Heckler & Koch HK4

     Notes: This is a simple double-action pistol for use by untrained personnel or by those requiring a small, concealable weapon.  It is one of the simplest pistols made, easy to use and maintain, even by those just beginning with firearms.  Alex Seidel, the designer of the HK4, was a former Mauser employee before World War 2, and the HK4 does share some features of another of his designs, the HSc. The HK4 was primarily a civilian pistol, though some use was made by police forces and (it is rumored) clandestine agencies or various governments.

     The HK4 was one of the first modular firearms designs; changes between calibers can be made simply by replacing the barrel, recoil spring, and magazine.  (In addition, the firing of .22 Long Rifle rounds requires the removal of a breech plate from the slide.)  Early models of the HK4 also required replacement of the extractor, but the need for this was quickly eliminated.  Barrels are marked with the caliber, and this is visible when the slide is forward through the ejection port. The frame is of light aluminum alloy, while the side is of steel.  The trigger is double-action, and only the hammer spur is exposed (just enough to thumb-cock it).  The safety is a simple thumb slide safety that blocks the firing pin; the HK4 also has a magazine safety and a disconnector safety.  The HK4 has a slide lock for when the magazine is empty; when a fresh magazine is inserted, the slide lock is removed by a trigger pull.  Like most European pistols of this time period, the magazine release is at the base of the grip.  Barrel length is 3.3 inches.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HK4

.22 Long Rifle

0.52 kg

8

$86

HK4

.25 ACP

0.52 kg

8

$95

HK4

.32 ACP

0.52 kg

8

$118

HK4

.380 ACP

0.52 kg

7

$138

Rechambering Kit

NA

0.68 kg

NA

$136

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

HK4 (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

HK4 (.25)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

HK4 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

HK4 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

 

Heckler & Koch Mk 23 OHWS

     Notes: The OHWS (Offensive Handgun Weapon System) replaced the Mk 22 Hush Puppy as the US armed forces' handgun for special operations units.  It is a match-grade .45 ACP weapon able to provide considerable accuracy at a reasonable cost.  When suppressed, the weapon is only as loud as a .22 pistol.  Sound can be further suppressed by operating in the single action mode, so the slide does not cycle.  The frame has a bracket ahead of the trigger guard for attachment of a small light or laser aiming module. (This is included in the cost of the weapon listed below.)   On top of the pistol is a mount that can take a telescopic sight.  Though initially designed at the request of US special operations forces, the Mk 23 has gradually been adopted in small numbers by special ops units in NATO, Israel, Australia, and South Korea. 

     It should be noted that despite the rugged construction and state-of-the-art design, the Mk 23 isn’t very popular among its users.  This is because, despite it’s excellent design, the Mk 23 is a rather heavy and bulky pistol, especially when combined with it’s custom-built silencer.  Rumors abound that it is becoming more common in US SOCOM units, the operators are using modified Heckler & Koch USP pistols in .45 ACP instead, along with lighter and more compact silencers made by a variety of US contractors.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Due to shortages, some special ops units are using a variety of other silenced weapons. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mk 23 Mod 0

.45 ACP, .45 HLR. .45 XHLR

1.1 kg

12

$715

Mk 23 Mod 0 with Silencer

.45 ACP

1.59 kg

12

$879

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk 23 Mod 0 (.45ACP)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

17

Mk 23 Mod 0 (.45ACP, Silenced)

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

14

Mk 23 Mod 0 (.45HLR)

SA

3

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

19

Mk 23 Mod 0 (.45XHLR)

SA

4

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

20

 

Heckler & Koch P7

     Notes: H&K’s P7 series started with an experimental design called the PSP.  The PSP quickly proved to be an excellent weapon in trials by the West German police, and was in fact sold as the PSP from 1975 until 1984; with some minor ergonomic changes. The PSP became the P7M8 in 1985.  (The PSP and P7M* are identical for game purposes.)  The P7M8 was bought in large numbers by the West German police in the late 1970s and was made their standard service handgun in 1980.  The next large-scale customer was the Hellenic (Greek) Air Force, and sales of the P7M8 and its variants then took off; many sales were made to civilians, and a very few to military forces, but far more were made to police forces worldwide.

     The P7M8 has a “squeeze-cocking” mechanism that is perhaps its “signature feature.”  The squeeze-cocking mechanism allows the P7 to be drawn, cocked, and fired with one motion, yet prevents it from firing if dropped or bumped.  Squeeze-cocking starts with a variant of a double-action mechanism.  The front of the grip has a sort of lever that the shooter pulls back by squeezing his fist.  This requires about 20 pounds of force, but since the shooter is using his whole hand to actuate the squeeze-cocking mechanism, it’s not as difficult as it sounds.  Once the mechanism is actuated, only a tiny amount of force is required to keep the squeeze-cocking mechanism actuated (which also allows the squeeze-cocker to act as a grip safety).  When the squeeze-cocker is released, the hammer automatically decocks.  The squeeze-cocking mechanism, by itself, makes the P7 series very safe weapons.  The extractor doubles as a chamber-loaded indicator.  Though the P7 has no conventional decocker, it is also possible to decock the P7 by keeping the squeeze-cocker depressed, pulling back the slide a fraction of an inch, and returning it forward; the hammer will decock as the slide moves forward.  There are otherwise no manual safeties on the P7.  The downside of squeeze-cocking is added complexity, manufacturing costs, and a rather wide grip that hampers shooters with small hands.  The magazine well of the P7 is well-angled (more so than the grip angle itself); this is necessary to fit the squeeze cocker into the grip, but has the incidental effect of making the P7 slightly quicker to reload.  Like many European pistols (until the last 20 years or so), the P7M8 uses a heel-mounted magazine release.  The P7M8 uses a barrel 4.1 inches long; sights are fixed and of the 3-dot type.

