Ruger 22 Charger

     Notes: Jumping on the bandwagon of pistols made from rifles. the 22 Charger appears to be made from a 10/22 rifle.  The furniture is laminate, but finished in a brown faux wood or "Green Mountain."  The pistol has a true pistol grip, and a 15-round magazine (though it can take all 10/22-compatible magazines). Metalwork is largely alloy steel, finished in matte black.  The barrel is 10 inches, and has a threaded muzzle with a cap. Atop the receiver is a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The barrel is cold-hammer forged.  The 22 Charger comes with an adjustable bipod, which attaches to the forward sling swivel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

22 Charger

.22 Long Rifle

1.42 kg

15

$448

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

22 Charger

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

18

With Bipod

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

24

 

Ruger American Pistol

     Notes: Following on the heels of the Ruger American rifles, the American Pistol was originally designed for the US Army Modular Handgun System Concept competition.  (It was cut from that competition.)  The designers started from a blank slate, and used CAD to design the pistol on a computer before any components were built.  It therefore contains a lot of what the Army was asking for, like a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.  The magazine catch and slide stop are ambidextrous, and the grip has modular outserts for larger or smaller hands.  They slide into place and lock down with Torx screws. (a “10 Torx wrench is included with the pistol as bought from the factory). The frontstrap and backstrap are checkered, with coarser checkering on the backstrap. Frame construction is largely of synthetic long-stand nylon material; the slide is steel with a black nitride finish. The trigger is hand-tuned and designed to have a short takeup and a crisp and short reset.  It is striker-fired and DAO operation, but feels more like a conventional firing-pin operation with first trigger pull almost as light as an SA pistol, at 5-6 pounds of pressure and a break of 0.25 inches.  The trigger pull is described by one gun expert as “short, smooth, and crisp.” The controls are oversized and ambidextrous, but the Ruger American does not currently have a manual safety. Ruger plans to offer one in the near future (as I write this on 07 Apr 16). The frame is polymer, with a carbon steel slide, and black for the polymer frame and grip and a blackened Nitride finish for the metal.  The grip is wraparound rubber with a stippled finish, and is adjustable with outserts. Sights are Novak Lo-Mount Carry 3-dot sights, though they are dovetailed in and may be replaced.  There is a Picatinny Rail under the dust cover. 9mm versions have a 4.2-inch barrel; .45 versions have a 4.5-inch barrel. The slide runs on full-length metal rails instead of relatively small metal inserts as on many polymer pistols. Manufacturer magazines are of nickel-plated steel that has a Teflon finish, another requirement of the AMHSC competition.  Finish is Black Nitride; the 9mm version also comes in a finish of Brown Cerekote.

     In 2016, Ruger came out with the Ruger American Compact.  It is essentially the same as the standard-length model, but the 9mm version uses a 3.55-inch barrel and the .45 model uses a 3.75-inch barrel.  They, of course, have a shorter Picatinny Rail under the dust cover. Frame height is the same as the standard model and the magazines are identical.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

American

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

17

$243

American

.45 ACP

0.89 kg

10

$409

American Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

12, 17

$236

American Compact

.45 ACP

0.81 kg

10, 12

$399

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

American (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

American (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

American (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

American (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

Ruger LCP

     Notes: The LCP (Lightweight Compact Pistol) is perhaps Ruger’s smallest design ever marketed; it has a barrel only 2.75 inches long, a total length of only 5.16 inches and a width of less than an inch, and its glass fibeRfilled nylon frame makes it extremely light in weight.  The LCP is striker-fired to reduce the size of the pistol, and a deliberate choice was made at the time not to chamber it in 9mm Parabellum, though Ruger chose the most powerful ammunition they felt the pistol could safely take.  Though the frame is very light polymer, the slide is hardened steel; the polymer is matte black, while the slide is dark matte blued.  Naturally, such a lightweight, small pistol can be quite a handful, but the LCP’s design softens recoil by just a bit.

     The LC9 is a new version of the LCP, chambered for 9mm Parabellum.  It is much heavier than the LCP due to heavier-gauge construction, but has the same polymer frame and light alloy slide and barrel.  The trigger action has been smoothed over the LCP, and the pistol is dehorned a bit more. The barrel is longer at 3.12 inches. The LC9s is similar for game purposes, but has no external manual safety or magazine safety, using DAO operation.  It can use laser aiming modules and extended 9-round magazines.  The frame is of light alloy steel, though the weight is the same as the standard LC9.  The slide is blued and the frame is finished matte black.  The firing table is slightly different than that for the LC9, and the costs and some other particulars is a bit different.

     The LC380 is an LCP sized up to the LC9's dimensions and barrel length.  The result is a pistol which, in game terms, is not very different then the LC9.  The frame, however, is made from composites, and the slide of light alloy steel, as is the barrel.

