Dreyse MG-13

     Notes:  The MG-13 was designed by rebuilding the old Dreyse light machinegun.  The barrel jacket was replaced by a light perforated air-cooling jacket, a bipod was mounted near the muzzle, a simple butt was added, and a saddle-type magazine was developed.  Unfortunately, the MG-34 was developed around the same time period, and was a much better and robust weapon.  The MG-13s were then sold to Portugal, renamed the M-38, and served until the late 1940s.  A large amount of them ended up in Angola, where they were still turning up in the hands of guerillas as late as the 1980s.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-13

8mm Mauser

10.89 kg

25, 75 Drum

$2881

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-13

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

3

6

104

MG-13 (Bipod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

1

3

135

 

Heckler & Koch HK-11/21 Series

     Notes: The HK-21 was originally conceived in the mid-1970s as essentially a light machinegun version of the G-3 battle rifle, in order to provide infantrymen with a weapon that longer range and the ability to provide sustained fire for longer periods of time.  As such, the original HK-21 did not differ very much from the G-3 externally; however, the HK-21 was internally a very different weapon.  The HK-21 is a belt-fed weapon, able to feed from standard German, French, or US disintegrating link belts, or the German DM-1 50-round non-disintegrating link belt.  For the most part, the operation of the HK-21 is the same as that of the G-3; however, the HK-21 fires from a closed bolt instead of an open bolt, primarily to increase accuracy and increase resistance to dirt.  The selector mechanism of the G-3 is retained, including the ability to fire on semiautomatic, though the rate of automatic fire is increased to 900 rpm.  The buttstock shape is changed to allow the nonfiring hand to grip it, the rear sight has been changed to an adjustable drum-type which is recalibrated to allow for the increased range (the hooded front sight post remains the same), and a folding bipod has been added to the front of the barrel sleeve.  The barrel is 17.7 inches long, tipped with a flash suppressor, and is of the quick-change type.  For the most part, the HK-21 is meant to be fired from its bipod, but it can also be mounted on a tripod developed for it (called Tripod Mount 1102), which weighs 9.2 kg.

     The HK-21 also has several unusual features.  By changing the barrel, feed plate, and bolt, the HK-21 can also fire either standard 5.56mm NATO or 7.62mm Kalashnikov belts.  (The latter chambering was produced primarily with an eye towards possible export sales, and the parts for this version are rather rare these days.)  In addition, the belt-feed mechanism and parts may be removed and replaced with a magazine adapter, allowing the HK-21 to feed from various magazines and drums.

     By the late 1990s, the HK-21 was no longer being produced (it was superseded by later versions of the HK-21 series).  However, it was in production for quite some time and can still be found in Portugal, Mexico (license production), and some African and Southeast Asian countries. 

     The HK-21A1 is essentially a modified and improved version of the HK-21.  Perhaps the biggest change is that the HK-21A1 cannot be converted to magazine feed; it is a belt-feed-only weapon.  The basic belt-feed mechanism is identical to that of the HK-21, but it can be rotated downward for easier reloading.  The belt feed unit can also be completely removed as part of field stripping, which allows for easier cleaning of both the unit and the receiver itself.  The HK-21A1 can be fed from pretty much any disintegrating or non-disintegrating link belt.  The HK-21A1 can actually be loaded without raising the feed cover (though the charging handle must be cycled twice instead of once to do this).  No option was provided to allow the HK-21A1 to fire 7.62mm Kalashnikov ammunition, but the HK-21A1 can still be converted in the same manner as the HK-21 to fire either 7.62mm NATO or 5.56mm NATO ammunition.  The HK-21A1 is primarily meant for squad and platoon support, and is therefore meant to be fired from a bipod, but can also be mounted on the 1102 Tripod.  The bipod is essentially the same as that of the HK-21, but in addition to folding, it is detachable, and can be mounted either at the end of the barrel sleeve (for better stability) or at the front of the receiver (for better balance).

