AA Arms AP-9

     Notes: AA Arms was not the actual manufacturer of these weapons; the AP-9 series was actually manufactured by Kimel Industries, but distributed by AA Arms.  They began distributing the AP-9 in the early 1990s and did so until 2001.  The AP-9 looks like a small submachinegun, but has no automatic fire function and is basically a large pistol that looks very much like the Intratec TEC-9.  (It may, in fact, be a TEC-9 by another manufacturer with some cosmetic changes.)  The standard model has a 5-inch barrel; the AP-9 Target started out with a 12-inch barrel (later called the AP-9/12 Target), but this was later reduced to an 11-inch barrel (the AP-9/11 Target); they both have a separate fore-end and a fluted barrel.  The AP-9 Mini/3 has a 3-inch barrel and a lighter frame; the AP-9 Mini/5 has the reduced-weight frame.  These weapons were banned by most states under the Brady Gun Bill and other legislation, even after more cosmetic changes designed to make them “look less threatening,” and the introduction of 10-round magazines.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AP-9

9mm Parabellum

1.59 kg

10, 20

$248

AP-9/12 Target

9mm Parabellum

1.82 kg

10, 20

$319

AP-9/11 Target

9mm Parabellum

1.79 kg

10, 20

$309

AP-9 Mini/3

9mm Parabellum

1.37 kg

10, 20

$227

AP-9 Mini/5

9mm Parabellum

1.43 kg

10, 20

$248

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AP-9

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

AP-9/12 Target

SA

2

2-Nil

2

2

Nil

31

AP-9/11 Target

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

29

AP-9 Mini/3

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

6

AP-9 Mini/5

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

 

Ace Glock Super .45

     Notes: This is similar to the Ace Super .45 below; however, it is based on a Glock 21 instead of an M-1911A1.  As with the Super .45, the Glock Super .45 is cleaned up somewhat and, most importantly, strengthened to handle the increased power of the .45 Super cartridge.  This includes modifications to or replacement of the recoil spring, the chamber, magazine spring, and most critically, the barrel.  Other modifications include a Pearce Glock Grip enhancer and MMC adjustable sights with tritium inlays, and a ported barrel.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ace Glock Super .45

.45 Super

0.79 kg

13

$451

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ace Glock Super .45

SA

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

 

Ace Super .45

     Notes: This is an M-1911A1, cleaned up, accessorized, and strengthened to fire the .45 Super cartridge.  This variant of the .45 ACP is a .45 ACP bullet in a longer case with more powder, and offering more damaging capability and more range than a standard .45 ACP.  This round is somewhat more available than the military.45 HLR and .45 XHLR usable in some military weapons. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ace Super .45

.45 Super

1.25 kg

7

$403

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ace Super .45

SA

3

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

17

 

Action Arms AT-84

     Notes: This is a firearm built on the standard 9mm pattern, with rubber grips and double-action-only action. The weapon can be readily converted from 9mmP to .41AE with the help of a kit.  It is a rather rare weapon, which did not see much sales.  It is a license-produced copy of a Swiss weapon. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-84

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

15

$246

AT-84

.41 Action Express

1.2 kg

15

$338

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-84 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

AT-84 (.41AE)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

Accu-Tek AT-9/AT-40

     Notes: Accu-Tek began making pistols in the late 1980s, producing the AT-series of pistols.  In 2001, the company was acquired by Excel Industries, but the pistols are still sold under the Accu-Tek name.  The AT-9 is a rather chunky-looking compact weapon made from stainless steel and with a double-action-only operation.  The hammer is shrouded and the pistol has no external safety mechanism, relying primarily on its DAO operation.  The barrel is a mere 3 inches in length.

     The AT-40SS was introduced in 1992, and is a .40 Smith & Wesson variant of the AT-9.  It was introduced in 1992, but was short-lived.  A version was produced with a blackened finish (but still made from stainless steel), called the AT-40SSB. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-9

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

7

$144

AT-40SS

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.9 kg

7

$181

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

AT-40SS

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

 

Accu-Tek AT-25SS/AT-32SS/AT-380SS

     Notes: These three related pistols are small-caliber versions of the Accu-Tek AT-series, made from stainless steel.  They all vaguely resemble the Walther TPH and have an extended magazine base to help provide a better hold on the weapon, due to their short grips.  They have a firing pin safety and a magazine safety.  The AT-32SS was the first to appear; this weapon has a satin stainless finish and fires .32 ACP ammunition.  A version with a blackened finish exists (AT-32SSB).  The AT-25SS appeared next in 1991, but comparatively few were made and the weapon stopped production in 2000.  A few of these weapons were made with a light alloy frame, and there was also a version with a blackened finish.  The last, but most popular and varied, was the AT-380; it appeared in 1992, and comes in a version with a standard stainless steel finish, blackened finish, the Lady 380 (also known as the AT-380L) which is basically a more attractive form of the AT-380 with a bright chrome finish and bleached gray oak grip plates, and the AT-380HC (High Capacity).  The AT-380HC started out with a double stack magazine of 12-round capacity, but this was later changed to 10 rounds to comply with the Brady Gun Bill.   The AT-380 II is basically an updated version of the AT-380SS, with a slightly larger magazine, construction largely of 17-4 stainless steel, adjustable rear sight, and a safety which blocks both the firing pin and trigger.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The AT-380 II does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-25SS