     The LC9-LM is an LC9 with a Crimson Trace Laserguard attached ahead of the trigger guard and under the dust cover.  The laser is a red laser, and is not seen in transmission, like most lasers, only projecting a dot on the target.  It is otherwise the same as the LC9.

     The LCP II has user-suggested improvements as well as improvements thought up by the design team.  It is a little more compact than the LCP, and more easily fits a wider variety of holsters.  The frame is one piece, and of glass-filled nylon.  The frame is textured to provide a secure grip, and the larger grip frame provides better distribution of recoil forces (but has no effect in game terms).  Sights are improved, though still very low profile.  The barrel is of alloy steel, and blued inside the alloy steel slide.  The slide is also blued, and the barrel is 2.75 inches long. It should be noted that 6-round LCP magazines can be used with the LCP II, but will not activate the bolt hold-open feature.  7-round LCP magazines cannot be used with the LCP II.  Proprietary magazines produced for the LCP II work properly and are recommended in all cases.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The LCP is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LCP

.380 ACP

0.27 kg

6

$131

LC9

9mm Parabellum

0.48 kg

7

$143

LC9s

9mm Parabellum

0.48 kg

7, 9

$143

LC380

.380 ACP

0.48 kg

7

$135

LC9-LM

9mm Parabellum

0.49 kg

7

$543

LCP II

.380 ACP

0.3 kg

6

$132

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LCP

SA

1

Nil

0

6

Nil

6

LC9

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

LC9s

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

LC380

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

LC9-LM

SA

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

LCP II

SA

1

Nil

0

7

Nil

6

 

Ruger Mark I

     Notes: The Ruger .22 Rimfire pistol series began in 1949 with the Ruger Standard Model (also known as the “Standard Auto”), which was actually manufactured until 1982.  The design was partially inspired by the Luger; Bill Ruger did this partially because many thought the Luger’s grip angle was ideal, and partially to capitalize on the fame of the Luger after World War 2.  The Standard Model used a fixed barrel with a reciprocating cylindrical bolt; there is no slide as such, though the pistol is cocked by grasping the two serrated “wings” at the end of the receiver.  The Standard Model had an internal hammer, and the mechanism was designed to function as fast as possible.  Barrels were tapered and either 4.75 inches or 6 inches.  Until 1951, the Standard Model had checkered grips with the symbol of Sturm, Ruger and Company on a red medallion; with the death of Alexander Sturm in 1951, the background of the medallion was changed to black in memory (and stayed that way until nearly the end of production of the Mark II series).  Though most of the Standard Model Pistols were built in the US, a few hundred were assembled in Mexico using US-made parts and have Spanish markings instead of English markings.

     Within a few years, shooters were demanding a target version of the Standard Model; in 1951, Ruger answered this demand with the Mark I (also known as the “Mark I Target”).  It was virtually identical to the Standard Model, but had adjustable sights and optional wood grip plates (still emblazoned with the Sturm, Ruger and Company logo).  The first Mark Is appeared with a 6.9-inch straight barrel, but from 1952-55, a tapered 5.25-inch barrel was offered, and from 1963 until 1982 when the Mark I was replaced by the Mark II, 5.5-inch bull barrel was also built.  A few Mark Is, mostly those with bull barrels, were also built with muzzle brakes, and 5000 examples of a stainless steel model were built in 1976 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the death of Alexander Sturm (the Mark I was one of his last designs).  In addition, some examples were made with fixed sights (primarily in 5.25-inch barrel versions) and from stamped or pressed steel parts to cover the loweRpriced end of the market; these examples of the Mark I were primarily meant for simple plinking or recreational shooting.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Standard Model (4.75” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.02 kg

9

$128

Standard Model (6” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.07 kg

9

$140

Mark I (5.25” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.04 kg

9

$133

Mark I (5.5” Bull Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.07 kg

9

$136

Mark I (5.5” Bull Barrel w/Brake)

.22 Long Rifle

1.23 kg

9

$186

Mark I (6.9” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.12 kg

9

$149

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Standard Model (4.75”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Standard Model (6”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mark I (5.25”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Mark I (5.5” Bull)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Mark I (5.5” Bull w/Brake)

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

10

Mark I (6.9” Barrel)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Ruger Mark II

     Notes: This successor to the Mark I appeared in 1982.  It was at first available only in the Standard version, with a blued finish and black Delrin plastic grip plates, with a 7-inch barrel.  (Shorter versions were added later.)  Target models began to appear in 1983, and stainless steel versions in 1984 (versions with an extra “K” in the model number are in stainless steel).  A plethora of versions and variants then began to appear, both from Ruger and from custom models by various gunsmiths.  Over 2 million Mark IIs have been built, and production of them has only recently stopped, to be replaced by the Mark III series.

