Ruby

     Notes: Actually designed by the Basques, these people saw that the French and Spanish would need a small automatic pistol for use in World War 1.  From 1915-1918, they produced some 700,000 Ruby Pistols.  The problem with the Ruby was not the pistol itself; the problem was that many of the Ruby pistols were produced in some 39 cottage-industry shops, and the parts of these Ruby pistols were in most cases not interchangeable.  The French need a lot of small arms fast, and therefore were in no position to argue.  These particular versions of the Ruby also ranged in quality from top-notch to horrible. 

     However, most Ruby pistols were in fact produced by the Spanish firm of Gabilondo in Eibar.  These were essentially mass-produced and did have interchangeable parts, and functioned quite well (with the exception of their rather weak cartridge).  The Ruby is essentially a simplified form of the FN M-1903, in order to cut costs and production time, but the simplifications did not appear to hurt the performance of the Ruby.

     The Ruby served on until the 1930s; though some were passed on to the Foreign Legion, the Legion appeared to prefer the Mle 1892 revolver as their sidearm.  It should be noted that “Ruby” was more a generic term for this pistol than a specific name; they were in fact known by a variety of names, though they were identical in construction.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ruby

.32 ACP

1.33 kg

7

$175

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ruby

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

 

SPS DC Custom IPSC Open Class

     Notes: SPS DC Custom is a company that normally makes match pistols, and the DC IPSC Open Class is no exception.  It is a “race gun,” designed for competitions where one is doing a lot of firing on the move or from short halts.  The DC IPSC Open Class has a match barrel, long muzzle brake, and may be bought with a rail for optics or with a C-More red dot sight.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

IPSC Open Class

9mm Parabellum

1.3 kg

21, 26

$450

IPSC Open Class

9x21mm

1.3 kg

21, 26

$467

IPSC Open Class

9mm Steyr

1.3 kg

21, 26

$484

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

IPSC Open Class (9mm Para)

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

13

IPSC Open Class (9x21mm)

SA

2

Nil

2

1

Nil

15

IPSC Open Class (9mm Steyr)

SA

2

1-Nil

2

1

Nil

14

 

SPC DC Custom Standard Plus

     Notes: This basically a “normal” sort of pistol built to precision standards.  Its hallmark is the magazines; normal internal magazines are of course available, but large-capacity extended magazines are also available for the pistol.  The Custom Standard Plus normally is equipped with a Bo-Mar micrometer sight (a rail for optics is optional).  The grip plates are of a composite material and available in a rainbow of colors.  The slide and frame is chromed, and has cocking grooves on the front and rear of the slide.  The trigger is skeletonized and has an adjustable trigger stop.  The safety is ambidextrous and extended, and the grip safety is extended into the beavertail.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Standard Plus

9mm Parabellum

1.14 kg

12, 15, 17, 21, 26

$250

Standard Plus

.38 Super

1.14 kg

12, 15, 17, 21, 26

$286

Standard Plus

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.14 kg

12, 15, 17, 21, 26

$324

Standard Plus

.45 ACP

1.14 kg

12, 15, 17, 21, 26

$410

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Standard Plus (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Standard Plus (.38)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Standard Plus (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

14

Standard Plus (.45)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

Star 1 (1919)

     Notes: Also named the Model 1919 after the year of introduction, this pistol is usually called the Model 1 since it was the first weapon that Star produced.  The frame is similar to the M-1911, but the slide is more reminiscent of the Beretta series of the time.  The safety mechanism is a bit complicated and can be difficult for armorers to work with, but field stripping is not normally a problem.  The Militar version was designed for the Spanish Army (one of a plethora of weapons they were using at the time), and is larger and chambered only for 9mm Largo.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star 1

.25 ACP

0.68 kg

8

$136

Star 1

.32 ACP

0.8 kg

8

$183

Star 1

.380 ACP

0.89 kg

8

$221

Star 1 Militar

9mm Largo

1.1 kg

8

$281

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star 1 (.25)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Star 1 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Star 1 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Star 1 Militar

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

Star 28

     Notes: The Star Model 28 was the first of what Star called the Super 9 series – pistols of modern design and high quality, manufactured using up-to-date methods and materials and designed for military, police, and civilian use.  The Super 9 series, in fact, uses the CZ-75 design as a base (and by extension, the HP-35 Hi-Power), though it does not externally resemble the CZ-75 very much.  Most parts of the Super 9 series are interchangeable, though as one goes further down the design road, this becomes less true.