.25 ACP

0.33 kg

5

$89

AT-25AF

.25 ACP

0.31 kg

5

$89

AT-32SS

.32 ACP

0.53 kg

5

$112

AT-380SS

.380 ACP

0.57 kg

5

$131

AT-380HC

.380 ACP

0.79 kg

10, 12

$131

AT-380 II

.380 ACP

0.67 kg

6

$132

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-25SS

SA

-1

Nil

0

5

Nil

5

AT-25AF

SA

-1

Nil

0

5

Nil

5

AT-32SS

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

6

AT-380SS

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

AT-380HC

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

AT-380 II

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

 

Accu-Tek BL-380/BL-9

     Notes: These pistols are similar to their AT-series cousins, but are more squared, compact, and snagless in form.  They have no sights, just a sighting groove, and are finished only in black.  They have DAO operation, and the magazines have an optional extension at the bottom to improve grip on the pistol.    The BL-380 came first, in 1997; the BL-9 did not appear until 1997.  The XL-9 is a version of the BL-9 with actual sights that are adjustable and 3-dot in nature, and has a stainless steel finish.  It is identical in game terms to the BL-9.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The BL-9 and XL-9 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BL-380

.380 ACP

0.6 kg

5

$134

BL-9

9mm Parabellum

0.62 kg

5

$142

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BL-380

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

BL-9

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

 

Accu-Tek CP-9SS/CP-40SS/CP-45SS

     Notes: These pistols, introduced in 1992 (except for the CP-45SS, which was introduced in 1995), are further refinements of the AT-series, being a bit longer in the barrel, and though having no external safeties, so have an external side catch.  They also have a firing pin safety.  They are finished only in stainless steel, and optional magazines are available with a finger extension.

      Twilight 2000 Notes: The CP-45SS is very rare.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CP-9SS

9mm Parabellum

0.82 kg

8

$144

CP-40SS

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.82 kg

7

$181

CP-45SS

.45 ACP

0.82 kg

6

$222

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CP-9SS

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

CP-40SS

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

CP-45SS

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Alchemy Arms Spectre

     This pistol bucks the trend of late 20th and early 21st century pistols in that its frame is made of light aluminum alloy instead of polymer.  The slide is normally of stainless steel, but titanium is also available (the Spectre TI).  This makes for a very light pistol that gives up nothing in strength or long-term durability.  The whole pistol looks very much like a metal version of a Glock.  The trigger pull is short and light, even though it is a double-action-only pistol.  The Spectre has a manual safety and a grip safety; the sights are fixed, but large, wide, and easy to acquire.  The Spectre may be had with or without a light rail under the dust cover.  The Spectre has been described as a mechanical masterpiece, simple yet quite different from other pistols.

     The Spectre was introduced in 2000 in .45 ACP with a 4.5-inch barrel, however, by 2002, it had been joined by .40 Smith & Wesson and 9mm Parabellum versions, and by a version in all three calibers with a shorter 4-inch barrel.  It should also be noted that an 18 Dec 07 web search turned up two links to Alchemy Arms’ site; however, one is now owned by a software company, and the other a web host trying to sell the domain name.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Spectre does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Spectre (4.5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

0.94 kg

10

$404

Spectre (4.5” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.94 kg

10

$318

Spectre (4.5” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.94 kg

10

$244

Spectre TI (4.5” Barrel)

.45 ACP

0.86 kg

10

$410

Spectre TI (4.5” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.86 kg

10

$322

Spectre TI (4.5” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

10

$247

Spectre (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

0.93 kg

10

$399

Spectre (4” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.93 kg

10

$313

Spectre (4” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.93 kg

10

$239

Spectre TI (4” Barrel)

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10

$404

Spectre TI (4” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.85 kg

10

$317

Spectre TI (4” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

10

$242

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Spectre (4.5”, .45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Spectre (4.5”, .40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Spectre (4.5” 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Spectre TI (4.5”, .45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Spectre TI (4.5”, .40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Spectre TI (4.5” 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Spectre (4”, .45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Spectre (4”, .40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Spectre (4” 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Spectre TI (4”, .45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Spectre TI (4”, .40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Spectre TI (4” 9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

American Arms CX-22 DA

     Notes: This pistol, introduced in 1989, is a rimfire pistol based loosely on the PPK.  The CX-22 DA has a matte-blued finish, and as its name suggests, double-action operation.  It is a serviceable and reasonably well-made weapon, but the small caliber and short barrel limits its utility.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CX-22 DA

.22 Long Rifle

0.62 kg

10

$112

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CX-22 DA

SA

-1

Nil

0

2

Nil

6

 

American Arms Escort

     Notes: This double-action self-defense weapon was introduced in 1995, but made only in small numbers.  It was built largely of stainless steel, and featured a chamber-loaded indicator, an adjustable rear sight (lateral adjustments only), and a soft polymer wrap-around grip.  It is a very light weapon with a relatively short barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Escort

