Cadillac Allante 1990-93

Notes: At the time, the Allante was Cadillacís most expensive model, launched with much fanfare and hoopla. The body and interior were designed by Pininfarina in Italy, coupled with an American drive train and engine. The bodies were produced in Turin, Italy, then loaded onto special aircraft and flown to Cadillacís plant in Detroit and finished. The Allante is a convertible coupe with a lot of luxuries both large and small. The Allante is built light, with aircraft-grade aluminum making up much of the body (though the frame was of steel), and a folding soft top which could be replaced with a removable aluminum top if the owner desired. (At the buyerís option, and for an extra charge, the Allante could be had with both tops, though they could not both be mounted at the same time.) It has a fully independent suspension. Disc antilock brakes are standard on the 1990 model, as is traction control (which was new for Cadillacs at the time), a driverís side airbag, electronically-controlled shock absorbers, and a premium-quality Delco-Bose AM/FM/CD/Cassette stereo system.

1991 brought an upgrade to the sound system, to 200 watts. The engine was equipped with platinum-tipped spark plugs. A speed-dependent damping system was installed, to provide shorter reaction times for the electronically-controlled shocks based on the vehicleís speed. 1992 brought little but cosmetic changes. In 1993, a 295-horsepower V-8 Northstar engine replaced the earlier 200-horsepower V-8. A new electronically-controlled automatic transmission was added to take advantage of the new engine. A new traction control system was installed, which could control the brakes and shut down some of the engineís cylinders temporarily if necessary. Road Sensing Suspension was also added, adjusting the suspension damping based on the surface on which the Allante was driving and the speed at which it was traveling. The rear suspension was adjusted, and new tires were used that were rated at up to 250 kph. The glass in the door windows was now one-piece. The seats were redesigned to be much more comfortable, the sound system went up to 8 speakers, and the console had a fold-out cupholder and had controls that were easier to reach and manipulate. The seats were power-adjustable seats, including power lumbar support adjustment. Though the Allante was vastly improved in 1993 over its introduction, it was considered too expensive by most customers and it was discontinued after the 1993 model year.

Though performance was excellent, handling sharp, and acceleration brisk, there were problems with the Allante. The initial engine was way too loud, growling at nearly any speed except idle. The 1990 modelís ride was stiff Ė too stiff, though in 1991 this situation improved considerably, though bad pavement could still bring a rough ride. In 1993, the RSS system improved ride even more, making it smooth over virtually any pavement and any speed. Some said that the transmission shifting lagged somewhat, but most people didnít notice it. The seats didnít support very well in high-speed or quick turns, especially the wider seats of the 1993 model (though they are soft and comfortable). The folding convertible top was not powered in any model year. The console buttons and controls tended to all look alike, and it could be difficult to find the right one. Fuel in the gas tank tends to slosh due to a lack of baffles.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-8 Convertible

$7,220

G, A

376 kg

1.71 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

295 hp V-8 Convertible

$8,020

G, A

376 kg

1.86 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-8 Convertible

676/135

155/33

87

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

295 hp V-8 Convertible

894/179

205/43

87

132

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac Brougham 1986-92

Notes: Aside from limousines, this is the longest production automobile (5.61 meters) ever built. It is the predecessor of the Fleetwood, and has just about every luxury available to the industry at the time. Like many cars of the period, it has the terrible door-mounted front seat belts; these belts are not as good as frame-mounted belts at stopping forward momentum, and tend to tangle the occupants when they get into or out of the front seats; but are a way of practically ensuring that the belts are worn.

Antilock brakes appeared starting in the 1989 model year, and a driver-side airbag in the 1990 model year. Also in 1990, a 175-horsepower V-8 engine was available. 1991 brought a more powerful 170-horsepower standard engine to the Brougham, as well as a 10-horsepower boost to the most powerful engine. For 1992, the Brougham gained an optional trailer hitch, with the ability to tow 3.18 tons. The tow package included changes to the engine, transmission, and suspension to enable this feat.

Due to the heavy construction, the Brougham fares well in wrecks, but the engines provided are really not powerful enough to move the vehicle with any authority and work very hard, consuming a lot of fuel. The Brougham handles like a tank, but the ride is very soft and quiet, and acceleration brisk. The brake pedal can be a bit spongy, and the steering vague. The controls seem to be scattered about in haphazard fashion. Leg and headroom is excellent except for the very tall.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

140 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,252

G, A

455 kg

1.94 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

170 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,252

G, A

455 kg

1.96 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

175 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,252

G, A

455 kg

1.96 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

185 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,252

G, A

455 kg

1.96 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

140 hp V-8 Sedan

442/88

100/20

87

62

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

170 hp V-8 Sedan

520/104

120/25

87

76

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

175 hp V-8 Sedan

532/106

125/25

87

77

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

185 hp V-8 Sedan

560/112

130/25

87

82

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $400 for a tow package.

Cadillac Catera 1997-01

Notes: This is Cadillac's version of a sports sedan, and also Cadillac's smallest model. The Catera has the crisp handling and tight cornering of a sports car, and the comfortable ride and luxury features of a Cadillac, but is underpowered for a vehicle of its weight, especially so for a sports car.