     The Model 28, however, uses a mechanism very similar to that of the CZ-75, being a double-action pistol with numerous safety features and modern controls.  The hammer mechanism and lockwork, however, is derived from the Tokarev and the SiG P-210.  The slide-mounted manual safety not only retracts the firing pin too far for it to strike any ammunition that may be in the chamber; the engaged safety also physically blocks the hammer from making contact with the firing pin, even if the hammer falls.  Unfortunately, this safety has to be pushed upwards to the fire position, and back down to engage the safety; studies have shown that a human being naturally associates a downwards position with firing – and therefore, the Star 28’s safety is “backwards” from an ergonomic standpoint.  (To be fair, many pistols have this problem.)  The manual safety does not affect the ability of the slide to move, nor does it prevent the trigger from being pulled not the hammer from falling.  This facilitates dry fire training, though Star subsequently discovered that dry-firing a Model 28 bad for the mechanism, and Star officially discouraged dry firing the Model 28.  The Star 28 also has a passive magazine safety, but even a shooter with a minimum of skills can remove it; the Star 28 also has a slide lock.  During the testing by the Spanish Army, it was also discovered that the Star 28 was very intolerant of low-quality ammunition – and this intolerance of bad ammo would plague the Super 9 series later down the road.

     The Star 28 was originally designed in response to a Spanish Army requirement for a new service pistol (the Model 28 submitted to Spanish military tests was slightly modified and called the Model 28DA).  It lost this competition, but was then quickly placed on the civilian market, where it also did not sell in large numbers.  The base Model 28 uses a 4.33-inch barrel and virtually all-steel construction, except for a few things like the checkered plastic grip plates.  Despite the short production run (ending late in 1984), the Star 28 had two variants – the Model 28P, with a 3.86-inch barrel, and the Model 28PK, which used a light alloy frame, but had the same dimensions as the Model 28P.

     The Model 30 improved upon the Model 38, and also fixed a number of problems and just plain strange features of the Model 28.  The extractor was improved, becoming an external extractor seen as a short bar on the right side of the frame below the ejection port.  The extractor also projects out from the frame when a round is in the chamber, therefore serving as a chamber-loaded indicator.  The trigger pull became a bit lighter and smoother, the sights a bit better (with the rear sight becoming adjustable), and the slide-mounted safety became a bit easier to move.  The barrel of the Star 30 also grew to 4.69 inches. The front of the trigger guard was reshaped to allow the use of a steadying finger from the nonfiring hand. 

     The Model 30 came in two versions.  The Model 30M, designed for the Spanish Army and Air Force (adopted by the Spanish military in 1989) and some Guardia Civil units, is made almost entirely of steel; the Star 30M is no longer an issue Spanish military weapon, but still sees some Spanish police use, is also still used by Peruvian police, and is also a popular civilian pistol in some places.  The Model 30PK was designed primarily for use by Spanish police, but was conversely also used by some Spanish military personnel.  The Model PK uses a light alloy frame and a shorter 4-inch barrel.  Both versions of the Model 30 were sold on the civilian market, and usually called the Starfire when sold to civilians.  (Just to make this more confusing, Model 30s sold on the civilians may or may not be marked with the name “Starfire” – and just to confuse things even more, the Model 31 was also sold on the civilian market and called the Starfire…)

     The Model 31 constituted a major modification/improvement of the Model 30.  Mechanical differences include a change to an ambidextrous (though still slide-mounted) safety lever which is also extended (though still “backwards” in operation).  The manual safety also adds a third selector position, which decocks the pistol.  The extractor was once again modified; the Model 31’s extractor uses a shorter external bar with a smaller amount of rotation; the extractor springs are also beefed up (and are, in fact, the same springs as used on the Firestar).  Barrel length is reduced (making the Model 31 a mid-sized pistol), but the barrel is heavy and of better-quality construction; it is also coned, which simplifies locking.  Trigger pull is further lightened and smoothed, and the sights have also been further improved over those on the Model 30.  Other changes include a change to stronger checkered polymer grip plates and a generally more ergonomic and partially-dehorned exterior.  Though designed for Spanish military and police use, the Model 31 found its greatest sales in the Americas as a civilian pistol called the Starfire (and see the Model 30 entry above).