     The Mark II Standard was the first; it comes in MK 4, MK 6, and MK 7 versions, roughly indicating their barrel lengths (4.75”, 6”, and 7”.)  Stainless steel versions are named KMK 4, KMK 6, and KMK 7.  The Mark II Target versions are basically the same pistols with adjustable sights and heavier barrels.  The KMK 4 Target is quite different; it has a 4.75” barrel with an adjustable rear sight, and a special match grip with an adjustable hand rest.  The Mark II Government Competition is also a variant of the Mark II Target; it has a very heavy barrel with flattened sides, an adjustable sight, and a rail for mounting other types of optics. 

     The Mark 22/45 was designed as a training pistol, and the grip has the same angle as the Colt M1911A1.  This unfortunately means that the magazines cannot be used in a standard Ruger Mark II and vice versa.  The controls of the pistol are, as much as possible, in the same position as those of the M1911A1.  The frame of the Mark 22/45 is made of black Zytel composites.

     The Mark II Bull Barrel comes in a variety of sizes, ranging from P4 version with a black Zytel frame and an adjustable rear sight to the MK 10 with a steel frame and long 10-inch barrel.  They all have in common a heavy bull barrel for extra accuracy and stability. 

     The Suppressed Mark II was a special issue weapon to US military and government agencies, most notably US Navy SEALs and Army Special Forces, where it replaced the suppressed High Standard pistol.  It uses a very large wipeless silencer, and has modifications to quiet its action so that a slide lock is not necessary.  The silencer is permanently affixed and cannot be removed except by those with Armorer skill.  The weapon is quite a bit larger than most Mark IIs, and the .22 Long Rifle round is of limited killing power, but it does have its usefulness, most notably in close-up elimination of enemy personnel and assassination.  It was primarily used by US military forces in the 1980s, but remains in the inventory, and may still be used by the CIA.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mark II Standard MK 4

.22 Long Rifle

0.99 kg

10

$127

Mark II Standard MK 6

.22 Long Rifle

1.05 kg

10

$139

Mark II Standard MK 7

.22 Long Rifle

1.08 kg

10

$148

Mark II Target MK 678

.22 Long Rifle

1.19 kg

10

$150

Mark II Target KMK 4

.22 Long Rifle

1.1 kg

10

$129

Mark II Government Competition KMK 678GC

.22 Long Rifle

1.28 kg

10

$152

Mark 22/45

.22 Long Rifle

0.79 kg

10

$120

Mark II Bull Barrel P4

.22 Long Rifle

0.88 kg

10

$121

Mark II Bull Barrel P512

.22 Long Rifle

0.99 kg

10

$136

Mark II Bull Barrel MK 512

.22 Long Rifle

1.19 kg

10

$137

Mark II Bull Barrel MK 10

.22 Long Rifle

1.45 kg

10

$185

Mark II Suppressed

.22 Long Rifle

1.15 kg

10

$181

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk II Standard MK 4

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Mk II Standard MK 6

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mk II Standard MK 7

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mark II Target MK 678

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mark II Target KMK 4

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Mark II KMK 678GC

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mark 22/45

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Mark II Bull Barrel P4

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Mark II Bull Barrel P512

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Mark II Bull Barrel MK 512

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Mark II Bull Barrel MK 10

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

19

Mark II Suppressed

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

 

Ruger Mk III

     Notes: This small-caliber pistol is due to replace the Ruger Mk IIs and Ruger Mk 22/45s in production in 2004.  The shape is roughly the same, but there are several changes and improvements to the Ruger Mk III.  One of these changes is the magazine release; instead of a spring-loaded hook at the bottom of the magazine well, the Ruger Mk III has a more modern button arrangement on the left side of the frame in a position similar to the M1911.  The ejection port has been reshaped to reduce stoppages, particularly those due to stovepiping.  The Ruger Mk III has a chamber loaded indicator, the first ever found on a rimfire pistol.  The pistol can also be locked into a safe mode by use of a key.  A third safety is a magazine safety; if there is no magazine in the weapon, it will not fire, even if there is a round chambered. 

     The first version of the Mk III is the MKIII512; this has a 5 1/2-inch barrel, micro-adjustable rear sight, and blued finish.  The second version is the P4GCMKIII model of the Mk III 22/45; this weapon has the classic 1911-like shape and features of earlier Ruger 22/45s, in addition to the improvements described above and a polymer grip frame.  This version has a 4-inch barrel.  The third member of the Mk III line is the Mk III 678 Hunter; this has the improvements of the Mk III line, plus a fluted 6.875” barrel, Weaver rail (plus backup iron sights), special cocobolo grip plates with special checkering, and a lightened trigger pull.  Later versions include the MKIII678, with a 6.875-inch slab bull barrel for extra accuracy, checkered laminate grips with a thumbrest, and drilled and tapped for a scope mount in addition to having adjustable iron sights.  The MKIII4 has a short 4.75-inch tapered barrel and fixed sights, and is designed primarily for plinking rather than target shooting.  The MKIII6 is similar, but has a 6-inch barrel.  More models of the Mk III are promised for the future.