.380 ACP

0.54 kg

7

$137

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Escort

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

American Arms P-98

     Notes: Introduced in 1989, this pistol is made to resemble a Walther P-38, but fires rimfire ammunition.  The P-98 has a ring-type hammer and the trademark American Arms radial-type hammer-blocking safety on the lift side of the slide.  The weapon also has a magazine safety. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-98

.22 Long Rifle

0.71 kg

8

$129

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-98

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

American Arms PX-22

     Notes: This is similar in concept to the CX-22, but is made to resemble the Walther TPH instead.  The weapon was introduced in 1989, and usually finished blued.  The weapon is even smaller than the CX-22 DA.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PX-22

.22 Long Rifle

0.43 kg

7

$82

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PX-22

SA

-1

Nil

0

3

Nil

5

 

American Arms Spectre

     Notes: Built in Italy and imported to the US by American Arms, the Spectre pistol is basically a cut-down, semiautomatic version of the Spectre submachinegun.  It was a so-called “triple-action” weapon – it could fire in single-action mode, double action mode, or by dropping the hammer by means of a decocking lever.  The Spectre pistol has ambidextrous controls.  The grips are of black nylon and the finish could be blued or nickel.  The front sight is adjustable for height, and the rear sight could be adjusted laterally by sliding it along its dovetail.  Originally, 30-round magazines were supplied with the Spectre pistol, but after the Brady Gun Bill, 10-round magazines only were sold with the weapon. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Spectre

9mm Parabellum

2.04 kg

10, 30

$258

Spectre

.45 ACP

2.68 kg

10, 30

$417

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Spectre (9mm)

SA

2

Nil

1

1

Nil

15

Spectre (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

1

Nil

17

 

American Derringer LM-5

     Notes: Though the design and form of the LM-5 was clearly based upon that of the LM-4 Semmerling (see US Special Purpose Firearms), the LM-5 is much smaller, lighter, chambered for smaller calibers, and is a semiautomatic pistol instead of having the odd operation of the LM-4.  The LM-5 is a tiny backup-type pistol with a length of just over 4 inches and a barrel of just 2.25 inches.  The grip is barely large enough to put one’s hand around.  The LM-5 has metalwork of almost entirely stainless steel, with a finish that may be blued or left in its stainless steel color; however, wooden grips surround the stainless steel frame, with additional thin checkered wood grip plates.  The trigger guard is surprisingly large for such a tiny pistol, since it sweeps forward all the way to the pistol’s muzzle.  American Derringer makes the LM-5 only in very limited quantities, and it is still a very rare weapon. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LM-5

.25 ACP

0.39 kg

5

$84

LM-5

.32 H&R Magnum

0.46 kg

4

$143

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LM-5 (.25)

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

LM-5 (.32)

SA

2

Nil

0

5

Nil

3

 

American Tactical Imports GSG-5P

     Notes: These two pistols are imported exclusively for distribution though ATI, and are .22 Long Rifle semiautomatic versions of the MP-5.  The GSG-5P has a 9-inch barrel and is based on the standard MP-5, while the GSG-5PK has a 4.685-inch barrel and is based on the MP-5K.  In either case, they are designed for even hotloaded .22 Long Rifle rounds, and are recoil-operated and fire from a closed bolt.  Both have no stocks and no provision to attach a stock.  Both have MP-5-type sights, but the GSG-5P also has a short length of MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver.  The GSG-5P has a flash suppressor; the GSG-5PK has no flash suppressor and the muzzle is flush with the end of the handguard, which has a projection underneath to stop errant fingers.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

GSG-5P

.22 Long Rifle

2.67 kg

10, 22

$171

GSG-5PK

.22 Long Rifle

2.36 kg

10

$126

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

GSG-5P

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

16

GSG-5PK

SA

-1

Nil

2

1

Nil

8

 

AutoMag

     Notes:  This pistol was made popular by Clint Eastwood in one of his Dirty Harry series of movies.  It is a huge handgun firing powerful cartridges made especially for it.  The cases for these cartridges, the .44 AMP and .357 AMP (AutoMag Pistol) were made by shortening and necking out 7.62mm NATO cartridges.  The original AutoMags are very valuable today, but the ammunition usually has to be handmade because it is so rare.  The operation of the pistol is similar to that of the M-16 assault rifle.  It is believed that only about 50 original examples of the AutoMag were every made by Harry Sanford’s company; Sanford, the designer of the AutoMag and the ammunition, sold the license as a part of his bankruptcy, and it went through several hands until bought by AMT.  The AutoMag series was then sold to Galena Industries, but then Galena went bankrupt; the status of all former AMT designs is now uncertain.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AutoMag

.44 AMP

1.8 kg

7

$526

AutoMag

.357 AMP

1.5 kg

7

$392

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AutoMag (.44)

SA

4

1-1-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

AutoMag (.357)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

2

3

Nil

14

 

AMT/Galena Automag Series

     Notes: The history of the Automag was an odd one; it is estimated that throughout its history, at least 8 companies had at one time or another had licenses or owned the rights to produce either the original or variants of the original Automag.  AMT and Galena were perhaps the two major producers of Automag variants (though never the original Automag itself).   AMT first produced the Automag II in 1987 and later other variants and semi-variants; however, Galena bought in 1998 the rights to most of the Automag variants (except, again, the original Automag), as well as the rights to use the AMT name on some of its products.  The Galena versions tend to be virtually identical to their former AMT counterparts, except for weight differences and magazine capacities in some cases.

