 1990, with only a decocker and no safety catch.  Production ended in 1991.  It is identical to the Model 1006 for game purposes.  Another weapon that is identical to the 1006 for game purposes is the 1046; it has a blued finish despite being made from stainless steel, and has a double-action-only operation. Only 148 Model 1046’s were built.

     The Model 1066 is a compact version of the 1006.  It has wrap-around Xenoy grips, an ambidextrous safety, and was produced from 1990-1992.  The Model 1076 is the same weapon with the addition of a decocker.  It was produced from 1990-93, and is identical to the Model 1066 for game purposes.  The Model 1086 is a double-action-only version of the Model 1066, but is otherwise identical for game purposes.  It was produced from 1991-92.

     In 1992, Smith & Wesson decided to abandon their work on the 10mm pistol in favor of their own .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge.  Manufacture of Smith & Wesson 10mm pistols largely stopped in 1993.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 1076-FBI

10mm Colt

1.19 kg

9, 11, 15

$362

S&W 1006

10mm Colt

1.19 kg

9

$360

S&W 1066

10mm Colt

1.13 kg

9

$354

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 1076-FBI

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

12

S&W 1006

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

S&W 1066

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

Smith & Wesson 4000 Series

     Notes: This Smith & Wesson pistol was designed specifically to use the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge and introduce it to the public.  It was meant to do this with as little retooling and cost as possible; as such, it is basically a Model 4506 modified to accept the then-new caliber.

     The first of these pistols to enter the scene was the Model 4006.  This is a double-action pistol with a stainless steel slide and an alloy frame finished to look like stainless steel.  It is still being manufactured.  In 1997, the Model 4006 TSW was introduced; this version has a rail under the frame for the attachment of accessories, a stainless steel slide and frame, a wrap-around Delrin grip, and an ambidextrous safety.  The Model 4006 TSW may have an adjustable, fixed, or tritium-inlay sight; the standard 4006 has a fixed sight.

     Some variants of the 4006, identical for game terms, are the Model 4003 (built from 1991-1993), with a Novak rear sight and black wrap-around Xenoy grip; and the Model 4004, a blued version of the 4003.

     The Model 4013 is a compact version of the Model 4003, with a shorter barrel and alloy frame.  In 1997, the Model 4013 was spun off into the 4013 TSW model, with a rail under for frame for accessories, and Novak Lo-Mount rear sight with tritium sight inlays.  A double-action-only version of the Model 4013 TSW is known as the Model 4053 TSW.  The Model 4014 is a blued version of the Model 4013.  The Model 4026 is a stainless-steel-finish version of the 4013 with a double action. The Model 4014 stopped production in 1993, as did the 4026.  The Model 4053 is a double-action-only version of the 4013, with a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight.  A TSW version also exists.  They are identical to the 4013 and 4013 TSW, respectively, for game purposes.

     The Model 4043 is a double-action-only version of the 4013, with a 4-inch barrel.  It was introduced in 1991.  It has no safety catch, only a firing pin safety.  The 4044 is a blued version of this weapon.  This weapon also has a TSW version, the Model 4043 TSW.

     The Model 4046 is a double-action-only version of the 4006.  It has a Novak Lo-Mount rear sight with a wrap-around Xenoy grip.  Production of this model was halted in favor of the 4046 TSW version, which is still being manufactured.

     The Model 4001 “Shorty Forty” is an unusual variant of the 4000 Series, introduced in 1992.  It has a very short 3.5” Bar-Sto barrel, Novak-Lo-Mount rear sight, and a large magazine for its diminutive size. 

     Two more variants of the 4000-Series are the Model 410 and 411.  The 411 came first; it is standard type of service pistol with a blued finish, and alloy frame.  It was basically an advanced prototype, and was manufactured from 1992-1995.  The Model 410 was built starting in 1995 and is still being manufactured.  It has a alloy frame, blued finish, and wrap-around Xenoy grip.  It has a safety as well as a decocking lever.

     The Model 4040PD (more commpnly known as the AirLite PD) is a very light version of the 4000 Series.  To make the weapon, Smith & Wesson started off with the Model 3913’s frame instead of the heavier 4506 frame.  In addition, the frame is made from scandium alloy instead of steel.  It looks almost identical to the 3913, but has several differences to allow it to fire the more powerful .40 Smith & Wesson round.  The 4040PD also has a DAO trigger, and Novak LoMount 3-dot sights.  The grips are Hogue rubber wrap-around types, and the front strap is checkered.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Models 410 and 411 are very rare.  None of the TSW-series weapons exist, nor does the Model 4040PD.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

