CZ-22/CZ-24

     Notes:  This pistol was originally developed by an employee of Mauser, Josef Nickl.  Nickl was disappointed when Mauser decided not to accept the design, and he took it to Brno in Czechoslovakia when Mauser sent him there to assist in the production of Mauser rifles for the Czech Army.  The Czechs changed the caliber of the design to fire .380 ACP, and placed it into mass production for the Czech Army as the VZ-22.  About 35,000 were built before the unnecessarily complicated design was simplified into the VZ-24.  The manufacture of the VZ-24 was much easier, stripping was a bit easier, a magazine safety was added, and the wooden grips were replaced with vulcanized rubber.  180,000 VZ-24s were made, and it is still relatively to find in Eastern Europe and Germany.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

VZ-22/VZ-24

.380 ACP

0.7 kg

8

$139

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

VZ-22/VZ-24

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

                                                                                                            

CZ-27

     Notes:  This is a simplified version of an earlier pistol, the CZ-24.  This was done by reducing the caliber and making the pistol into a pure blowback weapon.  It was issued to Czech police and treasury guards, and also widely exported.  When Germany occupied Czechoslovakia in World War 2, they took the CZ-27 into service, calling it the P-27.  Production continued for about a decade after World War 2, and it can still be found in police and civilian hands today.

     A rare variant of the CZ-27 has a barrel extended to 5 inches, and threaded to accept a silencer.  It is still not known whether they were built during the Nazi occupation or shortly after World War 2.  These versions are very rare, and the silencers designed for them even rarer.  An experimental version of this assassin’s pistol was chambered for .22 Long Rifle cartridges; it is believed that no more than 10 of these were ever built, and today they are close to impossible to find.  They are included below for curiosity’s sake only.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-27

.32 ACP

0.7 kg

8

$124

CZ-27S

.32 ACP

0.73 kg

8

$135

CZ-27S (Silenced)

.32 ACP Subsonic

0.93 kg

8

$205

CZ-27S

.22 Long Rifle

0.64 kg

8

$103

CZ-27S (Silenced)

.22 Long Rifle

0.75 kg

8

$138

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-27

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-27S (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

(w/Silencer)

SA

1

Nil

2

3

Nil

8

CZ-27S (.22)

SA

-1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

(w/Silencer)

SA

-1

Nil

2

2

Nil

6

 

CZ-38/39

     Notes:  This weapon is a clumsy weapon with a barrel and slide outsized to its grip.  It can be very dangerous to its user, because its greatest virtue is also it’s greatest vice: the simplicity of disassembly.  The weapon is so easy to take apart that it sometimes comes apart all by itself, often during firing.  In addition, it is clumsy to hold and point, the slide is difficult to cycle, and the trigger is long, heavy, and creepy. 

     The CZ-39 was a version of the CZ-38 designed for the Nazis by then-occupied Czechoslovakia.   This form of the weapon reverted to simple blowback operation, but the low-power of the cartridge was not attractive in military terms, and the hammer could not be cocked, even when exposed and back.  The pistol could only be fired by pulling on the trigger, and the trigger had a quite heavy pull.  However, the problems with the pistol falling apart seem to have been largely solved.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-38

.380 ACP

0.94 kg

8

$228

CZ-39

.380 ACP

0.94 kg

8

$228

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-38

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

CZ-39

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

 

CZ-45 Tomiska (“Little Tom”)

     Notes: At the time this pistol was designed (1908), the area of Pilsen, Bohemia was a part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire.  Though Alois Tomiska later worked for the forerunner of Ceska Zbrojovka, the Little Tom was made in what was then Austria-Hungary.  It is a small blowback pistol, meant for self-defense and concealment.  The weapon was designed to be light, with an open-topped slide and a simple safety catch, and light steel construction.  The hammer is almost totally shrouded.  Tomiska lost control of the design some time after the fall of Austria-Hungary, and the Little Tom or pistols like it were built all over Europe after World War 1.  Though production numbers completely outstripped all of Ceska Zbrojovka’s other pistols up until that point, the Tomiska was not actually type-standardized until 1945, and by that time tens of thousands could already be found in Europe, though distribution outside of Europe was relatively small.  Further modification turned the CZ-45 into the CZ-52, and later the CZ-70.  Early 1980s Seecamp pocket pistols, similar pistols by Autauga, the NAA Guardian, the Intratec Protec, and even the Kel-Tec P-32 are near-copies or updates of the CZ-45.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Little Tom