     The AMT Automag II perhaps looked more like a sort of cross between the original Automag and a smaller version of the M-1911A1.  Chambered for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire, the Automag II was available with barrels of 3.375, 4.5, and 6 inches. The Automag II was built almost entirely of stainless steel, except for the grips of black, horizontally-grooved plastic.  Sights are Millet adjustable rear sights and a ramped front sight.  Galena is still making the Automag II, largely without any changes from the AMT version except for a smaller magazine and much heavier weight.  (Both versions shoot the same for game purposes.)   For a few months in 1990, IAI also built the Automag II under contract with AMT, mostly to help AMT make up for lack of production capability to keep up with demand.

     AMT followed this up with the Automag III.  The Automag III was chambered for .30 Carbine or 9mm Winchester Magnum, and used a 6.37-inch barrel.  The .30 Carbine round, despite being rather anemic in power, is designed to operate with quite high chamber pressures, something that would normally require a semiautomatic pistol to be quite heavy if chambered in .30 Carbine.  Larry Grossman overcame this with a highly-modified Browning operating system.  The AutoMag III is still one of the longest and heaviest of the AutoMag series.  The 9mm Winchester Magnum chambering is a very rare chambering of the Automag III, as it was built only for a very short time in 1992, and was never really popular with the public.  The rear sight is a variant of the Millet adjustable sight of the Automag II, but the front sight is a blade.

     The Automag IV is (externally) quite similar to the Automag III, but was, for most of its history, chambered for the .45 Winchester Magnum cartridge.  Introduced in 1990 as the Auto Javelina Hunter in 10mm Colt (not to be confused with the Javelina version of the Hardballer), the name was quickly changed within a couple of months.  The .45 Winchester Magnum chambering version appeared at the beginning of 1991.  In 1992, a version in 10mm Magnum was also introduced.  “Longslide” versions of all three chambering appeared in 1994.  Standard barrels are 6.5 inches; Longslides have 8.6-inch barrels. Sights are the same as those of the Automag III. Since 1997, the Automag IV has been available only in .45 Winchester Magnum with a 6.5-inch barrel, and it is still being built by Galena.

     The Automag V was an extremely rare, limited-production run of the Automag chambered for the .50 Action Express cartridge.  It was introduced in 1993, and produced at a slow rate until early 1995.  Production has never been picked up again, by AMT or anyone else.  Unlike other of the AMT/Galena Automags, the Automag V was available in several finishes depending upon the wishes of the buyer.  Barrel length was 6.5 inches, and the sights were similar to the Millet sights of the other AMT/Galena Automags, though with a rear sight calibrated specifically for the .50 Action Express round.

     Galena introduced two versions of the Automag of their own, the Automag 440 and the Accelerator.  Both are chambered for .440 Cor-Bon cartridge, and were introduced in 2000.  The Automag 440 has a 7.5-inch barrel and is built only to special orders; it generally has a matte black finish externally over its stainless steel, but other finishes can be had to order.  The grip plates are of fine walnut and are finely checkered, along with the frontstrap and backstrap.  The Accelerator is built partially on a 1911 frame and has a stainless steel finish with a 7-inch barrel.  Magazine capacity is also larger.  Both have adjustable Millet-type sights.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: None of the Galena versions exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline (indeed, Galena Industries does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline), which also means that the Automag 440 and the Accelerator also do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AMT Automag II (3.375” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

0.77 kg

8

$155

AMT Automag II (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

0.83 kg

8

$166

AMT Automag II (6” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

0.91 kg

8

$182

Galena Automag II (3.375” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

0.91 kg

7

$155

Galena Automag II (4.5” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

0.98 kg

7

$166

Galena Automag II (6” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum

1.07 kg

7

$182

AMT Automag III

.30 Carbine

1.21 kg

8

$306

AMT Automag III

9mm Winchester Magnum

1.3 kg

8

$354

AMT Automag IV

10mm Colt

1.18 kg

7

$377

AMT Automag IV Longslide

10mm Colt

1.21 kg

7

$397

AMT Automag IV

10mm Magnum

1.29 kg

7

$453

AMT Automag IV Longslide

10mm Magnum

1.32 kg

7

$473

AMT Automag IV

.45 Winchester Magnum

1.3 kg

7

$531

AMT Automag IV Longslide

.45 Winchester Magnum

1.33 kg

7

$551

AMT Automag V

.50 Action Express

1.3 kg

5

$670

Automag 440

.440 Cor-Bon

1.3 kg

5

$526

Accelerator

.440 Cor-Bon

1.3 kg

7

$521

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AMT Automag (3.375”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

