Marathon Sportsman Bush & Field

     Notes: This rifle and the company that produced it remained from 1984-88.  It was produced primarily in kit form, and barrels and bolts could be interchanged to allow the rifle to fire different calibers of ammunition.  It is basically a modified Mauser action of the Spanish Santa Barbara type, using a walnut stock with a low Monte Carlo comb and a heavy squared fore-end.  The pistol grip wrist and fore-end are finely checkered, and the butt has a thick rubber recoil pad.  The trigger may be adjusted four ways with screws.  It is drilled and tapped for a scope mount as well as having iron sights.  It was a rather heavy rifle, but this contributes to its stability.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Sportsman Bush & Field

.243 Winchester

3.58 kg

5 Internal

$1012

Sportsman Bush & Field

.270 Winchester

4.21 kg

5 Internal

$1471

Sportsman Bush & Field

7mm Mauser

4.1 kg

5 Internal

$1381

Sportsman Bush & Field

7mm Remington Magnum

4.26 kg

5 Internal

$1510

Sportsman Bush & Field

7.62mm NATO

4.18 kg

5 Internal

$1443

Sportsman Bush & Field

.30-06 Springfield

4.52 kg

5 Internal

$1723

Sportsman Bush & Field

.300 Winchester Magnum

4.81 kg

5 Internal

$2288

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Sportsman Bush & Field (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

Sportsman Bush & Field (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

69

Sportsman Bush & Field (7mm Mauser)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

80

Sportsman Bush & Field (7mm Magnum)

BA

4

1-2-3

7

4

Nil

86

Sportsman Bush & Field (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

89

Sportsman Bush & Field (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

78

Sportsman Bush & Field (.300)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

89

 

Marlin 15

     Notes: This is a magazine-fed bolt-action rifle with a simple hardwood stock and little or no refinements.  The basic Model 15 is a simple bolt-action rimfire rifle with a medium-quality birch stock that has a pistol grip wrist, a half-length fore-end, and a plastic trigger guard.  Sights consist of a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight and a simple blade front sight.  The Model 15 was superseded by the Model 25, which has an improved safety catch similar to that found on the Model 880.

     The Model 15Y (also known as the Little Buckaroo) is a youth model which is the same except for the 16.25-inch barrel and short butt.  The Model 15Y was replaced in production by the Model 15YN, with an improved safety catch. 

     The Model 25M is also similar to the Model 15, but fires .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire.  Like the others, it was replaced in production by a version with a modified safety, called the Model 25MN.  The Model 25MB, also known as the Midget Magnum, has a 16.25” barrel, and is a takedown rifle. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Marlin 15

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.49 kg

7

$284

Marlin 15Y

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.2 kg

7

$225

Marlin 25M

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.49 kg

7

$315

Marlin 25MB

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.28 kg

7

$277

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Marlin 15 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

Marlin 15 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

45

Marlin 15 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

49

Marlin 15Y (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

30

Marlin 15Y (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

34

Marlin 15Y (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Marlin 25M

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

63

Marlin 25MB

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

51

 

Marlin 17

     Notes: Introduced in 2002, the Model 17 was designed specifically for the new .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire round.  It is basically a modification of the Model 15, with a similar action, modified for the needs of the .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire chambering.  There are two versions of the Model 17: the standard Model 17V, using a heavy match barrel, and the Model 17VS, which is basically the same weapon but has a stainless steel barrel, receiver, bolt, firing pin, safety, trigger, and trigger guard.  It is identical to the Model 17V for game purposes.  Stocks in both cases are made from hardwood with a coating of Mar-Shield varnish.  The Model 17 has no iron sights; it is designed exclusively for use with a telescopic sight.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This Model 17 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Marlin 17V

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire

3.2 kg

7

$440

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Marlin 17V

BA

2

1-Nil

6

1

Nil

66

 

Marlin 80

     Notes: The Model 80 is a pre-World War 2 bolt-action rimfire rifle, introduced in 1935.  It is a “takedown rifle;” it is designed to be assembled and disassembled easily.  It has a straight-comb butt with a pistol grip wrist; a pair of finger grooves were cut into the fore-end until 1937, when Marlin eliminated the grooves.  Most Model 80s has steel trigger guards, but a few Model 80s built in 1939 has trigger guards made of Tenite plastic.  The Model 80 used a 24-inch barrel, with a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight and a blade front sight. 