.25 ACP

0.43 kg

6

$84

Little Tom

.32 ACP

0.49 kg

6

$107

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Little Tom (.25)

SA

-1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

Little Tom (.32)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

 

CZ-50/CZ-70

     Notes: Based on the Walther PP and PPK, the CZ-50 is the primary pistol of the Czech State Police and Internal Security Forces.  It is a compact weapon with rounded surfaces and a shrouded hammer for quick draws from pockets and under clothes.  The CZ-50 is a double-action-only weapon; it cannot be fired in the single-action mode, where the hammer is cocked before drawing the trigger.  Unfortunately, the CZ-50’s safety tends to slip internally, making the weapon sometimes safe when it is set on fire and unsafe when set on safe.  In addition, the CZ-50 is made of inferior materials and trigger draw can be creepy.  The Czech Army solidly rejected this design in favor of the CZ-52, and today it is only found in the hands of police and security forces.  The CZ-70 is a newer version, built of newer materials and addressing the reliability problems of the CZ-70.  It replaced the CZ-50, but production ceased in 1983.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-50

.32 ACP

0.68 kg

8

$97

CZ-70

.32 ACP

0.65 kg

8

$98

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-50/CZ-70

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

CZ-52

     Notes: The CZ-52 was, until recently, the standard Czech military pistol.  Like many Czech firearm designs of the period, it was not designed using or based upon any Soviet input.  The result is a pistol unlike any other, with unusual design features and capable of using ammunition and loads not able to be used by most other pistols of the same caliber. Design of the CZ-52 began in 1947 to replace the numerous service pistols used at the time by the Czech military (most of which were .32 ACP or .380 ACP); the CZ-52 was designed to fire ammunition more powerful than those rounds without being a much larger weapon.

     To this end, the designers began with an unusual roller-locking design that is rarely seen even in modern Western pistols; in fact, it is more common in longarms (especially Heckler & Koch designs).  This helps control recoil without needing some kind of complicated recoil dampener.  It also has two other features unusual in Eastern-Bloc pistols of the time: a slide lock and a decocker.  Original CZ-52s are finished in natural steel or phosphated; during later reconditioning done in the 1970s, most of them were blued and had their wooden grip plates replaced by ribbed plastic.  The CZ-52 is known to be one of the best-made weapons in the world, wearing slowly and evenly; as a result, many of the original production examples are still functioning flawlessly, 50 years later.

     One of the unusual aspects of the CZ-52 is its ability to digest ammunition of varying types.  The CZ-52, though in service use primarily was issued with the 7.62mm Tokarev round, was actually designed for the Czech M-48 round.  The M-48 has virtually the same dimensions as the 7.62mm Tokarev round, but uses a much more powerful propellant charge, and is therefore sort of a “hot” 7.62mm Tokarev round.  The CZ-52 can also easily fire the 7.62mm Tokarev, to include sub-loaded, bad-quality, and extremely “hot” wildcat home-bakes.  It can fire bullets which are heavy, light, steel-cored, rubber, etc.  The CZ-52 is a physically small pistol, only 8.25 inches (20.96cm) long, and with a shortish 4.7-inch barrel.  The recoil spring is very strong, which can create problems during stripping and disassembly.  The sights are common for Eastern Bloc pistols of the time – fixed and tiny.  The magazine release is on the heel, which takes some getting used to by many export buyers.

