Chrysler 300 2005

Notes: Chryslerís new flagship, the 300 offers V-6 and V-8 engines ranging from decent to high power. The 300 is a luxury sedan which comes in four trim levels: Base, Touring, 300C, and 300 SRT-8. The Base model has a 190-horsepower V-6, the Touring has a 250-horsepower V-6, the 300C has a 300-horsepower V-8 Hemi, and the 300 SRT-8 has a 425-horsepower V-8 Hemi. The 300C has the Multi-Displacement system; this means that four of its cylinders deactivate when the car is cruising at a stable speed. Touring and 300C models have AWD; the others have rear-wheel drive. All models have an automatic transmission, with rear-wheel drive V-6s having a 4-speed transmission and the others having a 5-speed transmission with AutoStick. Four wheel disc brakes are standard on all models; all have antilock brakes and antiskid/traction control standard except the Base, where they are optional. The 300 SRT-8 is the sport model, with Brembo-brand brakes, a sport suspension, and special seats and trim inside and out. Other standard features on all models include a tilt/telescoping steering column dual front airbags, and a power-adjustable driverís seat. Wheels and tires get successively larger as one goes up the food chain. Options for all models include side-curtain airbags, power-adjustable gas and brake pedals, satellite radio, a navigation system, and UConnnect, which is a hands-free wireless interface for cell phones using the audio system.

The Base engine is slightly underpowered, and high-acceleration moves can require some planning time with that engine. The other engines range from excellent to spectacular performance. However, the transmissions do suffer from some lag when downshifting, but it is generally only a fraction of a second. When the 5-speed transmission is set to manual in AutoStick, this lag does not occur. The Multi-Displacement system delivers undetectable changes in performance when it activates while cruising, though it does save fuel. The ride is smooth, even on most rough surfaces, though some especially rough surfaces (such as when the road crews are in the middle or resurfacing roads) can produce a fair amount of jiggle. It is a very stable car, with little body lean even in tight turns, though handling is not as good as many other cars in its class. The SRT-8 is even better in these respects, and also delivers excellent handling. Road feel when steering and braking are quite good. The V-8 engines are actually quieter than the V-6s, which can get loud when under labor (especially the Base engine). The instrument panel has large, easy-to-read-gauges Ė except at night, when the poor backlighting can render markings indistinct. All controls are in easy reach, but the cruise control and windshield wipers are on the same lever and they can easily be mixed up. The navigation system screen (if so equipped) is a bit small, but easy to use. The interior is roomy, but the rear seats are a bit too flat and passengers may slide around in tight turns (except on the SRT-8, which has suede backings to the seat). Front visibility is OK, but to the rear it is poor due to a small window and thick roof pillars, and even the front corners are hampered by thick roof pillars. The trunk is large and deep, but the opening is not very big, and the lift from the ground is pretty high.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The 300 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

190 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

355 kg

1.69 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

250 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

355 kg

1.77 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

355 kg

1.85 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

425 hp V-8 Sedan

$9,220

G, A

355 kg

2.07 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

190 hp V-6 Sedan

654/131

150/30

68

85

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

250 hp V-6 Sedan

802/160

185/38

68

111

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Sedan

914/183

210/43

68

143**

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

425 hp V-8 Sedan

1140/228

265/53

68

190

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $200 for satellite radio; add $10,000 for a navigation system; add $400 for UConnect.

**When cruising on 4 cylinders using Multi-Displacement, reduce fuel consumption by 30%.

Chrysler 300M/LHS 1999-04

Notes: These are both updated versions of the Concorde sedan; the LHS was already a version of the Concorde, while the 300M is a newer sport version of the Concorde. They both have shorter bodies than the older Concordes, and have distinct styling of their own. They both use a 253-horsepower V-6 coupled to an automatic transmission, but the 300M also uses AutoStick, which allows the 300M to be switched between automatic and a clutchless manual transmission. Standard features for 1999 included dual front airbags, antilock brakes, a trunk cargo net, a Sentry Key "chip-in-the-key" theft deterrent system, leather upholstery, heated front seats, and traction control. When first introduced, the 300M and LHS had a limiting governor in their engines that did not allow the cars to travel at more than 189 kmh (Com Mov 262), but this was removed later in the model year. The 300M further differs from the LHS in having a sport suspension, sport steering, and an optional Performance Handling package. The 300M also has 60/40 split folding rear seats.

For 2000, there were primarily minor cosmetic changes, including a 4-CD changer, better backlighting for the instruments, and the Performance Handling package with chrome wheels. In 2001, side airbags became optional, and new standard features included steering wheel audio controls, a 3-point seatbelt for the center rear seat, and chrome alloy wheels. A new Luxury Group option package was introduced, which primarily consisted of a better trim package, but also included automatic tilt-down side mirrors for backing up. In 2002, an even sportier version, the 300M Special was introduced, with a lowered and stiffened suspension, a unique trim package, larger wheels, slightly more powerful engine with more torque, and Xenon headlights. Changes for 2003 included only an optional satellite radio, which was added midway through the model year. 2004 added an optional navigation system and slightly larger wheels. The former 300M Specialís package now became part of an option available to all 300Ms.

Though the 253-horsepower outpaces most American cars of this class and period, it doesnít quite match import cars of the same period and class. The engine also can get a bit rough when hard pressed, and road and wind noise are not really tuned out to Chrysler standards. However, handling is impressive, even more so with the 300M, though with the Performance Handling package, rough surfaces can get jarring. The low suspension of the 300M Special edition can make dirt or rough roads downright painful. The interior is mostly roomy, though legroom in the rear seat is slightly deficient. The instruments can be difficult to read in darkness, but the driverís position can be tailored very well to the driver, with a tilt steering column and adjustable seats. If the interior is light colored, daytime reflections in the front and rear windshield can be distracting. The trunk is large on the LHS, but significantly smaller on the 300M.

Twilight 2000 Notes: These cars do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

253 hp V-6 LHS Sedan

$7,620

G, A

425 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

253 hp V-6 300M Sedan

$7,620

G, A

382 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

255 hp V-6 300M Special Sedan

$7,620

G, A

382 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

253 hp V-6 LHS Sedan

884/177

205/40

65

113

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

253 hp V-6 300M Sedan

884/177

205/40

65

113

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

255 hp V-6 300M Special Sedan

888/160

205/36

65

114

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for a navigation system; add $200 for satellite radio.

