Mark Three Vector 22 Shooting System

     Notes: The Vector 22/SS is a 10-round enclosed-cylinder revolver that is capable of firing as a double-action revolver, in semi-automatic mode, or automatic function.  The front half of the weapon is unlocked and pivoted upward, and a loaded cylinder is put into the weapon.  The front half is then swung back down and locked.  The weapon is largely made of injection-molded thermoplastic resins, and looks very much like a box with a pistol grip on the back.  The Vector 22/SS may be sound-suppressed internally, without a protruding silencer. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though a very rare weapon, the Vector 22/SS is one of the plethora of weapons tested by the US military during the Twilight War.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This weapon was never put into production.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mark Three Vector 22/SS

.22 Long Rifle or .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

0.68 kg

10 Cassette

$174

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mark Three Vector 22/SS (.22 Long Rifle)

DAR

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Mark Three Vector 22/SS (.22 Long Rifle)

5

-1

Nil

1

3

7

8

Mark Three Vector 22/SS (.22 Magnum)

DAR

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Mark Three Vector 22/SS (.22 Magnum)

5

1

Nil

1

3

7

6

 

MasterPiece Arms Protector

     Notes: MPA has been known for 20 years for their semiautomatic clones of the Ingram M-10 and M-11 submachineguns; the Protector pistols are their first offerings not based on that platform.  Available in two calibers, the Protector is a small hideaway gun designed for self-defense and backup purposes.  They are in fact quite small, easily fitting in an ankle holster, in the small of the back, or a pocket.  They are also almost totally dehorned, aiding concealed carry and drawing.  Nonetheless, the trigger guard is large for use with gloves, and the barrel is 2.25 inches long despite an overall length of only 4.4 inches.  Despite the short length, the Protector is hammer-fired, with the hammer being slightly recessed to increase safety while keeping the hammer from snagging on anything.  The sights are necessarily small, with a simple trough rear sight and a rounded low blade front sight.  The Protector is not a cheap “Saturday Night Special” type of handgun; manufacturing standards are quite high and the pistols are made from machined 4140 steel (stainless steel for the slide and barrel). The slide grips have an unusual scalloped design which is both attractive and helps ensure a good grip on the narrow slide; due to the small size of the Protector, the grooves extend a third of the way down the slide.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Protector is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MPA-32

.32 ACP

0.31 kg

6

$107

MPA-380

.380 ACP

0.32 kg

6

$126

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MPA-32

SA

1

Nil

0

6

Nil

4

MPA-380

SA

1

Nil

0

6

Nil

5

 

M-15 General Officers’ Pistol

     Notes: This pistol was often issued to US Army generals in place of the standard M-9 or M-1911A1.  It is a basically a compact M-1911A1, cut down in size and rebuilt.  It can be recognized by its dark-blue finish, the inscription “General Officer Model RIA” on the slide, a brass plate on the left grip upon which the owning general’s name is engraved, and the seal of Rock Island Arsenal on the right grip.  The sights on the M-15 are higher than the standard M-1911A1. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-15

.45 ACP

1.02 kg

7

$398

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-15

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

Mitchell Arms Colt-Browning

     Notes: These weapons are based on a few Colt-Browning weapons, most notably the Colt M-1911.  One of these is the Alpha .45; it is basically an M-1911A1 clone with a double-stack magazine, ambidextrous safety, ands gray finish with black plastic grip plates; it also has an interchangeable single-action/double-action trigger system.  The Mitchell Gold .45 is also similar, but has a slightly longer, match-quality barrel and an adjustable micrometer rear sight.  The Mitchell Alpha .44 is basically the same weapon as the Alpha .45, but fires .44 Magnum rounds and has a smaller magazine and slightly longer barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Alpha .45

.45 ACP

1.07 kg

10

$407

Gold .45

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

10

$409

Alpha .44

.44 Magnum

1.25 kg

6

$510

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Alpha .45

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Gold .45

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

Alpha .44

SA

4

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Mitchell Arms High Standard

     Notes: These are based on the old High Standard target pistols.  Mitchell once worked for High Standard and decided to use his knowledge to produce these weapons; however, he later lost a patent-infringement suit brought by High Standard, and had to stop making his High Standard clones.  Before the suit, he made several versions, including the long-barreled Citation II, the Olympic ISU II with a muzzle compensator, the Sharpshooter II with a heavy bull barrel, the heavy Sport King II with a shorter barrel than the Citation II (but still a long barrel), and the short-barreled Victor II.  These pistols are made from stainless steel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Citation II