     The original CZ-52s were built only from 1952-56, but over 200,000 of them were made during this short period.  Though they have mostly passed out of Czech use (at first by the CZ-83, then various Czech-built pistols chambered for 9mm Parabellum when the Czech Republic and Slovakia joined NATO), some are still in use by Eastern European police forces.  After the Czechs had replaced most of their CZ-52s, many CZ-52s were sold to Third World countries.  Some also inevitably leaked out to terrorists.  CZ-USA is now importing new CZ-52s, as former Eastern Bloc weapons are becoming more and more popular in the West; these newer versions can have virtually any finish, sights, grip plates, etc., imaginable, and are also chambered for 9mm Parabellum as well as the original 7.62mm M-58/7.62mm Tokarev.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Of course, CZ-USA does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, though there are still customized examples of the CZ-52 in existence, often used by high-ranking officers and government officials.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-52

7.62mm M-48 or 7.62mm Tokarev

0.96 kg

8

$238

CZ-52

9mm Parabellum

0.97 kg

8

$245

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-52 (7.62mm M-48)

SA

1

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-52 (7.62mm Tokarev)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

CZ-52 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

 

CZ-75

     Notes: An upgrade of earlier Czechoslovakian pistols, the CZ-75 was designed with the Western market in mind. It was much sought after, and found its way into many Czechoslovakian units, although it was difficult to obtain in the United States.  Most of the production was in 9mm Parabellum ammunition, but late production models were also made in 9x21mm and .40 Smith & Wesson.  There is also a Kadet model; it fires .22 Long Rifle ammunition.  The CZ-75B is essentially identical to the base CZ-75 except for its firing pin safety.  The CZ-75BD is also identical, except for its decocker. The CZ-75B/SD (also known as the Tarantule) is also essentially the same, but has both the firing pin safety and threading on the muzzle for a suppressor.  The CZ-75B/SA is a CZ-75 with longer cocking grooves, both on the front of the slide and the rear, SA operation, an extended beavertail, and an ambidextrous safety; it comes in 9mm Parabellum and .40 Smith & Wesson. The CZ-75 Compact is, as the name suggests, a smaller version of the CZ-75; the .40 Smith & Wesson version is surprisingly heavy for its size, but this dampens recoil somewhat.  (The .40 S&W version of the Compact is not available until mid-2005.)  The CZ-75D Compact is similar to the CZ-75 Compact, but uses a light alloy frame and a slightly shorter barrel; in addition, the grips are rubber and the sights are snag-free.  The CZ-75 Standard IPSC was designed for competition; it is an accurized CZ-75 with a longer barrel, adjustable sights, magazine limited to 10 rounds (as per IPSC rules, not to comply with the Brady Gun Ban), a magazine extension for the fingers, extended magazine release and safety levers, ambidextrous safety, wood grip plates, and a beveled magazine well.  The CZ-75 Champion is a “tricked-out” version designed for Open Class IPSC competition shooting; it has a ported barrel, rubber ergonomic grip, precision hand-fitted parts, extended magazine release, beveled magazine well, and ambidextrous safety.  The CZ-75 Target Sports (also called the Tactical Sports), new for 2005, is a model specifically designed for IPSC Standard Division competitions; it is single-action, with fixed target sights, a polymer match trigger adjustable for take-up and overtravel, a competition hammer, an extended magazine catch, an ambidextrous safety, a polymer “funnel” magazine well for quicker reloads, and a barrel as long as is allowed in that division of IPSC competition.

     The CZ-75TS Czechmate is designed especially for IPSC Open or Limited competition; switch-out parts give the Czechmate the ability to comply with either IPSC division.  The 5.4-inch barrel has prominent slot-type porting, and comes with a C-MORE red dot sight  Extra parts included for Limited Division IPSC are an unported barrel with a dovetailed fiberoptic front sight and an adjustable rear sight that replaces the slide handle (as the cocking grooves are not normally accessible under the C-MORE sight).  Magazines made for use with the Czechmate are huge, including a “Big Stick” 26-round magazine which extends out of the grip.  The barrel is match-quality, bushingless, has a heavy profile, and is made of a special steel alloy. The wrap-around grip plates are of aluminum, and the frontstrap and rearstrap are checkered. The interior of the magazine well is aluminum, and it is beveled and flared. The trigger is undercut, as is the beavertail, promoting a high grip that reduced felt recoil (IRL). Finish is Black Polycoat. The Czechmate is a heavy modification of the Target Sports.