Chrysler Cirrus 1995-00

Notes: The Cirrus is a compact car with the interior room of a midsize car. It replaced the LeBaron in the Chrysler roundup. It shares a chassis with the Dodge Status and the Plymouth Breeze. The Cirrus is a near-luxury car, coming only in LX and LXi trim levels. The base engine for the 1995 model is actually Japanese-made, built by Mitsubishi, and is a 168-horsepower V-6, and comes only with automatic transmission. Standard features include dual front airbags, antilock brakes, air conditioning, tilt steering wheel, AM/FM/Cassette, power Windows, power locks, and power side mirrors.

In 1996, the base engine dropped to a 150-horsepower I-4, which was standard in the LX and an option in the LXi. The only other new feature was headrests in the rear seats. 1997 made the I-4 engine standard for both the LX and LXi, with the V-6 an option for both models. The interior was redesigned to have a larger center console, with an armrest and a storage bin. In 1998, the LX trim level was dropped; so was the I-4 engine. 1999 brought primarily minor cosmetic changes, but it also introduced the Sentry Key, which is Chryslerís version of the "chip-in-the-key" antitheft feature. In 2000, the LX version came back, as did the 4-cylinder engine, standard for the new LX and an option for the LXi. The formerly optional 8-speaker sound system became standard, as did aluminum wheels. Both models also had anchor points for three child seats in the rear seats of the Cirrus.

Visibility is good in all directions except the rear, where a high shelf makes seeing out the back difficult. The two engine choices offer decent to good power, but they are rather loud. The automatic transmission version tends to downshift with a bit of a delay, and the engines lack torque. Handling is similar to a sports sedan; this means handling is firm and precise, but the suspension is stiff and transmits road bumps and noises to the interior. Interior room is ample; in the rear, shorter adults can even cross their legs, though the rear seat really isnít wide enough for the three-person capacity advertised.

Twilight 2000 Notes: These vehicles were not built beyond the 1995 model year.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

150 hp I-4 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

340 kg

1.43 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

168 hp V-6 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

340 kg

1.44 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

150 hp I-4 Sedan

614/123

140/28

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

168 hp V-6 Sedan

674/135

155/30

61

75

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler Concorde/New Yorker/LHS 1993-97

Notes: This is a midsize car with an unusually long wheelbase, even more so with the New Yorker version. The New Yorker is basically the same car, but with more legroom for the rear seat and more luxurious appointments. These cars were built at Chryslerís facilities in Canada. Like many of Chryslerís designs of the period, it is a "cab-forward" design, with the engine riding way out beyond the front wheels and the cabin of the car riding between the wheels, with the floor lower than normal and the wheelbase stretched. For 1993, dual front airbags were standard, as was antilock brakes; options included traction control, a Touring suspension, and a folding child seat in the center of the rear seat. Engine choices include 153-horsepower and 214-horsepower V-6s, each with automatic transmissions. The Concorde sedan is the only version available for 1993.

1994 brought a jump in power for the base engine to 161 horsepower. The sporty LHS and the luxury New Yorker joined the lineup; each used only the 214-horsepower engine, and both were some 12.7 centimeters longer even though they sat on the same chassis as the Concorde. The New Yorker has a split front bench seat, while the LHS has a pair of bucket seats up front. Later in the 1994 model year, those two editions got variable-assist power steering. The Touring suspension became standard on the Concorde, and the front seat widened to become a three-place seat. The power steering became more effective, increasing handling at low speeds while also increasing road feel. Options included remote keyless entry and cruise control.

1995 brought little changes, but a bug in the remote keyless entry was fixed and the cruise control feature could be turned off without hitting the brakes. 1996 was the final model year for the New Yorker. The Concorde and LHS got extra soundproofing, making the interior very quiet, and the LHS got a new antenna which was embedded in the back window. In 1997, the base engine was dropped, leaving only the 214-horsepower V-6.

The long wheelbase means the ride is excellent while interior room is likewise good, with three large adults being able to ride in the rear seat in comfort. The doors are wide and the windows large. The base vehicle tends to bounce a bit over humps, but not overly so, and an optional Touring Package improves the ride and handling further. The dashboard is well arranged and controls easy to find, even without looking; the exception to this is the climate controls, which are a rather long reach for the driver. The back windows on the LHS and New Yorker version are rather narrow, limiting rear vision, but otherwise visibility is excellent, and the Concorde does not have this problem. The engines can get a bit loud when pressed, the base engine more so; this improved quite a bit in 1996 Concordes and LHSs with their added soundproofing.

Notes: The New Yorker was not carried beyond the 1995 model year, and the LHS beyond the 1996 model year, but the Concorde continued to be built in Canada until the 1997 model year.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew*

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

153 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

$6,820

G, A

370 kg

1.58 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

161 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

$6,820

G, A

370 kg

1.58 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

214 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

$7,220

G, A

370 kg

1.62 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

214 hp V-6 New Yorker/LHS Sedan

$7,252

G, A

385 kg

1.63 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

153 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

572/114

130/28

68

68

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

161 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

598/120

140/28

68

72

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

214 hp V-6 Concorde Sedan

758/152

175/35

68

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

214 hp V-6 New Yorker/LHS Sedan

754/151

175/35

68

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*The LHS and 1993 Concorde have a Crew rating of 1+4.

Chrysler Concorde 1998-04

Notes: The Concorde was extensively redesigned for 1998, with the New Yorker being dropped and the LHS being placed in a different line than the Concorde in 1999. The Concorde got a more streamlined body, with a Ferrari-like grille. The trim levels were LX and LXi, with the LX getting a 200-horsepower V-6, and the LXi getting a 225-horsepower V-6. Both had automatic transmissions. The LX had optional antilock brakes and traction control; these were standard in the LXi. Thopugh the wheelbase remained the same as on the previous Concorde models, the overall length grew by some 19 centimeters. The weight dropped by some 45 kilograms due to extensive use of aluminum in the rear of the car, the hood, and the engines. Front bucket seats were standard on both trim levels, but a front bench seat was optional. Standard on both trim levels were dual front airbags.