.22 Long Rifle

1.3 kg

10

$152

Olympic ISU II

.22 Long Rifle

1.3 kg

10

$184

Sharpshooter II

.22 Long Rifle

1.25 kg

10

$137

Sport King II

.22 Long Rifle

1.3 kg

10

$147

Victor II

.22 Long Rifle

1.21 kg

10

$125

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Citation II

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Olympic ISU II

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

10

Sharpshooter II

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Sport King II

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Victor II

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

8

 

NAA Guardian

     Notes: This tiny pocket pistol was popular with civilians for self-defense purposes as well as police officers and government agents for concealed carry and backup purposes.  It is a small weapon with a short grip that can be a problem for large hands and a short range best suited for short-range self-defense.  There are five versions, from the tiny .25 ACP-firing model to the still-small Guardian .380.  In between are models firing .32 ACP and two proprietary cartridges: the .25 NAA, a .32 ACP cartridge necked down to accept a .25 ACP bullet, and the .32 NAA, a .380 ACP cartridge necked down to accept a .32 ACP bullet.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though this weapon was barely in production before the Twilight War started, production continued at a good pace throughout the war and beyond.  The versions firing .25 NAA and .32 NAA do not exist, however.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Guardian

.25 ACP

0.38 kg

6

$82

Guardian

.25 NAA

0.38 kg

6

$87

Guardian

.32 ACP

0.38 kg

6

$106

Guardian

.32 NAA

0.53 kg

6

$113

Guardian

.380 ACP

0.53 kg

6

$129

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Guardian .25

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

Guardian .25 NAA

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

3

Guardian .32

SA

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

4

Guardian .32 NAA

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

Guardian .380

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

5

 

Network Custom Guns 1911

     Notes: This pistol is normally sold as a kit to modify your 1911 to use a new method of operation instead of being a complete pistol.  However, we will treat it here as a complete pistol. It is often referred to as the 1911 Gas Gun.

     Accurizing a 1911 is difficult,  Fortunately, the 1911 is already a weapon with natural pointing features and firm operation, so only those who are looking to wring every bit of performance out of their 1911 need this sort of modification.  For it changes the 1911 from blowback operation to gas retarded operation, and it is not an easy modification to carry out, due to the 1911's tilting barrel.  The modifications also use a fixed barrel. It results in a pistol that pushes the slide a little forward but reciprocates the barrel.  The internal parts are made of an alloy of brass, titanium, and magnesium.  The frame and slide are of stainless steel.  The modifications are too numerous to list here in their full extent, but John Adkins has made a simple drop-in kit (though difficult to implement).  It includes complete modifications to the guide rod, barrel, feed ramp, extractor, and more (and magazines with extra-strong springs are recommended). It tolerates soot and dirt quite well, and is capable of digesting nearly any sort of rounds, including .45 Super rounds..

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

NCG 1911 (5" Barrel)

.45 ACP and .45 Super

1 kg

7, 8

$408

NCG 1911 (6" Barrel)

.45 ACP and .45 Super

1.01 kg

7, 8

$420

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

NCG 1911 (5", .45 ACP)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

NCG 1911 (5", .45 Super)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

1

4

Nil

17

NCG 1911 (6", .45 ACP)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

17

NCG 1911 (6", .45 Super)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

1

3

Nil

21

 

Nighthawk/AAC 1911

     Notes: Built in conjunction with Advanced Armament Corporation, this is a suppressor-ready 1911-type pistol that has a threaded muzzle designed for use by any caliber the AAC 1911 uses. (The suppressor is called the Ti-Rant, and the “Ti” in the name refers to its titanium construction.)  The slide and frame are machined from carbon steel with a proprietary dark blued finish.  The slide has cocking grooves front and back, as well as cuts under the muzzle to help mount the suppressor.  When the suppressor is not mounted, a cap can be screwed on to protect the threads.  The slide has aiming grooves on top as well as a tritium-inlay front sight and an adjustable Heinie Straight-Eight Suppressor sight rear sight, also with tritium inlays. The sights are designed to be high enough to be useful with the suppressor fitted, and the rear sight strong enough that the weapon can be cocked one-handed against a hard surface.  The grip plates are reverse-checkered, and the frontstrap and backstrap are checkered.  The grip panels are of aluminum and designed to be thin. The 5.5-inch barrel is match-quality and stainless steel, with a deep black phosphate finish on it.  The frame is chamfered, with the slide lock cut flush with the slide stop.  The pistol is otherwise dehorned as much as possible.