     The CZ-75 Full-Auto Pistol (sometimes referred to, incorrectly, as the CZ-75A or CZ-75R) is a version of the CZ-75 designed to fire fully automatic.  There is a shoe under the front of the frame; this may be used for a laser sight, or to mount an inverted spare magazine (which may then be used as a foregrip).  There is also a mount on top of the weapon for optical accessories.  This weapon is popular with Czech special operations units and, unfortunately, terrorists.  Early versions were ported to fight barrel climb; later versions eliminated the ports, though it was a common post-issue modification.

     The CZ-85, introduced in 1985, is essentially an updated CZ-75, and is nearly identical to the CZ-75.  The CZ-85 is usually finished with matte, non-reflective finish, but polished black, polished and matte blue, nickel, and chrome are also available, as well as two-tone finishes and an optional clear polymer coating for the frame, external portion of the slide, and the trigger guard. The CZ-85 is equipped with ambidextrous controls (except, for some reason, the magazine release, which is identical to that of the CZ-75).  The top of the slide is also ripped to further reduce unwanted reflections, and the slide also has improved slide gripping grooves.  Sights are virtually identical to those of the CZ-75, though later examples are of the 3-dot type. The checkered plastic grip plates are also identical to CZ-75s made after 1987.  Other than having an ambidextrous control, the manual safety is identical to that of the CZ-75; in addition, (except for very early production models), the CZ-85 has a passive firing pin safety.  Operation is double-action.  Variants include the CZ-85 Combat, which has an adjustable and removable rear sight (the front sight is not adjustable, but is dovetailed in), a trigger adjustable for overtravel, a loop-type “Commander” hammer, wooden grip plates, and a magazine that drops free instead of simply popping out a bit when released.  The CZ-85 is also normally sold with a set of exchange sights with tritium inlays.  The CZ-85B has an ambidextrous safety and slide release. The CZ-85 Champion also has the CZ-85 improvements, and also a quicker-acting magazine release.  The CZ-85 Combat has ambidextrous controls and eliminates the firing pin safety. In all cases, the CZ-85 uses a 4.7-inch barrel (as does the CZ-75).

     A little-known fact is that the original CZ-75 is actually a close copy of similar Italian Tanfoglio pistols of the period, particularly the TA-90.  This means that magazines designed for the TA-90 (which is a 9mm Parabellum pistol) and its descendants will fit into the CZ-75 and its descendants.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is a common sidearm among Czech special operations units.  The 9x21mm and .40 Smith & Wesson versions do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, however, nor does the CZ-75 Champion, CZ-75 Standard IPSC, CZ-75 Target Sports, or Czechmate.  In addition, the CZ-85 Combat and CZ-85 Champion also do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-75

9mm Parabellum

0.9 kg

15

$245

CZ-75

9x21mm

0.98 kg

15

$262

CZ-75

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.06 kg

15

$318

CZ-75 Kadet

.22 Long Rifle

1.09 kg

15

$127

CZ-75 Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

13

$237

CZ-75 Compact

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.07 kg

10

$310

CZ-75D Compact

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

10

$238

CZ-75 Standard IPSC

9mm Parabellum

1.28 kg

10

$253

CZ-75 Champion

9mm Parabellum

1.01 kg

10

$310

CZ-75 Champion

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.01 kg

10

$384

CZ-75 Target Sports

9mm Parabellum

1.27 kg

10, 20

$252

CZ-75 Target Sports

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.36 kg

10, 17

$326

CZ-75 Full Auto (Ported)

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

15, 25

$270

CZ-75 Full Auto (Unported)

9mm Parabellum

0.92 kg

15, 25

$245

CZ-75TS Czechmate (Open Division)

9mm Parabellum

1.36 kg

20, 26

$456

CZ-75TS Czechmate (Limited Division)

9mm Parabellum

1.21 kg

20, 26

$256

CZ-85

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

15

$221

CZ-85 Combat

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

15

$225

CZ-85 Champion

9mm Parabellum

1 kg

15

$232

CZ-85 Champion

.40 Smith & Wesson

1.16 kg

12

$295

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-75 (9mm Parabellum)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

CZ-75 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

13

CZ-75 (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

CZ-75 Kadet

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

CZ-75 Compact (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-75 Compact (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-75D Compact

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-75 Standard IPSC

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

CZ-75 Champion (9mm Parabellum)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