The 1997 version has a 200-horsepower V-6 engine, with only an automatic 4-speed transmission available. Standard features include antilock brakes, daylight running lamps, dual front airbags, traction control, a dust and pollen filter for the AC/heater, power windows, a rear view mirror that automatically darkens in response to bright lights, folding rear seat, programmable power locks, theft-deterrent system, steering wheel-mounted radio controls, and automatic climate controls. Options include leather upholstery, power sunroof, front and rear seat heaters, and an 8-speaker Bose sound system. 1998 brought a power rear sunshade, as well as optional OnStar and a Radio Data System (RDS), which picks radio station call letters and sound titles and displays them, as well as breaking into broadcasts to announce emergencies, weather information, and traffic congestion. 1999 brought few changes, but it was the first Cadillac to meet national low-emission standards, and the sport version was equipped with side airbags for the front. 2000 had numerous styling differences inside and out; in addition, the suspension was modified for a firmer ride, and the sports edition got a spoiler. All Cateras were now equipped with side airbags, and the sports versionís suspension was adjusted for even tighter tolerances. In 2001, the solid disc brakes were replaced by ventilated ones to help prevent overheating and lower brake wear.

Steering is precise, though a bit over-assisted, and it stops surely and quickly, without nosedive. Wind rush can get a bit loud at highway speeds, and the tires thump loudly over bumps and tar strips in roads. The seats are plush, soft, comfortable and well suited for long trips, but putting a third passenger in the rear seat can take away that pleasure. Most controls are well positioned, but the power window controls are on the center console, and the cruise control switches at the end of the turn signal stalk are tiny, poorly marked, and difficult to manipulate. The headrests on the front seats are large and the rear window opening narrow, compromising rear visibility. The trunk is roomy, and there are split folding rear seats for larger cargo.

Twilight 2000 Notes: Versions beyond the 1995 model year do not exist, since Cadillac was a major builder of military vehicles for the US military and her allies.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-6 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

360 kg

1.71 tons

1+4

4

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-6 Coupe

676/135

155/33

68

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $175 for a Radio Data System.

Cadillac Cimarron 1985-88

Notes: This was a subcompact Cadillac, yet the highest-priced version of GMís J-car series. It was available only as a sedan version. It was, however, a very weak seller for Cadillac, and sort of an embarrassment for them; though it was well-appointed for a subcompact, It was not a very agile or peppy vehicle, having a choice of two rather weak engines and a bouncy suspension. The Cimarron is basically an expensive Chevy Cavalier. Standard features, apart from luxury items, included an early version of antilock brakes, but problems included engine and transaxle vibration (caused by quick deterioration of the upper engine torque strap) and a manual transmission that can be difficult when changing gears. The Cimarron is normally a fairly quiet vehicle, except at high RPMs and high speeds.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

85 hp I-4 Sedan

$6,020

G, A

258 kg

1.17 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

88 hp I-4 Sedan

$6,420

G, A

258 kg

1.17 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

120 hp V-6 Sedan

$6,420

G, A

258 kg

1.19 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

135 hp V-6 Sedan

$6,820

G, A

258 kg

1.19 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

85 hp I-4 Sedan

442/89

100/20

51

37

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

88 hp I-4 Sedan

460/92

105/23

51

39

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

120 hp V-6 Sedan

590/118

135/28

51

53

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

135 hp V-6 Sedan

660/132

155/30

51

60

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac CTS 2003-05

Notes: This is an entry-level car (for Cadillac, anyway) which replaced the Catera in the Cadillac line. It is notable for being the first Cadillac to be offered in a manual transmission version in over 20 years. The CTS is meant to be a sports sedan, and was tested extensively in Germany for over a year before it was first placed on the market. The CTS has all the creature comforts that are basic for a Cadillac, ranging from air conditioning to leather upholstery to an AM/FM/CD/Cassette player (with voice activated controls), but the fancier stuff are options or not present. Some of the standard features of note are dual front airbags, side front airbags, antilock brakes, traction control. Options include a sunroof or moonroof (manual or power), a navigation system with voice-activated controls, a heated front seat, power adjustable front seats, a split folding rear seat, a cargo rack on the roof, high intensity headlights, and a tow hitch.

2004 brought two new engines, OnStar with hands-off voice activated controls, and an optional Sport package with an antiskid system, speed-variable steering assist, upgraded brakes, and load-leveling suspension. XM satellite radio was also added as an option. The 2005 model year brought an optional smaller engine with less horsepower but greater fuel economy; the 220 horsepower V-6 was deleted as a base engine. Most of the rest of the changes were cosmetic.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This car does not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

210 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

318 kg

1.62 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

220 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

318 kg

1.63 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

255 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

318 kg

1.7 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

400 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,820

G, A

318 kg

1.93 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

210 hp V-6 Sedan

746/149

170/35

66

94

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

220 hp V-6 Sedan

770/154

180/35

66

98

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

255 hp V-6 Sedan

850/170

195/40

66

114

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

400 hp V-8 Sedan

1148/230

265/53

66

178

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $200 for satellite radio.

Cadillac DeVille 2000-05

Notes: This car was redesigned in 2000, becoming more aerodynamic and rounded. The wheelbase got longer, but the entire vehicle actually became almost 4 centimeters shorter. The DíElegance and Concours versions were replaced by the new DHS (DeVille High-luxury Sedan) and DTS (DeVille Touring Sedan) versions. The 2000 versions were still powered by Northstar engines, 275 horsepower in the base and DHS versions and 300 horsepower in the DTS. Traction control and antilock brakes are standard, as is OnStar and dual front and dual front side airbags. The taillights use LED technology to snap on faster. Options included dual rear side airbags and StabiliTrak (standard on the DTS). Standard on the DTS only is Continuously Variable Road Sensing Suspension.