     The AAC Recon 1911 is very similar to the AAC 1911, but is larger in its barrel and slide; in addition, it has a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.  The 5.8-inch barrel does not have a special coating to it, as does the AAC 1911. Frame size and controls are the same as on the AAC 1911.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AAC 1911

.45 ACP

1.1 kg

8

$414

AAC 1911 w/Silencer

.45 ACP

1.72 kg

8

$602

AAC 1911

9mm Parabellum

1.15 kg

10

$254

AAC 1911 w/Silencer

9mm Parabellum

1.5 kg

10

$362

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AAC 1911 (.45)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

w/Silencer

SA

2

Nil

3

2

Nil

14

AAC 1911 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

w/Silencer

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

12

 

Nighthawk Custom Falcon

     Notes:  The Falcon is made to be a solid, close-tolerance pistol; it is not hand-hade, but it is hand-fitted, and must pass the skilled engineers in Nighthawk Custom’s shop before they are considered suitable for sale.  Originally, the Falcon starts the manufacturing process with a solid steel billet 22.7 x 12.7 cm in size, which is machined down to the proper dimensions.  Once the parts are machined/carved/filed down, the hand-fitting begins.  This includes an extended thumb safety, an internal trigger safety, a beavertail grip, and a grip safety with a bump for positive engagement. A low-profile slide stop is used.  The trigger is hand-fitted and given tight tolerances, and is equivalent to a match trigger pack.  The trigger is aluminum and has three slots cut in it to lighten the trigger.  The slide is for the most part done the same way as other pistols, but instead of serrations, the Falcon has 8-ball cocking cuts which provide secure grips yet give the fingers a bit less wear. Atop the slide in the rear is Heinie Ledge slight which is dovetailed in and has two tritium inlays.  The front slide is a blade, with the blade having 40-lpi serrations to cut glare.  The front of the muzzle and slide are beveled, allowing faster draws and replacing into the holster.  The lower frame and the grip/magazine housing are one-piece. The frontstrap is high-cut as 30 lpi; the backstrap is cut at 20 dpi.  The Falcon can take many grip plates, but standard issue is a G-10 grip with a golfball pattern.  The top of the slide itself has three long ball radius cuts, to cut down glare. The hammer is a loop-type hammer, which is also checkered. The barrel is 5 inches and bushingless; a version with a 4.25-inch barrel also exists, and is called the Commander.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Falcon

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

8

$405

Falcon Commander

.45 ACP

1.12 kg

8

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Falcon

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

Falcon Commander

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Nighthawk Custom GRP

     Notes: The GRP (Global Response Pistol) was reputedly designed by Nighthawk at the request of certain unnamed members of the special operations community, though of course Nighthawk will not disclose who requested the GRP design.  The pistol turned out so well that Nighthawk asked those unnamed special operations units for permission to market the GRP to civilians, which they granted, and the GRP is now available on the general market. 

     The GRP is basically an improved 1911-type pistol.  The improvements start with variants of the Novak Extreme Duty front and rear sights; the rear sight is micrometer-adjustable, and both are dovetailed in and have tritium inlays for night use.  The barrel is heavy and match grade, and the bushing is also match-grade.  Both are hand-fitted, and the chamber is hand-reamed.  The front and rear of the slide have cocking serrations, and the top of the slide has grooves hand-cut into it to reduce glare.  The ejection port is lowered and flared to help ensure that rounds eject properly.  The hammer is skeletonized loop-type Commander hammer.  The grip safety has a hump near the top to allow positive engagement of that safety.  The magazine well is beveled, and the magazine release is extended.  The trigger is one of the few non-steel parts of the GRP, being aluminum, match quality, and adjustable for overtravel and pull.  The slide stop is slightly larger than normal, which also helps the shooter use it quickly and without fumbling; the manual safety is likewise extended.  Most parts of the GRP are hand-fitted, and the fit and finish make the exterior of the GRP look almost seamless.  If you take the GRP in your hand and shake it, it makes virtually no noise whatsoever – there is no play in its parts.