     In general, there are two variants of the Model 31: the standard-sized Model 31M (also called the Model 31P) with a steel frame and 3.9-inch barrel, and the Model 31PK, which is essentially the same as the Model 31M, but with a light alloy frame.  In addition, the Model 31M also comes in a version chambered for the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge.  Introduced in 1990, the .40 Smith & Wesson chambering had the same problem as many of the early pistol chambered for that cartridge – reliability – as many early adopters of the .40 Smith & Wesson underestimated the chamber pressures that the cartridge generated.  As a result, the Model 31M in that chambering did not enjoy a large production run.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star 28

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

10, 15

$241

Star 28P

9mm Parabellum

1.06 kg

10, 15

$236

Star 28PK

9mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

10, 15

$237

Star 30M

9mm Parabellum

1.14 kg

10, 15

$245

Star 30PK

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

10, 15

$239

Star 31M

9mm Parabellum

1.13 kg

15

$237

Star 31M

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.22 kg

11

$310

Star 31PK

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

15

$238

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star 28

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Star 28P

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Star 28PK

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Star 30M

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Star 30PK

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Star 31M (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Star 31M (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

12

Star 31PK (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

Star 1911

     Notes: As might be guessed by the name, this is Star’s version of the M-1911.  There are two versions, the full-sized PL and the compact PLC.  The pistols basically look like M-1911s, but have a flared grip to provide a finger rest, and have polymer frames that house high-capacity magazines.  They have no grip safety, but do have the large beavertail common to M-1911s, but do have the other M-1911-type safeties.  These pistols were introduced in 1999.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols do not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star 1911 PL

.45 ACP

1 kg

14

$407

Star 1911 PLC

.45 ACP

0.8 kg

10

$399

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star 1911 PL

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Star 1911 PLC

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

 

Star A

     Notes: Though the Spanish Army officially adopted the Astra 400 in 1921 as its standard service pistol (at that time), a lot of troops, especially officers and senior NCOs as well as the Guardia Civil (Paramilitary Security Force) did not like the Astra 400, feeling it was simply too big and complicated.  They preferred the Star Model A, which was essentially a Colt M-1911 rechambered for the 9mm Largo cartridge.  The Guardia Civil adopted the Model A in 1922 as its own service weapon, and many senior military troops and police also used the Model A instead of the Astra 400. 

     As with the M-1911, the Model A uses a 5-inch barrel and has essentially the same shape and natural pointing qualities of the M-1911.  (The designers did, in essence, start with an M-1911 and then put in features and modifications to externally and, to a lesser extent, internally differentiate it from the M-1911.) The Model A initially had no grip safety, but one was added in 1924.  The shape of the hammer differs from that of the M-1911, being quite a bit smaller, and the beavertail is also much smaller.  The Model A’s trigger mechanism is also somewhat different, and the Model A uses an external extractor instead of an internal one.  Unfortunately, the Model A used rather tiny sights (as was common with many Spanish pistols of that time period), making aiming problematic, and acquiring a quick sight picture virtually impossible.

     In 1946, several other changes and features were introduced.  A chamber-loaded indicator was added, and a special disassembly catch was also devised that made stripping and reassembly far easier than before (easier than even the M-1911A1).  This version was called the Super A, and it remained in production until 1989 – but still did not outlast the Model A in production: Model A production lasted into the mid-1990s.  The Super A is identical to the Model A for game purposes.

     Though almost all Model A’s and Super A’s were chambered for 9mm Largo, a few other chamberings were also produced.  These alternate chamberings are quite rare.

     The Model B was a slightly-later development of the Model A.  The Model B resembles the Model A (and still looks very much like an M-1911). Differences between the Model B and A (and M-1911) include a larger hammer spur (though several types of hammer styles may be encountered), a somewhat larger beavertail (though still without a grip safety), and a slightly humped backstrap.  The barrel is slightly shorter at 4.8 inches, but heavier steel and more solid construction makes the Model B much heavier than its Model A counterparts.  As the Model B chambers 9mm Parabellum, the grip is noticeably slimmer than that of the M-1911 (as is the Model A’s grip).  It has a longer grip tang than the Model A, and the backstrap is checkered. Production of the basic Model B began somewhere from 1926 to 1933 (the exact date is in dispute by firearms experts), and lasted until 1984.  Large numbers were used on both sides during the Spanish Civil War, and some 35,000 were also used by the Nazis during World War 2.  Due to their association/subjugation by the Nazis during World War 2, the Model b was also used by Bulgaria, Croatia, and Hungary. An unusual user of the Model B was the Royal Navy during World War 2, though where they got them is not exactly clear. West German police used the Model B for some time after World War 2, hand-me-downs from the Nazis. An unknown number (several thousand at the least) were also used by the British during World War 2 and slightly beyond.  The South Africans used the Model B as a substitute standard sidearm for their police and military forces for several decades.  The Model B was, however, most popular on the civilian market of the US, Central South America, and Africa.