     In 2012 some new versions of the 22/45 were introduced.  The 22/45 Lite is equipped with a composite Zytel frame and a reinforced aluminum slide; most other metal parts are also aluminum.  This lightens the pistol.  The barrel is 4.4 inches.

     The 22/45 Threaded Barrel comes in two versions: one with an adjustable front and rear sight, and one with a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver and another below the barrel.  In both cases, the barrel is a fluted bull barrel and the tip is threaded for use with a silencer, suppressor, or a muzzle brake.  Also in both cases, the frame is of Zytel. Barrel lengths are 4.5 inches. For game purposes, they both shoot the same, but have slightly different prices.

     Ruger makes a version of the 22/45 for sale exclusively by Davidson’s.  It is essentially a 5.5-inch-barrel version of the 22/45 with a fluted bull barrel and optional fiberoptic sights.  The frame is light alloy, while the slide is blued steel.  For game purposes, the two versions are the same.  Ruger also makes a version of the 22/45 for exclusive distribution by TALO; this version has an alloy frame and steel cylinder, but has a 4-inch tapered barrel and fixed sights. Two other versions of the 22/45 are made for Big Rock Sports and Sports South; these two are identical for game purposes.  These have bull-profile 5.5-inch barrels with alloy frames and steel slides and barrels.  Both have fixed sights.

     Some new versions of the Mk III have also been brought out over the years.  The Mk III Target/Competition version has a 6.88-inch bull-profile slab-sided barrel, with a micrometeRadjustable rear sight and a blade front sight.  The frame and barrel are of stainless steel; the rest of the metalwork is of carbon steel.  The grip plates are of laminated hardwood, and the grip has a thumbrest.

     Two versions were built for distribution by Sports South; they are identical to the MKIII6 and MKIII4, except for the stainless steel finish, black synthetic grip plates, and fixed sights.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols do not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mk III (MKIII512)

.22 Long Rifle

1.01 kg

10

$135

Mk III (MKIII678)

.22 Long Rifle

1.28 kg

10

$151

Mk III (MKIII4)

.22 Long Rifle

0.99 kg

10

$127

Mk III (MKIII6)

.22 Long Rifle

1.05 kg

10

$140

Mk III 22/45 (P4GCMKIII)

.22 Long Rifle

0.82 kg

10

$120

Mk III 678 Hunter

.22 Long Rifle

1.16 kg

10

$149

Mk III 22/45 Lite

.22 Long Rifle

0.65 kg

10

$124

Mk III 22/45 Threaded (Adjustable Sights)

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$126

Mk III 22/45 Threaded (Rail)

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$128

Davidson’s Mk III 22/45

.22 Long Rifle

0.91 kg

10

$136

TALO Mk III 22/45

.22 Long Rifle

0.74 kg

10

$120

Big Rock Sports Mk III 22/45

.22 Long Rifle

0.99 kg

10

$136

Mk III Target/Competition

.22 Long Rifle

1.28 kg

10

$151

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk III (MKIII512)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Mk III (MKIII678)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mk III (MKIII4)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Mk III (MKIII6)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mk III 22/45 (P4GCMKIII)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Mk III 678 Hunter

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mk III 22/45 Lite

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Mk III 22/45 Threaded

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Davidson’s Mk III 22/45

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

TALO Mk III 22/45

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

Big Rock Sports Mk III 22/45

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Mk III Target/Competition

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Ruger Mk IV

     Notes: The Ruger Mk IV is basically an improved Mk III, incorporating many of the features requested by shooters of the Mk I, Mk II, and Mk III.  It’s biggest improvement is the one-button takedown for field stripping and disassembly, a great improvement over the somewhat complicated takedown of earlier models. This button is at the bottom rear of the frame. (You’d have to work to accidentally trip it during firing.)  The rest of field stripping and disassembly is likewise made much easier than earlier models.  The bolt stop is in a more ergonomic position, and the manual safety is ambidextrous and locks the sear.  (The safety can also be converted to left-side-only by the user if desired.)  The magazine release is on the left side of the frame, behind the trigger guard, near the safety (which, admittedly, can lead to confusion). The rear sight is adjustable and the barrel and receiver are drilled and tapped for the use of user-installed optics; the front sight is dovetailed in and is a blade-type sight.  The Mk IV comes with a Weaver or Picatinny rail, at the option of the buyer. Upon magazine release, the magazine drops free for faster reloading, and the Mk IV has a magazine disconnect that prevents the Mk IV from firing without a magazine inserted.

     The Mk IV Target features a one-piece CNC-machined frame.  Internal cylindrical bolt construction ensures a permanent sight-to-barrel alignment, allowing for greater accuracy.  The Mk IV Target comes in an aluminum/steel alloy-frame version, a stainless steel frame, and an aluminum-frame model with a wood ergonomic grip.  Alloy-frame versions are have a blued finish, while the stainless steel frame version has a satin finish.  All Mk IV Target versions have a 5.5-inch match-quality bull barrel.