2001 brought a CD player to the base DeVille (which formerly had an AM/FM/Cassette). Options included a tire pressure sensing system, and the Infotainment system, which was a touchpad screen that combined stereo controls (including information about the station and song or program being played) and email capability. The 2002 model year brought a rear seat DVD entertainment to the DeVille, and standard tire-pressure sensing to the DHS and DTS. Satellite radio became an option during the model year, and leather upholstery became standard on all models. In 2003, the tire-pressure sensing system became optional across the board, and an optional thermal night vision became available. In 2004, heated and cooled seats, and a heated steering wheel, became optional on the base model and standard on the DHS and DTS. The front airbags now protected the head and torso, side curtain airbags were added, and rear side airbags became an option. The thermal camera became an option on all versions (previously unavailable on the base model), as did ultrasonic rear parking assistance. The navigation system accepts voice inputs, and the DVD system can play on the front windshield if the transmission is in Park. In the 2005 model, the DTS and DHS lost 10 horsepower, but gained slightly in fuel economy, and the DTS also gained front bucket seats and a sportier trim package.

The acceleration of the DeVille is outstanding. The automatic transmission is smooth and reliable. Unfortunately, the DeVille requires premium fuel for proper performance, and fuel economy is not that good. Head and legroom in the both the front and rear are exceptional, except for the middle of the seats, where the console in the front and drive train tunnel in the rear can leave the passenger short on legroom. The seats themselves are soft, described as like those of a limousine. The dashboard are easy to see, and the console controls are large and clearly labeled (though there are a lot of them). Visibility is excellent except for the thick rear roof pillars.

Twilight 2000 Notes: These cars do not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision*

Radiological

275 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,088

G, A

411 kg

1.8 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

290 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,088

G, A

411 kg

1.81 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,088

G, A

411 kg

1.81 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

275 hp V-8 Sedan

864/173

200/40

70

123

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

290 hp V-8 Sedan

902/180

210/43

70

129

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Sedan

934/187

215/43

70

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $150 for the Infotainment system; add $175 for satellite radio; add $400 for a DVD system; add $450 for a thermal viewer; add $1000 for Ultrasonic Rear Parking Assistance.

Cadillac DeVille/Concours 1994-99

Notes: These two Cadillacs are the same, except for the engines and that the Concours is plusher than the DeVille. The 1994 models have a DeVilles (more properly known as Sedan DeVilles) have a 200-horsepower V-8, while the Concours (more properly known as the DeVille Concours) use a massive 270-horsepower Northstar V-8. The Concours also has a Road Sensing Suspension (RSS) that adjusts the suspension nearly instantly based on the roughness or smoothness of the road. The DeVille has a Speed Sensitive Suspension (SSS) which adjusts the suspension to one of three levels based upon the speed of the car. Antilock brakes are standard for both. The seatbelts (except for those in the center) are height-adjustable.

1995 has standard traction control, which may be switched off if desired; it also has long-life transmission fluid, rated at 100,000 miles. Both have dual front airbags. In 1996, the engine of the base model was switched to that of the former Concours and increased to 275 horsepower, while the new Concours got a 300-horsepower Northstar V-8. Daylight running lamps became standard on both, as was a new stereo system with controls on the steering wheel and long-life coolant. The Concours added rain-sensing windshield wipers and variable-assist power steering, while the DeVille gained a stainless steel exhaust system and Road Sensitive Suspension. 1998 brought little except some cosmetic differences. The 1999 model year brought massaging front seats to the Concours and Stabilitrak suspension which was standard on the Concours and optional on the DeVille. A Golden Anniversary version was added to the line, which was basically a Concours with special white paint, special trim, wood interior trim, and two-tone leather upholstery.

One of the main attractions of the DeVille or Concours (or any Cadillac) is the luxury option package, which is extensive. This vehicle is available only as a 4-door sedan.

Regardless of engine, the vehicles are equipped only with automatic transmission, which shifts with buttery smoothness. Due to the weight of the vehicles and the high-performance engines, fuel economy is poor, and all engines demand premium fuel. The ride is smooth, quiet, and low on noise and vibration. They are not agile, but handle reasonably well for cars of their size and weight. From 1998 on, they are equipped with StabiliTrak, which greatly improves agility. The antilock brakes are strong and bring the vehicle to a stop fast. The interior is spacious and comfortable, and the trunk is huge and easy to load. The climate controls can be difficult to reach by the driver.

Twilight 2000 Notes: Versions beyond the 1995 model year do not exist, since Cadillac was a major builder of military vehicles for the US military and her allies.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,420

G, A

430 kg

1.8 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

270 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,220

G, A

430 kg

1.94 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

275 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,220

G, A

430 kg

1.94 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,220

G, A

430 kg

1.95 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-8 Sedan

646/129

150/30

76

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

270 hp V-8 Sedan

792/158

185/38

76

120

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

275 hp V-8 Sedan

806/161

185/38

76

123

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Sedan

872/174

200/40

76

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac Coupe DeVille/Fleetwood 1990-93

Notes: The Coupe DeVille/Fleetwood comes in four versions, one in a 2-door coupe version (the Coupe DeVille) and three in 4-door sedan configuration (the Sedan DeVille, the Fleetwood, and the Fleetwood Sixty Special). They get more plush the further you go up the line, so the Coupe DeVille and Sedan DeVille are base vehicles (but still pretty luxurious), the Fleetwood is more luxurious, and the Fleetwood Sixty Special is the top of line and is loaded with everything available to the range. The engine is big and powerful, a 180-horsepower V-8, but it demands premium fuel. The automatic transmission, standard on both cars, shifts smoothly and stays out of overdrive until the vehicle reaches 65 kph. A driverís side airbag is standard on all models, and antilock brakes are standard on Fleetwoods and optional on DeVilles. Another feature standard to all versions is a "chip in the key" theft deterrent system, where the key has a microchip embedded in it, and this interfaces with the ignition; the car cannot be started without this key by normal means or with standard hotwiring. Another option for DeVilles and standard feature for Fleetwoods was Speed Sensitive Steering.

