Safari Arms Matchmaster

     Notes: This is a 1911-type pistol with a number of interesting features, such as a Smith & Wesson “K” Sight, a Commander-type hammer, an ambidextrous safety, an enlarged ejection port, special magazines designed to feed flawlessly, and a squared-off trigger guard.  The grip has a finger groove for the middle finger. The Matchmaster can be had with a Teflon coating, chromed, stainless steel, blued, or even with a frame of a light alloy called Armaloy.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Matchmaster (Steel Frame)

.45 ACP

1.14 kg

6

$408

Matchmaster (Alloy Frame)

.45 ACP

1.03 kg

6

$411

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Matchmaster (Steel Frame)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Matchmaster (Alloy Frame)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Savage

     Notes:  Early in the 20th century, the firm of Savage Arms produced three pistols.  All were virtually identical; the 1907 had large grip serrations on the slide and a serrated hammer; the 1915 added a grip safety and had no hammer; and the 1917 had a spur hammer and a wedge-shaped grip.  The 1915 model is the most common one; in addition to large numbers of sales to US civilians, they were also sold to the Portuguese Army and later handed down to the Guarda Nacional de Republica.  From there, the Portuguese models were sold off to civilians and some Portuguese and Spanish police departments in the 1950s, and they are still rather common in Southern Europe.  The pistols were regarded as of excellent quality and can still be expected to be in good condition.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Savage

.32 ACP

0.63 kg

10

$122

Savage

.380 ACP

0.72 kg

10

$141

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Savage (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Savage (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

Seecamp LWS-380

     Notes: Billed as the smallest .32ACP on the market, the LWS-32 is definitely one the smallest pistols in the world, at 108mm long complete and 0.45 kg.  The barrel is very short at 2 inches. It was designed for Texas’ concealed firearms market. 

     The LWS-380 is basically a larger version of the LWS-32, firing the .380 ACP cartridge instead of the .32 ACP.  It is actually lighter than the LWS-32. The LWS-380 was actually first devised in 2000, but problems with putting the .380 ACP round into such a small package (it’s only a tiny bit larger than the LWS-32) delayed actual production until early 2004.  Hotloads are not tolerated, nor are rounds longer than standard size.  A spacer in the action prevents longer rounds from loaded into the pistols; hotloads will rupture the action and barrel. Due to the low weight and small size, the recoil of the LWS-380 can be substantial.  The two pistols are essentially the same except for the caliber.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is an exceedingly rare weapon in the Twilight 2000 timeline, but can be found in some cases. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LWS-32

.32 ACP

0.45 kg

7

$108

LWS-380

.380 ACP

0.32 kg

6

$125

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LWS-32

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

5

LWS-380

SA

1

Nil

0

6

Nil

4

 

SCCY CPX-2

     Notes: This is near-subcompact pistol from a relatively new company on the scene.  Two finishes are available: all-matte black, a black frame and a bead-blasted stainless steel slide. The bead blasting is reportedly done by hand.  The barrel and slide are steel; however, the receiver is of 7075-T6 aluminum, and the frame is otherwise polymer (Zytel).  The grip has serrations, including the grip panels, and the rear of the grip is cushioned.  The sight is a three-dot sight, though the rear sight is dovetailed in.  Magazines are propriety, with an 9-round flush magazine, and a 10-roundone with a firing step.  Parts are heat-treated for strength, incl;uding the 3.1-inch barrel.  A key can be inserted into the frame to lock it.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CPX-2

9mm Parabellum

0.43 kg

9, 10

$218

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CPX-2

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

 

SIG-Sauer USA M17

     Notes: The M17 is a variant of the Swiss SIG-Sauer P320, which won the US Military’s MGS (Modular Gun System) competition in 2017.  They beat out such competitors as the Glock 17 Gen 4, Beretta APX, CZ P09, Smith & Wesson M&P (which offered a family of military pistols to suit varying roles in the US Military), Detonics STS, and a few other minor competitors’ designs.  (Interestingly, Beretta was originally going to submit their upgraded M9 – the M9A3 – but at the last minute chose not to.)  The M17 entered limited service with the US Air Force and US Army late in 2017, with full production beginning earlier this year.  The 101st Air Assault Division was the first Division to convert to the M17. Some 280,000 are estimated to be produced for the US Army alone over the next ten years, with a possible 212,000 in the years after that. US Army deliveries call for 6300 per month. The Marines OKd the M17, but will likely not begin to replace their M9s until the end of their M9s life cycles in 2020.  The US Navy has not indicated whether they will replacing their M9s with M17s.  And while SOCOM has indicated that they will replace some of their pistol (most notably their M9s) with M17s, it is well known they have license to use almost any equipment and weapons they find work best.  It should be noted that the US handgun competition was the Modular Gun System; while the M17 is the standard service pistol variant, the US will probably acquire more P320 variants in several calibers and configurations.  An M18 variant, with a shorter barrel and grip for military investigation agents, has already been approved.  In addition, the P320 offers the ability to change calibers and barrel lengths through changing of parts instead of the whole pistol.