S&W 4006

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.77 kg

11

$311

S&W 4006 TSW

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.81 kg

11

$311

S&W 4013

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.76 kg

8

$308

S&W 4013 TSW

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.78 kg

9

$308

S&W 4043

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.81 kg

11

$313

S&W 4043 TSW

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.85 kg

11

$313

S&W 4046

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.06 kg

11

$311

S&W 4046 TSW

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.07 kg

11

$311

S&W 4001

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

9

$309

S&W 410

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.81 kg

11

$313

S&W 4040PD

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

7

$312

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

S&W 4006

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4006 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4013

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

S&W 4013 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

S&W 4043

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4043 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4043

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4046 TSW

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4001

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

S&W 410

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

S&W 4040PD

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson M&P

     Notes: The M&P (Military & Police), as the name indicates, was designed specifically for use by police, military, and governmental agencies, but will also be available to civilians.  It is a standard sort of 21st century pistol, with a Zytel polymer frame, stainless steel slide coated with black Melonite, and a MIL-STD-1913 rail for accessories under the barrel.  The standard grip angle is similar to that of the M-1911, but the M&P comes with three interchangeable gripstraps to make the pistol fit better in the hand of the shooter.  The magazine release is not ambidextrous, but it can be reversed easily.  The trigger mechanism is borrowed from the Sigma, though it has a smooth face and is slightly narrower.  The safety/slide catch is ambidextrous.  There are two types of slide catch/safety that are available; the standard one is flat to the frame, and the other one sticks out a bit more.  The cocking grooves are at the front and back, and are reptilian (wavy) in shape to give a better grip. There are at least four safeties on the weapon: the slide catch/safety, a trigger travel safety, a striker block safety, and a magazine safety.  Civilian versions also have an internal frame-locking safety.  Barrel length is 4.5 inches for the standard M&P, and 4 inches for the Compact version. The M&P is used by some civilian law enforcement organizations; though it is not officially used by any military services, the M&P is carried in small numbers by some members of units such as special operations units that give their troops a greater latitude in weapons choices.

     A compact version was introduced in mid-2006; this is basically the same as the standard M&P, except for its shorter 3.5-inch barrel, shorter accessory rail under the dust cover, and shorter grip (with a correspondingly-smaller magazine).  In addition, the M&P compact has no magazine safety (and says so quite prominently on both sides of the slide). 

     In 2008, these M&P pistols were joined by several new versions.  Interest and demand in a longer version of the 9mm version for competition as well as general-use purposes became more insistent, and the M&P-9L was designed; this is essentially an M&P-9 with a longer 5-inch barrel.  In 2007, a .45 ACP version was introduced; in 2008, it was joined by a Compact version.  The M&P-9JG is named after Julie Golinski, a US Army veteran who is now one of the best champion shooters in competition today.  The M&P-9JG is a highly-accurized and somewhat customized M&P-9 (though not as accurized and customized as Julie Golinski’s own M&P-9, of course), and the barrel is a mid-length 4.25 inches, match-quality, and a slightly thicker profile than a standard M&P-9. The front sight has a fiberoptic inlay to help sight the weapon, while the rear sight is a Warren Tactical sight.  The barrel and slide are made of stainless steel instead of carbon steel.  Visually, the most striking feature is the interchangeable backstraps; they are pink, to denote her support of breast cancer survivors and breast cancer research, and a portion of each sale of the M&P-9JG goes to breast cancer research.

     In 2012, a new, even more compact version of the M&P – the M&P Shield.  The design is essentially the same as other M&Ps except for the shorter 3.1-inch barrel and a slimmer grip holding a smaller magazine and is an additional factor in making the Shield smaller.  Magazines are a proprietary 8 rounds with a firing step on the bottom or a 7-round non-proprietary magazine.

     At the Modern Day Marine Expo 2009, David Holt, Vice President for Military Programs at Smith & Wesson, showed a single example of an M&P-45 threaded for a silencer.  He said that it was from a “one-time only batch produced as a favor to an unnamed activity.”

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M&P is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M&P-9

9mm Parabellum

0.69 kg

10, 17

$244

M&P-357

.357 SiG

0.69 kg

10, 15

$271

M&P-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.69 kg

10, 15

$318

M&P-45

.45 ACP

0.76 kg

10

$409

M&P-9 Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.62 kg

10, 12

$233

M&P-357 Compact

.357 SiG

0.62 kg

10

$261

M&P-40 Compact

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.62 kg

10

$307

M&P-45 Compact

.45 ACP

0.74 kg

10

$402

M&P-9L

9mm Parabellum

0.71 kg

10, 17

$252

M&P-9JG

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

10, 17

$246

M&P-45 (Silenced)

.45 ACP

1.58 kg

10

$578

M&P Shield

9mm Parabellum

0.54 kg

7, 8

$229

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M&P-9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