     Further improvements were made with the HK-21E and HK-23E versions.  The two calibers available were essentially separated (the HK-21E is in 7.62mm NATO and the HK-23E is in 5.56mm NATO).  The barrel of the HK-21E was lengthened to 22 inches, while the barrel of the HK-23E remained at 17.7 inches.  A 3-round burst setting was added to the selective fire mechanisms of both versions.  The HK-21E and HK-23E both have a receiver lengthened 3.7 inches over that of the HK-21A1, allowing for the installation of the new selector mechanism as well as new recoil buffer mechanisms, as well as an improved belt-feed unit which has far greater pulling power than the HK-21A1.  The quick-change barrel’s grip has been improved, and the trigger unit can be replaced with a winter trigger unit.  The stock has a compartment for a cleaning kit.  The bipod is adjustable for three increments of elevation, and the HK-21E and HK-23E are capable of traversing up to 30 degrees either way while the bipod remains still.  The cyclic rates of automatic fire have been lowered somewhat (to 800 rpm for the HK-21E, and 750 rpm for the HK-23E, from the previous cyclic rate of 900 rpm), though this is not important in the mechanics of the Twilight 2000 v2.2 rules.

     Even with the development of the HK-21E and HK-23E, some customers (especially customers in Latin America and the Mexican Army) still perceived a need for a lighter version of those weapons which were magazine-fed instead of belt-fed, primarily for use as squad automatic weapons and heavy rifles.  Heckler & Koch responded to this request with the HK-11A1 and HK-13A1, and later the HK-11E and HK-13E.  The HK-11A1 (chambered for 7.62mm NATO) and the HK-13A1 (chambered for 5.56mm NATO) are essentially HK-21Es and HK-23Es which are primarily meant for magazine-feed (though they can still be turned into belt-fed weapons by use of a parts kit), sights calibrated for shorter ranges, and a forward assault grip underneath the barrel sleeve (which can be rotated and locked to the left or right sides if the shooter desires).  The folding bipod has different feet, and is not detachable (it is mounted at the front of the barrel sleeve), and the barrel length for both the HK-11A1/HK-11E and HK-13A1/HK-13E are 17.7 inches.  The HK-11A1 can use 20-round G-3 magazines and also use a 50-round drum designed by Heckler & Koch; the HK-13A1 accepts 20 and 30-round magazines of German manufacture in addition to a 50-round drum.  The HK-11E differs primarily in the magazine well, which will accept any 20 or 30-round magazine which conforms to NATO/US STANAG specifications; the HK-13E will accept any 5.56mm NATO magazine which conforms to NATO/US specifications, as well as older German magazines and the 50-round Heckler & Koch drum.  These versions are not designed for tripod mounting, however.

     Though the G-8 was designed more as a heavy rifle for sustained fire and as a sort of tactical marksman’s weapon, it is in fact a modified version of the HK-11E. and is therefore included here for completeness.  The operating system is essentially the same as that of the HK-11E, complete with a fire selection lever allowing semiautomatic fire, three-round bursts, and fully automatic fire.  The G-8 was designed with a great deal of input from German border security police, SRT-type teams, and antiterrorist units (particularly GSG-9), as it was conceived of and designed specifically for their use.  The G-8 is sort of a hybrid of battle rifle, light machinegun, and marksman’s weapon; it has a barrel the same length as the G-3 (17.7 inches) but the barrel is heavier than that of the G-3 (it is almost a bull barrel).  The barrel is tipped with a flash suppressor/muzzle brake combination.  The barrel is also of the quick-change type, and includes a carrying handle (mostly for use when changing the barrel, though it is at the center of balance for the G-8).  The sights are similar to those of the G-3, but can be adjusted more precisely, and both the front and rear sights may be so adjusted.  The G-8 normally uses the 20 and 30-round Heckler & Koch magazines or the 50-round drum H&K developed for the HK-11A1 and HK-11E, but it can also be modified for belt feed in the same manner as the HK-11E.  There is also a G-8A1 variant, which cannot be modified for belt feed.  Some G-8s also have a forward assault grip under the handguard.  The G-8 includes a mount allowing the use of most NATO telescopic and night vision devices, though a possible future modification is the replacement of this mount with a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  An HK-11E-type bipod equips the G-8, but it is not equipped for tripod or pintle mounting.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The HK-21, HK-21A1, and HK-21E were also used by US Navy SEALs and Israeli armed forces, and US Marines operating in the Middle East. (The SEALs were often the ones using the 7.62mm Kalashnikov models.)  The US Army’s Delta special operations unit was said to be fond of the HK-21A1.  All of these weapons were quite common in the Mexican military as well as several countries in Latin and South America; as a result of their widespread use by the Mexican military, many of them were captured in the American Southwest and used by everyone from marauders to resistance forces, or simply people protecting their homes in the area; examples were even used against the Russians in Canadian and US hands as far away as Alaska.  The G-8 is an exception; it was issued exclusively to German special operations units and the Border Police, and only in limited quantities.  (Special ops units typically got the G-8s, while Border Police got the G-8A1s.)