1999 brought a modified suspension to both the LX and LXi, which softened the ride and reduced road noise. Both had thicker carpeting inside, and a cargo net was added to the trunk. The tires of the LX were enlarged to the same size as those on the LXi. The LXi got speed-sensitive variable-assist steering as well as an optional 4-disc CD changer. 2000 brought optional front side airbags to the Concorde, as well as a 3-point safety belt to the center rear seat. An option package known as 22D was given to the LX, which included alloy wheels and other unique trim features. The LXi gained the optional Infinity sound system, which had steering wheel-mounted audio controls. In 2002, the Concorde dropped the new body and took the form of the old LHS instead. A new top-of-the-line trim level was added: the Concorde Limited, which was simply more plush than the LXi, and had a 2345-horsepower V-6 engine. In addition, the Concorde Limited had a special edition mid-year: the Pro-Am Edition Group, with two-tone leather, unique interior trim, and a special golf bag. There were no significant changes to the Concorde in 2003 or 2004, other than a new engine for the LXi developing 250 horsepower.

The 200-horsepower engine is a little underpowered, but the other engines are successively better. Handling on all models is impressive, however, with tight turning, little body lean, tires with excellent grip, and quick steering response. Braking is a weak point, both in performance and road feel. The suspension is soft, and soaks up most bumps and rough roads. This version of the Concorde is quieter than earlier versions, but not as quiet as competing models. Gauges are clear and controls well-marked, as well as easy to reach. Front and side visibility are good, but rearward visibility suffers greatly from a sloping roof, wide side pillars, and a narrow rear window. The interior is large, with the doors wide and the Concorde generally easy to get into. The trunk is large and has an ample opening for loading, though it is a bit high off the ground.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This version of the Concorde does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew*

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

425 kg

1.56 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

225 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

425 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

234 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

425 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

250 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

425 kg

1.63 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-6 Sedan

736/147

170/35

64

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

225 hp V-6 Sedan

792/159

185/38

64

100

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

234 hp V-6 Sedan

818/164

190/38

64

104

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

250 hp V-6 Sedan

866/173

200/40

64

111

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With the optional bench front seat, Crew rating is 1+5.

Chrysler Crossfire 2005

Notes: The Crossfire is designed as a sports car, with only two seats and in a hatchback coupe or convertible configuration. The parts are made in the US, but the actual cars are assembled in Germany as the Mercedes-Benz plant, and the Crossfire is in fact based heavily on the Mercedes-Benz SLK. Trim levels come in Base, Limited, and SRT-6. The Base and Limited editions have 215-horsepower V-6 engines with a 6-speed manual transmission (standard) or 5-speed automatic transmission (optional); the SRT-6 has a supercharged version of the same engine, developing 300 horsepower, and coupled to a 5-speed automatic transmission with AutoStick. The SRT-6 also has a sports suspension and special trim, paint, interior styling, and wheels. All Crossfires have standard antilock brakes, duel front airbags, antiskid/traction control, and torso side-impact airbags. The wheels are slightly larger in the back than in the front. The Crossfire comes with "summer" tires as standard, but all-weather tires are optional. There is no spare tire; instead, the Crossfire comes equipped with an air compressor and a can of tire sealant. All Crossfires have spoilers; the SRT-6ís is stationary, while the other versions have a spoiler which powers up or down depending upon the speed of the car (or it may be left stationary). The Limited and SRT-6 versions have leather upholstery, and as an option may have a navigation system.

The 215-horsepower engine has good power, but brisk maneuvers often require flooring the gas pedal when the car is equipped with automatic transmission to coax a downshift. The coupeís suspension is firm (some would say harsh). Convertibles have a softer suspension which is also more forgiving. The SRT-6 has a very stiff suspension which, while providing excellent handling, also can make for a jolting ride over rough surfaces. The sound of the tires can be intrusive. Wind noise is also intrusive at highway speeds. The 215-hosepower engine is fairly quiet, but the exhaust from the 300-horsepower engine is rather loud. The dashboard is more retro than its Mercedes cousin, and this gives the instruments and controls a rather busy look which can be difficult to decipher quickly. The instrumentsí in particular, are digital and virtually impossible to read when wearing polarized sunglasses. The gearshift knob on manual transmission versions is made from slippery metal, and could be annoying. The leather seats can be a bit slippery, except in the SRT-6, where they have suede inserts. The headroom is merely adequate for the average male, and the low-slung suspension means that the Crossfire can be difficult to get into in the first place, especially in coupes. Visibility can be poor due to small windows, a low seat position, and a low roof, especially to the rear. The trunk is quite small, which is typical for cars of this class, and the top on the convertible robs its trunk of almost half its space when it is down.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The Crossfire does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price**

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

215 hp V-6 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

173 kg

1.39 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-6 Coupe

$8,020

G, A

173 kg

1.54 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

215 hp V-6 Convertible

$7,220

G, A

148 kg*

1.42 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-6 Convertible

$8,020

G, A

148 kg*

1.57 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

215 hp V-6 Coupe

872/131

200/30

60

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-6 Coupe

1084/163

250/38

60

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

215 hp V-6 Convertible

854/128

200/30

60

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-6 Convertible

1066/160

245/38

60

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With the top down, the Load rating is only 80 kg.

**With a navigation system, add $10,000.

Chrysler Imperial/New Yorker Fifth Avenue

Notes: These cars were produced by stretching previous editions of the New Yorker some 13 centimeters to produce the New Yorker Fifth Avenue, and nearly 23 centimeters to make the Imperial. They both, however, sit on the same wheelbase, with the size differences being primarily in the very front and back. For 1990, both cars had a 147-horsepower V-6 coupled to an automatic transmission. The trim levels were of high quality and plushness (with the Imperial being more luxurious than the New Yorker Fifth Avenue), and standard features included automatic rear load leveling, power windows, power door locks, heated power side mirrors, and an automatic climate control system.

1991 brought a standard 150-horsepower engine with much more torque to the Imperial; this engine was an option for the New Yorker Fifth Avenue. The Imperial lost its leather upholstery, replaced by high-quality cloth. The New Yorker Fifth Avenue lost its automatic climate controls, and its steering wheel lost its leather wrapping. 1992 gave the New Yorker Fifth Avenue a revised front and rear end which made them more aerodynamic; the Imperial retained its squared appearance. 1993 brought primarily trim and luxury equipment changes, such as to the sound system and climate control system. It was replaced by the Concorde and a Concorde-based New Yorker.

