Bazalt/Tula DP-61 Duel

     Notes: Though designed by Bazalt, the DP-61 is actually manufactured by Tula.  It appears to be a smaller version of the SA-7 Grail SAM, though of course it is not a SAM, but designed, like the DP-64, for use against naval saboteurs and other attack swimmers.  It also has some value against minisubs (as does the DP-64).  Though similar in purpose to the DP-64, its operation is somewhat different, and of course has only one barrel.  The DP-61’s greatest difference is the use of that one barrel; the barrel is snapped down for loading, then snapped up to about 15 degrees elevation, firing its grenade in a ballistic arc that is figured into the sights.  This allows the concussion round, which has many similarities to a small depth charge rather than a conventional concussion grenade, to hit the water at a more direct angle, with the concussion round sinking faster.  It can be preset before launch to detonate up to 16 meters underwater.  When it explodes, a marking flare pops to the surface and floats, giving (hopefully) the approximate position of the swimmer or minisub.

     The concussion round can also be used to attack land targets and personnel; the barrel is snapped down to a straight position at the time, not using an arcing trajectory.

     The second kind of round is simply the marking flare, though it is brighter in this case and burns for two whole minutes.  It uses the arcing flight tube position, unless directly marking land targets.  It is used to quickly mark the position of sightings of combat swimmers, as it is a smaller, lighter round which can be reloaded faster.

     The DP-61 uses a rocket-boosted grenade, allowing it to achieve more range and fire a heavier payload than the DP-64.  This means that it does produce backblast and has danger to troops behind the shooter, and it can’t be fired from enclosed spaces.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazine

Price

DP-61

55mm Russian High-Velocity

6 kg

1 Internal

$692

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

DP-61

SS

GR-55M Concussion

2

Nil

190

1890

 

SS (2)

GRS-55 Marking Flare

1

Nil

190

1890

 

Bazalt DP-64 Nepryadva

     Notes:  This weapon was designed to protect ships and ports from combat swimmers and frogmen.  It is a twin over-and-under barrel grenade launcher with a selection of rounds available.  Chief among these is the concussion round, designed to have double the concussion value underwater.  An antipersonnel round was also developed to allow use against swimmers that come up on land.  The DP-64 can be fired from enclosed spaces and with personnel behind it, at it produces no backblast and operates using a locked breech.

     Perhaps the most interesting round fired by the DP-64 is the CG-45 concussion round.  When this round is fired, it dives to a pre-set depth (of up to 16 meters).  This causes the normal effects of a concussion round exploding underwater; it also ejects a flare that floats to the surface above the explosion, marking the approximate position of the swimmer.

     This launcher has been copied wholesale by China.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazine

Price

DP-64

45mm Russian Medium-Velocity

10 kg

2 Internal

$1210

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

DP-64

SA

FG-45 APERS

1

Nil

140

860

 

SA

CG-45 Concussion

1

Nil

140

860

 

SA

SG-45 ILLUM

1

Nil

140

860

 

Bazalt MRG-1 Ogonek

     Notes: Sort of the same idea as the DP-64 but…more, the MRG-1 is a practically ground-mounted MRL able to fire salvoes of high-caliber grenades for the defense of shipping and ports. “Grenade launcher” is sort of a misnomer here, as the MRG-1 fires what are essentially miniature depth charges; the HE grenades can be set at launch to explode up to 100 meters in the air or 40 meters underwater.  The MRG-1 is also able to use any of the DP-64’s grenades.  The MRG-1 has seven launch tubes for grenades; the launchers are under manual remote control, and the operator may be up to 30 meters away.  Launches may be done as individual shots under operator control, or as a 7-round salvo with one push of a button.   The launch tubes are situated in a cluster, with one central tube and six others surrounding it.  The operator may select which tube to launch, useful to fire flares followed by HE grenades.

     The DP-65 is a relative of the MRG-1; it is a more elaborate affair (though it has only six launch tubes), with the ability to be controlled by one or both of two control boxes situated within 100 meters of the launcher.  It can also automatically react to and launch against incursions into a preset target zone within 100 meters to the front of the tripod launch tube cluster.  Firing characteristics are the same as for the MRG-1.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazine

Price

MRG-1

55mm Russian Medium-Velocity

53 kg

7 Internal

$5010

DP-65

55mm Russian Medium-Velocity

132 kg

6 Internal

$12050

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

MRG-1

SA

RG-55 HE

N/A

N/A

168

1030

 

SA

GRS-55 ILLUM

N/A

N/A

168

1030

 

SA

FG-45 APERS

N/A

N/A

140

860

 