     The first variant of the P7M8 was the increased-capacity P7M13; it’s identical to the P7M8 except for its ability to use a double-stack magazine, the enlargement of the lower frame necessary to accommodate that double-stack magazine, and a magazine release relocated to a place behind the trigger guard and made ambidextrous.  The P7M13 was introduced in 1984 as H&K’s entry into the US military’s competition for its new service pistol; though it lost that competition, the P7M13 was well received by police forces worldwide.  The P7M13 also has a very rare variant: the P7M13 Compensator, with an extended 5-inch barrel that is equipped with muzzle porting.  Another minor variant of the P7M13 was built specifically for the Mexican military; the Mexicans insisted on having a manual safety, and promised a 3000-pistol order if H&K would include one for them.  H&K obliged, placing the manual safety as a sliding switch on the right side of the frame above the trigger, and Mexico bought the 3000 resulting P7M13 variant.  Yet another minor variant is the P7M13SD, a version with an extended barrel threaded for use with a silencer.

     The next variant of the P7 to be attempted was the ill-fated P7M45 (also known as the P7M7).  The P7M45 was appropriately modified to fire the .45 ACP cartridge.  However, the gas-cylinder breech locking delay system used by the P7 quickly proved to be inadequate to the chamber pressures generated by the .45 ACP round.  This led to the addition of an oil-dampened recoil suppressor to further slow the opening of the breech.  The P7M45 was a pistol that was easy to shoot due to the incidental reduced felt recoil, but the whole firing mechanism had become incredibly complex, prone to failure, and expensive to produce.  Despite over two years of work to make the P7M45 work, H&K finally had to admit defeat and give up on the idea, after an unknown, but small number of prototypes were built.

     Next came the P7K3.  This little brother of the P7M8 is chambered for smaller cartridges, and due to the lesser power of these cartridges, the P7K3 is able to use a far less complicated operating mechanism based on simple blowback.  The P7K3 is also capable of easily accepting a kit that allows the firing of .22 Long Rifle cartridges.  The P7K3 uses a shorter 3.8-inch barrel.

     The newest member of the P7 series is the P7M10, introduced in 1993 and designed for the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge.  The design changes for the firing of the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge included a rather heavy, blocky-looking, and unattractive slide profile.  Many Heckler & Koch technicians did in fact know that this heavy slide was actually unnecessary, and most of the prototypes in fact had the traditional, sleek-profile P7 slide.  Those techs were overruled at the insistence of other H&K technicians that the traditional P7 slide would never hold up to long-term use.  The slide may be heavier and stronger, but the results seem to have contributed to the P7M10’s lukewarm sales.

     A rare variant of the P7 is the P7A13.  This was one of the pistols that Heckler & Koch sent to the US to compete for the new  9mm combat pistol competition, and though many of the testing soldiers and technicians still contend that the P7A13 was the best of the tested pistols.  Nonetheless, the P7A13 was rejected for reasons that were not publicly revealed.  The P7A13 is essentially the same as the P7M13, but has different grip plates that the Pentagon claimed were more ergonomic.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P7M10 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PSP/P7M8

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

8

$237

P7M13

9mm Parabellum

0.79 kg

13

$239

P7M13 Compensator

9mm Parabellum

0.89 kg

13

$273

P7M45

.45 ACP

1.11 kg

8

$398

P7K3

.22 Long Rifle

0.53 kg

8

$117

P7K3

.25 ACP

0.57 kg

8

$135

P7K3

.32 ACP

0.66 kg

8

$181

P7K3

.380 ACP

0.75 kg

8

$220

P7M10

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.11 kg

10

$312

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PSP/P7M8/P7M13

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P7M13 Compensator

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

P7M45

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P7K3 (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

P7K3 (.25)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

P7K3 (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P7K3 (.380)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P7M10

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

 

Heckler & Koch P9

     Notes: This weapon was designed to provide a pistol that would wear slowly, yet not be complicated or difficult to maintain or use.  It loads and operates in a similar manner to the HK4, but the slide stop must be actively depressed to make the slide go forward after inserting a magazine; this, while making for a safe pistol, does require a decent measure of dexterity and practice if you want to be able to do it quickly.  The P9S quickly acquired a reputation for reliability and accuracy under even very adverse conditions.  Its buyers include Germany’s Saarland State Police (sort of a local version of the FBI), GSG-9, the Sudanese Army and the US Navy SEALs (for whom H&K made a special version noted below).  It’s also popular among various police forces around the world and civilians; versions built for 7.65mm Parabellum, since it is a rare caliber for the P9S, are even considered semi-collectors’ items and will command a rather high real-world price.