     The finish of the GRP is Matte Black Perma-Kote, while the grip plates are of dark green Linen Micarta.  Nighthawk uses much finer checkering for these grip plates, as well as the frontstrap; many pistols with standard-lpi checkering tend to be abrasive on the hand, especially when chambered for the larger calibers.  In addition, the entire pistol is dehorned as much as possible.  A Nighthawk Recon version exists, which has a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.

     In the Fall of 2006, several weapons magazines carried short articles about a version of the GRP called the “GRP II.”  The GRP II is supposed to be a Commander-sized version of the GRP, with a 4.25-inch instead of the 5-inch barrel of the standard GRP, but otherwise built to the same standards as the GRP.  Unfortunately, I have not heard anything about this iteration outside of a few magazine and Web articles; it does not even appear on Nighthawk Custom’s own site.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The GRP does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

GRP

.45 ACP

1.16 kg

8

$405

GRP II

.45 ACP

1.15 kg

8

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

GRP

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

GRP II

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Nighthawk Custom Falcon

     Notes: A product of Nighthawk Custom’s Special Customization shop, the Falcon begins life as a more-or-less standard 1911, and in fact owners of 1911s can request their pistol be modified into a Falcon.  It was introduced at the 2011 SHOT Show, and went into production shortly before the end of 2011.

     Externally, the Falcon’s steel frame is modified to include a one-piece mainspring/magazine well combination.  This means that the grip safety is more of a relatively-thin layer and does not require much pressure to actuate.  The butt of the magazine well is rounded for comfort while not sacrificing any grip length; the magazine well is also funneled. Only one set of cocking serrations are included (at the rear), but the rear sight is also strong enough to be used as a cocking grip.  Along the sides of the slide and the top of the slide are three ball-cuts to direct the eye towards the sights. The front sight is a fixed blade with a small fiberoptic dot, the rear sight is a Heinie Ledge Sight which is attached to another set of ball-cuts, and has a simple notch for sighting.  The rear sight can be removed or even slid forwards and back along the ball-cuts.  The 5-inch barrel has an extra-thick bushing with a cosmetic crown at the end of the barrel (this is not a target crown).  Barrels are hand-fitted; choices are a Nighthawk Custom Match-Grade Stainless Steel barrel or a Kart Match-Grade Carbon Steel barrel.  Grips, including the frontstrap, have a golf-ball-type G-10 pattern; the backstrap has the same pattern, but only superficially so.  Nighthawk Custom will finish the Falcon, including the grip plates, in Coyote Tan, Black, OD Green, or an OD Green-based camouflage pattern.  To top it off, the Falcon has a short MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Falcon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Falcon

.45 ACP

1.1 kg

7, 8, 9, 10

$411

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Falcon

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

Nighthawk Custom Hi Power

     Notes: This is Nighthawk’s take on the Browning Hi-Power, specifically the FN MK III – it is, in fact, built on a MK III base.  It essentially adds the features that gunsmiths and shooters have been adding for decades, in a like-custom mainstream weapon.  It has a hand-stippled frame, slide, and trigger guard.  The rear sight is a Heinie Slant Pro, with the top of the slide textured to cut down glare; the front sight has a 14-karat gold bead as well.  The back of the rear sight and slightly slanted forward to further cut down glare. Construction is steel, with a Cerekote finish that may be bright or blued (or Satin Black, as Nighthawk Custom says it); the standard grips are textured rubber, but checkered cocobolo grips are also available.  The beavertail is extended to such an extent that it eliminates hammer bite. The thumb safety is ambidextrous and serrated, as are the slide release and magazine release. The magazine well is beveled.  The 4.7-inch barrel is crowned. The hammer is match-quality, the sear lever is improved, and the trigger is also match-quality (and tuned to a 4-pound pull weight). Conspicuous by its absence is the lack of a MIL-STD-1913 rail. It’s heavier than the Browning Hi-Power, but brings so much more to the game.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Hi Power

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

13

$246

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Hi Power

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Nighthawk Custom Lady Hawk

     Notes: As the name suggests, the Lady Hawk is a commander-sized 1911-type pistol designed for use in ladies’ personal defense.  Normally, the slide carries the Lady Hawk name, but at customer request, this can be omitted for male buyers who prefer a smaller self-defense pistol with Nighthawk Custom quality.  It should be noted that in real life, the Lady Hawk is an expensive pistol (one will run you, in real life, about $3000), part of this is the superb fit, finish, and features, but much of this is because you’re paying for a “brand” name product. The Lady Hawk was designed with considerable collaboration with renowned pistolsmith Richard Heinie.