4

AMT Automag (4.5”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

AMT Automag (6”)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

AMT Automag III (.30)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

AMT Automag III (9mm)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

1

2

Nil

15

AMT Automag IV (10mm Colt)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

AMT Automag IV Longslide (10mm Colt)

SA

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

21

AMT Automag IV (10mm Magnum)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

2

3

Nil

17

AMT Automag IV Longslide (10mm Magnum)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

2

4

Nil

22

AMT Automag IV (.45)

SA

4

1-1-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

AMT Automag IV Longslide (.45)

SA

4

1-1-Nil

2

4

Nil

25

AMT Automag V

SA

5

1-2-Nil

2

4

Nil

20

Automag 440

SA

4

1-2-Nil

2

4

Nil

20

Accelerator

SA

4

1-2-Nil

2

4

Nil

19

 

AMT Back Up

     Notes: As the name would suggest, this is a small pistol designed for concealment and backup purposes.  It was introduced in 1976 chambered for .380 ACP, made entirely of stainless steel and fairly heavy for a small backup weapon.  It had no safety catch, but did have an automatic firing pin safety.  This weapon was produced by Ordnance Manufacturing Company; after AMT took over the design, a safety catch was introduced, as well as a grip safety.  This model was known as the Back Up II, and also came chambered for .22 Long Rifle, 9mm Parabellum, .38 Super, .40 Smith & Wesson, and .45 ACP.  The original Back Up is often referred to as the Small-Frame Back Up, and it is a physically smaller weapon with a 2.5-inch barrel.  The Back Up II (and the later Back Up versions) are often called the Large-Frame Back Ups; they use 3-inch barrels and are heavier weapons.

     In 1992, a new AMT Back Up was introduced; this weapon was a double-action-only (DAO) pistol with a 6-round capacity, and is also called the Back-Up DAO.  The safeties were removed except for the automatic firing pin safety, relying on the DAO design instead.  In 1994, a .45 ACP version of this weapon was introduced, followed by several other calibers, and finally the .357 SiG and .400 CorBon in 1998.  This new AMT Back Up is otherwise, for game purposes, essentially the same as the Back Up II.

     The Back Up design was the only AMT pistol not sold to Galena Industries, and so is the only one still in active production by AMT.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The .357 SiG and .400 CorBon models does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Back Up

.380 ACP

0.51 kg

5

$128

Back Up II

.22 Long Rifle

0.41 kg

8

$83

Back Up II

.380 ACP

0.52 kg

6

$134

Back Up II

9mm Parabellum

0.54 kg

6

$142

Back Up II

.357 SiG

0.57 kg

6

$155

Back Up II

.38 Super

0.58 kg

6

$160

Back Up II

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.62 kg

6

$179

Back Up II

.400 Cor-Bon

0.63 kg

5

$184

Back Up II

.45 ACP

0.7 kg

5

$221

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Back Up

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

5

Back Up II (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

5

Back Up II (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Back Up II (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

Back Up II (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Back Up II (.38)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Back Up II (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Back Up II (.400)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Back Up II (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

 

AMT Hardballer Series

     Notes: The AMT Hardballer is a stainless steel version of the standard US .45 automatic. The Hardballer is an exceptionally well-made weapon, but still essentially for the most part a 1911 clone.  Other than the stainless steel construction, other differences from a standard 1911 include a longer grip safety and larger manual safety, a chamber-loaded indicator, and a beveled magazine well.  The finish is matte stainless steel.  When a longer-barreled version of the Hardballer with a 7-inch barrel was introduced, the name of the standard Hardballer was changed to the “Hardballer Government,” or simply the “Government.”  Alert readers may remember the Longslide version as that Arnold Schwarzenegger carried in the movie Terminator. 

     Another, far rarer version, was produced between 1980 and 1984; it is called the Skipper and is basically a compact version of the Hardballer, with a 4-inch barrel.  A version of the Skipper called the Combat Skipper, with an alloy frame, was also built, but proved to be much less popular.  Between 1989 and 1992, the Javelina was produced; it is basically a Hardballer Longslide firing 10mm Colt instead of .45 ACP, and it too was not very successful.  The Commando, basically a Hardballer re-chambered for .40 Smith & Wesson, was introduced in 1997, and later produced by Galena from 2000-02.  AMT’s Accelerator was also based on the Hardballer Longslide; it was chambered for .400 Cor-Bon, and was the last version of the Hardballer that AMT produced itself; it did, however, serve as a model for Galena’s Accelerator (see above).