     The P9S’s firing mechanism is based on a modified delayed-blowback system, and (unusually for a handgun) also uses roller-locking, like most of Heckler & Koch’s semiautomatic and automatic longarms.  The trigger mechanism is double-action.  As is usual for most H&K firearms, the P9S is extremely well-built, but the P9S is considered by many to be above even H&K’s high standards.  Construction is largely of steel, but the steel used is strong, light, and of high quality, and as much as possible, not machined.  The grip is of wrap-around plastic with checkered sides and finger grooves on the frontstrap.  The trigger guard is shaped for a supporting finger – including crescent shaping and even checkering.  This trigger guard is widely regarded as the P9S’s only serious design flaw, as it can result in snagging when drawn and also spoils the otherwise sleek lines of the P9S.  (Just an aside: I quite frankly don’t really care what a weapon looks like, as long as it does its job.)  The P9S uses a totally-shrouded hammer.  On the left side of the slide is a manual safety; if the weapon is cocked, a cocking indicator protrudes from the rear of the slide, since one cannot simply look at the hammer to see if the P9S is cocked.  On the left of the frame behind the trigger is a decocker, and the magazine release is at the heel.  Barrel length is 4 inches.

     Most P9S’s were made to fire 9mm Parabellum; however, a version firing .45 ACP was made for the US market from 1977-80, and a model firing .22 Long Rifle was also made, primarily for the European market.  The P9S Sport (called the P9S Competition in Europe) used an extended 5.5-inch barrel, a muzzle counterweight, and a modified slide that neatly covers the longer barrel as well as concealing the counterweights.  The P9S Sport was also available with optional ergonomic walnut grips.  The P9S Target is essentially the same as a standard P9S (for game purposes), but is fitted with a fully adjustable rear sight.  Production of the P9S series stopped in 1984.

     In the 1980s, the US Navy SEAL’s Mk 22 Mod 0 silenced weapons were becoming excessively worn, and they were looking for a short-term replacement until the OHWS competition was resolved.  During the 1980s, this pistol was the P9S, equipped with a QualaTech wipeless silencer.  The silencer is made from stainless steel, and does not wear out as fast as silencers with wipes.  The noise level also does not increase with use of the silencer.  The action of the P9S is quiet enough that a slide-locking feature was not necessary and was not included.  For the SEALs, QualaTech also mounted sights directly on the silencer, due to the large size of the silencer and the relatively small size of the P9S.  The barrel was slightly extended to allow the silencer mounting.  The suppressor could be easily removed, allowing the weapon to function as a normal P9S.  The “SEAL P9S” is not currently being used (as far as the public knows, of course), but they are reputedly keeping them in storage in working condition.

     There was a version of the P9S that never made it out of the prototype stage: the subcompact P9K.  Said to be one of the personal projects of Theodor Koch, only four prototypes were built, and the P9K seems to have died with Theodor Koch in October of 1976.  Supposedly, the P9K would have been built and sold at the same time as the P9S.  Various sources conflict, but most seem to put the barrel length at about 3 inches, which is what I used for the “what-if” statistics below.  I have not been able to get any solid information about the weight, so what is below is only a rough guess based on the weight of a standard P9S.  In addition, different sources give different figures for the magazine capacity, so that is an educated guess as well.

     Before the P9S, there was the P9.  The P9 was built from 1969-78, but the production appears to have been very low-rate, and only a total of 485 P9s were built (with only 24 of them chambered for 7.65mm Parabellum).  The P9 differed from the P9S primarily in being single-action instead of double-action.  The first three also had an exposed hammer, but after those, production changed to the concealed hammer.  The P9 also did not have the trigger guard for a supporting finger, having a traditional rounded trigger guard instead.  The P9 could have an adapter for a stock/shoulder holster attached to the bottom rear of the grip.  Of course, since the P9 had an option for a stock, it was natural that someone at H&K would get a wild idea that maybe a fully-automatic version could be built…and prototypes for one were!  These prototypes (which never had actual designations – they merely had typical H&K prototype numbers starting with StK), could be fired with or without the stock, and were tested with wooden foregrips ahead of the trigger guard and horizontal ones attached to the same place, but projecting to the side (H&K tested the prototypes with the horizontal foregrip projecting to the right and foregrips projecting to the left).  One could surmise that these were merely experiments; they were perhaps never even meant to be the prototypes for an actual production full-auto P9S.  Figures on weight, cyclic rate and magazine capacity vary wildly from source to source, so again I’ve resorted to educated guesses; I would guess that H&K tried several extended magazines and possibly even with cyclic rates.  But of course, I have included “what-if” stats below…