M&P-357

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

M&P-40

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

M&P-45

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

13

M&P-9 Compact

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

M&P-357 Compact

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

M&P-40 Compact

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

M&P-45 Compact

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

M&P-9L

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

M&P-9JG

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

M&P-45 (Silenced)

SA

2

Nil

3

2

Nil

9

M&P Shield

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

 

Smith & Wesson SD

     Notes: Designed and billed as a weapon for home and personal defense (“SD” stands for “Self-Defense”), the SD is basically a simpler version of the M&P pistol above.  The basic profile of the SD is similar to that of the M&P, but the SD has a shorter barrel, is 13mm shorter, weighs less, uses slightly smaller magazines, does not have the lever-type takedown, and does not come with interchangeable backstraps (or the capability to use them).  The SD retains the front and rear cocking serrations, but those on the SD are shallow and broad.  The SD is, in addition to being a simpler version of the M&P, it is a much less expensive (in real-life terms) version of the M&P.  However, the SD is almost totally dehorned, with corners beveled flat or rounded.  The SD is a mid-sized pistol with a barrel of four inches and a mid-sized grip that still holds a decent amount of rounds in its magazine.  Construction of the frame is polymer, with textured surfaces on the sides of the grip, frontstrap, and backstrap.  The polymer is black, and the steel slide is finished in black Melonite.  The SD has 3-dot-type sights, with the dots being tritium inlays.  The SD is striker-fired, and has no exposed hammer; the entire firing mechanism is internal. The sights are low-profile and designed to be as non-snag as possible.  Under the cover is a light rail for accessories. Two versions of the SD exist: the SD-9, chambered for 9mm Parabellum, and the SD-40, chambered for .40 Smith & Wesson.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The SD does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SD-9

9mm Parabellum

0.64 kg

10, 16

$241

SD-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.64 kg

10, 14

$316

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SD-9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SD-40

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

 

Smith & Wesson SW1911

     Notes:  This is something that Smith & Wesson once said they would never build – their own version of the M-1911.  It is basically a modern version of the M-1911, with a loop hammer, skeletonized trigger, alloy and stainless steel construction, ramp rear sight, and the deletion of the grip safety.

     In 2004, Smith & Wesson introduced their version of the Commander-type compact 1911 – the SW1911Sc.  As the name indicates, the SW1911Sc has a lightweight scandium alloy frame, with a carbon steel slide and barrel.  In addition, the weapon is bobbed short. 

     In 2005, Smith & Wesson introduced a full-sized scandium alloy-framed SW1911, the SW1911PD (Personal Defense). The slide and barrel are of carbon steel, and the frame, slide, and controls are finished in black.  The trigger and hammer are finished in bright natural metal.  The SW1911PD also has an external extractor, something which is now in vogue because it increases the reliability of cartridge extraction.  The sights are Novak Lo Mount 3-dot sights, with the rear sight being adjustable.  The grip plates are of checkered rosewood.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The SW1911Sc and SW1911PD do not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SW1911

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

8

$409

SW1911Sc

.45 ACP

0.79 kg

8

$407

SW1911PD

.45 ACP

0.84 kg

8

$415

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SW1911

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

SW1911Sc

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

SW1911PD

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

 

Smith & Wesson 4040PD

     Notes: The Smith & Wesson company has been making revolvers with scandium frames for quite some time, but making a compact automatic pistol with a scandium frame is new for them.  The 4040PD is a 3913 made with a scandium frame and up-calibered to .40 Smith & Wesson.  Rubber grips are also added for a more positive grip and 3-dot sights makes it easier to put on target.

     Twilight 2000 Story: This weapon is very rare, due to the late start and exotic materials employed in its construction.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

4040PD

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

7

$312

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

4040PD

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson CS-9/CS-40/CS-45 

     Notes: Designed in 1998, the CS-9 heralded a new line on ultra-compact pistols from Smith & Wesson, using the old “Chief’s Special” designation.  The weapon became popular with law enforcement and civilians who needed a concealed pistol.  Utilizing an aluminum alloy/carbon steel frame design, the weapon is extremely lightweight, but capable of using the higher pressure of the 9mm +P rounds.  The CS-9 was followed in 1996 by the CS-45 pistol, similar in external appearances to the CS-9 but chambered in the larger .45ACP cartridge; then the CS-40 was designed shortly thereafter.  However, in all other aspects, they are nearly identical in appearance.  There are also CS-9D, CS-40D, and CS-45D versions; these have double-action-only operation, but are otherwise identical to the standard versions.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CS-9