1991 brought a new 200-horsepower V-8 appeared as an option; it too needs premium fuel. Antilock brakes became standard on DeVilles. Fleetwoods gained Computer Command Ride (CCR) as an option, which improves stability and handling as well as ride, by dampening shock with a semi-variable suspension. Another standard feature was Ez-Kool solar control glass, which decreased glare and ultraviolet exposure. There were also styling changes, such as a new grille and a "power dome" hood. Late in the Year, the DeVille Touring Sedan arrived; this version had 16-inch wheels, performance tires, quicker-ratio steering, thicker stabilization bars for a firmer ride, and an interior that featured leather upholstery and walnut trim. The 1992 model year brought traction control as a standard feature on Fleetwoods and the DeVille Touring Sedan, and an option on the other DeVilles. CCR became a standard feature on Fleetwoods and DeVille Touring Sedans. In 1993, the Fleetwood name was dropped, becoming the DeVille Special Sixty, but otherwise remaining the same car. Speed Sensitive Steering became a standard feature on all versions.

Unfortunately, the CCR does not work particularly well between 65-100 kph, causing the car to bounce and float too much over bumps. Interior space is ample and the trunk huge. The seats have been described as easy chair comfortable. The doors are tall and wide. Wind noise can turn into a rushing at high speeds.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

180 hp V-8 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

395 kg

1.6 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

200 hp V-8 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

395 kg

1.61 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

180 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

395 kg

1.64 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

200 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

395 kg

1.65 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

180 hp V-8 Coupe

652/131

150/30

68

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

200 hp V-8 Coupe

714/143

165/33

68

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

180 hp V-8 Sedan

638/128

150/30

68

80

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

200 hp V-8 Sedan

698/140

160/33

68

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac Eldorado 1992-02

Notes: This is a sport coupe member of the Cadillac line. Based on the same chassis as the Seville, the Eldorado uses classic lines and styling, as opposed to the Sevilleís European look. Though nearly a foot longer than the previous line of Eldoarados, there was only a modest gain in interior space; most of the extra space went under the hood. The 1992 model had standard antilock brakes and a driverís front airbag. An optional sport interior replaces the digital instruments with analog ones, and a Touring Coupe version had a firmer suspension and a wood-trimmed interior. The engine for this model is a 200-horsepower V-8.

The 1993 model had dual front airbags, Speed Sensitive Steering, Speed Sensitive Suspension, a redesigned rear suspension, and an electronic automatic transmission which adjusts to the driverís style. A new Sport Coupe used a 270-horsepower V-8, while the Touring Coupe gained a 295-horsepower engine and revised traction control, and a Road Sensing Suspension (RSS). In the 1994 model, the 270-horsepower V-8 became the base engine used by both the base Eldorado and the Sport Coupe. All models now had Road Sensing Suspension, though in the base model it was set softer than the other versions. 1995 brought 5 more horsepower to both remaining engines, and the new Integrated Chassis Control System was added to improve braking and handling. The Road Sensing Suspension was improved with electronic controls to measure the steering angle, and the Eldorado got a new grille. 1996 brought a new dashboard to the Touring Coupe, with larger instruments and redesigned climate and stereo controls that were easier to reach. In the 1997 model, the Eldorado gained StabiliTrak and rain-sensing windshield wipers. 1998 brought little except a new sound system. In 1999, optional massaging front seats were added to the Touring Coupe, as well as integrated StabiliTrak and Road Sensing Suspension. OnStar became standard on 2000 models; the Sports Coupe gained leather upholstery, but the optional massaging seats on the Touring Coupe were deleted. 2001 brought split/folding rear seats to the base model. 2002, the last year for the now-slow-selling Eldorado, brought primarily cosmetic changes.

None of the engines are very economical, and all demand premium fuel. An improved form of Computer Command Ride adjusts the suspension for speed, and makes for a firm but soft ride and excellent handling at all speeds. Steering is likewise precise. Front seat space is good, but rear space is merely adequate, though good for a sport coupe; however, the rear sights are inclined at what many will find is an uncomfortable angle. The trunk is large for a coupe. Climate controls are awkwardly placed behind the steering wheel until the 1996 model. Seats are comfortable except in their lumbar support. The roof pillars are huge, and impede rear side vision.

Twilight 2000 Notes: Versions beyond the 1995 model year do not exist, since Cadillac was a major builder of military vehicles for the US military and her allies.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-8 Coupe

$7,220

G, A

370 kg

1.71 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

270 hp V-8 Coupe

$8,020

G, A

370 kg

1.85 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

275 hp V-8 Coupe

$8,020

G, A

370 kg

1.85 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

295 hp V-8 Coupe

$8,020

G, A

370 kg

1.86 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Coupe

$8,020

G, A

370 kg

1.86 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-8 Coupe

676/135

155/33

76

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

270 hp V-8 Coupe

828/165

190/38

76

120

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

275 hp V-8 Coupe

842/169

195/40

76

123

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

295 hp V-8 Coupe

894/179

205/43

76

132

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Coupe

910/182

210/43

76

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar.