     Production of the Model 80 stopped in late 1939, replaced in production by the improved Model 80B.  The Model 80B used a stock made from better-quality wood, the Tenite plastic trigger guard, and a radial safety catch on the stock behind the bolt handle. The Model 80BE is virtually identical to the Model 80B, but used a simplified set of sights consisting of an adjustable aperture rear sight and a hooded bead front sight.  The Model 80C had a widened semi-beavertail fore-end.  The Model 80B was produced only in 1940; the Model 80BE from 1940-41, and the Model 80C in 1941 and then again from 1945-71.  Post-war Model 80Cs used walnut Monte Carlo-type stocks starting in 1957 as well as a trigger guard with a more attractive design.  All are identical to the Model 80 for game purposes.

     The Model 81 of 1939 is basically a Model 80, but had a tubular magazine.  This was superseded in 1940 by the Model 81B with the improved-wood stock, Tenite trigger guard, and the radial safety catch behind the bolt handle.  The Model 81BE is a Model 81B with the aperture and bead sights.  The Model 81C is a Model 81B with a widened semi-beavertail fore-end.  The post-war Model 81C used a Monte Carlo-type stock starting in 1957 and the better trigger guard of the Model post-war Model 80C.  All are identical to the Model 81 for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 80

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.61 kg

8

$309

Model 81

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.65 kg

24 (.22 Short), 21 (.22 Long), 18 (.22 Long Rifle); Tubular

$310

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 80/81 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

43

Model 80/81 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

49

Model 80/81(.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

53

 

Marlin 512 Slugmaster

     Notes: This weapon is based on the Marlin 55 Goose Gun.  Though some argument could be made for placing it in the shotgun category – it fires shotgun slugs – I think it is better placed here with the rifles, since the barrel is rifled, the Slugmaster is unsuited for firing shot or most other types of special shotgun rounds, and in fact, firing shot rounds through the Slugmaster’s barrel will ruin the rifling.  As with the Goose Gun, the Slugmaster is designed for 12 gauge 3-inch rounds, but the barrel is considerably shorter than that of the Goose Gun, at only 21 inches.  The same two-round magazine is used for the Slugmaster as is used for the Goose Gun, and the action is virtually identical (except for the chamber loaded indicator).  The Slugmaster has rifle-style iron sights, as well as drilling and tapping for a telescopic sight mount.  The stock is of beechwood from Maine and has a walnut finish, and the butt has a thick recoil pad. 

     In 1997, the Model 512DL was introduced; it is a Model 512 with a black high-impact stock instead of a wooden stock.  In 1998, the Model 512P was brought out; it is a model 512DL with compensator ports near the muzzle to help suppress barrel climb.  The front sight bead of the Model 512P was also replaced with a bright orange glass fiber bead.  The Model 512DL was not produced after 2000.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Models 512DL and 512P do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Marlin 512

12 Gauge 3” (Slugs Only)

3.6 kg

2

$921

Marlin 512DL

12 Gauge 3” (Slugs Only)

3.2 kg

2

$951

Marlin 512P

12 Gauge 3” (Slugs Only)

3.2 kg

2

$977

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Marlin 512

BA

6

2-4-Nil

8

6

Nil

87

Marlin 512DL

BA

6

2-4-Nil

8

5

Nil

87

Marlin 512P

BA

6

2-4-Nil

8

4

Nil

87

 

Marlin 780

     Notes: This is an improved Model 80, with a better stock, matte-finished receiver to reduce glare, and a larger trigger guard for use with a gloved trigger.  The Model 781 is similar, but uses a tubular underbarrel magazine.  The Model 782 fires magnum ammunition; the Model 783 is the magnum equivalent of the Model 781. 