     The Mk IV Hunter uses a 6.88-inch fluted bull barrel, with an adjustable rear sight and a fiberoptic front sight.  One version has checkered laminate grip plates on the handle; the other has ergonomic wood grips.  Both have frames of satin stainless steel.

     The Mk IV 22/45 continues the tradition of a .22 caliber weapon of this type with a grip angle similar to the M1911.  It has a 4.4-inch bull barrel, and is constructed largely of anodized aluminum alloy.  The barrel is also threaded, and a suppressor, flash suppressor, or muzzle brake may be attached. (It is made primarily for a suppressor; a flash suppressor or muzzle brake would look pretty silly.) The rear sight is adjustable, and the front is a fixed blade.  The 22/45 has a barrel shroud with many cooling holes in it; the holes are not ports.  The barrel shroud and receiver are milled into a single tube. Atop the receiver/barrel shroud is a mounting rail; this may be a Weaver or Picatinny rail at the option of the buyer; it is about four inches long and sits in between the two sights.  There are two models of the 22/45, but they differ primarily in the anodization color of the barrel shroud/receiver tube.  One is uniformly anodized black, and the other is anodized black except for the receiver/barrel shroud, which is anodized in bronze. They have no differences in game terms.

     The Mk IV Competition has a 6.88-inch slab-sided match-quality slab-sided bull barrel.  It is largely made of stainless steel and is finished in satin.  It has smooth, polished laminate grip plates set with the Ruger emblem. The rear sight is micrometer-adjustable; the front sight is a dovetailed blade.  The Competition comes with a Weaver or Picatinny rail atop the receiver and barrel.

 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mk IV Target (Alloy Frame)

.22 Long Rifle

1.01 kg

10

$138

Mk IV Target (Stainless Steel Frame)

.22 Long Rifle

1.21 kg

10

$138

Mk IV Target (Wood Grip)

.22 Long Rifle

1.02 kg

10

$139

Mk IV Hunter (Laminate Grips)

.22 Long Rifle

1.25 kg

10

$151

Mk IV Hunter (Wood Grips)

.22 Long Rifle

1.26 kg

10

$152

Mk IV 22/45 Lite

.22 Long Rifle

0.71 kg

10

$125

Mk IV Competition

.22 Long Rifle

1.33 kg

10

$155

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk IV Target (Alloy Frame)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mk IV Target (Stainless Steel Frame)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mk IV Target (Wood Grip)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Mk IV Hunter (Laminate Grips)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mk IV Hunter (Wood Grips)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Mk IV 22/45

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

Mk IV Competition

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

 

Ruger P85 Series

     Notes: The P85 was Ruger’s first “large-caliber” pistol, and was designed specifically for the competition to replace the M1911A1 as the US military’s primary sidearm.  As such, it has a high magazine capacity, ambidextrous controls, a decocking lever, and a firing pin safety.  The P85 uses a light alloy frame, but almost all of the internal parts are made of stainless steel, and the slide is blued steel.  The P85 is capable of firing virtually any sort of 9mm Parabellum ammunition.  (A rare variant, chambered for 9x21mm, was also produced in small numbers, and is similarly tolerant of ammunition.)  The ejection port is large for more positive extraction.  The hammer is the so-called Commander-type (a ring-shaped hammer).  The sights are of the three-white dot type, and the front of the trigger guard is squared-off for the index finger of the nonfiring hand.  The P85 has been called ungraceful-looking, and even unattractive, but is what it is: a military pistol, and an excellent one at that. 

     In 1990, a version with a stainless steel frame and slide was introduced: the KP85.  A version of the P85 with only the decocking lever being ambidextrous was also introduced at this time, the P85DC (KP85DC in stainless steel).  These two are identical to the P85 and KP85 for game purposes.

     The P89 is a further development of the P85. It is slightly longer and heavier than the P85, but is otherwise identical to the P85.  Variants include the stainless steel KP89, the P89/KP89DC with a decocker only, and the KP89DAO in stainless steel and with a double-action-only operation.  These are all identical to the P89/KP89 for game purposes. 

     A rare variant of the KP89, the KP89X, was also built in limited quantities (some 6000 in all), most of which were sold in Europe.  They are designed to fire 7.65mm and 9mm Parabellum, with the caliber changeable simply be changing the barrel and recoil spring.  The safety catch could be moved from the left to the right side of the pistol by the user.   

     The P90 and KP90 are essentially variants of the P89 and KP89 chambered for .45 ACP.  The P90 and KP90 do not have decockers, but do have conventional manual safeties.  A later variant, the KP90DC, does have a decocker. A limited-edition version, the P90TH, has a two-tone finish (blued slide and a faux stainless steel frame), and is equipped with Hogue ergonomic black rubber grips.  It is identical to the KP90 for game purposes.

     Manufactured only from 1992-1995, the “P91” was actually manufactured only in stainless steel and with only the decocker ambidextrous, and is therefore more properly known as the KP91DC.  A KP91DAO version also exists.  The KP91 is otherwise the same as the P85 and its related weapons, except for its caliber.