     The P9S Sport Competition is an accurized version of the P9S.  Improvements include an adjustable rear sight and a trigger adjustable for pull weight and overtravel.  The P9S Sport Competition includes a small screwdriver to adjust the micro-adjustable rear sight.  The barrels were either standard length (4 inches) but match quality, or 5.5 inches.  Grip plates could be standard P9S grips, stippled target grips with thumb and palm rests, or smooth wooden grips.  A muzzle compensating weight is optional.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P9

7.65mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

9

$195

P9

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

9

$239

P9 Shoulder Stock

N/A

0.5 kg

N/A

$30

P9S

.22 Long Rifle

0.72 kg

9

$120

P9S

7.65mm Parabellum

0.8 kg

9

$195

P9S

9mm Parabellum

0.88 kg

9

$239

P9S

.45 ACP

0.79 kg

7

$396

SEAL P9S

9mm Parabellum Subsonic

1.47 kg

9

$338

P9K

9mm Parabellum

0.84 kg

7

$227

P9K

.45 ACP

0.77 kg

6

$387

P9 Full-Auto

9mm Parabellum

0.93 kg

9, 15, 20

$242

P9S Sport Competition (4” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

0.99 kg

9

$239

P9S Sport Competition (5.5” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

1.02 kg

9

$254

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P9 (7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

w/stock

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

14

P9 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

w/stock

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

15

P9S (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

7

P9S (7.65mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P9S (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P9S (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

11

SEAL P9S

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

11

P9K (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

P9K (.45)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

P9 Full Auto

5

1

Nil

1

3

7

10

w/stock

5

1

Nil

2

2

4

15

P9S Sport Competition (4”)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P9S Sport Competition (5.5”)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Heckler & Koch P30

     Notes:  Introduced in its perfected form in 2006, the P30 was previously known as the P3000 during its development.  The P30 is essentially a further development of the P2000, with the improvements being primarily to the ergonomics (which also alter the appearance of the weapon).  Heckler & Koch has been heavily touting the P30 as the best possible police pistol manufactured, but the safety provided by its variants and its ergonomics would also make it excellent for civilian use.

     Like the P2000, the P30 uses a modified Browning operation.  The frame is of strong polymer, with a steel slide, barrel, and operating parts.  The trigger unit is a separate module, which allows for several variants of the P30 to be available, distinguished primarily by the trigger operation.  The controls are ambidextrous.  The grip is modular, with three finder swells in the front and 3 interchangeable side plates and backstraps (in addition to the basic grip itself), allowing a high degree of ergonomic customization.  The dust cover, as such, is molded into an integral MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The barrel is of high-grade steel, 3.86 inches long.

     The variants (with their different trigger units) are the basic P30, with an exposed spur-type hammer, DA operation, and a trigger pull weight of 11.4/4.5 pounds.  The P30V1 uses a spurless hammer and has no decocker.  The P30V2 is identical to the P30V1, but the trigger pull weight is increased to 11.4/7.3 pounds.  The P30V3 is as the basic P30, but the trigger action may be switched between DA and SA.  The P30V4 is also identical to the P30V1 except for the trigger pull weight (11.4/6.1 pounds).  The P30V5 uses DAO trigger action and has a fixed trigger pull weight of 8.1 pounds.  The P30V6 is the same as the P30V5, but with a trigger pull weight of 8.8 pounds.  For game purposes, all these variants are identical.

     For the time being, no other variants of the P30 have been announced, but I’d be willing to bet additional chamberings, barrel lengths, and other customization options are coming.

     The P30L is a “longslide” version with a barrel length of 4.45 inches.  Other features are basically identical to that of the P30.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The P30 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P30

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

10, 15

$235

P30

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.79 kg

10, 13

$310

P30L

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

10, 15

$246

P30L

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.82 kg

10, 13

$321

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P30 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

P30 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

P30L (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

P30L (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

Heckler & Koch P2000

     Notes:  Though reminiscent of the USP, the P2000 is an unrelated weapon that is constructed largely of polymer.  The amount of polymer used is astounding; even things like some of the internal workings use polymer construction, though the slide and barrel are steel.  Due to the shape, the P2000 is actually larger than it seems to be at first glance; however, it fits in the hand better than the USP.  All of the controls are ambidextrous.  The hammer mechanism is two-piece; this means that though the hammer is down, the double-action trigger pull is far lighter than most double-action pistols. The front of the trigger guard is contoured for the index finger of the supporting hand.  The grip can be fitted with one of four sizes of removable backstraps to fit larger hands. The P2000 SC (Sub-Compact) is a smaller version of the same pistol.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P2000

9mm Parabellum

0.62 kg

10, 13

$235

P2000

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.78 kg

10

$309

P2000

.357 SiG

0.73 kg

10

$262

P2000 SC

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

10

$223

P2000 SC

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.73 kg

9

$297

P2000 SC

.357 SiG

0.68 kg

10

$251

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P2000 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

P2000 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P2000 (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