     The Lady Hawk is designed around a 4.25-inch Nighthawk Custom match-grade barrel that is crowned and recessed instead of having a bushing.  The frame is of carbon forged steel, and has a slim profile for smaller hands.  (Optionally, the Lady Hawk can be had with an aluminum alloy frame; for the most part, this does not change the firing characteristics in game terms.)  The backstrap and grip safety as well as the trigger guard are designed to encourage a high grip on the pistol when firing.  The grip plates are also very thin, and made of checkered black aluminum.  The frontstrap is textured with Heinie Signature Scalloping, as it the backstrap.  The slide is likewise of carbon steel, and has Heinie Straight Eight low-profile night sights mounted on it.  The hammer, sear, extended safety, and extended magazine catch are match-quality and are Heinie designs; ambidextrous controls are available as an option.  The standard finish is titanium blue with hard chromed controls, but alternate finished include PermaKote Black, Sniper Gray, OD green, desert tan, hard-chromed, and Diamond (polished) Black. Operation is single-action.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Lady Hawk is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Lady Hawk

9mm Parabellum

1.02 kg

9

$241

Lady Hawk

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.06 kg

9

$315

Lady Hawk

.45 ACP

1.1 kg

9

$400

Lady Hawk (Alloy Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

9

$242

Lady Hawk (Alloy Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.94 kg

9

$317

Lady Hawk (Alloy Frame)

.45 ACP

0.98 kg

9

$403

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Lady Hawk (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Lady Hawk (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Lady Hawk (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Nighthawk Custom Talon

     Notes: The Talon is a 1911 clone which is exceptionally well-made and has a few unusual features.  Most of these are for esthetics or durability, such as the gray baked-on polymer PermaCoat finish, bright silver aluminum trigger (halfway between a medium and short length, and with a light 3.5-pound pull), slide grooves serrated at 25 lpi (with grips front and back), the top of the rear of the slide checkered at 40 lpi (looks good and reduces glare when sighting), front strap and rear strap also checkered at 30 lpi, and fine checkered wood grips with the Nighthawk Custom Talon logo.  The sights are a wide front ramp and a new rear sight from Novak, similar to their LoMount fixed sights but with a U-shaped aperture; and also adjustable for windage.  These sights have tritium inlays, and are dovetailed to allow them to be removed and replaced with other sights if the owner desires.  The wide front ramp along with the narrow rear aperture can present a tight sight picture, which will give a lot of problems to an inexperienced shooter.  Internal parts are largely of stainless steel.  The barrel is either a standard barrel or a match-quality bull barrel; both are target-crowned.  They are also offered with short or full-length guide rods.  The safety/slide stop is ambidextrous and is of Nighthawk Custom’s own design, larger than the switches on most 1911 clones.  The grip safety is of an unusual shape, narrowing at the top and having a light touch.  The magazine release is slightly extended, but not enough to be accidentally activated. 

     The Talon II is a Commander-sized version of the Talon, with a 4.1-inch barrel.  It is a “heavy Commander” style pistol, using a standard-size frame with a short barrel and slide, and heavier-gauge steel than is standard for 1911-type pistols.  It is, in fact, heavier than the Talon by several ounces, helping to tame recoil and barrel climb.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Talon-9 (Standard Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

10

$248

Talon-9 (Bull Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

10

$250

Talon-45 (Standard Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.04 kg

8

$407

Talon-45 (Bull Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.05 kg

8

$409

Talon II-9 (Standard Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

10

$239

Talon II-9 (Bull Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.01 kg

10

$240

Talon II-45 (Standard Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

8

$398

Talon II-45 (Bull Barrel)

.45 ACP

1.12 kg

8

$399

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Talon-9 (Standard Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Talon-9 (Bull Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Talon-45 (Standard Barrel)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Talon-45 (Bull Barrel)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

Talon II-9 (Standard Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Talon II-9 (Bull Barrel)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Talon II-45 (Standard Barrel)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Talon II-45 (Bull Barrel)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Olympic Arms OA-93/96/98 Series 