Cadillac Escalade 1999-2000

Notes: Cadillac joined the SUV craze in 1999 with the Escalade, an SUV that is nonetheless up to Cadillacs normal luxury standards. The Escalade is basically a posh version of the GMC Yukon Denali, sharing the same chassis and most of the body panels. The grille and exterior trim are different, as is the interior trim, which includes real wood. The rear door consists of a drop-down tailgate combined with lift-up glass, forming sort of a clamshell opening. The 1999 model uses a 255-horsepower V-8 with a 4-speed automatic transmission, and can tow 2.95 tons. Standard features included a version of OnStar that includes a voice-activated microphone, and also keeps track of appointments, birthdays, or whatever the driver wants to be reminded of. Though the Escalade has the usual host of Cadillac luxuries, such as a deluxe sound system, antilock brakes, dual-front airbags, and leather upholstery, it is lacking in some of the other refinements present on other Cadillacs of the period, such as DVD entertainment systems, massaging seats, StabiliTrak, Computer Command Ride, etc.

The 2000 model kept the same basic body outside and the same basic design inside. The rear door remained the same, though buyers had the option of full center-opening doors instead. Standard equipment includes full-time 4-wheel drive, daylight running lamps, rear-seat air conditioning, 10-way power front seats, heated front and rear seats, and a Bose stereo system with AM/FM/Cassette/6-CD changer. There was no 2001 Escalade model, but the line picked again in 2002.

The Escalade can feel sluggish in the power department; this is because the engine, though powerful, does not do well against the weight of the Escalade. That engine also demands premium fuel. Handling is likewise sluggish, with pronounced body lean, poor dampening of rough surfaces, and mushy response from the brakes. It is not an SUV you would really want to take off-road. The seats are comfortable, but the leather is inferior to other Cadillac models, and the seats are really too soft and flat for many people. Seating, however, is generous in both head and legroom. The Escalade is tall enough that getting in and out can be a problem Ė and there are no running boards to alleviate this. There are plenty of stash places and bins for your stuff. The impression one gets is that the Escalade for this period is just something thrown together to get Cadillac into the SUV market in a hurry.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This vehicle does not exist.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

255 hp V-8 SUV

$8,784

G, A

1.48 tons

2.53 tons

1+4

2

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

255 hp V-8 SUV

592/119

135/28

112

114

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar (which is actually a standard feature).

Cadillac Escalade 2002-05

Notes: Withdrawn from the market for a year for retooling, the Escalade became the SUV it should have been with the 2002 model year. The 2002 offers two new V-8 engines with higher power than the previous models. Standard features include the same version of OnStar as the previous model, a deluxe sound system, antilock brakes, dual front airbags, side front airbags, power adjusting seats, greater seating capacity, a "chip in the key" antitheft system, automatic load leveling, remote keyless entry, daylight running lamps, and a hands-free cell phone. The second row of seats folds flat and the third row is removable. Options include a moonroof (whether power or manual), and a first aid kit. Traction control and a StabiliTrak are standard on the all-wheel drive model only. The two-wheel drive model has the lower-power engine, while the all-wheel drive model has the higher-powered one. Towing capacity is 3.31 tons for the 2-wheel drive model and 3.63 tons for the all-wheel drive model.

2003 brought long wheelbase model, the ESV. The power brakes and gas pedal became adjustable, and the StabiliTrak system was extended to all models and was improved; traction control was extended to all models as well. An option for all models are bucket second-row seats instead of a bench seat. 2004 brought XM satellite radio to all Escalade models, a trailer package, standard second-row bucket seats, and a tire pressure monitoring system. The baseline engine was increased by 10 horsepower. The CD player was changed to a CD changer. A DVD system became an option on the ESV model. A navigation system became an option on all models, as did heated seats. The moonroof was still an option, but a load rack on the roof was the standard feature. Alloy wheels were standard on all models, with chrome wheels an option. Another new standard feature on all is an ultrasonic obstacle detection system when backing the vehicle. A new version, the EXT, was introduced, which is basically an SUV which can be converted to a short-bed pickup truck, similar to the Chevy Avalanche. Towing ability of the EXT is 3.31 tons, but the cargo capacity for the vehicle is much less than other versions, and there is also less seating. Most of the changes for the 2005 model are cosmetic, but other standard additions include Road-Sensing Suspension, and the trailer package became standard. The 295 horsepower engine has been eliminated, with the 345 horsepower engine becoming the standard across the board.