     In 1989, the successor to the Model 780 series, the Model 880, was introduced.  The Model 880 is virtually identical to the Model 780, but has a black high-impact plastic stock.  The Model 880SS, introduced in 1994 version is somewhat heavier, has a black high-impact plastic stock, and has a stainless steel barrel and receiver.  (Other metal parts are nickel-plated.)  The Model 880SS has a protected front sight post with a bright orange inlay for visibility.  In 1996, another version, the Model 880SQ (Squirrel) was introduced; this weapon has all-blued metal parts, no iron sights, and dovetails for the mounting of a telescopic sight.  The barrel is also a heavy match barrel, and the Model 880SQ is heavier as a result.  The Model 880SQ stopped being produced in 1999.

     At the same time as the Model 880, the Model 881 was introduced.  It is basically a Model 880 which is fed by a tubular magazine below the barrel.  Iron sights are supplied, as are dovetails for telescopic sight mounts.  The stock is of wood.  The Model 881 remained in production until 1999.  The Model 882 is a Model 880 chambered for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire; the barrel, bolt, and trigger of stainless steel, while the other metal parts are nickel-plated (including the magazine).  A variant of the Model 882 is the Model 882SQ; this has a heavy match rifle, no iron sights, and a black high-impact plastic stock.  The metal parts are matte blued.  Production of the Model 882SQ stopped in 1998.  The Model 882SQ was replaced by the Model 882SSV, which is basically a Model 882 with a heavy stainless steel match barrel.  (It is identical to the Model 882SQ for game purposes.)  The Model 883 is a Model 882 which is fed by a tubular underbarrel magazine instead of from a detachable magazine.  There are variants of the Model 883 which have nickel-plated metal, stainless steel parts, and stocks of different woods.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 880SS is very rare in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The Model 880SQ does not exist, nor does the Model 882SSV.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Marlin 780

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.49 kg

7

$284

Marlin 781

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.53 kg

25 (.22 Short), 21 (.22 Long), 17 (.22 Long Rifle); Tubular

$284

Marlin 782

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.56 kg

7

$315

Marlin 783

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.61 kg

12 Tubular

$316

Marlin 880

.22 Long Rifle

2.49 kg

7

$294

Marlin 880SS

.22 Long Rifle

2.7 kg

7

$294

Marlin 880SQ

.22 Long Rifle

3.2 kg

7

$292

Marlin 881

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.7 kg

25 (.22 Short), 19 (.22 Long), 17 (.22 Long Rifle); Tubular

$284

Marlin 882

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.8 kg

7

$315

Marlin 882SQ

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

3.2 kg

7

$333

Marlin 883

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.7 kg

12 Tubular

$324

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Marlin 780/781 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

Marlin 780/781 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

45

Marlin 780/781 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

49

Marlin 782/783

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

63

Marlin 880

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

49

Marlin 880SS

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

49

Marlin 880SQ

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

51

Marlin 881 (.22 Short)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

40

Marlin 881 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

45

Marlin 881 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

49

Marlin 882

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

63

Marlin 882SQ

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

66

Marlin 883

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

63

 

Marlin MR-7

     Notes: This is the first Marlin bolt-action rifle designed for centerfire rifle cartridges, surprisingly not introduced until 1996.  It is an unremarkable design, with a stock of fine American walnut which is finished with Mar-Shield varnish, but little other refinements.  The MR-7 was removed from the market in 2000.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MR-7

.270 Winchester

3.4 kg

4

$1456

MR-7

.30-06 Springfield

3.63 kg

4

$1709

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MR-7 (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

60

MR-7 (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

68

 