     Notes: This is an M-16, unbelievably, cut down to a pistol-sized weapon.  The lower receiver is actually an M-16 lower receiver, only slightly modified.  The history behind the family of OA-93 and OA-96 weapons stems from attempts to make a lightweight and handy version of the M-16 and CAR-15.  The OA-93 was the first version of this, introduced in 1993.  The pistol was designed in both a civilian arm (the OA-93OSS) and a law enforcement model (the OA-93).  These saw respectable sales, especially the law enforcement model that garnered some popularity with SWAT units across the United States.  However, these weapons were only useful in some tactical situations; for law enforcement, it is felt that these weapons present too much power in a handheld pistol (thus resulting in over-penetration of a suspect).  The passage of the 1994 Crime Bill did much to hurt the design of this weapon, since the law, which forced it to redesign the OA-93 if they wanted to stay in business, affected its design.  

     The OA-96 has not met with strong sales, as the design changes have led to a different weapon entirely than the previous OA-93.  The 30-round ammunition well is pinned and welded in place, and as such it cannot be detached.  The OA-96 has a button in the rear that opens the upper receiver and can then be loaded via stripper clips.  The original OA-93 has continued to be produced, but in a different configuration, with the biggest change being that of an added forward handgrip.  Several companies overseas which cater to mercenaries have purchased quantities of the new OA-93TG and OA-93 and are offering them for sale to individuals; one particular change is adding the upper receiver if the carbines based upon the OA-93, which was offered for sale to law enforcement personnel.  Some dealers have also added modified upper receivers and burst control groups that turn the OA-93 and OA-93TG into very deadly compact pistols.  With the common use of the vortex muzzle suppresser the weapon’s muzzle blast is greatly reduced and the weapon is easier to control as a result. 

     Twilight 2000: The OA-96 and OA-98 do not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

OA-93

5.56mm NATO

2.08 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$899

OA-93OSS

5.56mm NATO

1.83 kg

30 Clip

$800

OA-93TG

5.56mm NATO

1.83 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$849

OA-93SF

5.56mm NATO

2.08 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$899

OA-93TG FA

5.56mm NATO

1.83 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$849

OA-93TG SF

5.56mm NATO

1.83 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$849

OA-96

5.56mm NATO

1.9 kg

30 Clip

$800

OA-98

5.56mm NATO

1.9 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$849

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

OA-93

SA

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

Nil

12

OA-93OSS

SA

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

11

OA-93TG

SA

2

1-Nil

2

2

Nil

11

OA-93SF

3

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

3

12

OA-93TG FA

5

2

1-Nil

2

3

7

11

OA-93TG SF

3

2

1-Nil

2

3

4

11

OA-96

SA

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

11

OA-98

5

2

1-Nil

2

3

7

11

 

Olympic Arms 1911 Pistols

     Notes: Olympic Arms produces a number of 1911 clones through their Schuetzen Pistol Works.  These 1911 clones have a number of common features: matched frames and slides, hand-fitted and headspaced barrels, ramped and throated chambers, lowered and widened ejection ports, beveled magazine wells, hand-fitted triggers and sears, with the triggers hand-adjusted for length of travel and pull weight, extractors adjusted for reliability, extended manual safeties, widened grip safeties, adjustable rear sights, dovetailed front sights, and full-length guide rods.  All 1911-type pistols can be had in stainless steel, black carbon steel, or what Olympic calls the Deuce configuration (stainless steel frame topped with a black carbon steel slide.

     The Matchmaster 5 is for the most part a classic 1911-type pistol with a 5-inch barrel and smooth walnut grip plates laser-etched with a scorpion icon.  Finish is stainless steel with a matte clear finish.  The standard trigger guard is squared, but a round trigger guard may be requested.  Likewise, the standard frontstrap has finger grooves, but a smooth frontstrap may be had.  The Matchmaster 6 is identical, but uses a 6-inch barrel.  The Big Deuce is finished with a parkerized slide and a bead-blasted stainless steel frame, and has a 6-inch barrel made from 416 stainless steel.  The Big Deuce has double-diamond checkered grip plates of fine-grade walnut or exotic wood.

     The Westerner series differs primarily in the finish of the frame and slide – they are color-case hardened instead of having more standard pistol finishes.  The grip plates are of high-quality plastic, but are ivory-colored and laser-etched with the Olympic Arms seal.  The smallest version is the Constable; this version uses a 4-inch barrel on a full-sized frame with a loop-type hammer, sort of a Commander-type version.  The Westerner is a full-sized 1911, with a loop-type hammer and a 5-inch barrel.  The Trail Boss is essentially the same, but has a 6-inch barrel.