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HK-21

7.62mm NATO

7.94 kg

20, 80 Drum, 50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt*

$2217

HK-21

5.56mm NATO

5.75 kg

20, 30, 40, 100 Belt*

$1362

HK-21

7.62mm Kalashnikov

7.06 kg

30, 40, 75 Drum, 100 Belt*

$1857

HK-21A1

7.62mm NATO

8.3 kg

50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt, 250 Belt

$2217

HK-21A1

5.56mm NATO

6.01 kg

100 Belt, 200 Belt

$1362

HK-21E

7.62mm NATO

8.8 kg

50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt, 250 Belt

$3210

HK-23E

5.56mm NATO

6.84 kg

100 Belt, 200 Belt

$1801

HK-11A1

7.62mm NATO

8.15 kg

20, 50 Drum, 50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt, 250 Belt*

$3077

HK-11E

7.62mm NATO

8.15 kg

20, 30, 50 Drum, 50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt, 250 Belt*

$3077

HK-13A1

5.56mm NATO

5.9 kg

20, 30, 40, 100 Belt, 200 Belt

$1801

HK-13E

5.56mm NATO

5.9 kg

20, 30, 40, 100 Belt, 200 Belt

$1801

G-8

7.62mm NATO

8.15 kg

20, 30, 50 Drum, 50 Belt, 100 Belt, 200 Belt, 250 Belt*

$3068

G-8A1

7.62mm NATO

8.15 kg

20, 30, 50 Drum

$3068

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

HK-21 (7.62mm NATO)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

7

52

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

3

67

(With Tripod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

1

104

HK-21 (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

7

2

4

46

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

2

60

(With Tripod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

1

92

HK-21 (7.62mm Kalashnikov)

5

4

2-Nil

7

3

7

52

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-Nil

7

1

3

67

(With Tripod)

5

4

2-Nil

7

1

1

103

HK-21A1 (7.62mm)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

7

52

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

3

67

(With Tripod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

1

104

HK-21A1 (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

7

2

4

46

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

2

60

(With Tripod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

1

92

HK-21E

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

4/6

72

(With Bipod)

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

2/3

93

(With Tripod)

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

1/1

143

HK-23E

3/5

3

1-Nil

7

2

2/4

46

(With Bipod)

3/5

3

1-Nil

7

1

1/2

60

(With Tripod)

3/5

3

1-Nil

7

1

1/1

92

HK-11A1/HK-11E

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

4/6

52

(With Bipod)

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

2/3

67

HK-13A1/HK-13E

3/5

3

1-Nil

7

2

2/4

46

(With Bipod)

3/5

3

1-Nil

7

1

1/2

60

G-8

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

3/5

56

(With Bipod)

3/5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

2/3

72

*These weapons may be assembled to fire from magazines or belts, but may not be assembled in such a way to allow the gun to use both at the same time (i.e. interchangeably). 