9mm Parabellum

0.59 kg

7

$145

CS-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.69 kg

7

$182

CS-45

.45 ACP

0.68 kg

6

$224

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CS-9

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

CS-40

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

CS-45

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson Mk 22 Mod 0 

     Notes: The "Hush Puppy” is a silenced, 9mmP, semiautomatic pistol specially manufactured for the US Navy (which calls it the Mk-22) by Smith & Wesson (which calls it the Model 0). Made of stainless steel (to resist saltwater-induced corrosion), it is fitted with an integral silencer and slide lock. When fired with the slide locked (to prevent the clank of the recoiling slide) using subsonic 9mmP ammunition, the only sound is the hammer dropping. The Mk-22 is thus a silenced weapon, rather than a suppressed one. With the slide locked, it can only be fired once, then the slide must be manually worked to eject the spent round and recock (ROF BA). The pistol comes with a special holster designed to hold the weapon with silencer affixed (included in the cost). 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: With Mk 23 Mod 0’s in somewhat short supply, some Hush Puppies were refurbished and sent back into duty, usually with better silencers.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mk 22 Mod 0

9mm Parabellum or Parabellum Subsonic

1.5 kg

8

$340

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk22 Mod 0 (Standard Ammo)

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

12

Mk 22 Mod 0 (Subsonic Ammo)

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

11

 

Smith & Wesson PPK/S-1

     Notes: This is a copy of the Walther PPK/S made by Smith & Wesson.  There are few differences between the original and the PPK/S-1, except for slight size and weight differences and that the PPK/S-1 can carry one less round.  The PPK/S-1 is considered to be a better quality pistol than the original, however.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PPK/S-1

.32 ACP

0.6 kg

7

$118

PPK/S-1

.380 ACP

0.65 kg

7

$137

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PPK/S-1 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

PPK/S-1 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Smith & Wesson Sigma

     Notes: These pistols were introduced in 1994.  They use a high-strength polymer frame, and are very robust and easy to maintain and operate.  The Sigma is double-action-only and in addition, has a trigger safety so that the weapon cannot be fired unless the trigger is fully pulled.  They have no external safeties at all.  The Sigma is an especially good weapon for those with small hands. 

     The SW-9F and SW-40F were introduced together in 1994.  These weapons originally had a 4.5” barrel, but in 1999, the barrels were reduced to 4 inches.  Both have triple-dot sights, but these can be replaced with sights carrying tritium inserts.

     The next version of the SW-9 and SW-40 were the “C” models.  The SW-9C and SW-40C are double-action-only weapons that are very similar to the post-1999 models of the SW-9F and SW-40F, but have stainless steel barrels.  The magazine release, normally on the left side of the frame, may be easily switched to the right side.  They are a bit lighter than their “F” model counterparts, and were manufactured until 2000.

     The SW-380 is a compact version of the Sigma in .380 ACP chambering.  Instead of sights, the SW-380 has a sight “tunnel” on top of the slide, which is good only at the short ranges for which the SW-380 is designed.  The SW-380 is a double-action-only only.  It has no safety catch, but does have a hinged trigger and automatic firing pin safety.  It was manufactured until 2001.

     The SW-9V and SW-40V came next; these are similar to the post-1999 models of the SW-9F and SW-40F (though they appeared in 1998) with black polymer frames and stainless steel slides, instead of the OD Green frame and OD-finished slides of the SW-9F and SW-40F. 

     In 2000, another version of the SW-9F and SW-40F appeared.  These are the SW-9E and SW-40E, and they have a rail under the frame for accessories, a black frame, and a black Melonite coating for the slide.

     The SW-9G and SW-40G were introduced in 2001 with the military market in mind.  The frame’s finish is in OD green, and the slide in black Melonite, but reflects no light at all.  Under the frame is a rail for mounting accessories.  They have narrow grips to allow female soldiers and those with small hands a good grip, but this restricts magazine capacity.  The front sight has a tritium inlay, while the rear sight has a double-dot system. 

      At the same time, the SW-9P and SW-9P were introduced; these pistols are ported to help fight recoil.  The slide is of stainless steel.  It is otherwise similar to other Sigmas.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These early versions of the SW-9F and SW-40F are rare weapons, and the rest do not exist at all.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SW-9F (Early)

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

15

$243

SW-9F (Late)

9mm Parabellum

0.73 kg

15

$239

SW-40F (Early)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.74 kg

14

$317

SW-40F (Late)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

14

$313

SW-9C

9mm Parabellum

0.69 kg

16

$239

SW-40C

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.7 kg

14

$313

SW-380

.380 ACP

0.4 kg

6

$212

SW-9G

9mm Parabellum

0.7 kg

10

$239

SW-40G

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.7 kg

10

$313

SW-9P

9mm Parabellum

0.7 kg

10

$264

SW-40P

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.7 kg

10

$338

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SW-9F (Early)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

SW-9F (Late)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-40F (Early)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

SW-40F (Late)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-9C

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-40C

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-380

SA

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

7

SW-9G

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-40G

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SW-9P

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

SW-40P

SA

2

N

1

2

Nil

10

 

9