     The M17 is a self-cocking striker-fired design with no external hammer, using the standard SIG-Sauer cam-actuated barrel. The M17 is DAO, with no decocker, but a lightened trigger pull weight. To meet US regulations, the M17 has a manual safety, though technically none is needed with a DAO handgun. The frame and some of the internal parts are of polymer, while the slide is stainless steel.  However, the finish/color of the frame and slide are generally going to be the  same, though they may vary from pistol to pistol.  The controls are ambidextrous and slightly extended; these include a bright orange chamber loaded indicator which pops up at the back or the ejection port.  No tools are required for field stripping.  The frame is narrower than the M9, as there were many complaints among smaller-handed soldiers about the M9’s grip being too wide to get a good grip.  The M17’s grip is ergonomically-shaped and has three interchangeable backstraps to fit the gun to the soldier. The sights are of the 3-dot type with tritium inlays, and both the front and rear sights are fully adjustable for windage and elevation.  In addition, the rear sight is dovetailed in. Below the dust cover is a fairly long molded-in Picatinny rail for accessories.  Versions of the M17 with extended, threaded barrels have been procured.

     Barrel length of the M17 is 4.7 inches, with the threaded-barrel version coming to 5 inches.

     The lion’s share of M17’s are chambered in 9mm Parabellum.  However, the US has also taken delivery of M17s chambered in .40 Smith & Wesson, .357 SIG, and .45 ACP for special applications.

     Four special versions of the M17 were designed specifically for use by the Sentinels at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.  These versions have a gloss-black frame and slide (the frame is aluminum instead of polymer).  Their version of the M17 does not have a Picatinny Rail, and the grip has grip plates made with wood made from the USS Olympia, the ship that transported the first Unknown Soldier to be entombed in 1921. The grip plates have inserted medallions bearing the symbol of the 3rd Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier emblem.  The four pistols each have a name – Silence, Respect, Dignity, and Perseverance. This name is inscribed to the level of the stainless steel below the black finish on the right side of the slide near the front. On each side at the rear of the slide, a “XXI” is engraved.  As the Unknown Soldier M17s do not have cocking grooves, these engravings are the closest the pistols have to cocking grooves.  Sights are same as those of the standard M17, except that the sight plate has engravings of the Greek gods of Peace, Victory, and Valor, and instead of tritium inlays, they have glass dots made from marble dust from the Tomb.  The “XXI” symbolizes the 21 steps the Sentinels walk in both directions when guarding the Tomb. The Sentinels will patrol wearing a special holster allowing the pistol to have a 21-round extended magazine inserted, emblematic of the 21-round salute given to veterans at their funeral.  The magazine bottom plate shoes also have the Greek figures for Peace, Victory, and Valor engraved, and the shoes are aluminum, not polymer.  The shoes, which are removable, are also engraved with the last name of the Sentinel on duty and his badge number.

     The M18 is essentially a compact M17, and is the military equivalent of the P320 X-Carry. It has a shorter barrel and slide and a shorter frame than the M17.  The M18 has been procured for Military units like the Army’s CID, the Navy’s NCIS, and the Air Force’s OSI.  It is also used for certain special applications by SOCOM troops, though the M18’s role in SOCOM has not been publicly defined.  It has the standard polymer frame and stainless steel slide, barrel, internals, like the M17.  Like the M17, there is a version with an extended, threaded barrel for use with a suppressor, and there is a molded-in Picatinny Rail.  Barrel length is 3.86 inches for the standard version, or 4.16 inches for the extended barrel version..

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M17

9mm Parabellum

0.84 kg

17, 21

$249

M17

.357 SIG

0.84 kg

14

$276

M17

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.84 kg

14

$324

M17

.45 ACP

0.84 kg

10

$411

M17 (Threaded Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

17, 21

$252

M17 (Threaded Barrel)

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10

$414

M17 (Sentinel Version)

9mm Parabellum

1.11 kg

17, 21

$246

M18

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

17

$240

M18

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.77 kg

14

$315

M18

.45 ACP

0.77 kg

10

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M17 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

M17 (.357)

SA

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

M17 (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

M17 (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

13

M17 w/Threaded Barrel (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

M17 w/Threaded Barrel (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

M17 (Sentinel Version)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

M18 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

M18 (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

12

M18 (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10