     1993 brought the P93 and KP93, which were compact versions of the P89 and KP89.  Both are DAO weapons, allowing Ruger to not have to place any controls externally except for a magazine release, though there are a number of passive safeties.  The hammer, when not cocked, fits flush into the slide and frame.  P93DC and KP93DC variants also exist, with an ambidextrous decocker on the slide above the grip and an ambidextrous magazine release.  The sights are three-dot high-visibility white types, and the front of the trigger guard is squared off to facilitate two-handed shooting.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P85 and P89 were selected by the US Marines and Coast Guard over the M9 due to their excellent resistance to corrosion.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P85

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

15

$244

P85

9x21mm

0.87 kg

15

$261

KP85

9mm Parabellum

0.87 kg

15

$242

KP85

9x21mm

0.91 kg

15

$260

P89

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

15

$244

KP89

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

15

$242

KP89X

7.65mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

15

$199

KP89X

9mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

15

$245

KP89X Caliber Change Kit

N/A

0.22 kg

N/A

$51

P90

.45 ACP

0.95 kg

7

$404

KP90

.45 ACP

1 kg

7

$402

KP91

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.94 kg

11

$316

P93

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

15

$238

KP93

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

15

$236

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P85 (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P85 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

KP85 (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

KP85 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

P89

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

KP89

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

KP89X (7.65mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

KP89X (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P90

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

KP90

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

KP91

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P93

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

KP93

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

Ruger P94

     Notes: This pistol was introduced in 1994.  It is a mid-sized pistol in two calibers and several models.  The P94 marks a sort of different design philosophy at Ruger -- the use of more modern manufacturing techniques and materials to produce a relatively lighter weapon, and the use of smoother contours to produce a sleeker pistol.  The standard P94 uses DA/SA operation, has an aircraft-grade aluminum frame and steel slide and a manual safety.  The KP94 denotes, as with most Ruger designs, a version using a stainless steel frame and slide.  The KP944 is virtually identical to the KP94, but is found only in .40 Smith & Wesson and has additional streamlining.  The standard P94 did not see any substantive variants, but the stainless steel-framed models had DAO models without external controls (other than a magazine release) and versions with decockers.  There is also a KP94L version; this model is identical to a 9mm version of the KP94, but is equipped with an integral laser aiming module in front of the trigger guard below the dust cover.

    The P94 series is equipped with 3-dot high-contrast sights.  The rear sight is adjustable for windage, and both are dovetailed in and may be replaced.  The magazine release is ambidextrous; versions with decockers have ambidextrous decockers as well.  DAO versions cannot be thumb-cocked; if this is attempted with a DAO model, the hammer will simply fall again without firing the weapon.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P94

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

15

$241

KP94

9mm Parabellum

0.98 kg

15

$240

KP94L

9mm Parabellum

1.04 kg

15

$640

KP944

.40 Smith & Wesson

1 kg

10

$314

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P94

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

KP94

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

KP94L

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

KP944

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

Ruger P95

     Notes: This compact Ruger pistol was designed specifically to be able to fire the +P loading of 9mm Parabellum without significant wear on the barrel or mechanism.  A composite polymer frame is used along with an ergonomic molding to make it possible to fire high-power loadings over a long period of time without great fatigue on the part of the shooter.  It also sort of breaks the mold in naming conventions; the entire series has a composite Xenoy frame, but the slides are different as are certain components.  The P95 has a semigloss black steel slide, and the KP95 a stainless steel slide; the P95DC and KP95DC have only the ambidextrous decocker, without a safety catch; the P95DAO and KP95DAO have double-action-only operation.  All are identical for game purposes.

     In 2006, Ruger redesigned a number of features of the P95.  The polymer frame was greatly-strengthened, as stated in Shooting Times magazine, the new frame is “a custom compounded, high-strength polymer with long-strand fiberglass filler.”  This material also has great resistance to wear and cleaning solutions, as well as being strong enough that the internal mechanism, particularly in the area of the slide rails, to be reduced in complication.  The new P95 has been partially dehorned (particularly in the slide and trigger guard).  The backstrap and frontstrap were given textured finishes, granting the shooter a better hold.  The frame has been given a matte black finish instead of the semigloss finish of the original P95.  Under the dust cover is a short MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The cocking grooves on the slide of the new P95 are deeper and much easier to grasp.  Sights are 3-dot and dovetailed in; in addition, the rear sight is adjustable for windage on its own.  Trigger action has been made lighter and smoother.  The decocker has been made ambidextrous and is of a design which is much easier to actuate; in addition, the magazine release and safety (if so equipped) are also ambidextrous.  Finally, depressing the magazine release makes the magazine fall free of the pistol, speeding up reloads.  Though the new production P95 has a different cost, it is otherwise identical to the stats of the P95 for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The KP95 is a rare weapon, the last Ruger product made before the November Nuclear Strikes; the P95 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P95