 

Mauser MG-34

     Notes:  The MG-34 was an improved version of the MG-30, which was in of itself an improved version of the MG-15.  The MG-34 introduced the general-purpose machinegun concept to large-scale use, and introduced the use of the machinegun as the primarily killing instrument with the rest of the infantry squad backing up the machinegun crew.  The Germans of World War 2 even made regular use of beaten zones as a legitimate use of machinegun fire. Even the “light” mid-caliber machineguns of most other countries were heavy, often water-cooled affairs and could hardly be called light by today’s standards or even next to the MG-34.

     By the time Mauser and his team got finished with the MG-34, it had little resemblance to the MG-15 or MG-30.  The magazine feed had been replaced by a disintegrating link belt (with a 75-round drum as an option), the weapon had a quick-change barrel, and the operation was greatly simplified.  In a broad sense, the MG-34 was the ancestor of modern GPMGs and light machineguns.  The bipod was a bit flimsy, and the MG-34 was unstable on it; however, it was light enough to deliver automatic fire from the hip and it was rock-solid on its bipod.  It also tended to jam in dusty conditions.  The MG-34 could use one of two tripods, a lightweight 6.75-kilogram tripod or the heavier Laffette tripod, which weighed 23.6 kilograms, incorporated a telescopic sight, special sighting equipment for indirect/plunging fire, and a bracket on the right leg for an ammo box from which the gun could feed.  The Laffette tripod’s legs could be extended to facilitate antiaircraft fire, or used with the legs spread wide and the shooter aiming using a periscopic sight.  The MG-34 served throughout World War 2, even though it was officially superseded by the MG-42; it was perhaps more prevalent in World War 2 than the MG-42.  MG-34 (and MG-42) design influenced a number of post-war machineguns, such as the German MG-3 and its derivatives and the US M-60.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-34

8mm Mauser

12.1 kg

250 Belt or 75 Drum

$2792

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-34

10

4

2-3-Nil

8

2

12

85

With Bipod

10

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

7

111

With Tripod

10

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

2

170

 

Maxim MG-08

     Notes:  This is an improvement of the Maxim machineguns that Germany adopted between 1887 and 1901.  It is a typical Maxim pattern weapon, heavy with a toggle action.  It was originally issued with a sledge that weighed 32 kilograms.  The 28-inch barrel was almost entirely enclosed within a water jacket, used for cooling the barrel in sustained fire, but the cyclic rate of fire was only about 400 rpm.  Feed was from non-disintegrating cloth belts.  The MG-08 was very effective in World War 1, but also quite cumbersome, and could take as many as four men to move if one wanted it moved quickly.  The MG-08 was produced from 1908-18.  The M-1909 was a rare export version which used an early version of the light tripod mentioned below.  It was manufactured by DWM and sold in small amounts to several Central American and South American countries as well as Switzerland, Belgium, Romania, China and Persia (now Iran).  After receiving these guns, the Swiss and Chinese quickly copied them and built them in their own factories, but DWM-built versions are rather rare.

     The MG-08 was replaced with the somewhat lighter MG-08/15, using a stock, pistol grip, and bipod, and also had a muzzle booster to increase the abysmal rate of fire.  The cyclic rate was increased to only 500 rpm, however.  The lMG-08/15 was a further lightened version for use on aircraft; it had a skeleton jacket that had a mechanism to use with interrupter gear so it can fire through propellers. 

     In 1916, a new light tripod was designed to replace the heavy sledge.  (This tripod was copied by Belgium and Russia to use with their Maxim-pattern machineguns.)  The MG-08/18 was the last World War 1 version of the MG-08 used by the Germans; it dispensed with the water jacket and used a light air cooling casing instead.  Unfortunately, the barrel tended to overheat so much that German doctrine was to use the MG-08/18 in threes so two could cool while one fired. 