SA

CG-45 Concussion

N/A

N/A

140

860

 

SA

SG-45 ILLUM

N/A

N/A

140

860

 

KBI AGS-30

     Notes: The AGS-30 began replacing the AGS-17 in Russian service in 1994.  The AGS-30 is a much simpler weapon than the AGS-17, using some 40% less parts, and is much lighter than the AGS-17.  Other differences include only one rate of automatic fire, though again the cyclic rate is low enough that a gunner can squeeze off short bursts and single shots with a minimum of practice.  The operation is blowback, using a heavy buffer, bolt, and sear; in addition, the AGS-30 uses a counter-recoil buffer to further decrease recoil, and the bolt uses long recoil.  Cocking is by a simple lever.  The same PAG-17 2.7x sight as the AGS-17 is used, along with backup iron sights.  The lighter weight of the weapon decreases the standard crew for the AGS-30 to two men.  A variant, the AG-30, is designed for mounting on vehicular mounts or tripods without any modifications, but does not have the PAG-17 sight.  The AGS-30 fires the same rounds as the AGS-30, and can also fire two additional rounds – the VOG-30, with a larger explosive and propellant charge, and the GPD-30, an enhanced fragmentation round.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazine

Price

AGS-30

30mm Russian Medium Velocity

16 kg (with Tripod)

30 Belt

$1120

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

AGS-30

5

HE

0

1

140

1325

 

5

HEDP

0

1

140

1325

 

KBI AGS-30

     Notes: The AGS-30 began replacing the AGS-17 in Russian service in 1994.  The AGS-30 is a much simpler weapon than the AGS-17, using some 40% less parts, and is much lighter than the AGS-17.  Other differences include only one rate of automatic fire, though again the cyclic rate is low enough that a gunner can squeeze off short bursts and single shots with a minimum of practice.  The operation is blowback, using a heavy buffer, bolt, and sear; in addition, the AGS-30 uses a counter-recoil buffer to further decrease recoil, and the bolt uses long recoil.  Cocking is by a simple lever.  The same PAG-17 2.7x sight as the AGS-17 is used, along with backup iron sights.  The tripod is a new lightweight model weighing only 5.7 kilograms.  The lighter weight of the weapon decrease the standard crew for the AGS-30 to two men.  A variant, the AG-30, is designed for mounting on vehicular mounts or tripods without any modifications, but does not have the PAG-17 sight.  The AGS-30 fires the same rounds as the AGS-30, and can also fire two additional rounds – the VOG-30, with a larger explosive and propellant charge, and the GPD-30, an enhanced fragmentation round.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

AGS-30

30mm Russian Medium Velocity

10.8 kg

5

30 Belt

$1120

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

AGS-30

5

HE

1

2

140

850

 

5

HEDP

1

2

140

850

 

5

VOG-30 HEDP

1

2

112

680

 

5

HE-FRAG

1

2

140

850

 

KBI GM-94

     Notes: Despite the capabilities of the GM-94, this pump-action grenade launcher was actually designed for use by the Russian equivalent of police SRT teams, and came into military use relatively recently.  The GM-94 is basically a greatly-enlarged RM-93 shotgun, and operates in a similar manner – one pumps the barrel forward to jack a round into the chamber (and to eject any fired shell), and back again to lock the barrel and cock the weapon.  The barrel is pulled almost halfway forward to load the tubular magazine atop the weapon.  The barrel is not only heavily ribbed externally, it also has two hand stops to aid in working the action and gripping the weapon.  Construction is primarily of steel, with a stock that can be swung up and over the weapon to fold it.  When folded, the stock may also be used as a carrying handle.  The ammunition is peculiar to the GM-94, and not used by any other weapon.  Though the tubular magazine can normally hold four rounds, if it has thermobaric rounds (whether one or as many as three), the magazine can hold only three rounds, since the thermobaric grenades are longer than other types of ammunition.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is a popular terrorist weapon in the Merc 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

GM-94

43mm Russian Low-Velocity

4.5 kg

4/5

4 Tubular*

$590

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

GM-94

PA

Baton

2

Nil

50

Nil

 

PA

CS

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

Thermobaric

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

Flash-Bang

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

FRAG

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

HE

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

HEAT

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

ILLUM

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

Rubber Slug

2

Nil

100

420

 

PA

Star Cluster

2

Nil

100

320

*If even one thermobaric round is loaded into the magazine, only three rounds may be carried.