The Escalade for this time period has more available engine power in both models; at the same time, it is lighter, especially in its 2-wheel drive incarnation. The engines still demand premium gasoline, however. Handling has been greatly improved, especially in the all-wheel drive model, and you might even take this one off-roading. The seats are more comfortable, especially in the front, and the headroom and legroom are still generous, except in the third row seat, which is best for children.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This vehicle does not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

285 hp V-8 2WD SUV

$9,348

G, A

1.47 tons

2.42 tons

1+7**

1

Headlights

Open

295 hp V-8 2WD SUV

$9,348

G, A

1.47 tons

2.42 tons

1+7**

1

Headlights

Open

345 hp V-8 AWD SUV

$9,748

G, A

1.44 tons

2.52 tons

1+7**

2

Headlights

Open

345 hp V-8 ESV SUV

$10,280

G, A

1.33 tons

2.66 tons

1+7**

2

Headlights

Open

345 hp V-8 EXT Pickup

$10,280

G, A

1.14 tons

2.67 tons

1+5

2

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap***

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

285 hp V-8 2WD SUV

684/172

160/41

98

127

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

295 hp V-8 2WD SUV

704/177

165/41

98

132

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

345 hp V-8 AWD SUV

754/190

175/44

98

148

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

345 hp V-8 ESV SUV

716/178

165/41

117

148

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

345 hp V-8 EXT Pickup

740/185

170/44

117

154

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar (which is actually a standard feature); add $200 for satellite radio; add $400 for a DVD system; add $1000 for Ultrasonic Rear Parking Assist.

**With second row bucket seats, Crew rating is 1+6.

***Starting with the 2004 model, all Escalades have a 117-liter fuel tank.

Cadillac Fleetwood 1993-96

Notes: This is a full-sized car based on the chassis of the Roadmaster. The suspension is not as soft as other Cadillacs, so while you might feel more bumps, turning and maneuvering is surer and the car wallows less than its siblings. Steering is firmer, and the Fleetwood is equipped with traction control so grip in tight turns and slippery pavement is much better than other Cadillacs. Interiors are roomy unless you are sitting in the middle. Front seats are adjustable in three dimensions. All seats are firm, but lack thigh support. Engines require premium fuel.

For 1993, the Fleetwood was equipped with a 185-horsepower V-8 coupled to a 4-speed automatic transmission. Traction control and antilock brakes are standard, as well as dual front airbags. For 1994, the Fleetwood had an optional engine derived from that of the Corvette Ė at 260 horsepower, it was a dramatic increase in power, though the Fleetwoodís huge weight tends to sap this. To take advantage of this power, 1994 Fleetwoods equipped with this engine had a new electronic-controlled automatic transmission. A new option for 1994 was a trailer hitch and tow package, enabling the Fleetwood to tow 2.67 tons. 1995 brought long-life transmission fluid and platinum-tipped spark plugs, and the side mirrors became larger, were mounted further forward, and could fold. 1996, the final year for the Fleetwood, brought primarily cosmetic changes (mostly in new stowage compartments in the doors and folding center armrest).

Twilight 2000 Notes: Versions beyond the 1995 model year do not exist, since Cadillac was a major builder of military vehicles for the US military and her allies.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

185 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,784

G, A

470 kg

2.03 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

260 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,184

G, A

470 kg

2.12 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

185 hp V-8 Sedan

542/109

125/25

87

82

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

260 hp V-8 Sedan

708/142

165/33

87

116

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac Seville 1992-97

Notes: This has been described as Cadillac's best premium sedan in ages. It uses the same chassis as the Eldorado coupe, and is nearly a foot longer than previous versions of the Seville. The 1992 version has standard antilock brakes as well as a driverís side airbag. There is also a sport version of the 1992 Seville with analog instead of digital dashboard gauges and a console-mounted gearshift instead of one on the steering column. The top of the line Seville was the Seville Touring Sedan (STS) version, with tons of luxuries, quicker steering, thicker stabilizer bars, analog instruments, and leather upholstery.

The 1993 model has dual front airbags, and a 295-horsepower V-8 Northstar engine was installed in the STS version. Base and Sports models also had an optional Northstar engine available, developing 270 horsepower. The automatic transmission was electronically controlled, and the STS version also had traction control. The STS also gained Road Sensing Suspension. (Base and Sport versions had Speed Sensitive Suspension instead.) In 1994, the 270-horsepower engine became the base engine; the base model was renamed the Seville Luxury Sedan (SLS). Traction control and Road Sensing Suspension were extended to all Sevilles. In 1995, the two Northstar engines added 5 horsepower, and an Integrated Chassis Control System was standard on all models and improved braking, traction control, and handling. The 1995 Seville also had headlights and wipers that turned on with one control. 1996 brought daylight running lamps, a new dashboard layout with larger analog gauges, better grouping of climate and stereo controls, and stereo and climate controls duplicated on the steering wheel. 1997 brought StabiliTrak and rain-sensing wipers to the STS version.

The chassis has been stiffened over previous Sevilles, and the suspension has Computer Command Ride added; this makes for a surer ride, with better handling, and tighter cornering. While the suspension floats a bit under 75 kph, the ride firms up considerably over that speed. Headroom is ample, and there is plenty of room for adults front and back. The doors are wide and tall. Thick rear pillars hamper rearward vision, but visibility in other angles is excellent. Climate controls are hidden behind the steering wheel in models up to the 1995, but later models have these controls moved for better access. The trunk is roomy and easy to load. The extra length means that there is plenty of legroom, and the car is wider as well. Like almost all Cadillacs, the engines demand premium gasoline.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

200 hp V-8 Sedan

$7,220

G, A

360 kg

1.74 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

270 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

360 kg

1.88 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

275 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

360 kg

1.88 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

295 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

360 kg

1.89 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

360 kg

1.89 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

200 hp V-8 Sedan

666/133

155/30

76

89

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

270 hp V-8 Sedan

816/163

190/38

76

120

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

275 hp V-8 Sedan

830/166

190/38

76

123

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

295 hp V-8 Sedan

882/176

205/40

76

132

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Sedan

896/179

210/43

76

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

Cadillac Seville 1998-04

Notes: The Seville was redesigned for 1998, somewhat more rounded and aerodynamic, and greatly improved on the inside. The vehicle itself was nearly 8 centimeters shorter, but the wheelbase increased by nearly 4 centimeters. The base version is the SLS; it has a 275-horsepower V-8 Northstar engine, and standard features include StabiliTrak, Road Sensing Suspension, antilock brakes, dual front airbags, and seat belts anchored to the frame of the vehicle; options included OnStar. The STS version used a 300-horsepower engine, and had the additional standard features of Adaptive Seat System, which used 10-air-filled cells to adjust the front seat comfort precisely to the occupants; and a Radio Data System, which displays information about the song, program, and station being played, as well as cutting in with emergency, weather, and traffic congestion information.