     The MG-08 was used by the Germans as late as 1938 in front line formations, and 1945 in reserve formations.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-08

8mm Mauser

26.44 kg (30.5 kg with water)

100 or 250 Cloth Belt

$2906

MG-08/15

8mm Mauser

18 kg (22 kg with water)

100 or 250 Cloth Belt

$2905

lMG-08/15

8mm Mauser

22 kg

100 or 250 Cloth Belt

$2906

MG-08/18

8mm Mauser

17 kg

100 or 250 Cloth Belt

$2905

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-08 (Sledge)

3

5

2-3-Nil

7

1

1

208

MG-08 (Tripod)

3

5

2-3-Nil

7

1

2

208

MG-08/15

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

2

6

104

MG-08/15 (Bipod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

1

3

135

lMG-08/15

5

5

2-3-Nil

7

1

1

208

MG-08/18

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

2

6

104

MG-08/18 (Bipod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

9

1

3

135

 

Parabellum MG-1914/MG-1917

     Notes:  Sometimes known as the “Zeppelin Gun” for its employment in the gun mounts of World War 1 lighter-than-air craft, the Parabellum gun was designed in response to a German military need for a machinegun for use on aircraft flexible mounts.  In 1918, when the Germans were beginning to have a hard time finding weapons of any sort, it was modified for use in the ground role.  The Parabellum gun is basically a vastly-lightened Maxim MG-08 machinegun, with the toggle inverted so that it broke upwards instead of downwards.  This allowed the designer to change the operation to short recoil, making for a lighter mechanism.  The bulky water cooling jacket was also eliminated, replaced with a perforated air cooling jacket.  This is also the easiest way to tell an MG-1914 from an MG-1917; the MG-1914 has a wide cooling jacket, while the MG-1917 has a slim cooling jacket.  The MG-1917 also has a forward handgrip, and a bipod; it was meant to be used in the ground role as well as an aircraft gun.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-1914

8mm Mauser

9.8 kg

250 Belt

$2798

MG-1917

8mm Mauser

11 kg

250 Belt

$2872

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-1914

5

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

2

202

MG-1917

5

5

2-3-Nil

8

2

6

101

MG-1917 (Bipod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

3

131

MG-1917 (Tripod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

8

1

1

202

 

Rheinmetall MG-3

     Notes: The story of the MG-3, now the standard German GPMG, began shortly after World War 2 and the formation of the then-new West German Army (Bundeswehr).  The West Germans needed small arms; they partially made do with surplus weapons from other countries, partially with newer designs from other countries, but it was quickly realized that as far as GPMGs were concerned, the MG-42 was pretty much still the best light machinegun in the world.  Rheinmetall re-designed the MG-42 for the then-new 7.62mm NATO cartridge, producing what Rheinmetall called the MG-42/59.  The West German Army called the new weapon the MG-1, with later versions (MG-1A1, MG-1A2, and MG-1A3) differing primarily in small details to ease production.  (The Italians, in fact, still use a further-modified form of the MG-1A3, though they are phasing them out, and they still call it the MG-42/59.)  The MG-1 series could only feed from the 50-round DM-1 non-disintegrating link belt.  At the same time, Rheinmetall also directly re-chambered some MG-42s to fire the 7.62mm NATO cartridge; these were designated the MG-2.  Both the MG-1 and MG-2 were used by the West Germans until 1968 (and unofficially, even longer then that).

     In 1968, Rheinmetall introduced the MG-3; this version externally looks like an MG-1A3.  The rate of fire of the MG-1 and MG-2 was considered way too high (they still had almost the original rate of fire of the MG-42, about 1100 rpm), so the weight of the bolt of the MG-3 was almost doubled, reducing the standard rate of fire to 900 rpm.  The MG-3, like many GPMGs of the period, has a variable gas regulator, primarily for use when compensating for fouling, but it also allows the rate of fire to be adjusted from 700-1300 rpm.  The receiver was modified so that the MG-3 could accept standard NATO disintegrating link ammunition belts (but could also accept the earlier DM-1 belts).  The strength of the belt pull was also dramatically increased; though the standard NATO belt has 100 rounds, experiments were conducted with MG-3’s feeding from hanging 1000-round belts!  A new plastic drum was also designed to contain a 100-round belt and attach it to the receiver; most of it is of green or black plastic, but they also have a clear plastic rear to allow the gunner to check how much ammunition is left on the belt.  Ammunition feed, like most Western belt-fed weapons, is from the left side.