15

CZ-75 Champion (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

16

CZ-75 Target Sports (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

13

CZ-75 Target Sports (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

14

CZ-75 Full-Auto (Ported)

10

1

Nil

1

2

9

12

CZ-75 Full Auto (Unported)

10

1

Nil

1

2

12

12

CZ-75TS Czechmate (Open Division)

SA

2

Nil

1

1

Nil

16

CZ-75TS Czechmate (Limited Division)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

14

CZ-85 (9mm, All)

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

CZ-85 (.40)

SA

2

2-Nil

1

2

Nil

15

 

CZ-75 P-01

     Notes:  This weapon is only partly related to the CZ-75; the CZ-75 name was used due to its familiarity in the West, and “P-01” was added to indicate that this is the first new CZ pistol of the new millennium.  There are numerous profile differences to improve ergonomics, and the sights are high-visibility 3-dot sights.  A decocker has been added.  Under the front of the barrel is a rail for a small flashlight or a laser dot sight.  The frame is of light alloy. It is just small enough to be called a compact pistol.  The P-06, introduced in 2008, is essentially the same as the P-01 except for its chambering. The SP-01 part of this series is aimed at competition shooters, while the P-01 is meant to be a service pistol.

     Enlarge the P-01 to have a 4.25-inch barrel, enlarge the grip to hold a larger magazine, give it rubber grip panels and an ambidextrous safety, and you have an SP-01.  Of course, you now have only a semi-compact pistol, but it is more effective than the P-01.

     The P-01 Phantom is similar in design, but uses a polymer frame with a molded-in MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover, and a scalloped grip shape that is more ergonomic.  The sides of the grip are stippled, and the frontstrap and backstrap are ridged.  The barrel is even longer at 4.7 inches, and the magazine capacity is a bit larger.

     The CZ-75 P-07, new for 2009, is an evolution of the CZ-75 P-01.  A little more compact than the P-01 with a barrel length of 3.7 inches, the frame is also of polymer, making it quite light.  The grips are checkered on the front and backstrap and have a stippled molding in the sides.  The trigger guard is enlarged and squared off at the front.  However, perhaps the biggest difference is the trigger mechanism itself; the user can use interchangeable trigger modules and other parts to change the P-07 from a double-action-only pistol with a decocker to a single-action pistol with a manual safety.  (One cannot have the P-07 configured with both a decocker and a manual safety.) The steel slide is more streamlined, and a MIL-STD-1913 rail is molded into the bottom of the dust cover.

     In the late 2000s, a radically-different version of the CZ-75 was introduced – the CZ-75 SP-01 Shadow.  The Shadow has become wildly popular amongst competitors of IPSC, particularly among female shooters as the grip size is smaller.  Perhaps the biggest change is a frame of black polymer, along with a thin polymer cover for other external components and controls.  These controls are stamped with patterns that ensure positive engagement and easy learning by touch what does what.  Grip panels may be aluminum, wood, rubber or polymer (checkered or non-checkered, or even custom-built).  An extended beavertail helps the Shadow to sit better in the shooter’s hand.  Under the dust cover is a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the sights have fiberoptic inlays which are removable or drift-adjustable.  The barrel is just under five inches, is match-quality, and specially seated and fitted, along with other vital internal parts, including the trigger pack. A variant of the SP-01 Shadow, the SP-01 Shadow Target, is designed specifically for USPSA Production Division competition.  Changes include a TRT low-profile adjustable rear sight and a fiberoptic front sight, specially-textured grip panels, and the ability to use 18-round magazines.

     The CZ-75 SP-01 Accu-Shadow has been built with CZ’s Accu-Bushing barrel and bushing; this essentially gives the pistol, in game terms, the advantages of a target crown.  (It’s more complicated IRL.)  The net result is a more accurate pistol (IRL; doesn’t work out that way in game terms.)  The Accu-Shadow has lighter recoil springs; this gives the Accu-Shadow less felt recoil (IRL), but does not reduce reliability, as potential customers thought might be so. The front sight is fiberoptic and the rear sight is an adjustable rear HAJO sight. It has a MIL-STD-1913 rail under the dust cover. The 4.61-inch barrel is made from “a custom steel alloy” and has a full-length guide rod.  The Accu-Shadow has a short-reset SA/DA trigger that gives the trigger weight of a tuned SA trigger. The SP-01 Shadow Target is very similar, but is available with wood grip plates, and has a fixed rear sight.