 

KBI RGS-50

     Notes: The RGS-50 is a single-shot shoulder-fired grenade launcher designed primarily for use by police, but also with some military applications (and called the RGS-50M in that guise).  The RGS-50 uses primarily a tubular break-open mechanism with an attached pistol grip and firing mechanism, along with a detachable shoulder stock and forward foregrip.  Sights are an adjustable ladder rear and post front. And the weapon is broken open by a latch behind of the rear sight.  The trigger mechanism has s safety switch.  The detachable shoulder stock has a rubber recoil pad.  The RGS-50 can be fired without the stock or even the foregrip if desired; the RGS-50’s stock weighs 2 kilograms, and the foregrip 0.2 kilograms.  On military versions, the foregrip folds backwards, and the sights are a bit more precise.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

RGS-50

50mm Russian Low-Velocity

6.3 kg

4/5

1 Internal

$685

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

RGS-50 (Stock/No Stock)

SS

CHEM

1/3

Nil

110

430

 

 

Flash-Bang

1/3

Nil

110

430

 

 

Beanbag

1/3

Nil

60

Nil

 

 

HE-FRAG

1/3

Nil

110

430

 

 

HEAT

1/3

Nil

110

430

 

 

HESH

1/3

Nil

110

430

 

KBTM AGS-17 Plamya

     Notes:  The Plamya (Flame) was first seen in use in Afghanistan in about 1977, though it had been in Russian and Warsaw Pact service since about 1975.  It is generally issued at the company level in infantry and combat engineer units, and is meant to provide a massive volume of high-explosive fire during assaults.  Construction is largely of steel; the firing mechanism allows only for variable rates of automatic fire, but the maximum cyclic rate is slow enough for a gunner to get single shots with a minimum of practice.  Recoil is blowback with a hydraulic recoil damper.  The charging handle is a handle attached to a wire cable.  The firing control levers fold for transport.  Though the AGS-17 is fed by 30-round belts, experienced AGS-17 gunners normally keep the first round loop open due to problems with first-round feed reliability.

     AGS-17 variants have also been found mounted in vehicle turrets as well as on pintle mounts, and in chin turrets and as door guns on helicopters (helicopter-mounted Plamyas are normally known as AG-17A’s instead of the AGS-17).  Other mounts include a mounting with a coaxial NSV machinegun on a high-angle mount for use in mountainous areas, and a remote control AGS-17 known as the 6S5 Mius that allows one gunner to control up to 4 AGS-17s at once, aimed by a laser rangefinder.  The standard AGS-17 is normally fitted with a 2.7x sight, and is mounted on a 12-kilogram tripod, though earlier AGS-17 tripods were of heavier and clunkier construction and weighed 17 kilograms.  The AGS-17 has proliferated throughout former Russian client states, and has also been copied by China.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

AGS-17

30mm Russian Medium Velocity

18 kg

5

30 Belt

$1368

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

AGS-17

2/5

HE

1

1/2

140

850

 

2/5

HEDP

1

1/2

140

850

 

TekhMash 6G27 Balkan

     Notes: Russian troops, though they were reasonably satisfied with the AGS-17 and AGS-30 and liked their light weight, they always wanted an AGL with more powerful rounds and especially, with greater range – something on par with Western AGLs like the Mk 19 and HK GMG.  The result of nearly 30 years of development is the 6G27, sometimes known (especially in the West) as the AGS-40.  First deliveries to the Russian Army took place in 2016; no exports of the 6G27 have taken place; indeed, it has not been offered for export sales.

     The 6G27 is definitely an increase in firepower over the AGS-17 and AGS-30, but the downside is increased weight – on its tripod, it weighs nearly twice as much as the AGS-17.  It might have been heavier, but portions of the receiver, and ammo drum, the stock, and parts of the trigger are of polymer. Dimensionally, however, the Balkan is more compact than the AGS-17 and AGS-30. Externally, the Balkan looks enough like the AGS-17 and AGS-30 that it could be mistaken for those launchers at first glance – and more importantly, it will fit on the same tripods and vehicular mounts as AGSs like the Plamya.  The 6G27 is equipped with an image intensification/telescopic sight with a power of 6x for the day telescopic sight and 10x for the night image intensifier.  Operation is by gas, and it fires from an open bolt. Feed is by belt, contained in a round polymer drum which attaches to the right side of the receiver. The Balkan is loaded and fired in virtually the same manner as the AGS-17 and AGS-30.