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

10, 15

$237

P95 (New)

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

10, 15

$240

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P95

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

Ruger P97

     Notes: This is sort of a version of the P95 in .45 ACP caliber, but it is designed to be relatively lighter and slimmer in profile than other heavy-caliber Ruger pistols.  It is similar in design to other pistols of the Pseries, but is larger to handle the higher caliber.  Like other Pseries pistols, it is a very light and handy weapon.  It uses a black Isoplast composite frame and a stainless steel slide, and comes only in models equipped with decockers or in DAO versions. The frame is black polymer, but the slide and trigger are black-finished or bright-finished stainless steel, and is thus more properly known as the KP97. The barrel is a mid-sized 3.9 inches. The finish may be in semi-gloss black or with the slide left in natural stainless steel.  The grip shape is ergonomic and designed to allow recoil forces to spread into the hand.  The KP97DC and DAO versions are identical for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

KP97DC

.45 ACP

0.87 kg

8

$400

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

KP97DC

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

 

Ruger P345

     Notes: This pistol is going to be the first of a new line of Ruger P-series pistols.  It is an almost total makeover of the KP97 series, which the P345 is replacing in production.  The P345 has been built to operate within smaller package that has a slimmer profile; the barrel length is slightly shorter than that of the P97 at 4.2 inches.  The P345 has essentially the same operation, but it is re-engineered to fit in a smaller space. It has redesigned sights, three safeties (as the Mk III above), and a polymer frame with light alloy strengthening at stress points. A deluxe version, the P345PR(PHX), differs in the grips, finish, and in having engraving on the slide, but is otherwise identical to the P345 in game terms.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P345

.45 ACP

0.82 kg

8

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P345

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

 

Ruger SR9

     Notes: The SR9 is designed with a different operation than other Ruger pistols: while other Rugers are hammer-fired (the trigger trips a spring-loaded hammer, which then hits the firing pin), the SR9 is striker fired (the trigger directly releases the firing pin, which itself is spring-loaded).  Though a common type of pistol operation in Europe, it is not that common in the US, but it does allow the designer to make a smaller, lighter pistol.  (Of course, the downside is that single-action operation is impossible with a striker-fired pistol.) 

     The SR9 uses a light polymer frame (specifically, fiberglass-filled Nylon), and the barrel is 4.14 inches.  Finishes include all-black, OD Green with a black slide, and black with a satin-steel finish; within those finishes, slides may be carbon steel or stainless steel.  Models also exist which will accept only 10-round magazines, to comply with local laws; standard magazine capacity is considerably larger, and standard SR9s can also use 10-round magazines.  The backstrap is reversible; one side is flat, and the other is arched; both are checkered.  The sides of the grip are likewise checkered.  The trigger pull weight is very light for a DAO trigger, and has a passive trigger safety.  The magazine release and manual safety are ambidextrous.  The SR9 has a chamber loaded indicator and a magazine safety.  The dust cover has a molded-in MIL-STD-1913 rail.

     The SR9c (for Compact) further reduces the dimensions of the SR9, including the barrel to 3.5 inches, and makes the frame from composites.  The SR40c is essentially the same, including a 3.5-inch barrel.

     In late 2010, Ruger introduced the SR40, essentially an SR9 in .40 Smith & Wesson Chambering.  For the most part, it operates and functions like the SR9, and has the same features as the SR9.  The SR45 is chambered for .45 ACP, and has the longest barrel at 4.5 inches.  It has a composite frame, and has adjustable 3-dot sights.  SR45s come in SR45s versions (alloy steel slide) and SR45 (Stainless Steel slide). There is a slight price difference, but none other for game purposes.

     The SR22 is a rimfire version of the SR9c.  It comes in versions with a standard barrel or a barrel threaded for a silencer.  The slide is made from aluminum and black anodized; the frame is made from black polymer.  Under the dust cover is a very short length of MIL-STD-1913 rail, starting just ahead of the trigger guard and ending level with the front of the pistol.  Sights are non-adjustable and of the 3-dot type, using white dots.  The barrel of the standard version is 3.5 inches and of the threaded barrel version 4 inches.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The SR9 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR9

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

10, 17

$243

SR9c

9mm Parabellum

0.66 kg

10, 17

$228

SR40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.77 kg

10, 15

$317

SR40c

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.66 kg

10, 15

$307

SR45

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10

$404

SR45s

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10

$405

SR22 (Standard Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.5 kg

10

$88

SR22 (Threaded Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

0.52 kg

10

$93

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SR9c

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

SR40

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

SR40c

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

SR45

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

SR22 (Standard Barrel)

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

6

SR22 (Threaded Barrel)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

 