P2000 SC (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

P2000 SC (.40)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

P2000 SC (.357)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

5

 

Heckler & Koch SP89

     Notes: This was an attempt by Heckler & Koch to make a civilianized version of the MP-5K.  This was only partly successful, not because of technical reasons, but because the US and several nations banned the importation of the SP89 due to its large magazine capacity and military looks, branding the SP89 with the nebulous (and inaccurate) term “assault weapon.”  The SP89 is basically a smaller version of the MP-5K, modified to fire only in semiautomatic mode and made very difficult to modify back to automatic fire ability without damaging the weapon.  The SP89 has no provision for a stock, and uses a 4.5-inch barrel; the entire weapon, however, is 13 inches long. It can be equipped with most of the optics of a standard MP-5K, as well as the 100-round C-Mag.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon exists, but is rather rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: For obvious reasons, this is a favorite of criminal gangs all over the world in the Merc 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SP89

9mm Parabellum

2 kg

15, 30

$243

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SP89

SA

1

Nil

2

1

Nil

11

 

Heckler & Koch VP9

     Notes: With ancestry going back to the VP70, the VP9 is only the second polymer-framed pistol for Heckler & Koch, and only its second striker-fired pistol.  (The P7 Series was its first.) It was originally designed for the needs of the Bundespolizei, but Heckler & Koch decided to withdraw it from the police market and aim it at the civilian market instead, where polymer-frame and striker-fired pistols are becoming more popular. (VP stands for Volkspistole, or People's Pistol). In its design designation, it was the P-40, but this was the police and military designation, before the decision was made to offer it to civilians first.  (HK decided to listen more to American shooters’ gripes that “HK doesn’t really make anything for civilian shooters.”) The VP9 borrows a lot from the P30 -- some say the VP9 is a new frame on a P30 slide, but it not that simple.  The internal parts and the ergonomics are different, and a P30 user will find nothing familiar upon field stripping the VP9. Ergonomic improvements include a higher grip on the frame. a larger trigger guard, and a raised magazine paddle-type release.  It is large enough to almost mimic a frame-mounted release. In addition, the VP9 comes with three interchangeable backstraps and six side plates to put the grip into any of 27 different configurations, as well as finger grooves.

     Under the barrel is a MIL-STD-1913 rail, fairly long for the length of the pistol.  A takedown lever is included, one that requires that the magazine be removed and the gun not be in battery.  It has a two-stage trigger and DA operation.  Other P30 features include the 3-dot sights, and a heavy-duty extractor. Cocking grooves are found at the front and rear of the slide. The sights are dovetailed in and can be removed and replaced.  Unlike most DA pistols, where the pull weight increases the further back you pull the trigger, the VP9/40’s trigger remains an even, crisp 5.2 pounds.

     The polymer frame has metal strengthening rails. Construction of the slide and internals is of cannon-grade machined steel.  The one-piece guide rod is surrounded by a flat mainspring. There is no manual safety, but the DA operation, and passive trigger and sear blocks are deemed sufficient.  IRL, it's slightly more expensive than a Glock, but you are paying for design quality. The 4.09-inch barrel is the same as that on the P30, with slight length modifications; it is cold hammer-forged from cannon-grade steel and uses polygonal rifling. Unlike the VP70, there is no automatic version of the VP9.

     Variants of the VP9 include the SFP9-SF; this is the same as the standard VP9 for game purposes, but the trigger pull weight is reduced to 4.4 pounds, with a total pull length of 6 millimeters and a reset length of 3 millimeters.  It also has a highly-weather and wear-proof coating, called by H&K a “maritime” coating. This version is sold only to military and police concerns.  The German Police requested a version for some of their officers, the SFP9-TR, with increased pull weight (6.7 pounds), and a slightly longer pull length and reset, due to safety concerns, as it was meant to be carried locked and cocked by undercover officers.  Again, for game purposes, it is identical to the standard VP9.  The SFP9-M is designed for use on ships and suchlike, or by those who want a more weatherproof weapon; it has a maritime coating, but it is otherwise identical to the VP9.  The SFP9-SD is equipped with an integral suppressor. In addition, there is an SFP9 Tactical, which is the same as a standard VP9, but has an extended 4.7-inch barrel with threads on the end allowing the attachment of most 9mm-compatible cans, as well as tritium-inlay sights.  Most 9mm Hecker & Koch magazines designed for the P7M13-series, all VP9-series magazines, or P30-series magazines can be used by the VP9; all can use equivalent aftermarket magazines.

     Several VP9 variants are built only in H&K’s US facilities.  The subcompact VP9SK has a 3.39-inch barrel, and an abbreviated Picatinny Rail under the dust cover. It comes with the same set of interchangeable backstraps and side plates as the standard VP9, and the frontstrap has the same finger grooves.  The VP9SK can use 13-round P7M13 magazines, 15-round VP9 magazines, or similar magazines, but when bought from the factory, the VP9SK comes with floorplates for the longer magazines.  (They can still be used without the floorplates.)  Like the standard VP9, tritium night sights are optional.  The VP9L is a “Longslide" variant, with a full 5-inch barrel.