The 1999 model brought massaging front seats, but little else but cosmetic changes occurred. The Adaptive Seat System became an option on the SLS, and heated seats became an option on both. 2000 brought a small but important change to the engines Ė they now were optimized for regular instead of premium fuel. OnStar was revised to use a voice-activated system that also automatically turned on automatically when the vehicle is involved in a crash. StabiliTrak was also improved in its antiskid role and also helped out the antilock brakes. A sensor in the front seat could detect the presence of a child or no occupant, and not fire the airbag in such a case. Options now included a navigation system and Ultrasonic Rear Parking Assist, which detects obstacles and sounds an alarm if one is detected. The 2001 model added new options, such as an email system, auto-reversing power front windows (so one does not get their hand or head stuck in them by accident), and there were also some cosmetic changes (mainly in paint color and exterior trim). The 2002 model brought an optional rear-seat DVD system, and heated seats became a standard feature. Another option was satellite radio. The 2003 model brought more cosmetic changes, especially to the grille of the SLS and the wheels of the STS (which were now chrome). Memory front seats were also standard, as was a power tilt/telescoping steering wheel. The STS also had standard rain-sensing wipers. 2004, the last model year for the Seville, dropped the STS (which became the name of a new car of its own), though the SLS version remained. New standard features included heated front and rear seats, the Ultrasonic Rear Parking Assist, and a DVD system which can also play reflected on the front windshield when the Seville is in Park.

As is normal with Northstar engine-equipped Cadillacs, the Seville for this time period has quick acceleration and smooth power. The automatic transmission is likewise smooth and changes gears almost imperceptibly. The SLSís engine is optimized for low-speed acceleration, while the STSís engine is optimized for responsiveness at high speed. The engines do eat fuel, however. The SLS has a soft suspension without being sloppy, while the STS has a firmer ride and quicker handling. The STS can be prone to steering wheel tug in quick takeoffs, however, and the magnetic power steering can lag behind a bit in response to road grades. Front seat head and legroom is generous, but the back seat is cramped and better suited to two adults rather than three. In addition, getting in and out of the back seat can be quite a chore for adults. However, all the seats are quite comfortable. Visibility is somewhat limited by large rear roof pillars and a tall back deck. The trunk is large, with a large opening, and the dashboard instruments are easy to read (and are digital). The console controls are easy to reach, except for some of the climate controls being a bit low.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This car does not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

275 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

353 kg

1.8 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

300 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,020

G, A

353 kg

1.81 tons

1+5

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

275 hp V-8 Sedan

864/173

200/40

70

123

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

300 hp V-8 Sedan

934/187

215/43

70

134

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $10,000 for a navigation system; add $1000 for Ultrasonic Rear Parking Assist; add $175 for satellite radio; add $400 for a DVD system; add $175 for a Radio Data System.

Cadillac SRX 2004-05

Notes: This is a mid-sized SUV, sort of a blend between car and SUV, with styling of both and handling more like a large sedan than an SUV. Itís bigger than even a large sedan, but smaller than a truck-based SUV such as the Escalade. Rear-wheel drive is standard, but all-wheel drive is an option many people take, even though the AWD version lacks low-range gearing. Two choices of engine are available in either type. The transmission is automatic, but with a shift gate to allow the driver to switch to a faux manual transmission. Antilock brakes are standard, as are dual front airbags and head-protecting airbags for the first two rows of seats, traction control, and leather upholstery. Options abound, including Magnetic Ride Control, which adjusts the ride according to the road surface; power adjustable pedals and heated front seats (standard on V-8-equipped SRXs), a rear-seat DVD entertainment system, an UltraView sunroof (with a 1.7 square meter opening), and UltraView Plus, which adds a second non-opening sunroof over the third row of seats. Both have a rear liftgate without a separate opening window, second row seating which folds down (and has storage bins in the back), and third row seats which fold flush with the floor. Other goodies include rain-sensing wipers, automatic headlights (which turn on with the wipers), a theft-deterrent system, OnStar, heated memory power front seats (on the V-8 model only), and even a universal garage-door opener. A tow package is optional, but towing capacity is disappointing (907 kg).

The 2005 model brings mostly cosmetic differences, but some other changes include a greatly strengthened tow package which allows a towing capacity of 1.93 tons.

Some bugaboos include the manual shift gate, which is slow to responds to driverís input. The V-6 engine is fine in city traffic, but lacks response at highway speeds. The suspension, while much better as absorbing bumps than the average SUV, is not nearly as good as Cadillacís other luxury vehicles. Wind rush can be loud to some people, and the V-6 engine can get loud during rapid acceleration maneuvers. There are redundant controls on the steering wheel for the climate system and stereo, but those buttons are not labeled well and their use is not immediately obvious. The covers on storage bins are a bit thin and have a cheap feel. Thick roof pillars can impede the view to the side and rear. The SRX is not really designed for off-roading.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This SUV does not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

255 hp V-6 SUV

$8,020

G, A

1.05 tons

2.01 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

320 hp V-8 SUV

$8,820

G, A

1.05 tons

2.15 tons

1+6

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

255 hp V-6 SUV

728/146

170/33

76

114

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

320 hp V-8 SUV

846/169

195/40

76

143

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $10,000 for a navigation system; add $400 for a DVD system.