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Some 70,000 of these pistols (virtually all of them standard Hardballers) were taken into federal service to help alleviate the shortage of standard service pistols such as the M-9 and M-1911A1.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Hardballer

.45 ACP

1.08 kg

7

$407

Hardballer Longslide

.45 ACP

1.16 kg

7

$427

Skipper

.45 ACP

1.07 kg

7

$397

Combat Skipper

.45 ACP

1.02 kg

7

$399

Javelina

10mm Colt

1.33 kg

8

$382

Commando

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.02 kg

8

$321

Accelerator

.400 Cor-Bon

1.28 kg

7

$352

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Hardballer

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Hardballer Longslide

SA

2

2-Nil

2

4

Nil

20

Skipper

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Combat Skipper

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Javelina

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

17

Commando

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Accelerator

SA

3

1-2-Nil

1

3

Nil

21

 

AMT Lightning

     Notes: This was AMT’s entry into the small-caliber pistol market.  It was a single-action pistol that looked very much like the Ruger Mk II (the frame is in fact a modified Ruger Mk II target frame), and had various barrel lengths, with the 5-inch barrel being a bull barrel as standard, and the other barrel lengths available with bull barrels or tapered barrels.  Other features include a trigger adjustable for pull weight and length, and a Millet-type micrometer-adjustable rear sight (with a high blade front sight atop a ramp).  Construction is largely of stainless steel (including the finish), with wrap-around black rubber grips which are checkered on the sides.  AMT produced the standard version of the Lightning between 1984-87.

     Variants include the Lightning Bullseye (produced only in 1986), which had 6.5-inch bull barrel with a ventilated sighting rib atop the barrel, a modified rear sight to clear the rib, and mounts on the rib for scope rings.  The Lightning Bullseye also used anatomical wooden grips instead of rubber grips.  The Baby Automag (not actually related to the other Automags) is a rare variant of the Lightning, with only 1000 produced in 1986.  The Baby Lightning used an 8.5-inch bull barrel, is chambered for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire, and has checkered rubber grip plates with a checkered frontstrap and rearstrap, but is otherwise the same as the Lightning Bullseye.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Lightning (5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.21 kg

10

$132

Lightning (6.5” Tapered Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.28 kg

10

$146

Lightning (6.5” Bull Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.29 kg

10

$148

Lightning (8.5” Tapered Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.39 kg

10

$169

Lightning (8.5” Bull Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.4 kg

10

$167

Lightning (10.5” Tapered Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.48 kg

10

$188

Lightning (10.5” Bull Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.49 kg

10

$191

Lightning (12.5” Tapered Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.56 kg

10

$209

Lightning (12.5” Bull Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

1.57 kg

10

$212

Lightning Bullseye

.22 Long Rifle

1.43 kg

10

$150

Baby Automag

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

1.59 kg

10

$213

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Lightning (5”)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Lightning (6.5” Bull)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Lightning (6.5” Tapered)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

Lightning (8.5” Bull)

SA

1

Nil

1

1

Nil

17

Lightning (8.5” Tapered)

SA

1

Nil

1

1

Nil

16

Lightning (10.5” Bull)

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

20

Lightning (10.5” Tapered)

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

19

Lightning (12.5” Bull)

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

24

Lightning (12.5” Tapered)

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

23

Lightning Bullseye

SA

-1

Nil

1

1

Nil

13

Baby Automag

SA

1

Nil

1

1

Nil

17

 

AMT On Duty

     Notes: This was a new concept in AMT pistols, designed by police for police.  It is a double-action only (DAO) pistol with a combined safety catch/uncocking lever.  It is finished in matte black, and has three-dot sights.  It was first offered in 1991, in 9mm and .40 caliber, but in 1994 a .45 ACP version was added.  It is a fairly lightweight weapon, but not too light, as to cut a compromise between portability and recoil dampening.  The last On Duty was produced in 1996.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

On Duty

9mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

15

$244

On Duty

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.03 kg

11

$318

On Duty

.45 ACP

1.17 kg

9

$404

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

On Duty (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

On Duty (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

On Duty (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Armalite AR-24

     Notes: I almost put the AR-24 in International Pistols; this is because the AR-24 is largely constructed by Sarsilmaz in Turkey, with only final fitting and customizing being done in the US.  However, since the AR-24 is built and distributed only by Armalite in the US, I have decided to include it there.  Armalite has has precious little recent experience at manufacturing pistols, and therefore asked Sarsilmaz to finalize their design and manufacture and assemble the parts.

     Externally, the AR-24 resembles a CZ-75, though internally it is quite different, and externally there are enough differences that one will mistake it for a CZ-75 only at first glance.  Operation is DA, using a short recoil and locked breech design that is borrowed from older Browning designs and brought up to date.  Safeties are numerous, including a half-cock hammer safety, a manual safety, a passive firing pin safety, and a magazine safety.  The frame is of polymer with a steel sub-frame (with forged steel frames being an option), and a barrel and slide of CNC machined forgings.  The grip panels are of black, checkered wood with a palm swell.  There is no grip safety, though a long beavertail is present (mostly to protect the thumb webbing from hammer bite).  Grip angle is virtually the same as that of the M-1911A1, complete with natural pointing qualities.  Front and backstraps are both checkered.  Finish is typically manganese phosphate with an additional coating of thin heat-cured epoxy.  AR-24’s are by no means dehorned; in fact, one complaint by many shooters is the number of sharp edges that can snag holsters and clothing.  The trigger guard is large enough to allow the use of heavy gloves.  Sights are of the 3-dot adjustable type, with luminous dots being an option.  Two sizes exist: the Commander-sized standard AR-24, and the compact AR-24K.  The standard AR-24 uses a 4.89-inch barrel, while the AR-24K uses a 3.89-inch barrel.  AR-24K magazines are shorter, and also have an extended baseplate to allow a good grip on the weapon.