The automatic transmission shifts gears in a rather sloppy manner; the 150-horsepower engine, with its greater torque, is not as bad in this respect, but thatís still not saying much. Engine noise is loud, and can get extreme when pressed, especially in the 147-horsepower engine. The suspensions are soft, yet the ride can get very bumpy on uneven or rough surfaces. Tires tend to squeal around even slight corners, and body lean is excessive. These cars are rated for 6 people, but only 4 adults will be comfortable, despite the huge size of the cars. However, getting into the cars is easy, due to large doorways.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

147 hp V-6 New Yorker Sedan

$6,820

G, A

375 kg

1.53 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp V-6 New Yorker Sedan

$6,820

G, A

375 kg

1.53 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

147 hp V-6 Imperial Sedan

$6,820

G, A

380 kg

1.6 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp V-6 Imperial Sedan

$6,820

G, A

380 kg

1.6 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

147 hp V-6 New Yorker Sedan

570/114

130/28

61

66

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp V-6 New Yorker Sedan

578/116

135/28

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

147 hp V-6 Imperial Sedan

548/110

125/25

61

66

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp V-6 Imperial Sedan

556/111

130/25

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler LeBaron Coupe/Convertible 1990-95

Notes: These are basically well-appointed sports cars. By the early 1990s, it was the USís top-selling convertible. The 1990 versionís base engine was only a 4-cylinder 100-horsepower engine, definitely underpowered, but a 141-horsepower V-6 was available as an option. Manual and automatic transmissions were available. The LeBaron Coupe and Convertible came in Highline or Premium trim, and sportier GT and GTC variants were also available. The GTC had an optional electronic variable-dampened suspension, allowing the driver to tune the suspension for the road surface. The GTC also had a 174-horsepower turbocharged I-4 engine, with quicker response times than the other engines. All versions have a standard driverís side airbag.

1991 saw the GTC given more engine choices, including a the 141-horsepower V-6 and a 152-horsepower turbocharged I-4 with less power, but more torque. The GT version was dropped, as was the performance suspension, but the sport suspension had similar specs. 1992 brought antilock brakes to the LeBaron Coupe and Convertible, and the convertibles got rear shoulder safety belts instead of merely lap belts. 1993 brought a great deal of cosmetic improvements, but the turbocharged I-4 engines were dropped. For the 1994 model year, only the GTC version was available, with only a V-6 engine, but with dual front airbags. Coupes also disappeared, replaced by the Sebring. In 1995, the final year for the LeBaron Convertible, there were little changes, and they were only cosmetic. A Sebring convertible would replace the LeBaron.

These cars lack a certain solidity in construction; even minor bumps or potholes can cause the frame to twist, flex, or vibrate greatly, and this is even more acute in the convertible version. Gauges are easy to see and read, and controls well positioned. Tall people will be more comfortable in front, but the backseat room is bigger than most coupes and convertibles. The trunk on both models is small. The 4-cylinder engines are loud, but only the turbocharged engines run smoothly. The V-6 is also a smooth runner, but is available only in an automatic transmission; unfortunately, all automatic transmissions for these cars shift rather poorly.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

100 hp I-4 Coupe

$6,420

G, A

310 kg

1.3 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

141 hp V-6 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

310 kg

1.37 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

152 hp I-4 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

310 kg

1.38 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

141 hp V-6 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

275 kg

1.37 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

152 hp I-4 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

275 kg

1.38 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

174 hp I-4 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

275 kg

1.39 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

100 hp I-4 Coupe

470/94

110/23

53

45

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

141 hp V-6 Coupe

602/121

140/28

53

63

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

152 hp I-4 Coupe

640/128

150/30

53

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

141 hp V-6 Convertible

602/121

140/28

53

63

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

152 hp I-4 Convertible

640/128

150/30

53

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

174 hp I-4 Convertible

720/144

165/33

53

78

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler LeBaron Sedan 1990-94

Notes: Only partially related to the LeBaron Coupe and Convertible, the LeBaron sedan is more closely related to the Dodge Spirit and Plymouth Acclaim of the period. The 1990 LeBaron Sedan had a 141-hoprsepower V-6 which was coupled to an automatic transmission as standard, but had an option for manual transmission. It also had a standard driverís side front airbag, and an optional Touring Package with front gas-charged shocks and rear anti-sway torsion bars.

1991 made antilock brakes optional for the LeBaron sedan, and the car also had a standard analog speedometer with a secondary metric scale. Other gauges were digital. 1992 brought an expansion of the LeBaron sedan lineup, including Base, LX, and Landau trim levels (the latter with a distinctive vinyl roof); however, the Base and Landau models dropped to a 100-horsepower I-4 engine as standard and the V-6 as an option. (The LX retained the V-6 as standard.) In 1993, the LX trim level disappeared; the Base model was renamed the LE, and had the 100-horsepower standard. The Landau gained the V-6 engine as standard, and both versions were remodeled somewhat. 1994 gave both models motorized seatbelts. The I-4 engine disappeared, leaving only the V-6, but coupled to a 3-speed automatic transmission (instead of the 4-speed of before); the 4-speed automatic transmission with overdrive was an option.

The LeBaron sedan of this period was surprisingly luxurious for its time, and was also surprising in its handling. The ride is smooth and soft, and handling is quite good. Unfortunately, the early 4-speed transmission is sluggish in downshifting, and thus passing and other speed maneuvers can be difficult despite which engine one chooses with that early transmission. The brakes are good, almost too good; nosedive is pronounced in panic stops, though youíll stop quickly. Rear seats could be either split folding or fixed, and both front and back seats are roomy, though not supportive to be comfortable on long trips. The trunk is large, flat-floored, and has a big opening.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

100 hp I-4 Sedan

$6,420

G, A

373 kg

1.35 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

141 hp V-6 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

373 kg

1.42 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

100 hp I-4 Sedan

454/91

105/20

61

45

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

141 hp V-6 Sedan

584/117

135/28

61

63

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler New Yorker 1990-93

Notes: This is basically a shorter-wheelbase version of the Imperial and New Yorker Fifth Avenue. Standard engine for 1990 was a 147-horsepower V-6, and it remained so during its short tenure in the Chrysler lineup. There were three trim levels; the New Yorker Salon, with minimal trim and features; the standard New Yorker, a near-luxury sedan; and the New Yorker Landau, with a host of luxury features. Antilock brakes and a driverís airbag were optional on all three trim levels.