     The two pistols simply called the Short Models are in appearance similar to the Matchmaster series, but smaller.  The finishes are bead-blasted stainless steel, with a squared trigger guard as standard and a rounded one as an option.  The frontstrap has finger grooves.  The grip plates are the same as on the Matchmaster series.  The Cohort has a 4-inch bull barrel on a full-sized frame; the Enforcer uses a compact frame with a bushingless 4-inch bull barrel, and the Triplex Counterwound self-contained recoil spring system.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols are not available in the Twilight 2000 Notes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Matchmaster 5

.45 ACP

1.13 kg

7

$412

Matchmaster 6

.45 ACP

1.25 kg

7

$424

Big Deuce

.45 ACP

1.25 kg

7

$424

Constable

.45 ACP

0.99 kg

7

$402

Westerner

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

7

$412

Trail Boss

.45 ACP

1.22 kg

7

$424

Cohort

.45 ACP

1.02 kg

7

$402

Enforcer

.45 ACP

0.99 kg

6

$401

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Matchmaster 5

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Matchmaster 6

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

18

Big Deuce

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

18

Constable

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Westerner

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Trail Boss

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

18

Cohort

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Enforcer

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

Olympic Arms (Whitney) Wolverine

     Notes: The original design for the Wolverine was a product of the now-defunct Whitney Firearms corporation.  The Wolverine was originally called the Lightning by Whitney, but early in production they decided to change the name of the pistol to the Wolverine.  This name continued until about halfway through the Wolverine production run, after which the Lyman Sight Company decided to press its patent on the Wolverine name for anything firearms-related (they had a scope on the market also named the Wolverine).  The name of the pistol was then changed to the Whitney Auto-Loader.  Production of this pistol began in 1956, but Whitney made only one production run of them, making about 10,000 copies. Whitney Firearms was then sold to the Charles E Lowe Company, who built and sold a few more from existing parts, but they never actually made any.  Sales of these pistols continued until 1963.

     The Whitney versions of the Wolverine were constructed using a light alloy frame/receiver/grip unit; the receiver portion being cylindrical and open at the top.  (Grips plates are of wood.)  The Wolverine had no slide per se, but instead used a sort of cylindrical insert almost like a barrel shroud/receiver insert.  This in of itself led to a rather complicated mechanism with an equally complicated operation, which is sort of a unique subset of blowback operation.  The striker/firing pin was one unit and was not held in place by any sort of spring, but instead held against the breech block by virtue of the fit of the pieces.  And one thing is certain: the Wolverine does have a large amount of pieces, most of them tiny; but when put together, the result is virtually flawless operation.  There is no bolt hold-open device when a magazine is emptied, but there is a magazine safety.  The design of the Wolverine was quite futuristic in looks at the time of its inception, with a raked grip, a ventilated sighting rib atop the pistol, adjustable rear sights, and a generally “space-age” looking design that probably put off a lot of prospective buyers at the time. 

     In 2004, Olympic Arms revived the Wolverine, having bought the design; in this new incarnation, it was known as the Olympic Arms Whitney Wolverine.  The biggest difference between the old Wolverine and the new Wolverine is the construction material: the frame/receiver/grip unit of the new Wolverine is made from polymer instead of light alloy (though the magazine well has an internal light alloy lining).  The appearance is otherwise basically the same, and the parts are largely finished in black or made from black polymer, as the original Wolverines were finished in black.  Unfortunately, on the new Wolverines, the magazines are quite difficult to load to full capacity; generally, somewhere around the 6th or 7th round, you need to insert the takedown tool or a cartridge into a hole in the magazine follower to force it down so you can load the rest of the rounds.  These magazines, when fully-loaded, can also be difficult to seat in the magazine well. 