     Currently, the AR-24 is chambered only in 9mm Parabellum, though Armalite says a .45 ACP version is planned, along with a .40 Smith & Wesson model.  These extra chamberings are presented in the stats below, just for completeness\, though they will probably not appear until mid-2008.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The AR-24 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AR-24 (Polymer Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.89 kg

15

$247

AR-24 (Steel Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.99 kg

15

$247

AR-24 (Polymer Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.02 kg

12

$321

AR-24 (Steel Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.14 kg

12

$320

AR-24 (Polymer Frame)

.45 ACP

1.16 kg

10

$408

AR-24 (Steel Frame)

.45 ACP

1.3 kg

10

$406

AR-24K (Polymer Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.85 kg

13

$237

AR-24K (Steel Frame)

9mm Parabellum

0.95 kg

13

$236

AR-24K (Polymer Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.98 kg

10

$311

AR-24K (Steel Frame)

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.09 kg

10

$310

AR-24K (Polymer Frame)

.45 ACP

1.12 kg

8

$397

AR-24K (Steel Frame)

.45 ACP

1.25 kg

8

$396

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AR-24 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

AR-24 (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

AR-24 (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

AR-24K (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

AR-24K (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

AR-24K (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

Arminex Trifire

     Notes: This is basically a modernized M-1911A1, retaining all the features of that weapon except the grip safety, but with those features tweaked a bit to provide maximum efficiency.  In addition, the Trifire is available in 9mm Parabellum and .38 Super in addition to the standard .45 ACP cartridge.  Though obtained by some US special operations personnel and police SRT members, the Trifire was primarily a curio in the civilian market. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon was never produced.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Trifire

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

9

$249

Trifire

.38 Super

1.14 kg

9

$276

Trifire

.45 ACP

1.44 kg

7

$409

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Trifire (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Trifire (.38)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Trifire (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

 

ASP Model 39 Custom 

     Notes: This is a special custom-made cut down S&W 39 for use as a concealed firearm.  Perhaps 500 of these weapons were produced.  The stock S&W 39 was shortened by a little less than 20mm, a Guttersnipe sight was added for easy aiming, the front of the trigger guard was re-shaped into a hook (for a finger to hold on to), and all sharp edges were smoothed.  In addition, the sides of the magazine well were replaced with clear inserts.  (Magazines designed for the ASP also have clear sides.)  This way, the user can easily determine the number of rounds in the magazine.

     Merc 2000 Notes: In some Third World countries, ownership of an ASP M-39 Custom could be quite a status symbol.  The story would go that the owner took it from a CIA or DIA agent who was sent to kill him, there was a violent struggle…etc.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

ASP M-39 Custom

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

7

$231

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

ASP Model 39 Custom

SA

1

Nil

0

3

Nil

7

 

Autauga (Welsch) 32

     Notes:  The Welsch 32 is a subcompact Autauga Arms pistol introduced in 1996, and described by one author as a “.25-sized .32 pistol.”  It is a simple “Saturday Night Special” type of small pistol, for personal defense or backup purposes.  It has been built as simple as possible, with straight double-action-only operation and no manual or grip safeties, and no slide catch or facility to hold the slide open when the weapon is empty.  It can even be fired with a round in the chamber and no magazine in the weapon, as it has no magazine safety.  The little pistol is, surprisingly, made from stainless steel however, but has a mere 2-inch barrel.  Sights are rudimentary and fixed.  Though introduced as the Welsch 32, from 1998 it was marketed by Autauga Arms as simply the Autauga 32.

     In 1999, an improved version of the Autauga 32 was introduced, the Autauga Mk II.  It is quite similar to the Autauga 32, but does have a manual safety, and better (though still fixed) sights.  The barrel is lengthened to 2.25 inches.  The grip is shaped a bit differently and is more ergonomic (though still rather small).  The grip is also slightly lengthened, allowing for an increase in magazine size.  Most importantly, the Mk II has been dehorned as much as possible, with rounded edges (even the sights are rounded). 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The original pistol will still be called the Welsch 32 in the Twilight 2000 timeline, but it is a rather rare weapon.  The Mk II does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Welsch/Autauga 32

.32 ACP

0.32 kg

6

$104

Autauga Mk II

.32 ACP

0.38 kg

7

$107

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Welsch/Autauga 32

SA

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

3

Autauga Mk II

SA

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

4

 