Ruger SR1911

     Like most such pistols, the SR1911 is basically a modernized M1911.  Specifically, the SR1911 is based on the Colt 1911 Series 70.  Construction is largely of stainless steel using a precision CNC-controlled machining process, with checkered cocobolo grip plates and a serrated backstrap.  The grip plates and fasteners are designed for easy removal and if desired, replacement. The barrel is also stainless steel, with a standard barrel 5 inches long, though other-sized versions are available.  The grip and slide have a low-glare finish. The barrel and bushing are machined out of the same piece of bar-stock, fitting together with very close tolerances.  The barrel is also designed for positive lock-up when firing, which improves accuracy just a hair (in game terms).  The trigger is one of the few parts which not made of steel, instead being made from skeletonized aluminum, and is adjustable for overtravel stop and pull weight, and is said to have a very crisp, light pull. (The other major part that is non-steel is the firing pin, which is made of titanium.) The beavertail is extended and the grip safety has a bump for positive engagement.  The manual safety and slide stop are also extended and oversized, along with the magazine release.  The ejection port is flared and lowered to aid case ejection.  The SR1911 will accept most aftermarket 1911 parts.  The pistol comes with two stainless steel magazines (one 7-round and one 8-round), but virtually any 1911 magazines will function properly with the SR1911.

     The basic model is above, with a 5-inch barrel and chambered for .45 ACP.  The rear sight is a drift-adjustable Novak 3-Dot sight; the front sight is also dovetailed in and adjustable for drift, and completes the 3-Dot triangle.  There is a Commander-sized version of this pistol, which has a 4.25-inch barrel and a slightly smaller gripframe that will only take a 7-round single-stack magazine.  It uses the same sights as the standard-sized SR1911.  The Lightweight Commander version uses an aluminum gripframe with a stainless steel coating that considerably lightens the weapon.  The SR1911 Target uses a hand-fitted bull barrel and fully adjustable target sights, and also has a dovetailed front sight.  The user can remove these sights to expose dovetails that can be used to mount more complex sights.  The grip plates are of G-10 polymer.  The SR1911 Talo Exclusive Commander is the same as the Commander for game purposes, but has a black nitride finish in gloss, black micarta grips, and drift-adjustable tritium 3-dot nights sights.  The Talo Exclusive Standard is likewise the same as the SR1911 Standard, but finished like its smaller Talo Exclusive brother, and mounting the same sights.  It too, is the same as the Standard for game purposes.  The VC Grace Distributer Exclusive is a Lightweight commander with a different finish and accouterments; differences include a polished stainless slide with the legend “Alaska State Troopers 75th Anniversary” on it; and black, rubberized, checkered grips with a charcoal-gray, matte gripframe.  Controls are coated in matte black Cerekote.  At the rear slide, there is a legend that says “X” of 75; only 75 of these exclusive versions of the SR1911 will be produced, and each one is numbered so at the rear of the slide behind the chevron-shaped slide grips.  In addition to these, a version of the Standard is equipped with a bull barrel; other than the barrel, it is the same as the Standard version.

     A version of the SR1911 Lightweight Commander is chambered for 9mm Parabellum; other than the weight and modifications for the new caliber, it is identical to the standard Lightweight Commander. In addition, the grip panels are black rubberized, and the gripframe is finished in charcoal gray.  A compact version of the SR1911 is produced in 9mm and with a 3.6-inch barrel; the gripframe, controls, sights, and chamber are coated in charcoal gray Cerekote.  A Target version of the SR1911 in 9mm Parabellum is produced, virtually identical to the .45 ACP Target version except for the charcoal-gray grip plates, controls, sights, and chamber.  A Talo Distributer Exclusive Lightweight Commander is produced in 9mm; it is the same as the Lightweight Commander in 9mm except for silver G10 grips cut in a chevron-shaped pattern, a gray gripframe, sights and controls, and the marking of “9mm Parabellum” on the exposed part of the bolt.  It also has chevron-shaped cocking grips on the slide, and behind them, the Talo Distributors symbol, laser-etched.

     A version of the Target is available chambered for the 10mm Auto cartridge, it is essentially the same as the .45 Target, but has black rubberized grips, and black controls and sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR1911 Standard

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

7, 8

$408

SR1911 Commander

.45 ACP

1.03 kg

7

$400

SR1911 Lightweight Commander

.45 ACP

0.83 kg

7

$403

SR1911 Target

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

7, 8

$411

SR1911 Bull Barrel

.45 ACP

1.18 kg

7, 8

$409

SR1911 Lightweight Commander

9mm Parabellum

0.83 kg

9

$242

SR1911 Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

7

$236

SR1911 Target

9mm Parabellum

1.19 kg

9

$252

SR1911 Target

10mm Auto

1.15 kg

8

$366

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR1911 Standard (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

SR1911 Commander (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

SR1911 Lightweight Commander (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

SR1911 Target (.45)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

SR1911 Bull Barrel

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

SR1911 Lightweight Commander (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

SR1911 Compact

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

SR1911 Target (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

SR1911 Target (10mm)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

16