     The iron sights were also modified; they never really worked for the 7.62mm NATO cartridge, and were recalibrated.  Barrel length was changed slightly (to 22.2 inches), and the rate of rifling was also changed due to new information gained from American experience in Vietnam.  The muzzle of the barrel was given a modified recoil booster, but retained the conical flash hider.  The barrel could still be changed quickly, but the procedure changed somewhat, mostly to protect the hands of the assistant gunner from the hot barrel.  An ability to use a blank firing adapter was added for training purposes.

     The MG-3 may be fired from a folding bipod near the end of the barrel sleeve; this bipod is not adjustable for height, but the left leg may be adjusted to allow for cant.  The feet of the bipod have spikes to help stabilize the gun.  The MG-3 also fits on standard NATO light tripods as well as NATO medium tripods, as well as pintle mounts.  A modified form of the MG-3 is also commonly used on German-made vehicles as coaxial armament, and a version with spade grips instead of a stock also exists which allows the MG-3 to be used as a door gun on helicopters.

     It should be noted that, all in all, relatively few modifications were made to the original MG-42 design; a World War 2 Nazi soldier could easily mistake the MG-3 for an MG-42 at first glance.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-3

7.62mm NATO

11.07 kg

50 Belt, 100 Belt, 250 Belt

$3131

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-3

5/10

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

6/13

73

(With Bipod)

5/10

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

3/6

94

(With Tripod)

5/10

4

2-3-Nil

8

1

2/3

133

 

Rheinmetall MG-15nA

     Notes:  This gun is generally known as a “Bergmann,” though it was probably designed by Louis Schmeisser.  It is a greatly lightened version of the MG-15 (nA stands for neuer Art – new pattern).  The water jacket of the MG-15 was discarded in favor of a perforated air-cooling jacket.  A bipod, pistol grip, and a rudimentary padded butt were added.  The MG-15nA fed from a belt that was contained in a drum on the right side of the weapon.  It was one of the first weapons to use a disintegrating link belt.  The MG-15nA was a very robust and reliable weapon, but despite its good qualities, it was neither produced nor adopted in great quantities, except to German troops fighting in Italy. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-15nA

8mm Mauser

12.92 kg

200 Belt

$2942

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-15nA

5

5

2-3-Nil

7

2

6

105

MG-15nA (Bipod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

7

1

3

136

MG-15nA (Tripod)

5

5

2-3-Nil

7

1

1

210

 

Rheinmetall MG-42

     Notes:  This was designed in response to Nazi Germany’s need for more machineguns that could be produced quickly and cheaply.  This led directly to the roller-locking mechanism that later made Heckler-and Koch famous – though it was a Mauser invention.  The MG-42 was made from parts pressed, stamped, and welded from sheet steel, yet yielded a better weapon than the MG-34.  The rate of fire was so high that the barrel change procedure was simplified to the point a soldier could almost do it in his sleep, usually in less than 5 seconds.  By the end of World War 2, over 750,000 had been built, and many of those were taken up by post-war armies, often with modifications to calibers of their countries.  The MG-3 is basically an MG-42 in 7.62mm NATO caliber, and the US M-60 is an MG-42 after “Americanization” and sort of a Rube Goldberg selection and modification process.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MG-42

8mm Mauser

11.5 kg

50 Belt

$2677

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MG-42

10

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

13

67

MG-42 (Bipod)

10

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

7

87

MG-42 (Tripod)

10

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

3

134