1991 saw the dropping of the Landau from this line, but the Salon edition got more luxurious. Padded rear roofs were no longer available. 1992 saw the two remaining models get a facelift, with more rounded front and back ends. The Landauís vinyl roof became an option on the two versions, and the Salon got hidden headlights. In 1993, the Salon got even more luxurious, approaching the standard New Yorkerís trim level.

The New Yorker, in all three of its incarnations, is a quiet and luxurious vehicle, but rather unexciting. The engine is adequate, but nothing to write home about; the automatic transmission shifts roughly; handling is average, but comfortable; ride is likewise average, but soaks up most bumps and rough road surfaces. The tires tend to squeal on corners, and there is excessive body lean. Though rated for 6 persons, 4 are more comfortable. Trunks space is ample, and controls are large and easy to read, while instruments are well laid out.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

147 hp V-6 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

375 kg

1.49 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

147 hp V-6 Sedan

584/117

135/28

61

66

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler Pacifica 2005

Notes: Sort of a cross between a large car, minivan, and SUV, the Pacifica is basically a large wagon-type vehicle which looks like a mini-SUV. At the beginning of the model year, the Touring edition was introduced, with the Base and Limited models added on either side of the trim arena later in the model year. The Pacifica comes in front-wheel drive and AWD versions, and front-wheel drive Base versions have a 215-horsepower V-6 engine. All other Pacificas, including AWD Base models, have a 250-horsepower V-6. All have a 4-speed automatic transmission with AutoStick. Base models have very little features, luxury or otherwise, but do have 4-wheel disc antilock brakes and dual front airbags, with the driverís airbag also protecting the knees. Side curtain airbags protecting all rows are standard on the Limited Edition and optional on the others. The Base model has a 5-seat capacity in two rows of seats (the 2nd row a bench); others have a 6-passenger capacity, with the 2nd row being bucket seats and adding a 3rd row bench seat. Options on the Touring and Limited Editions include a power liftgate, sunroof, traction control, a navigation system, power front seats, power-adjustable pedals, and a rear DVD entertainment system. The Limited Edition is available only with AWD and has special trim, paint, and interior styling. Towing capacity is 1.59 tons.

The Pacifica is a rather heavy vehicle, and both engines feel like they are working too hard. The 250-hosrpower engine requires at least Plus-grade fuel. The Pacifica has an OK ride, but nothing to write home about, though it is fairly tolerant of bumps and rough surfaces. Handling is what one should expect from such a heavy vehicle Ė it maneuvers like a heavy minivan, rather sluggishly. However, steering it is easy (within its limits), and body lean is not bad in turns, though it is noticeable. The braking is fast in sure, though there is some noseplow. The 250-horsepower engine gets rather loud, and even sounds ragged. However, wind and tire noise are very well-suppressed. The dashboard is well-laid out, if a bit unusually so, and requires some familiarization. Controls are easy to find and mostly easy to use, though the available navigation system cannot be reached by the front-seat passenger. The visibility is mostly quite good, though shorter drivers may find the headrest blocking their rearward view. Legroom and headroom are good, though some find the seats uncomfortable. The third-row seats fold flat, but can only be lifted again if you climb in or have long arms. Second-row seats also fold, but are easier to unfold again; however, they do not fold flat.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The Pacifica is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

215 hp V-6 Base Wagon

$7,984

G, A

1.22 tons

2.12 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

250 hp V-6 Base Wagon

$8,384

G, A

1.22 tons

2.19 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

250 hp V-6 Wagon (Other)

$8,384

G, A

1.08 tons

2.19 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

215 hp V-6 Base Wagon

596/119

140/28

87

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

250 hp V-6 Base Wagon

662/132

155/30

87

111

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

250 hp V-6 Wagon (Other)

662/132

155/30

87

111

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With a navigation system, add $10,000; with a DVD entertainment system, add $200.

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2001-04

Notes: I personally donít understand the fascination with this car; I think it is one of the ugliest vehicles on the road right now. Anyway, the PT Cruiser is basically a compact wagon, part car and part mini-SUV. The 2001 model went on sale in the spring of 2000, with unibody construction making it structurally a very strong vehicle. The only engine available in 2001 was a 150-horsepower I-4, coupled to a standard manual or optional automatic transmission. Standard features included a split folding rear seat, a multi-position rear shelf, a tilt steering wheel, a shifter on the floor, front and rear power windows, and a rear windshield washer/wiper for its liftgate. Options included a Touring Group package with a sportier suspension and larger wheels, antilock braking and traction control, 4-wheel disc brakes, leather upholstery, a power moonroof, a folding passenger seat, and (in mid-year) heated front seats.

In 2002, the PT Cruiser got optional cosmetic detailing such as flame decals for the sides. Three trim levels were offered: Base, Touring, and Limited. Base models gained a CD player and underseat storage bin (which was already standard on the Touring Edition); the Limited Edition also got adjustable lumber support in the front seats. Side-impact airbags were standard on the Limited Edition and optional on other models. 2003 brought a new PT Turbo Edition, with the primary difference being its 220-horsepower turbocharged I-4 engine. The PT Turbo has flame decals, chrome trim, and wood-grain body accents as standard. 2004 brought a 180-horsepower turbocharged I-4 as an option to the Touring and Limited Editions.

For the 2005 model year, a GT trim level was added to the PT Cruiser line, basically replacing the PT Turbo. In addition, a 2-door convertible was added to the line (in all four trim levels); the convertible is only a 4-seater, and has a trunk instead of a hatchback. (It is basically a large car.) The GT has a 220-horsepower turbocharged I-4, which was now an option only on the Limited. The 180-horsepower turbocharged I-4 was available only with an automatic transmission, while the others could have a manual or automatic transmission. When equipped with an automatic transmission, the GT is also equipped with AutoStick. The GT has a antilock 4-wheel disc brakes with traction control; these are only options on the Touring and Limited, and the Base modelís options are limited to antilock brakes without traction control. Front side-impact airbags are standard on the GT and Limited, and options on Touring; they are unavailable on the Base model. A new option for all models is a satellite radio.