     The Compact SDP is, as one might guess, a compact form of the CZ-75 SP-01. The small pistol has come interesting features not normally found in compact pistols, such as a competition hammer, decocker, a polished and smoothed firing pin, and a manually-tuned trigger. Some parts are hand-fitted, including the firing pin, trigger pack, and guide rod.  The 3.7-inch barrel is of stainless steel, as is the guide rod. The frame is of light alloy.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-75 P-01

9mm Parabellum

0.65 kg

10, 14

$238

CZ-75 P-06

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.77 kg

10

$312

CZ-75 SP-01

9mm Parabellum

1.13 kg

10, 14, 18

$240

CZ-75 P-01 Phantom

9mm Parabellum

0.82 kg

10, 19

$249

CZ-75 P-07

9mm Parabellum

0.77 kg

10, 14, 16

$235

CZ-75 SP-01 Shadow

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

10, 14, 15, 16

$251

CZ-75 SP-01 Accu-Shadow

9mm Parabellum

1.08 kg

10, 14, 15, 16, 18

$250

CZ-75 Compact SDP

9mm Parabellum

0.91 kg

10, 14

$235

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-75 P-01

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-75 P-06

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

CZ-75 SP-01

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

CZ-75 P-01 Phantom

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

11

CZ-75 P-07

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-75 SP-01 Shadow

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

CZ-75 SP-01 Accu-Shadow

SA

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12

CZ-75 Compact SDP

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

 

CZ-83

     Notes: This is an upgrade of the Czech version of the Makarov, designed with Eastern Europe in mind, and often carried in place of the Makarov by Czech and Slovakian forces.  They have ambidextrous safeties, and an automatic safety that blocks the firing pin until the trigger is fully depressed.  The weapon cannot be disassembled unless the magazine is removed and there is no round in the chamber.  After the fall of the Iron Curtain, the .380 ACP version became the most common version of the CZ-83, and another version of the CZ-83 chambered for 9mm Ultra was introduced for export to countries where use of “military” cartridges like the 9mm Parabellum by civilians is illegal.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The most common chambering for the CZ-83 in the Twilight 2000 timeline is 9mm Makarov.  The 9mm Ultra chambering is not available.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-83

.32 ACP

0.75 kg

15

$156

CZ-83

.380 ACP

0.8 kg

12

$196

CZ-83

9mm Makarov

0.8 kg

12

$209

CZ-83

9mm Ultra

0.8 kg

12

$228

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-83 (.32 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-83 (.380 ACP)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-83 (9mm Makarov)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-83 (9mm Ultra)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

CZ-92

     Notes:  This is a small backup/holdout pistol designed for personal defense at short range.  It is a double-action-only (DAO) pistol with no manual safety.  Removal of the magazine blocks the firing pin so that it cannot fire, even if there is a round left in the chamber.  The finish on the CZ-92 is better than is standard for such weapons.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-92

.25 ACP

0.43 kg

8

$86

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-92

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4

 

CZ-97B

     Notes: It is believed that this pistol was designed for the US, Canadian, and Mexican markets as it fires a round that is little-used in Europe, but common in those countries.  Rumors also say that South Korean special operations units are experimenting with the CZ-97B.  It is a conventional design using a derivative of the Browning action, and is pretty much a CZ-75 enlarged to fire the .45 ACP round and given some cosmetic changes.  It may be fired in single or double action modes.  It has a manual safety, firing pin block, and an indicator to tell the shooter whether the chamber is loaded or not. The grip plates are aluminum. The finish may be Black Polycoat or Gloss Blued.  The CZ-97BD variant has sights with tritium inlays; the CZ-97B has a fiberoptic front sight.  The CZ-97BD has a decocker instead of a manual safety.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-97B

.45 ACP

0.99 kg

10, 12

$302

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-97B

SA

2

2-Nil

1

3

Nil

14

 