Auto-Ordnance/Kahr Thompson Custom 1911

     Notes: Designed by Auto-Ordnance and built by Kahr, the Thompson Custom 1911 is, as it sounds, a variant of the M-1911 series.  Auto-Ordnance built some M-1911A1s during World War 2, so they had some experience at it, but not the facilities to build it.  Kahr was interested in making a .45 ACP pistol, but not the experience to do so and get it to the market quickly.  The Thompson Custom 1911 uses hand-fitted and finished parts, and the fit of these parts is rock-solid with no play in them, with the exception of the triggers.  Trigger pull is also somewhat heavy, and is described by one author has having a “gritty” takeup.  This makes them less tolerant to dirt, but also increases pistol integrity and strength.  There are two variants of this pistol: one with a stainless steel frame and one with an aluminum alloy frame.  The stainless steel frame is finished in natural metal, while the aluminum alloy frame is anodized with a flat black finish.  Both have stainless steel slides finished in natural metal.  The beavertail is extended, as is the grip safety.  Engraving of trademarks and symbols is done by laser, and are very crisp.  The ejection port enlarged and flared, as is common with many 1911-type pistols these days; this increases reliability of case ejection and extraction.  The front and rear sights are an Auto-Ordnance design and are dovetailed so that they may be changed is the user desires.  This also allows slight adjustments for drift.  The grip plates are of wood, with a checkered finished in an attractive pattern.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Thompson Stainless Custom 1911

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

7

$407

Thompson Aluminum Custom 1911

.45 ACP

0.88 kg

7

$409

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Thompson Stainless Custom 1911

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Thompson Aluminum Custom 1911

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

 

Auto-Ordnance Competition

     Notes: This is a heavy-caliber pistol designed for competition and target shooting.  It was first introduced in 1993 in Germany at the IWA arms fair.  The Competition looks like an M-1911A1 with some special features; these features include a muzzle compensator, a Commander hammer (i.e., a bobbed loop-type), enlarged controls, a Videcki Speed trigger (very sensitive), and a magazine with an extended finger rest.  The magazine well is also beveled for quick reloads, and beavertail is extended.  The barrel is only slightly longer than a standard M-1911A1 barrel, but it is a match-quality barrel.  Though the Competition is designed for match shooting, it could be quite an efficient man-killer also.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Manufactured Competitions are rare, but similar weapons could, and often were, made by gunsmiths all over the globe.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Competition

.45 ACP

1.26 kg

7

$459

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Competition

SA

2

2-Nil

2

2

Nil

15

 

Auto-Ordnance General

     Notes: This compact pistol is the same size as the Colt Commander, and comes in both .45 ACP and .38 Super versions.  It is finished in virtually the same manner as modern military pistols, and has the same safety features as the Commander and M-1911A1. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Again, this is one of the weapons issued as a “substitute standard” to US troops during the Twilight War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

General

.45 ACP

1.05 kg

7

$404

General

.38 Super

0.89 kg

9

$280

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

General (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

General (.38)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Auto-Ordnance TA-5

     Notes: It is debatable as to whether this weapon should be called a pistol – the TA-5 is, in fact, a modern version of the M-1927A1 Thompson SMG which cannot take a stock.  Though it might be called a stockless carbine, in the US it is for legal purposes a pistol, which is why I have put it here.  The TA-5 otherwise has most of the specifications of the M-1927A1 – steel construction, a walnut fore-end (and optionally, a foregrip), a 10.5-inch barrel with cooling fins for about 2/3 of its length, the same sights, and the ability to take any Thompson-type magazine (including the silly 10-round drum version of the 50-round drum that was required under the Assault Weapons Act if you wanted to use a drum magazine). 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is a very rare weapon in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

TA-5

.45 ACP

2.68 kg

10, 10 Drum, 20, 30, 50 Drum, 100 Drum

$462

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

TA-5

SA

2

2-Nil

4

2

Nil

32

 

Auto-Ordnance World War II

     Notes: This is basically a virtually exact copy of the M-1911A1 as issued during the Second World War, including the dull anodized finish and the legend “Model M1911A1 US Army” engraved on the left side of the slide.  Though built with modern manufacturing methods, it is for all intents and purposes an M-1911A1.  This pistol is also known as the “GI.”

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This pistol is one of those weapons issued as a “substitute standard” during the Twilight War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

World War II

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

7

$407

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

World War II

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Auto-Ordnance ZG-51 Pit Bull

     Notes: Long a producer of M-1911A1 clones that are so close to the original as to be virtually identical (except for the markings), one of Auto-Ordnance’s other products is the ZG-51 Pit Bull.  The Pit Bull is basically a subcompact M-1911A1, with a 3.5-inch cone-type barrel.  It looks very much like a smaller version of the Colt Commander or Officers’ Model .45, but it has ergonomic grips, a beveled magazine well, and fixed sights designed for the shorter sighting radius and range.  The frame is still a standard-sized frame.  The Pit Bull was introduced in 1989, but in the early-1990s was also chambered for the .41 Action Express round (a variant which, by comparison, did not sell nearly as well).  The first of these pistols were introduced as simply the “ZG-51,” but renamed the “Pit Bull” in 1994.  The Pit Bull line added compensated versions in 1998, but in the early 2000s, the Pit Bull line was discontinued.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Factory-produced compensated versions do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Pit Bull

.41 Action Express

0.93 kg

8

$323

Pit Bull

.45 ACP

1.02 kg

7

$392

Pit Bull Compensated

.41 Action Express

0.99 kg

8

$373

Pit Bull Compensated

.45 ACP

1.09 kg

7

$442

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Pit Bull (.41)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Pit Bull (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Pit Bull Compensated (.41)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Pit Bull Compensated (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

9