Marlin X-7

     Notes: The X-7 is intended to be a direct competitor to similar rifles with higher (real-world) prices, such as the Remington 700, Ruger M-77, and Winchester M-70.  The X-7 comes in long-action and short-action versions, and has features normally found on more (real-world) expensive rifles.  These include the Pro-Fire Adjustable Trigger, a match-quality trigger pack that is adjustable by the shooter for length of pull, pull weight, and takeup distance.  The bolt is fluted to reduce weight, and the interior working parts have a special coating which has good lubrication and anti-corrosion properties.  The X-7 has a tactitile red cocking/chamber-loaded indicator. The stock is of black synthetic with a slightly raised and padded cheekpiece and a Soft-Tech recoil pad.  The X-7 has a 22-inch floating barrel with precision button rifling and tipped with a target crown.  There are no iron sights, though the X-7 is drilled and tapped for a scope mount, and Marlin will include a one-piece scope base in the cost.

     The X-7C is essentially the same rifle, but it has a Realtree APG camouflage pattern and is a little heavier; otherwise, for game purposes, it is identical to the X-7.  The Model X-7S is built of more advanced materials in the stock and is a bit heavier, but otherwise identical to the X-7 for game purposes.  The Model X-7Y is identical for most purposes to the Model X-7S, but comes only in a short-action version, and is likewise a bit heavier than it’s X-7 brother.

     The Model X-7VH is designed for varmint hunting, but would serve as well as a hunting weapon on most North-American-type game.  Most of the features of the X-7 apply to the X-7VH, but the X-7VH has a heavy free-floating 26-inch barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

X-7

.25-06 Remington

2.84 kg

4 Internal

$1359

X-7

.270 Winchester

2.96 kg

4 Internal

$1549

X-7

.30-06 Springfield

3.12 kg

4 Internal

$1802

X-7

.243 Winchester

2.67 kg

4 Internal

$1089

X-7

7mm-08 Remington

2.98 kg

4 Internal

$1538

X-7

7.62mm NATO

2.97 kg

4 Internal

$1520

X-7S

.25-06 Remington

2.95 kg

4 Internal

$1358

X-7S

.270 Winchester

3.08 kg

4 Internal

$1547

X-7S

.30-06 Springfield

3.24 kg

4 Internal

$1800

X-7S

.243 Winchester

2.78 kg

4 Internal

$1087

X-7S

7mm-08 Remington

3.1 kg

4 Internal

$1536

X-7S

7.62mm NATO

3.09 kg

4 Internal

$1519

X-7Y

.243 Winchester

2.95 kg

4 Internal

$1538

X-7Y

7mm-08 Remington

3.08 kg

4 Internal

$1520

X-7Y

7.62mm NATO

3.24 kg

4 Internal

$1358

X-7VH

.22-250 Remington

3.52 kg

4 Internal

$974

X-7VH

7.62mm NATO

3.97 kg

4 Internal

$1561

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

X-7/X-7S (.25-06)

BA

4

2-Nil

7

4

Nil

73

X-7/X-7S (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

64

X-7/X-7S (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

73

X-7/X-7S (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

69

X-7/X-7S (7mm-08)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

84

X-7/X-7S (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

83

X-7YH (.22-250)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

2

Nil

83

X-7YH (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

103

 

Mossberg 4x4

    Notes: The 4x4 (I have yet to determine why Mossberg calls this rifle the “4x4”) is one of Mossberg’s newest rifles; it has just recently (as I write this in early August 2007) appeared on Mossberg’s website for sale.  It is one of those rifles called a “tackdriver” in shooting slang – a civilian rifle which is made so well that it has sniper rifle-like accuracy, capable of sub-MOA accuracy at long ranges.