     The VP40 is, for the most part, a VP9 chambered for the .40 Smith & Wesson round.  Most of the different versions mentioned above are also found in VP40 versions; however, there is no VP40SK (though there is some public interest in such a version), and there are no equivalents to the SFP9-SF, SFP9-TR or SFP9-SD.

     In Europe and Canada, the VP9 and VP40 are known as the SFP9 and SFP40, respectively.  Colors/finishes for the VP9/40 series include black, Flat Dark Earth, Gray, OD Green, and Midnight Bronze (the latter relatively new and fairly rare).  Many requests have been made to HK and HK-USA to sell VP9/40 pistols which have a frame of one color and a slide and other metal parts of another color.  HK does this, on an individual basis, but IRL it costs a little more.  (For game purposes, it is identical to a standard VP9/40 of same type.)

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

VP9

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

10, 13, 15

$240

VP9SK

9mm Parabellum

0.65 kg

10, 13, 15

$233

SFP9-SD

9mm Parabellum

1.1 kg

10, 13, 15

$330

SFP9 Tactical

9mm Parabellum

0.76 kg

10, 13, 15

$247

VP9L

9mm Parabellum

0.76 kg

10, 13, 15

$249

VP40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.82 kg

9, 10, 13

$314

SFP40 Tactical

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.83 kg

9, 10, 13

$322

VP40L

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.83 kg

9, 10, 13

$323

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

VP9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

VP9SK

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

SFP9-SD

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

SFP9 Tactical

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

VP9L

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

VP40

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

SFP40 Tactical

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

VP40L

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

16

 

Heckler & Koch VP70

    Notes: This weapon was introduced as a selective-fire pistol in 1970.  It had several features that were innovative for the time, such as a double-action-only trigger, a synthetic frame, a very high-capacity magazine, and a fixed barrel.  Unfortunately, the VP70 was so far ahead of its time that it never got many sales, and production stopped in 1984.

     With a synthetic stock attached to the butt, the VP70 version becomes a selective-fire pistol capable of 3-round bursts in addition to semiautomatic fire.  (Without the stock, only semiautomatic fire is possible, and the selector lever is on the stock.)  In 1971, this version was renamed the VP70M (M for Military).  One rather notable feature of the VP70M is that it has no manual or passive safety features at all, relying on its double-action operation. A civilian/police model without the capability for automatic fire or to attach a stock was introduced, called the VP70Z (Zivil).  This version could be found with no safeties, a manual safety, and/or a passive firing-pin safety.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

VP70M/VP70Z

9mm Parabellum

0.82 kg

18

$244

VP70M with Stock

9mm Parabellum

1.22 kg

18

$274

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

VP70M/VP70Z

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

VP70M w/Stock

3

1

Nil

3

2

3

16

 

Heckler & Koch USP

     Notes: The USP is the pistol upon which the Mk 23 OHWS pistol is based, and was introduced in 1993 at the SHOT Show that year.  The USP was originally designed with the idea of sales to US law enforcement; as such, the USP was first designed with the .40 Smith & Wesson round in mind, as it was rapidly becoming popular with police forces in the US.  It was quickly realized that many US police were still using 9mm Parabellum, and so a 9mm version was developed before the USP went on the market after its introduction at the 1993 SHOT Show.  The 9mm Parabellum and .45 ACP versions were adopted by German armed forces and police in 1996 in small numbers for special applications.  All three versions were widely bought by civilians in the US and Europe in the late 1990s and early 2000s, and it is very common in the hands of armed civilians in those countries.  The German Army uses the USP9 and USP9C, balling them the P-8 and P-10 respectively.

     The USP is modular and, the safeties, control levers, sights, and other components may also be changed to suit a variety of needs, including left and right hand users.  The pistol uses a patented recoil reduction system and has a slide-type accessory rail under the dust cover that is removable.  The frame is glass fiber polymer with metal reinforcement where necessary.  Sights are fixed, with a square notch rear sight and blade front; the rear notch is outlined and the front sight uses a dot, both in high-contrast, high-visibility colors.  The USP9 and USP40 use a 4.25-inch barrel; the USP45 uses a 4.41-inch barrel.  The sights are dovetailed in and can be replaced with others.  There are several variations of controls and trigger action available: DA with a safety/decocker on the left side or the right side of the frame; DA with a decocker only, on the right or left side of the frame; DAO versions with the same types of controls as the DA versions; DAO with no external safety or decocker; and DA with only a manual safety (on the right or left).  In 1993, 1994, and 1995, further adjustments were made to the USP, including a change to a captive recoil spring, changing from conventional rifling to polygonal rifling, and a reduction in the trigger pull weight in DA mode as well as improvement in the smoothness of the trigger action.  Magazines for the USP are available with an extended floorplate and finger rest.