     The most common Model B variant is the Super B.  Built from 1946-83, the Super B has several internal changes from the Model B, the most important of which is the replacement of the swinging under-barrel link the Model B uses for locking and unlocking the breech with a simpler fixed cam.  The Super B also adds a chamber-loaded indicator, and 3-dot-type sights that are a little larger than that of the standard Model B (the Model B has the same tiny sights of the Model A).  Stripping and reassembly have also been made easier.  Primary customers for the Super B were civilians.  The Super B is identical to the Model B for game purposes.  Though the Spanish Army did not take the Model B, they were quite impressed with the Super B and adopted as a standard sidearm in 1947.

     The Model BM a compact version of the Model B, using a 4-inch barrel on a full-sized Model B frame.  The Model BKM is essentially the same pistol as the BM, but with a lighter alloy frame.  The BS is a “Commander”-sized version with a 4.25-inch barrel, built using lightweight steel; the BKS (also known as the Starlight) is the BS’s alloy-frame counterpart.  All four of these were introduced around 1970, with production terminating in the early 1980s.  The Model C, introduced in 1928, is a Model B chambered for the 9mm Browning Long cartridge.  None of these weapons pistols saw any official military use, but police in Spain, Portugal, and South America used some of them, and they were popular among civilians.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star A

9mm Largo

0.62 kg

8

$283

Star A

.30 Mauser

0.53 kg

8

$204

Star A

9mm Parabellum

0.59 kg

8

$248

Star A

.45 ACP

0.78 kg

7

$407

Star B

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

8

$246

Star BM

9mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

8

$238

Star BKM

9mm Parabellum

0.73 kg

8

$239

Star BS

9mm Parabellum

0.71 kg

8

$240

Star BKS

9mm Parabellum

0.57 kg

8

$241

Star C

9mm Browning Long

1.1 kg

8

$256

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star A (9mm Largo)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

13

Star A (.30)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

Star A (9mm Parabellum)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

Star A (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

14

Star B

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Star BM

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Star BKM

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Star BS

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

Star BKS

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

Star C

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Star DKL

     Notes: This pocket pistol is based on a greatly scaled down M-1911A1 frame.  Internally, it uses a complicated action that is not normally used in a light pistol of a small caliber; however, this makes it a robust weapon that is not prone to jamming by dirt or mechanical failure.  Unfortunately, the small size and weight of the DKL lead to high muzzle blast and recoil. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star DKL

.380 ACP

0.42 kg

6

$136

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star DKL

SA

1

Nil

0

5

Nil

8

 

Star F

     Notes: This is a rimfire plinking, recreational and self-defense pistol, originally introduced in 1932 as the Model FTB.  The frame is based on the Colt M-1911, and the controls are the same, though the Model F has a bare barrel.  The Model FTB was not renamed to Model F until 1946; the barrel was also severely chopped at this time.  The Model F Target is the same weapon with a longer barrel, while the Model F Sport has a shorter barrel (but longer than that of the standard Model F).  These pistols were produced until 1972.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star FTB

.22 Long Rifle

0.78 kg

10

$155

Star F

.22 Long Rifle

0.69 kg

10

$122

Star F Target

.22 Long Rifle

0.78 kg

10

$151

Star F Sport

.22 Long Rifle

0.75 kg

10

$139

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star FTB

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

Star F

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Star F Target

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Star F Sport

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

Star Firestar

     Notes: These are a Spanish line of small backup pistols.  They are among the smallest in their calibers.  They use a Colt-Browning action, and have ambidextrous safety catches and a firing pin safety to prevent accidental discharges when dropped or bumped.  They can also be carried half-cocked to provide a measure of safety yet a quick response if the trigger is pulled.  This weapon, like all Star pistols, was a common export, especially to the US and South America. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Firestar M-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.86 kg

6

$183

Firestar M-43

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

7, 8

$146

Firestar M-45

.45 ACP

1.03 kg

6

$230

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Firestar M-40

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Firestar M-43

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Firestar M-45

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

Star Firestar Plus M-243

     Notes: This is a compact version of the Firestar M-43 that incorporates a surprisingly large magazine despite its small dimensions.  The frame is made from light alloy and the mechanism is the same as the standard Firestar.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Firestar Plus