     Based on the Model 100 ATR action, the 4x4, the 4x4 improves on the Model 100 ATR, using an action and receiver machined from solid bar stock.  Though the bolt has only two locking lugs, they are huge, and the 4x4 has a plunger-type ejector.  Barrels are 24-inches (except for a couple of versions which use a 22-inch barrel), and are button-rifled, free-floating, heavy profile, and with a target crown.  No iron sights are provided, but the 4x4 does have a Weaver sight rail.  Stocks may be wood or synthetic; both have a semi-Monte Carlo profile and a thick gel-type recoil pad.  The wood stocks may be laminated or un-laminated walnut; the synthetic stocks are made from strong polymer and use a skeletonized profile with internal aluminum reinforcement.  Synthetic stocks are invariably matte black, while the walnut stocks have a very attractive grain and can be a rich brown or a light gray.  The 4x4 is also noted for its relatively short length of pull (but not too short), which makes it suitable for shooters of almost all statures and also makes scope use easier.  Feed is from detachable polymer magazines, which may also be loaded from the top of the rifle through the action.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The 4x4 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

4x4 (Wood Stock)

.25-06 Remington

3.22 kg

4

$1368

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

.25-06 Remington

3.04 kg

4

$1382

4x4 (Wood Stock)

.270 Winchester

3.31 kg

4

$1557

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

.270 Winchester

3.12 kg

4

$1571

4x4 (Wood Stock)

7mm Remington Magnum

3.33 kg

3

$1596

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

7mm Remington Magnum

3.14 kg

3

$1610

4x4 (Wood Stock)

.30-06 Springfield

3.42 kg

4

$1809

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

.30-06 Springfield

3.23 kg

4

$1824

4x4 (Wood Stock, 22” Barrel)

.30-06 Springfield

3.41 kg

4

$1787

4x4 (Wood Stock)

.300 Winchester Magnum

3.53 kg

3

$2398

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

.300 Winchester Magnum

3.33 kg

3

$2413

4x4 (Wood Stock, 22” Barrel)

.300 Winchester Magnum

3.52 kg

3

$2334

4x4 (Wood Stock)

.338 Winchester Magnum

3.61 kg

3

$2619

4x4 (Synthetic Stock)

.338 Winchester Magnum

3.41 kg

3

$2635

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

4x4 (.25-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

70

4x4 (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

74

4x4 (7mm)

BA

4

1-2-3

7

4

Nil

92

4x4 (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

84

4x4 (.30-06, 22”)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

74

4x4 (.300)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

96

4x4 (.300, 22”)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

84

4x4 (.338)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

5

Nil

110

 

Mossberg 100 ATR

     Notes: Introduced in mid-2006, the Model 100 ATR (All-Terrain Rifle) is the first new bolt action rifle that Mossberg has introduced in about two decades.  It appears similar to most modern bolt-action rifles: a synthetic stock (in black, wood brown, or a Mossy Oak camouflage pattern), a semi-heavy barrel, and what looks like a fairly conventional action, with the bolt handle turned down part of the way and then projecting outwards, to clear scopes.

     Upon closer inspection, however, several differences become apparent.  Molded directly into the stock itself are the trigger guard and sling swivels (they are integral to the stock); in addition, checkering for the pistol grip wrist and fore-end are molded into the stock (though the checkering is not deep enough, in the opinion of many firearms experts).  It has no floorplate for the internal magazine; though this decreases the possibility of dirt entering the action, it also means that to unload the Model 100 ATR, each round must be cycled and ejected through the action.  The 22-inch barrel is free-floating a just little heavier than the typical sporting rifle barrel, and it is made of a high grade of chrome-moly steel.  (Almost half the barrel is also unsupported by the stock.)  The barrel has a target crown, and the butt has a thick recoil pad.  Metalwork is finished in matte-black blueing.  The Model 100 ATR has no iron sights of any kind, though it is drilled and tapped for scope bases as well as mounts like Weaver-type rails or MIL-STD-1913 rails.  The bolt rides on a receiver rail attached to the right side of the receiver; this bolt is also contained within a special bolt sleeve that contains an anti-bind feature as well as keeping the bolt in alignment if the rifle is abused.  The Model 100 ATR uses an ejector/plunger extractor combination.  At the rear of the bolt on the left is a shroud which contains a port for the escape of gasses in the case of cartridge or primer failure.