     A compact version of the USP quickly followed the introduction of the full-sized USP45.  The USP9C and USP40C use a 3.58-inch barrel, and the USP45C uses a 3.8-inch barrel.  A .357 SiG chambering was also recently introduced for the USP Compact (the USP-357C); it also uses a 3.58-inch barrel.  The grip and magazines are shorter, and magazines are available the USP Compact with an extended floorplate that includes a long finger rest.

     The USP45 Tactical is basically a USP45 upgraded to provide a combat pistol that is lower in cost (and especially) smaller than the Mk 23 Mod 0.  The basic USP45 has been given a longer 5.09-inch barrel with threads for a silencer (but cannot use the Mk23’s silencer), a slide lock to keep the slide from reciprocating when used with a silencer if desired (often used to further decrease noise) an adjustable match trigger and a corrosion-resistant finish.  The silencer that was first sold for use with the USP45 Tactical is a Heckler & Koch wet-type design that requires only about two teaspoons of water for optimum functioning and has a very low rate of wear; later, this was changed to a superior Knight Armament design. The barrel that is seated near the muzzle with a polymer O-ring system that realigns the barrel quickly after each shot.  This not only increases normal accuracy, but the accuracy of follow-up shots.  The sights used are modified target sights, micrometer-adjustable and high enough to reach over a mounted suppressor. The trigger is also match-grade, with the trigger guard being oversized for use with thick gloves. The USP45 Tactical is generally found with a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover, though H&K counts it as an option.  The line between where a USP45 Tactical is essentially an Mk 23 OHWS by another name can get a bit blurred.)  The USP45 Tactical is even in use by US SOCOM, giving them a weapon similar to the Mk 23 OHWS at a lower cost and in a smaller package.  Later, a .40 Smith & Wesson chambering was also made for the USP Tactical.

     At the request of certain unspecified agencies, Heckler & Koch also modified the USP45 Tactical into a more compact version, called the USP45CT.  (“CT” is, according to Heckler & Koch, the initials for “Compact Tactical,” but most users of the USP45CT cay it actually stands for “Counterterrorist,” due to its role.  Whether those users are joking or not, I don’t know.)  The USP45CT uses a 4.46-inch barrel, and has most of the special design features or the USP45 Tactical.  The sights, however, are fixed; they can be folded down or raised into a position high enough to clear silencers.  The USP45CT is also dehorned as much as possible, to include the deletion the safety/decocker of the USP45 Tactical; other than a slight weight difference and the caliber change, it is identical to the USP45 Tactical.  There is also a USP9 “Tactical;” however, it is not called the USP9 Tactical, and has several differences from the USP45 Tactical and USP40 Tactical.  It is the subject of the next paragraph.

     Other countries liked the Mk 23 OHWS, but as the .45 ACP is not a standard service round in many parts of the world, it would have been costly and impractical to put the .45 ACP into their supply systems.  For their special operations units, Heckler & Koch essentially downsized the USP45 into a pistol chambered for 9mm Parabellum, called the USP9SD.  The USP9SD has virtually all of the design features of the USP Tactical, except for the changes necessary for the caliber change, a shorter 4.7-inch barrel, and the lack of the O-ring barrel alignment system and match trigger module.  The standard silencer sold with the USP9SD is the Bugger & Thomet Impuls IIA, a stainless steel wet-type suppressor that needs only a very small amount of water (about two teaspoons) in it to function properly.  This silencer is able to be used with full-power 9mm Parabellum, though of course this will not eliminate the crack of the bullet as it breaks the sound barrier and is for all intents and purposes only a suppressor when full-power ammunition is used.

     The USP Compact LEM (Law-Enforcement Modification) is a USP Compact with some modifications to make it more suitable for law-enforcement personnel, especially SRT’s.  Chief among these modifications is the trigger; it is double-action-only (DAO), and has a very light trigger pull (after the first shot).  The trigger reach is also shorter.  The weapon is strengthened to handle +P and +P+ loads.  The magazines are double-stack and larger than the standard USP Compact magazines, and the magazine well is beveled.  The slide catch is ambidextrous, as is the magazine release; there are no other external controls.  The sights are adjustable Meprolight tritium night sights.  Originally produced only in .40 Smith & Wesson, the Compact LEM is now available in all USP Compact chamberings.

     There are several competition-grade models of the USP; one of these is the USP Match, which was introduced in 1997. At first the USP Match was only available in .45 ACP, but soon it was also available in .40 Smith & Wesson and 9mm Parabellum chamberings.  The USP Match is equipped with a match-grade, cold hammer-forged barrel 6.02 inches in length, and also has the O-ring barrel alignment system.  Under the barrel and dust cover, one finds a grooved surface and what look like sort of an upside-down muzzle brake, but these are actually a counterweight assembly that is designed to look good as well as being functional.  The rear sight is, of course target-type and micrometer-adjustable.  Blued and stainless steel finishes are available.  Though production of the USP Match stopped in 2005, the demand remains high and the USP Match will today command a high (real-world) price.  This is partially due to the Angelina Jolie’s use of a matched pair of .45 ACP USP Match pistols as Lara Croft in her Tomb Raider movies.