9mm Parabellum

0.7 kg

13

$144

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Firestar Plus

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

 

Star Max 8800

     Notes: This is a compact double-action pistol introduced in 2000 for self-defense.  The frame is light alloy, the slide steel (usually in a stainless-steel or chrome finish, but blued is also available), and the Max 8800 has an ambidextrous safety/decocker, an automatic firing pin safety, and a half-cock position for the hammer.  The rear sight is adjustable, but only laterally. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Max 8800

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

13

$234

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Max 8800

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

 

Star MD

     Notes:  This is basically a Model B that has been converted into a selective-fire machine pistol.  There are slots on the rear of the butt for a stock, and extended magazines are available.  About 8000 were built in Spain and exported to Central and South America in various calibers; Thailand also built them under license before World War 2.  Later, Star pistols similar to the Model B were also converted.  The automatic rate of fire, like most such weapons, is close to uncontrollable.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star MD

9mm Parabellum

0.7 kg

8, 16, 25

$246

Star MD

9mm Largo

0.7 kg

8, 16, 25

$281

Star MD

.38 Super

0.7 kg

8, 16, 25

$282

Star MD

.45 ACP

0.7 kg

8, 16, 25

$402

Shoulder Stock

NA

0.5 kg

NA

$25

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MD (9mm Parabellum)

10

1

Nil

1

3

16

12

MD (9mm Parabellum, Stock)

10

1

Nil

3

2

19

16

MD (9mm Largo)

10

2

Nil

1

3

16

11

MD (9mm Largo, Stock)

10

2

Nil

3

2

10

15

MD (.38)

10

2

1-Nil

1

3

16

13

MD (.38, Stock)

10

2

1-Nil

3

2

10

18

MD (.45)

10

2

Nil

1

3

17

14

MD (.45, Stock)

10

2

Nil

3

2

11

17

 

Star Megastar

     Notes: Introduced in 1992, the Megastar follows the Model 30 series and the Firestar series in that all three of them are progressively more-modified and improved versions of the CZ-75.  However, these Star pistols have also increasingly diverged from their CZ-75 base – virtually no Megastar parts will interchange with the CZ-75 or even the Model 30 and Firestar series.  Despite the initial popularity of the Megastar, sales fell off rapidly – many experts say that the sheer weight of the Megastar killed it, despite its technical excellence.  Even more likely was the world glut of various pistols; in 1997, this killed Star itself as an independent manufacturer.

     The Megastar is not just large – it is described by some shooters as being huge for a conventional pistol design, weighing in at nearly four pounds when loaded and being nearly 8.5 inches long in total.  Construction is for the most of not just steel, but heavy, high-strength steel, and the grip is large (too large for some shooters) in order for that heavy, high strength steel frame to house large-capacity magazines holding powerful ammunition.  (These magazines, by the way, are regarded as being some of the easiest of all pistol magazines to load, yet function reliably even when left fully loaded and sitting around for years.)  The high weight of the Megastar also makes firing these cartridges far more comfortable, serving to hold down felt recoil and muzzle jump.

     Operation of the Megastar is by recoil, with a double-action trigger mechanism.  The slide lock also functions as a decocker, and is mounted on the left side below the slide and above the trigger, easily accessible by the thumb of a right-handed shooter; though it is a bit of an awkward move, this sliding switch can also be operated by the trigger finger of a lefty.  The manual safety switch is slide-mounted and ambidextrous, though its location towards the rear of the slide does not make it useful for one-handed operation.  The manual safety has three positions: safe, in which the hammer locks if it is decocked and the firing pin retracts so that it cannot reach any chambered ammunition, and is locked in that retracted position; fully safe, in which the above actions occur, plus the decocking mechanism is engaged and the hammer falls and locks; and the fire position.  (The hammer itself is a grooved loop-type.)  The Megastar also has a passive inertial firing pin safety as well as a magazine safety.  The magazine release also allows the magazine to fall free out of the grip – on many Star pistols, the magazine release only pops the magazine out to allow the shooter to remove it (and with some Star pistols, most notably the Firestar, the magazine pops out only a fraction of an inch, making removal rather difficult and time-consuming). 