     The 100 ATR Bantam is a variant of the standard 100 ATR; it differs primarily in the very limited amount of chamberings and the short 20-inch barrel.  Versions with with wood stocks are called Bantams; versions with synthetic stocks are called Super Bantams.

     One of the newest version of the Model 100 ATR is the Night Train; the original Night Train was introduced in early 2008. The Night Train blurs the line between a civilian hunting weapon and a sniper rifle, having features that would appeal to and be useful by hunters, police snipers, and military snipers.  As the name would indicate, the Night Train is made4 completely from black synthetic or metal parts finished in a deep, matte black.  The Night Train is chambered only for 7.62mm NATO and uses an internal top-loading magazine.  Atop the rifle is a MIL-STD-1913 rail; no iron sights are mounted, but they can be had upon request, and the Night Train is sold by Mossberg complete with a Barska 6-24x60 scope. The Night Train also comes with a Harris folding bipod that is adjustable for height and cant.  The 22-inch barrel is match-quality and is tipped with a target crown.  The stock has a ventilated rubber recoil pad.

     The Night Train is definitely a quality weapon, but the Night Train II goes a few steps further.  The Night Train II is equipped with the fast LBA (Lightning Bolt Action) system for smooth operation.  The barrel is essentially the same, but is tipped with a large muzzle brake.  The stock has a raised neoprene cheekpiece that can take one of several interchangeable foam inserts (or no inserts at all).  The stock and metalwork may be black like the original Night Train, or one of three digital camo patterns.

     Interestingly, the owner’s manual says that the Model 100 ATR’s bolt and sleeve should not be disassembled by the user; in fact, the manual says that the only stripping that should be done by the user is to remove the bolt/bolt sleeve and the barrel (which is connected to the action) from the rifle.  The safety is standard for this type of rifle, with a red dot being uncovered if the rifle is set to fire.  The bolt can be cycled with the safety on, allowing the user to safely unload the rifle or clear dud cartridges.  The Model 100 ATR comes in long and short-action models; most calibers are short-action, with the .270 Winchester and .30-06 Springfield chambering currently comprising the long-action calibers available.  Some Mossberg employees have hinted at more calibers being available in the future, but at present this is just a rumor.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Model 100 ATR is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

 100 ATR

.243 Winchester

3.18 kg

5 Internal

$1085

 100 ATR

.270 Winchester

3.37 kg

5 Internal

$1546

 100 ATR

7.62mm NATO

3.36 kg

5 Internal

$1517

 100 ATR

.30-06 Springfield

3.46 kg

5 Internal

$1799

 100 ATR Bantam

.243 Winchester

2.95 kg

5 Internal

$977

 100 ATR Bantam

7.62mm NATO

3.12 kg

5 Internal

$1407

Night Train

7.62mm NATO

3.86 kg

4 Internal

$2277

Night Train II

7.62mm NATO

4.31 kg

4 Internal

$2479

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

 100 ATR (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

68

 100 ATR (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

63

 100 ATR (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

82

 100 ATR (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

71

 100 ATR Bantam (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

59

100 ATR Bantam (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

71

Night Train

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

83

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

108

Night Train II

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

83

With Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

108

 

Mossberg 142A Sporting Carbine

     Notes: This is a modification of earlier pre-World War 2 single-shot Mossberg designs, modified to fire from a short-barreled bolt-action rimfire rifle fed from a detachable box magazine.  The fore-end of the rifle was hinged and could be pulled down to provide a handgrip. The Mossberg 142A used a Monte Carlo-type stock.  The barrel length was 18 inches, and the sights a simple aperture rear sight with a bead front sight.  The Model 142A was built from 1949-57; rifles built before 1954 used a T-shaped bolt handle, while after that, the handle used a conventional ball.  The Model 142K, built from 1953-57, had a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight.