     Introduced in 1998, the USP Expert was designed specifically for IPSC competitions, particularly in Europe.  At first, the USP Expert did not sell well in the US, due to the magazine restrictions of the Assault Weapons Ban, but this has become moot, and US sales have picked up considerably.  The USP Expert uses a match-quality cold hammer-forged 5.2-inch barrel in conjunction with the O-ring barrel alignment system.  The magazine well is modified for quick and smooth tactical reloading; called a “jet funnel” by H&K, the mouth of the magazine well is highly-beveled, extended, and shaped to aid in reloading without actually looking at the pistol or the magazine.  The USP Expert’s slide has been reshaped to a lower profile, which actually aids in quick sight target acquisition.  The sights themselves are the same excellent match sights used by other USPs equipped with match sights.  The trigger unit itself is match-quality and has a trigger stop.

     A sort of “in-between” USP match-grade pistol is the USP Custom Sport.  Externally, the USP Custom Sport is almost identical to a standard USP, but the barrel is match-grade and cold hammer-forged, the trigger is match-grade, and the sights are target-type and micrometer-adjustable.

     The USP9 Elite match pistol is the newest version of the USP series. The USP Elite blends features of the USP Tactical, Expert, and Match, using the same-quality barrel (though a full 6.02 inches long) under a hand-fitted slide that tapers sharply in front of the frame; the barrel is also hand-fitted.  The sights are similar to those of the Expert, though higher-profile, and the front sight is also micrometer-adjustable, and they are dovetailed in.  The match trigger (with trigger stop) is also tweaked to produce a smoother and lighter pull.  A kit is also available to easily convert the USP Elite to the two chamberings available (the Elite is not made in a .40 Smith & Wesson version).

     A trivia point, the many US publications and web sites say that “USP” stands for “Universal Service Pistol.”  This is incorrect; “USP” stands for Universal Selbstlade Pistole, which is German for “Universal Self-Loading Pistol.”

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Elite, Expert and Compact LEM do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

USP9

9mm Parabellum

0.72 kg

10, 12, 15

$241

USP40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.78 kg

10, 12, 13

$315

USP45

.45 ACP

0.79 kg

10, 12

$402

USP9C

9mm Parabellum

0.67 kg

8, 10, 12, 13

$235

USP-357C

.357 SiG

0.67 kg

8, 10, 12

$262

USP40C

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.67 kg

8, 10, 12

$309

USP45C

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

8

$397

USP40 Tactical

.40 ACP

0.75 kg

8, 10, 12

$329

USP45 Tactical

.45 ACP

0.82 kg

8, 10, 12

$416

USP45CT

.45 ACP

0.7 kg

8

$407

USP9SD

9mm Parabellum

0.75 kg

10, 12, 15

$249

USP9C LEM

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

8, 10, 12, 13

$238

USP-357C LEM

.357 SiG

0.7 kg

8, 10, 12

$265

USP40C LEM

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.71 kg

8, 10, 12

$313

USP45C LEM

.45 ACP

0.73 kg

8, 10

$401

USP9 Match

9mm Parabellum

1.18 kg

10, 12, 13, 15, 18

$265

USP40 Match

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.18 kg

10, 12, 13, 16

$340

USP45 Match

.45 ACP

1.18 kg

8, 10, 12

$427

USP9 Expert

9mm Parabellum

0.87 kg

10, 12, 15, 18

$256

USP40 Expert

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.88 kg

10, 12, 13, 16

$331

USP45 Expert

.45 ACP

0.85 kg

10, 12

$418

USP9 Custom Sport

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

10, 12, 15

$246

USP40 Custom Sport

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.93 kg

10, 12, 13

$321

USP45 Custom Sport

.45 ACP

0.96 kg

10, 12

$405

USP9 Elite

9mm Parabellum

0.93 kg

10, 12, 15, 18

$265

USP45 Elite

.45 ACP

0.91 kg

10, 12

$427

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

USP9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

USP40

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

13

USP45

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

USP9C

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

USP-357C

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

USP40C

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

USP45C

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

USP40 Tactical

SA

2

1-Nil

1

4

Nil

16

With Silencer

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

12

With Silencer/Subsonic

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

11

USP45 Tactical

SA

2

2-Nil

1

4

Nil

15

With Silencer

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

12

With Silencer/Reduced-Power

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

11

USP45CT

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

12

With Silencer

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

10

With Silencer/Reduced-Power

SA

2

Nil

2

2

Nil

8

USP9SD

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

With Silencer

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

10

With Silencer/Subsonic

SA

1

Nil

2

2

Nil

9

USP9 Compact LEM

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

USP-357 Compact LEM

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

USP40 Compact LEM

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

USP45 Compact LEM

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

USP9 Match

SA

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

16

USP40 Match

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

20

USP45 Match

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

18

USP9 Expert

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

USP40 Expert

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

17

USP45 Expert

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

USP9 Custom Sport

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

USP40 Custom Sport

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

USP45 Custom Sport

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

USP9 Elite

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

16

USP45 Elite

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

18