     Most of the Megastar is dehorned, and balanced to make it comfortable to hold and fire despite the weight of the Megastar.  The sights are low-profile combat sights similar to the popular Novak Lo-Mount sights, and also use a 3-dot configuration with the dots being luminous.  The front sight is dovetailed, primarily to allow coarse windage adjustments, and the rear sight uses a wide notch.  The sights therefore are sell-suited to rapid target acquisition both by day and in low-light conditions.  The grip generally uses checkered plastic grip plates with a checkered backstrap and frontstrap; stippled rubber grip plates are also available, along with a wrap-around neoprene ergonomic grip.  The front of the trigger guard is squared and checkered for those who like to use a finger of the nonfiring hand to help steady their grip when shooting.  Construction quality is excellent.  The trigger mechanism does have a lot of slack (easily adjusted by a gunsmith), but pull weight is surprisingly light in both double-action and the single-action follow-up shots.  Barrel length is 4.6 inches.  Finish in either case is covered by a touch, clear corrosion-resistant coating, but can be matte blued, polished blue (both of which are actually variants of a black phosphate finish), or in a type of finish called Starvel by Star (a medium-matte brushed chrome). 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Megastar is a very rare weapon in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Megastar

10mm Colt

1.35 kg

14

$358

Megastar

.45 ACP

1.32 kg

12

$403

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Megastar (10mm)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Megastar (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

 

Star PD

     Notes: This pistol was designed to provide a high-powered weapon in a small package.  It appears to be a scaled-down M-1911A1, but has no grip safety.  The rear sight is fully adjustable.  The light weight and short barrel can make the PD difficult to fire, but it is not considered by most an unpleasant experience.  The PD is used mostly by undercover police forces. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star PD

.45 ACP

0.71 kg

6

$231

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star PD

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

 

Star Super A/B/M/P

     Notes: This was the standard service pistol of the Spanish military during most of the 1980s, but was replaced by the Star 30M starting in 1988.  The Super B’s were then handed off to lower-echelon and reserve forces as well as the police.  Externally, the Super B resembles the M-1911A1, but internally, is more akin to the Browning Hi-Power, and it has no grip safety.  The Super A, Super M, and Super P are similar, but fire 9mm Largo, .38 Super, and .45 ACP respectively.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Late in the Twilight War, they were pulled back from storage to arm new recruits and civilian militia forces. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star Super A

9mm Largo

1.07 kg

8

$281

Star Super B

9mm Parabellum

1.07 kg

8

$249

Star Super M

.38 Super

1.07 kg

8

$282

Star Super P

.45 ACP

1.07 kg

8

$402

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Super A

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

Super B

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Super M

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

Super P

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Star Ten

     Notes: This pistol was introduced in 1990, and is a double-action weapon designed for the 10mm Colt cartridge.  It has a steel frame and slide, with wooden or plastic grip plates.  The standard barrel is 4.5 inches, but this may be easily replaced (no special skills) with a 5.5-inch barrel that is ported.  A muzzle brake may also be attached (again, with no special skills required).  Despite the large magazine capacity, the grip is relatively small, due to extra thin grip plates.  The rear sight is a special combat sight that, while resembling the Novak, is a Star design. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star Ten (4.5” Barrel)

10mm Colt

1.23 kg

14

$358

Star Ten (5.5” Barrel)

10mm Colt

1.25 kg

14

$392

Star Ten (5.5” Barrel with Brake)

10mm Colt

1.39 kg

14

$567

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star Ten (4.5”)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Star Ten (5.5”)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

2

Nil

13

Star Ten (5.5” w/Brake)

SA

2

1-Nil

2

1

Nil

13

 

Star Ultrastar M-205

     Notes: This is a compact pistol that (for Star) makes the transition to a polymer-frame design with steel guide rails molded in and steel reinforcement bars in strategic places.  The polymer frame also permits an ergonomic design.  It can be fired in single or double action modes, but otherwise uses the basic Browning-type operation common to most Star pistols.  The main control is mounted just below the slide; it functions as a combination manual safety/decocker, and is ambidextrous.  The magazine release is not ambidextrous, but the side it is on can easily be switched by the user.  There is no magazine safety, but a firing pin safety is used that prevents the Ultrastar from being fired until positive pressure is applied to the trigger.  The conical muzzle formerly used by Star is gone, replaced by parts in the locking areas which have very high tolerances. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ultrastar

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

9

$248

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ultrastar

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

Star 105 Compact

     This is a compact version of the Star 30M pistol listed above.  Unlike the Star 30M, the Star 105 is recoil operated, and the weapon is 10% likely to jam if the person firing it does not have the strength to control the recoil of a single shot.  This weapon was designed and marketed to law enforcement agencies that needed a concealable weapon. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Star 105

9mm Parabellum

0.81 kg

9

$147

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Star 105

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8