PT stands for Personal Transportation, and it is that, with little room for cargo. It does drive nicely, with no top-heaviness, little body lean, and quick, agile handling. The suspension normally softens most bumps and rough surfaces Ė unless one has the Touring or Limited suspension, in which case rough surfaces produce jiggling. The GT version seems to have the best suspension, smoothing out most bumps and dips. The convertible doesnít have nearly the body flex that plagues most convertibles. The wind noise is not bad until the PT Cruiser reaches about 105 kmh (Com Mov 146), where it begins to get loud. None of the engines really sound smooth at any speed. Automatic transmissions can tend to shift with a lurch, and the turbocharged engines can lag when shifting at any speed. Braking is excellent, even without antilock brakes. Cargo space is a bit on the small side unless the rear bench seat is removed or folded down, and that seat must be removed for any sort of large cargo. Passenger space is roomy, even for tall adults, though the rear seat is a bit low, and the doors are large. Towing capacity for all versions is 454 kg.

Twilight 2000 Notes: The PT Cruiser does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

150 hp I-4 Wagon

$6,820

G, A

865 kg

1.42 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

180 hp I-4 Wagon

$7,220

G, A

865 kg

1.49 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

220 hp I-4 Wagon

$7,220

G, A

865 kg

1.51 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp I-4 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

168 kg

1.5 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

180 hp I-4 Convertible

$7,220

G, A

168 kg

1.57 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

220 hp I-4 Convertible

$7,220

G, A

168 kg

1.59 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

150 hp I-4 Wagon

618/124

145/28

57

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

180 hp I-4 Wagon

696/139

160/33

57

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

220 hp I-4 Wagon

826/165

190/38

57

98

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp I-4 Convertible

590/118

135/28

57

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

180 hp I-4 Convertible

664/133

155/30

57

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

220 hp I-4 Convertible

788/158

185/38

57

98

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $200 with satellite radio.

Chrysler Sebring 1995-00

This is a compact near-luxury sports coupe, later also available in a convertible model. Due to the cab-forward design, it is unusually roomy for a car of its size. Trim levels for 1995 consisted of LX and LXi, with the LX using a 140-horsepower I-4 coupled to either a manual or automatic transmission, and the LXi using a 155-horsepower V-6 coupled only to an automatic transmission. Standard features for both included dual front airbags, as well as a host of luxury features.

1996 brought few changes to the Sebring coupe, but the Sebring convertible made its first appearance in the 1996 model year. The equivalent trim levels were JX and JXi; the JX used a 150-horsepower I-4 engine, while the JXi used a 168-horsepower V-6. Both had automatic transmissions only. The convertible has a power top with a rear glass window which has a defroster. The JX and LX had optional antilock brakes, while these were standard on the LXi and JXi.

1997 brought Autostick to the Sebring convertible. Autostick is essentially a changeable transmission; it may function as either an automatic or a clutchless manual transmission according to the choice of the driver. 1998 brought a high-luxury Limited Edition to the Sebring convertible, but the coupe saw almost no changes. In 1999, the 4-cylinder engines were dropped, and some minor cosmetic changes were done to the Sebring coupe. 2000 saw several new standard features added, such as cruise control, power windows, 4-wheel disc brakes, and 16-inch wheels. Convertibles had more insulation added which made them quieter when the top is up, and all models had an optional emergency trunk release inside the trunk.

All engines with automatic transmission are slow to downshift, especially in maneuvers such as high-speed passing, but mileage is good. The 4-cylinder engines are OK only if equipped with manual transmission; they are sluggish with automatic transmission. Handling is average for a car of its class, and the ride if firm but not harsh, except over heavy lumps. The interior is very roomy for a car of its class, with adults able to stretch out front or back. Wind and road noises are low, but the engines are all rather loud. Convertibles have a different dashboard and control layout than coupes, and their layout is much better than the coupe. The interior is very roomy, with even large adults able to stretch out in the back seats. Like many convertibles, the Sebring convertible suffers from excessive jittering, especially over rough surfaces, and does not feel as solid as the coupe. The front seats have integrated seatbelts, which means they go on automatically upon closing the door and are buckleless, but one can get hung up in them when getting into the car.

Twilight 2000: The Sebring coupe was not built past the 1996 model year; the Sebring convertible was not produced at all.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

140 hp I-4 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

325 kg

1.32 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp I-4 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

325 kg

1.33 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

155 hp V-6 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

325 kg

1.33 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

168 hp V-6 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

325 kg

1.33 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

140 hp I-4 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

280 kg

1.52 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp I-4 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

280 kg

 

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

155 hp V-6 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

280 kg

 

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

168 hp V-6 Convertible

$6,820

G, A

280 kg

 

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

140 hp I-4 Coupe

618/124

145/28

61

62

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp I-4 Coupe

656/131

150/30

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

155 hp V-6 Coupe

676/135

155/30

61

69

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

168 hp V-6 Coupe

724/145

170/33

61

75

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

140 hp I-4 Convertible

546/109

125/25

61

62

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp I-4 Convertible

580/115

130/28

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

155 hp V-6 Convertible

598/119

135/28

61

69

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

168 hp V-6 Convertible

620/128

145/30

61

75

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler Sebring 2001-04

Notes: The Sebring coupe and convertible were redesigned for 2001, and joined by a Sebring sedan. The coupe version was found in LX and LXi trim levels, and equipped with a 147-horsepower I-4 engine coupled to an automatic transmission in the LX or a 200-horsepower V-6 with a manual transmission (and an optional automatic transmission) in the LXi. The optional automatic transmission for the V-6 was actually an AutoStick transmission, switchable between automatic and a clutchless manual transmission. The LX sedan had a 150-horsepower I-4 engine with an automatic transmission; the LXi sedan had the same 200-horsepower engine as the coupe (which was also optional in the LX coupe and sedan), again with AutoStick if an automatic transmission was installed. The convertible version had the 200-horsepower engine as standard, but otherwise came in JX, JXi, and Limited trim levels. The convertible had a power ragtop with a glass heated rear window, and the power windows raised and lowered automatically when the top is raised or lowered (though they could also be raised or lowered independently). The coupe had head-protecting side airbags; these were optional in the sedan. Four-wheel disc brakes were standard on all sedans, all convertibles, and the LXi coupe. Antilock brakes were standard on the Limited convertible, and optional on all other Sebring models except the LX coupe. Other improvements for all models included brighter headlights, thicker glass, and better soundproofing.