Cadillac STS 2005

Notes: This mid-size premium sedan replaces the Seville in Cadillacís lineup. It is basically a stretched version of the CTS with more bells and whistles; though it is 12 centimeters shorter than the Seville, the interior room is better due to its slightly greater height and the longer wheelbase. There are two engines available, a V-6 and a V-8, with rear wheel drive for the V-6 and rear-wheel drive or AWD available for the V-8 version. The transmission is an automatic with a manual shift gate. Standard features include antilock brakes, antiskid/traction control, dual front airbags, head-protecting side airbags for the ear seats, side curtain airbags for the front seats, and voice-activated OnStar that also automatically activates in a crash. Options include heated and cooled front seats, Adaptive Cruise Control which maintains a safe following distance between the STS and the car ahead of it automatically, a heads-up display, a navigation system with touchscreen and voice recognition, and XM satellite radio. A Preferred Equipment Package is also available, which gives the STS performance tires and steering, larger, alloy wheels, and Magnetic Ride Control which "reads" the road and adjusts the suspension for the texture of the road (Touring and Sport settings only). A Performance Handling Package can also be installed, which upgrades the brakes and gives performance-tread tires with 18-inch wheels.

The STSís engines are not noticeably different in city driving, but in highway driving, the V-8 is obviously superior. The transmission is quick and smooth. The ride is smooth, except over very bumpy or potholes surfaces, and even Magnetic Ride Control does not mitigate this very well. The power steering is a bit over-assisted, and can seem vague at times. The STS can feel heavy in cornering, but moderate high-speed turns feel good, with little body lean. The brakes are good, with quick, short stops. The interior of the STS is quite quiet, even with the engines in high RPMs or at high speed. The controls are easy to find, though the user will have to get used to what the sometime-cryptic markings mean. The ignition is keyless, which is a two-edged sword; while itís easy to get in and go, itís also easy to forget to turn off the engine (especially since the engines are so quiet), or accidentally leave the car in drive when parking. The headroom can be limited for tall drivers; if the STS is equipped with a sunroof, this is only worse. If the front seats are pushed back about midway, legroom for the rear seat occupants can become cramped. The trunk is surprisingly small considering the size of the STS, and the opening is small.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This car does not exist.

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

255 hp V-6 Sedan

$7,620

G, A

312 kg

1.75 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

320 hp V-8 Sedan

$8,420

G, A

312 kg

1.89 tons

1+4

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

255 hp V-6 Sedan

826/165

190/38

66

114

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

320 hp V-8 Sedan

952/190

220/45

66

143

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1

*Add $10,000 for OnStar; add $10,000 for a navigation system; add $10,000 for Adaptive Cruise Control; add $200 for satellite radio; add $1,000 for a HUD.

Cadillac XLR 2004-05

Notes: This is a premium sports car, a convertible with a retractable hard top. Though similar in appearance to newer Corvettes, the XLR is a quite different vehicle, with near-luxury appointments and a different type of engine. The suspension is tuned for a more comfortable ride than cars like the Corvette, and the transmission is an automatic with a manual shift gate. Standard features include traction/antiskid control, antilock brakes, Magnetic Ride Control (which adjusts the ride based upon the road surface), Adaptive Cruise Control (which maintains proper following distance between the XLR and the car ahead of it), heated/cooled leather seats, dual front airbags, side curtain airbags, a navigation system with a touchscreen that also controls the stereo functions, a DVD player which plays through the navigation touchscreen (and only functions when the car is in Park), and keyless entry and ignition. The only option for 2004 is XM satellite radio. 2005 brought little except cosmetic changes (mostly in the area of new paint colors and trim options). The engine, though different than that of the 2004 model, still has the same horsepower.

The engine offers excellent acceleration, while the transmission shifts smoothly and crisply. The ride is quite good, even over bumpy roads. The tires grip well, and there is almost no body lean. When the top is up, the interior is quiet, but when it is down, it is, if anything, louder than most convertibles. The climate controls are too low for the driver to reach them easily, but they are clearly marked and logically laid out. Even the door release is powered; the occupants must push a button rather than pulling a handle. There is no place on the car to put a key; instead, the "key" is actually a fob with buttons to open the car and start the engine. This can lead to accidentally leaving the engine on, leaving the car in Drive, etc. In addition, the car does not always respond to the fob without adjusting it in your pocket or taking it out of the pocket. The parking brake is a foot pedal rather than a lever in the center or on the wheel like most cars. The headroom and legroom are not anything to write home about, but it is adequate for most drivers. The seats are, however, very comfortable and adjustable, as is the steering column and wheel. Like most convertibles, the trunk is small, and there is very little interior space for storage. A big oversight is the spare tire; there is none!

Vehicle

Price*

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

320 hp V-8 Convertible

 

G, A

262 kg

1.65 tons

1+1

1

Headlights

Open

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

320 hp V-8 Convertible

1080/216

250/50

68

143

Stnd

W(2)

HF1 HS1 HR1