CZ-100 

     Notes: The CZ-100 is the Czech counterpart to the Swiss Glock, with a frame of high-impact polymer.  It uses all manner of modern operation and safeties.  They have a smooth ergonomic outline with as little protrusions as possible to avoid snagging on clothing or holsters.  Both the Czech and Slovakian armies are considering a change to this weapon.  The trigger guard is large to accommodate a gloved finger, as well as a squared off front of the trigger guard to accommodate a finger from the off hand for steadying.  There is a rail under the dust cover for accessories, but it is also designed to be snag free and a lot of lights and laser sights will not fit on it.  The difference between the CZ-100 and 101 is the magazine capacity and the handgrip, both of which are smaller in the CZ-101.

     The CZ-100 was further updated and modified, with the new version, the CZ-110, being released in 2006.  Other being a tiny bit lighter than the CZ-100, the primary difference between the two is that while the CZ-100 (and CZ-101) is a DAO design, the CZ-110 is DA/SA – able to operate either in double-action or single-action modes.  The CZ-110 is also designed to allow the slide to be pulled back even if the shooter’s non-firing hand is disabled; to do this, a slightly-hooked protrusion was added just behind the ejection port, which allows the shooter to pull the slide back by pulling it against a belt or suchlike.  (It also acts as a brass deflector.) For game purposes, the CZ-110 shoots like the CZ-100.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These pistols do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: These are runaway best sellers.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-100

9mm Parabellum

0.68 kg

10, 13

$237

CZ-100

9x21mm

0.7 kg

10, 13

$255

CZ-100

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.85 kg

10

$311

CZ-101

9mm Parabellum

0.67 kg

7

$235

CZ-101

9x21mm

0.69 kg

7

$253

CZ-101

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.84 kg

6

$309

CZ-110

9mm Parabellum

0.67 kg

10, 13

$237

CZ-110

9x21mm

0.69 kg

10, 13

$255

CZ-110

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.84 kg

10

$311

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-100 (9mm Parabellum)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-100 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

CZ-100 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-101 (9mm Parabellum)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

CZ-101 (9x21mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

CZ-101 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

CZ-122 Sport

     Notes: This was CZ’s first true sports rimfire pistol, introduced in 1997.  It is a steel pistol with a raised sighting rib above the slide as well as sights.  The rear sight is an adjustable LPA micrometer sight.  The sighting rib does not move with the slide, nor do the sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-122

.22 Long Rifle

0.88 kg

10

$141

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-122

SA

-1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

CZ-G2000

     Notes: This is a modern pistol introduced in 1999, with a composite frame, and Browning operation.  The CZ-G2000 has a notable lack of safety mechanisms, relying on an automatic firing pin safety and its double-action-only construction to keep the weapon safe.  The extractor doubles as a chamber-loaded indicator.  The front of the frame has grooves meant for the attachment of laser aiming modules or small flashlights.  The sights have white dots to help in aiming in low-light conditions.  The weapon can be had in all-black, or with a black frame and matte-nickel-finish slide.

     The CZ-G2000 was designed by the Guns Trade branch of CZ, for the competition for the new Czech police pistol.  That competition was won by the CZ-75 P-01, designed by the UB branch of CZ.  The CZ-G2000 design was then sold to another Czech company, Arms Moravia, and sold for a short time on the civilian and export market as the G2000, but was quickly no longer being offered by Arms Moravia.  Then, in 2005, it again appeared, being license-built by CAVIM in Venezuela, and called the Zamorana.  If you want a new CZ-G2000 now, you’ll have to buy it from CAVIM.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-G2000

9mm Parabellum

0.86 kg

19

$239

CZ-G2000

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.87 kg

16

$323

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-G2000 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

CZ-G2000 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

 