     The grenades have a better damaging radius, come in more varieties, and have over double the range of an AGS-17 or AGS-30.  They are sort of unusual; they are not exactly caseless, but the propellant casing and explosives casing are in a single unit and go downrange in one piece, with the propellant jacket producing extra fragments or extra effects depending on the round.  No empty case of any sort is ejected from the Balkan when it is fired, and round ejections occur only to clear a jam or unload the weapon.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

6G27

40x64mm Russian HV

32 kg

5

20 Belt

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

 

5

CHEM

1

2

206

2500

 

5

Flechette

1

2

206

2500

5

HE

1

2

206

2500

 

5

HEDP

1

2

206

2500

 

5

ILLUM

1

2

206

2500

 

5

Jumping Frag

1

2

206

2500

 

TsKIB SOO 6G30 (RG-6)

     Notes:  This weapon was developed in response to a Russian Army need for a multishot grenade launcher for use in Chechnya.  It is basically a modified GP-25 firing assembly with a rotating cylinder mechanism behind the barrel and a sliding stock with a thick recoil pad.  The 6G30 is, however, not designed to be fired with the stock in the forward position. The barrels in the rotating cylinder are rifled, while the single central barrel is not.  The weapon is wound when reloading like a clock using a folding crank at the rear of the cylinder.  The cylinder assembly hinges to allow for reloading. 

     Early production 6G30s had a defect, in that the weapon does not always fire on a given cylinder; any grenade is 2% likely not to fire, over and above the normal chance for misfire during catastrophic failure.  Grenades that do not fire are not defective; they may be reloaded and may then fire at normal probability, again with a 2% chance of misfire.  This is a defect of the weapon and not the rounds.  Newer production improvements are believed to have eliminated this problem.

     In addition to the types of rounds the GP-25 may fire, the 6G-30 can also fire a tactical flechette round called the Gvozd (Nail) and the GRD-40 extended-duration smoke round.

     This weapon was not issued to line units, but instead only to Spetsnaz and Alpha teams. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk*

Magazine

Price

6G30

40x44 Russian Low-Velocity

6.2 kg

3/4

6 Cylinder

$625

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

6G30

SA

CHEM

1

Nil

90

380

 

SA

HE

1

Nil

90

380

 

SA

HEDP

1

Nil

90

380

 

SA

ILLUM

1

Nil

90

380

 

SA

Flechette

1

Nil

30

Nil

*The 6G-30 cannot be fired with the stock folded.

 

TsKIB SOO GP-25/GP-30 Koster

     Notes: The GP-25 is a single-shot, muzzle-loaded grenade launcher of simple design and compact dimensions.  The GP-25 (also known as the BG-15, BG-1, or AK-GL) was designed specifically for use with AK-series weapons (but will also fit most foreign-made AK-derivatives with handguards about the same shape as the Russian AK series, as well as the AN-94), and clamps in place below the handguard, the area of barrel up to the gas block, and the very front of the receiver.  The GP-25 includes a rudimentary pistol grip, as well as a grenade launcher sight atop the gas tube.  Service with the Russians began in 1978.

     Grenades are slid into the muzzle of the grenade launcher and held in place by a spring-loaded latch.  Inserting a grenade cocks the launcher and also engages a safety that is removed by a thumb latch.  The GP-25 comes with a rubber recoil pad that can be slipped over the butt of the grenadier’s rifle.  (Again, this assumes that the dimensions of the rifle’s butt are approximately the same as that of Russian AK-series weapons.)  Other parts of the interface gear help protect the rifle itself against the recoil of the GP-25.  The stubby barrel of the GP-25 is a mere 8.07 inches long, with the entire weapon being only 12.72 inches long.  Firing may be done in direct fire or in indirect fire by bracing the butt on the ground against the grenadier’s foot.

     The GP-30 was designed to simplify production, but the new production procedures had the side-effect of lightening the weapon. The GP-30 has a simplified sight that is moved to the right side of the weapon.  It is otherwise identical to the GP-25 for game purposes.

     Both of these weapons can be fired separately from a rifle – but as they are light in weight, have only rudimentary pistol grips, and no provision for stocks, recoil is quite stiff and fire is inaccurate (one level more difficult).

     The GP-95 was designed specifically for use with the OTs-14 Groza assault rifle, but can also be used on the A-91 and 9A91.  The primary difference is in the mounting gear, which is incompatible with other assault rifles.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Bulk

Magazine

Price

GP-25/GP-95

40x47 Russian Low-Velocity

1.5 kg

2

1 Internal

$282

GP-30

40x47 Russian Low-Velocity

1.3 kg

2

1 Internal

$282

 

Weapon

ROF

Round

SS

Burst

Range

IFR

GP-25 (On/Off Rifle)

SS

CHEM

2/5

Nil

90

360

 

SS

HE

2/5

Nil

90

360

 

SS

ILLUM

2/5

Nil

90

360

 

SS

Jumping Frag

2/5

Nil

90

360