     Both the old and new Wolverines are unusually-accurate weapons for their short barrel lengths (4.625 inches).  An option on any of the new Wolverine models is a compact, pepperpot-type muzzle brake. Sight pictures on both are excellent, and the sights are also dovetailed into the “slide”; in addition, the new Wolverine has a sight rail atop its “slide.”  Both function with exceptionally with virtually no lubrication.  Both will digest virtually any type of ammunition you throw at them, though they are designed to function best using high-velocity ammunition.  However, you really want to read the instruction manual before disassembly, and don’t lose any of those tiny parts!  Colors for the frame of the new Wolverine ranges from the cool to the tactical to (in one case) the silly – frames can be had with in Black, Desert Tan, Coyote Brown, and Hot Pink.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Wolverine (Old)

.22 Long Rifle

0.65 kg

10

$128

Wolverine (New)

.22 Long Rifle

0.54 kg

10

$128

Wolverine (New, w/Muzzle Brake)

.22 Long Rifle

0.64 kg

10

$178

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Wolverine (Old)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Wolverine (New)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Wolverine (New, w/Muzzle Brake)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

 

Phoenix HP22/25

     Notes: These are tiny pocket pistols.  They are some of the few pocket pistols in these calibers able to reliably load and fire hollow-point bullets.  They are simple blowback pistols of unsophisticated design, but have a sighting rib above the barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HP22

.22 Long Rifle

0.57 kg

10

$83

HP25

.25 ACP

0.57 kg

10

$91

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

HP22

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

5

HP25

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

6

 

Phoenix Raven P-25

     Notes: Originally made by Raven Industries, the P-25 is a small .25-caliber pistol with a barrel of surprising length considering the size of the weapon.  P-25s built by Raven had no magazine safety, but the models produced by Phoenix do.  They may be finished in nickel-plate, blued, or chrome. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Raven P-25

.25 ACP

0.43 kg

6

$96

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Raven P-25

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

7

 

Precision Small Arms PSA-25

     Notes: Precision Small Arms is manufacturer of pocket pistols, primarily centered around its PSA-25 pistol – essentially a modernized Browning Baby-type weapon.  The members of the PSA-25 are all basically identical in design, though individual version vary greatly in finish, materials, and/or other customizations.  All of them use 2.13-inch barrels and are fed by 6-round magazines, firing the same caliber -- .25 ACP.  Most use black polymer grip plates and have simple, non-adjustable, low-profile sights.

     The “representative” version of the PSA-25 is the Traditional Model.  Finishes may be black oxide, blued, or polished blue.  The frame and slide are of light steel alloy, with a barrel made from stainless steel.  In addition to the polymer of the grip plates, the surfaces of the magazine release, safety, and trigger are coated with textured polymer.

     Most of the variants of other variants of the PSA-25 are identical to the Traditional for game purposes.  The Nouveau-Satin Model has a brushed nickel finish, extending to even the controls, transfer bar, and extractor.  The Nouveau-Mirror Model is identical to the Nouveau-Satin Model except that the finish is polished nickel instead of brushed nickel.  The Stainless Steel Model is also identical except for the polished stainless steel finish.  Montreux 18-Karat Model starts with polished stainless steel, and then almost all exposed metal parts are plated with Rose Gold (a mixture of 75% 18-karat Gold, 21% Copper, and 4% Silver); the magazine catch and trigger are not so coated.  Grip plates are of ivory.  The Montreux 24-Karat Model is identical except for the grade of gold used in the Rose Gold mixture.  The Diplomat Model has a polished blue finish for the slide and frame, with grip plates of ivory.  The trigger, the screws for the grip plates, the safety, transfer bar, and magazine catch are plated in 24-karat gold.  The Renaissance Model is a limited-edition model elaborately-engraved by hand (by Angelo Bee, formerly of FN) in a Vine pattern.  Finishes are custom and limited only by imagination, though most have at least the trigger, grip plate screws, magazine catch, and safety are plated in 24-karat gold.  Grip plates are usually of ivory.  The Imperiale Model is of the same bent as the Renaissance, but the engraving is a scroll pattern inlaid with 24-karat gold, and the ivory of the grip plates carry a scrimshaw design of the buyer’s request.

     The Featherweight is somewhat different, using a frame of T6 aircraft aluminum with a matte finish.  The slide is of polished stainless steel.  Controls are polished nickel-plated, while the trigger is plated with 24-karat gold.  Grip plates may be of black polymer or translucent polymer.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PSA-25

.25 ACP

0.27 kg

6

$82

Featherweight

.25 ACP

0.25 kg

6

$82

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PSA-25

SA

-1

Nil

0

5

Nil

3

Featherweight

SA

-1

Nil

0

6

Nil

3