CZ P-09 Duty

     Notes: IRL, this is an inexpensive pistol that is often underrated due to its lines and forms; it appears to be rather blocky, with a large squared-off trigger guard for a finger of the non-firing hand.  Novel design elements include the plethora of safeties, including a passive firing pin safety, DA/SA operation, a manual safety, and a decocker.  Another unusual feature is that the slide rides inside frame rails.  This gives shooters problems since the slide is narrower than the frame (though it has fore and aft cocking serrations); this is better for structural integrity, but requires precise manufacturing and machining.  It also sharpens the frame-slide fit and a very efficient lockup.  The sights are low-profile and are drift-adjustable (or can be removed and replaced if desired). The sights also have tritium inserts.  The standard magazine holds 19 rounds, but some shooters report that 20 rounds can be fitted in the factory-supplied 19-round magazines with no ill effects.  The magazine well is beveled to aid reloading. The barrel is 4.39 inches, cold forged, with a match barrel and bushing.  The hammer has just enough exposed serrated surface to allow thumb-cocking; in fact, all controls are serrated; though they are not ambidextrous.  The trigger pack is the Omega trigger system, which is match-quality. Another unusual feature is that with the proper level of training, the P-09 may be disassembled then reassembled, leaving the manual safety out. The P-09 comes with a set of three interchangeable backstraps, allowing for different sized hands.  The P-09 also has under the dust cover a MIL-STD-1913 rail; it is long for a pistol, running from the trigger guard to underneath the muzzle.

     The P-09 has enough match components and special features that it is imported and exported as a competition pistol instead of an ordinary pistol.  The P-09 is otherwise sold as big brother to the P-07.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-09 Duty

9mm Parabellum

0.78 kg

19

$249

P-09 Duty

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.88 kg

16

$313

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-09 Duty (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

12

P-09 Duty (.40)

SA

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

15

 

CZ-2075 RAMI

     Notes: This is a compact pistol firing powerful ammunition.  Many people are surprised at how small the weapon is, yet it has decent performance.  The CZ-2075 uses a bushingless barrel; while, when done right, this greatly reduces the number of parts in the weapon, when done wrong, it can cause functioning glitches and a loss of accuracy, and that is often the case with the CZ-2075.  The manual safety is very well positioned and unlikely to be tripped accidentally.  The CZ-2075 uses three-dot sights that are small and can be hard to use.

     In 2007, the CZ-2075 RAMI P was introduced.  It is virtually identical to the standard CZ-2075 RAMI, but has a selective DA and SA trigger, a passive firing pin safety, and very low-profile sights as well as dehorning for snagless draw.  It is identical to the standard CZ-2075 RAMI for game purposes.  The CZ-2075 RAMI BD was also introduced; this has a decocker (instead of a manual safety), a half-cock safety, and 3-dot combat sights with tritium inlays.  If the buyer wishes, his CZ-2075 RAMI BD may be equipped with either a manual decocker or a manual safety, but not both.  It to is identical to the standard CZ-2075 RAMI for game purposes.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is an extremely rare weapon.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

CZ-2075

9mm Parabellum

0.55 kg

10

$142

CZ-2075

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.62 kg

8

$180

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

CZ-2075 (9mm)

SA

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

CZ-2075 (.40)

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

 

CZ TT

     Notes: This is a polymer high-caliber pistol designed specifically for export to the West.  It is basically a conventional polymer-frame pistol firing the large  cartridges and with a relatively short barrel.  The barrel is ported to fight recoil and barrel climb.  Unlike most modern pistols, the TT has no decocking device, which is normally considered a serious omission these days for a pistol designed for civilian use as well as police and military use.  It is a double-action-only weapon, which does increase the safety factor.  The sights are 3-dot in white. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

TT-9

9mm Parabellum

0.74 kg

10

$236

TT-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

0.74 kg

10

$310

TT-45

.45 ACP

0.74 kg

10

$393

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

TT-9

SA

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

TT-40

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

TT-45

SA

2

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

 

KEVIN ZP-98

     Notes: This is a small Czech backup pistol used by police, home defense, and civilian personnel.  The KEVIN uses the principle of breech delay, which allows gases to bleed off slowly for less violent recoil and slide movement.  The weapon was available throughout Eastern Europe, and to some extent, Western Europe, but was never marketed in the US. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: General Robinson, NATO Commander in Chief, was killed by an assassin (supposedly a Dutch member of his staff, but actually Polish) who emptied a ZP-98 into his face in late 1999. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: Some of these weapons have made it to the US, where gang members love them.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

ZP-98

.380 ACP

0.39 kg

6

$151

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

ZP-98

SA

1

Nil

0

4

Nil

4