2002 brought a Sebring GTC convertible, with a 200-horsepower V-6 with much more torque than the normal 200-horsepower V-6, and with a manual transmission only. In 2003, the Sebring coupe caught up with the sedan style-wise, being redesigned in and out, including a better dashboard and front side-impact airbags that were standard instead of an option. 2004 gave sedans and convertibles revised front end styling, but little else.

The new engines used in this line of Sebrings are quieter, more powerful, and quicker in response than previous designs. However, the 4-cylinder engine is still a bit underpowered, and noisier than the V-6 as well. Automatic transmissions respond smoothly, especially with AutoStick. Handling is excellent and body lean is barely noticeable. The coupes are the most nimble of the three models, but they are also the worst when it comes to ride. The convertible does exhibit some body flex in tight turns and on rough pavement, but this is not as severe as the typical convertible. Steering feel is fairly good, though the power steering with I-4 engines feels over-assisted. The brakes have good stopping power, especially with antilock brakes. The interiors are surprisingly roomy and quiet (except, of course, in a convertible with its top down), with the exception of the rear seat in the coupe. Coupes are also too low and have too narrow doors for easy entry into the back seat.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This version of the Sebring does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

150 hp I-4 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

386 kg

1.45 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

200 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

386 kg

1.53 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

147 hp I-4 Coupe

$6,820

G, A

370 kg

1.41 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

200 hp V-6 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

370 kg

1.49 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

200 hp V-6 Convertible

 

G, A

257 kg

1.54 tons

1+3

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

150 hp I-4 Sedan

606/121

140/28

61

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

200 hp V-6 Sedan

748/150

175/35

61

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

147 hp I-4 Coupe

612/122

140/28

62

66

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

200 hp V-6 Coupe

766/153

175/35

62

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

200 hp V-6 Convertible

744/149

170/35

61

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler Town & Country 1991-95

This is a large minivan, with a lot of interior space. It is basically a near-luxury version of the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager. The 1991 model is an overhauled version of the first Town & Country brought out in 1990, and has a restyled exterior and more luxurious interior. The 1991 model used a 147-horsepower V-6 engine coupled to an automatic transmission, and during the model year, also got a driverís side airbag. Antilock brakes were also standard. The dashboard instruments were digital instead of analog.

The 1992 model added the option of child safety seats in the second row of seating (three of them). An all-wheel drive (AWD) version became available. Other options included gold spoke wheels and the absence of the wood-grain panels on the sides of the minivan. 1993 brought little but cosmetic changes, but the exhaust system became stainless steel. In 1994, what became the standard engine was a 162-horsepower V-6, but the old engine was still available and now had 150 horsepower. A passenger side airbag was added along with knee bolsters in the front. Side door guard beams were added, meaning that the Town & Country of this year and 1995 met Federal side-impact ratings until 1998. The 1995 model had a feature in itís optional keyless remote entry system that prevented the rear liftgate from opening by accident: the button for the liftgate had to be pressed twice within 5 seconds instead of just once.

Visibility is excellent from the driver position, with a low dashboard and large windows. The dashboard is also user-friendly, and controls are easy to reach and manipulate. The rear two rows of seats is removable for more cargo space, but at 41 kg each and cumbersome, usually require two people to lift out. There are numerous storage bins, pockets, and other nooks and crannies for storing assorted items. Seats are well-contoured and padded and very comfortable. The ride is quiet and car-like, with a suspension that reduces body lean and the chances of a rollover. The vehicle has a tow package, and is able to tow 907 kg with the 147 or 150 hp engine, and 1.04 tons with the 162 hp engine.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

147 hp V-6 Minivan

$7,084

G, A

1.14 tons

1.79 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

150 hp V-6 Minivan

$7,084

G, A

1.14 tons

1.79 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

162 hp V-6 Minivan

$7,084

G, A

1.14 tons

1.8 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

147 hp V-6 Minivan

496/99

115/23

76

66

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

150 hp V-6 Minivan

508/101

115/23

76

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

162 hp V-6 Minivan

538/107

125/25

76

72

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Chrysler Town & Country 1996-00

Notes: This is an update of the earlier Town and Country, differing primarily in body styling, options package (more comprehensive), and engines. The newer Town & Country has many standard features including dual front airbags and antilock brakes, dual-zone climate control, cruise control, and tinted glass. Options include two child safety seats in the second row (if equipped with cloth seats and a second-row bench seat), and a driverís side sliding door to complement the door on the other side. The vehicle also comes in two sizes, a 4.73-meter long version, and a 5.07-meter long model. As in the earlier model, the rear seats may be removed, but they are on rollers to make them easier to remove (though bucket seats cannot be removed). There were three trim levels, base, LX, and LXi, with base and LX models having a second-row bench and the LXi having second-row bucket seats. Base and LX models got a 158-horsepower V-6, while the LXi got a 166-horsepower V-6 (which was also an option on the base and LX).

1997 brought permanent AWD as an option on all models, with all-wheel disc brakes. 2WD versions got traction control instead. The driverís side sliding door became a standard feature. A new long wheelbase model was introduced, replacing the old one; after this, the three trim levels were referred to as SX (on a short wheelbase), and LX and LXi (on long wheelbases). 1998 brought a new, better looking open grille, brighter headlights, and a top-end engine which was boosted in power to 180 horsepower. In 1999, the second row bench seat was dropped in the SX and LX, replaced by bucket seats with folding child safety seats. These bucket seats also reclined fully. A small cargo net was installed between the front seats, and Limited Edition trim level was introduced which was even more luxurious than the LXi. For 2000, the SX was dropped, new interior and exterior colors were introduced, and an optional rear-seat VCR entertainment system could be installed.

As it has a longer wheelbase, the already good ride in improved. The doors were enlarged to ease entry and exit, and the step-in height is among the lowest of all minivans. There is average cargo space in the rear of the short wheelbase model, and ample space in the long-wheelbase models. Steering is precise and there is little body lean. Short wheelbase versions do not ride nearly as well as long wheelbase models, but both have good steering feel and braking. Tire noise is low, but wind rush is loud; however, the seats are quite comfortable. Towing capacity is 995 kg with the 158 horsepower engine, and 1.36 tons with the 166 or 180 horsepower engine.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This version of the Town & Country was never built.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

158 hp V-6 SWB Minivan

$7,252

G, A

1.13 tons

1.75 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

166 hp V-6 SWB Minivan

$7,252

G, A

1.13 tons

1.75 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

158 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

$7,516

G, A

1.23 tons

1.79 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

166 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

$7,516

G, A

1.23 tons

1.79 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

180 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

$7,916

G, A

1.23 tons

1.79 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

158 hp V-6 SWB Minivan

538/108

125/25

76

70

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

166 hp V-6 SWB Minivan

562/113

130/25

76

74

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

158 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

528/106

120/25

76

70

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

166 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

552/110

130/25

76

74

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

180 hp V-6 LWB Minivan

590/118

135/28

76

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With VCR entertainment system, add $150.

Chrysler Town & Country 2001-04

Notes: The Town & Country was redesigned inside and out for 2001, with a different body shape and new trim. The wheelbase was unchanged, but only the former long wheelbase was used on the new Town & Country. Trim levels were LX, LXi, and Limited, and each could come with all-wheel drive. LX and LXi versions used a 180-horsepower V-6, while Limited and all AWD versions used a 215-horsepower V-6 (this engine was also an option on the LXi). Both engines had an automatic transmission. The tires and wheels were larger on the new Town & Country. All versions have sliding doors on both sides, with power operation of these doors being an option on the LX and standard on the LXi and Limited. The dashboard was redesigned and the center console has a power outlet into which standard electrical devices may be plugged. This center console may be mounted between the front two or second row seats, at the operatorís option. A removable rear shelf was also added, which could be mounted at the center of the rear seats or on the floor. The front airbags had dual-stage inflators, and the new Town & Country also had front side-impact airbags; these were standard on the Limited and options on the other models. Other options for all included a rear-seat VCR entertainment system (with wireless headphones for all rear-seat occupants), a navigation system, a 4-CD changer, leather upholstery, and a power liftgate (standard on the Limited). The rearmost seat is removable and is also split folding (but does not fold flat). A standard feature for all versions is antilock brakes.

2002 brought an option for a rear-seat DVD entertainment system; the VCR entertainment system option was discontinued. Another option was a tire-inflation monitor. 2002 also brought two new high-luxury trim levels, the eL and eX. 2003 brought the option of a sunroof to all models except the LX, and power-adjustable gas and brake pedals were options on all models. 2004 made the tire-inflation monitor standard on all models except the LX.

This version of the Town & Country rides pretty much the same as a large car, absorbing bumps and rough pavement easily. The larger wheels and tires make handling car-like also. Braking is fast and stable. The 180-horsepower engine is slightly underpowered, but the 215-hosrsepower engine moves out smartly. It is one of the quietest minivans of its period, blanking out almost all engine, wind, and tire noise. The new dashboard makes controls easy to reach, but the cupholders block access to the CD player when cups are in them. The climate controls are three-zone, front, second, and third row. When equipped with a navigation system, the screen looks like it is sort of "stuck on" the top of the dashboard. The third-row seat can be removed, and comes apart into two pieces, but each section weighs 24.95 kilograms and is quite cumbersome.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This version of the Town & Country was never built in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

180 hp V-6 Minivan

$8,148

G, A

1.3 tons

1.86 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

215 hp V-6 Minivan

$8,148

G, A

1.3 tons

1.88 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

180 hp V-6 Minivan

570/114

130/28

76

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

215 hp V-6 Minivan

662/132

155/30

76

96

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With a DVD entertainment system, add $200; with a navigation system, add $10,000.

Chrysler Voyager 2001-03

Notes: Chrysler inherited the Voyager minivan from Plymouth after Plymouthís demise in 1999. It became the lower-priced alternative to the Town & Country, using a shorter wheelbase and less sheer luxury features than the Town & Country. The 2001 Voyager came in Base and LX trim levels, with a 150-horsepower I-4 being standard in the Base model, and a 180-horsepower V-6 being standard in the LX and optional in the Base. Both models had automatic transmission, with a 3-speed being teamed with the I-4 and a 4-speed with the V-6. Both have a passenger side sliding door, with a power sliding door being optional on the LX. The dashboard is similar to that of the Town & Country of the same period, and the Voyager also has a center console with a power outlet, able to be moved between the front and second-row seats. The dual front airbags had dual-stage inflators, and front side impact airbags were an option. Another option was antilock braking. Another option was a 4-CD changer. The third row seat of the Voyager is basically similar to that of the Town & Country, but is removable, split folding, reclining, and flat-folding.

The 2002 brought an optional rear seat entertainment system to the Voyager, either VCR or DVD-based. A new higher-luxury version (approaching the LX version of the Town & Country) was available, known as the eC model. The 3-speed automatic transmission was dumped, and both engines were now coupled to a 4-speed transmission. 2003 brought optional power-adjusting brake and gas pedals, though antilock brakes were no longer an option on the Base model.

The Voyager is a good option to the Town & Country Ė unless you are saddled with the I-4 engine. Ride is similar to that of a large car, and the interior is almost as roomy for passengers as a Town & Country, though there is less cargo space. The Handling isnít as good as a Town & Country of the same period, due to the smaller wheels and tires. Braking is only adequate. Noise suppression is also merely adequate. The second and third rows can suffer in the legroom department, especially if the passengers are tall. Like the Town & Country, the dashboard setup is excellent and the controls easy to reach Ė except for the CD player when there are cups in the cupholders.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This version of the Voyager is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

150 hp I-4 Minivan

$7,484

G, A

1.07 tons

1.75 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

180 hp V-6 Minivan

$7,884

G, A

1.07 tons

1.82 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

150 hp I-4 Minivan

514/103

120/25

76

67

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

180 hp V-6 Minivan

582/116

135/28

76

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*With a VCR entertainment system, add $150; with a DVD entertainment system, add $200.