     The Model 140K (despite the nomenclature) came later, and was built from 1955-58.  This version had a barrel 24.5 inches long, a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight and a post sight at the muzzle; in addition, the fore-end had a Schnabel tip.  The Model 140B was basically the same, but used a simple peep rear sight and a hooded ramp-type sight at the muzzle.

     The M-144. built from 1949-54, was designed as a target-shooting version of the Model 142A.  The Model 144 uses a T-shaped bolt handle, a 26-inch match-quality barrel, and a micrometer-adjustable aperture optical sight at the rear along with a hooded ramped blade at the front.  The stock used a straight comb, and the fore-end was deep and had a hand-stop.  Modifications of the Model 144 included the Model 144LS, with a ball-type bolt handle, a Lyman-made rear optical sight, and a Lyman-made front globe sight.  It was replaced by the Model 144LS-A, which had sights made by Mossberg, and finally by the Model 144LS-B, which used different Mossberg-made sights and a 27-inch barrel.  All of these stopped production in 1985.

     The Model 146, built from 1949-54, was a takedown version of the Model 142A, but also had a straight bolt handle, a Schnabel tip on the fore-end, a 26-inch barrel, and was fed by a tubular magazine instead of a box.  The Model 146A was the same, but the iron sights were mounted in dovetails.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 142A

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.74 kg

7

$248

Model 140K

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.63 kg

7

$314

Model 144

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

3.63 kg

7

$481

Model 144LS-B

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

3.71 kg

7

$492

Model 146

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

3.8 kg

30 (.22 Short, 26 (.22 Long), or 20 (.22 Long Rifle; Tubular

$330

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 142A (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

33

Model 142A (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Model 142A (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

41

Model 140K (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

44

Model 140K (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

49

Model 140K (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

54

Model 144 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

48

Model 144 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

53

Model 144 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

58

Model 144LS-B (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

50

Model 144LS-B (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

55

Model 144LS-B (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

60

Model 146 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

47

Model 146 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

52

Model 146 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

57

 

Mossberg 340 Series

     Notes: This series was intended as a replacement for the Model 142 series.  The Model 340 series, like the Model 142 series, had many components in common with the semiautomatic Mossberg rimfire rifles of the period – in fact, this required that the bolt handle be placed much further forward than is usual for bolt-action rifles in order to keep the magazine in the same place.  The trigger mechanism was also much better than that of the Model 142 series (and most rimfire rifles of the period).

     The base model 340B was built from 1958-60, and used a Monte Carlo-type stock and cheekpiece.  The butt was of plastic, with a thin white spacer.  The barrel was 18 inches, with a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight.  The Model 340B-A was identical except for the simple peep-type rear sight which was dovetailed into the rifle.  The Model 340K is also virtually identical, but uses simple, non-adjustable open sights; the Model 340K-A is the same as the Model 340K, but the rear sight is dovetailed into the rifle.  The Model 340M was similar to the Model 340B, but used a full-length Mannlicher-type stock and a barrel length of 18.5 inches.

     The Model 341 was built from 1972 onward, and was a semi-deluxe version with a 24-inch barrel, a walnut Monte Carlo-style stock with impressed checkering on the pistol grip wrist and fore-end, a spring-leaf and elevator rear sight, and a ramp front sight.

     Produced concurrently with the Model 340 series, the Model 342K was a version of the Model 340B with a mostly-plain stock (though a low cheekpiece was retained), a front section of the fore-end which could be pivoted downward to form a sort of foregrip, and simple open iron sights.  The Model 342K-A was identical except for the dovetailed rear sight.  Though slightly lighter than the Model 340B, it shoots identically for game purposes.

     The Model 344 was built for a short time in 1985, and was the last magazine-fed rimfire rifle Mossberg built.  It used a 24-inch barrel, and for game purposes shoots the same as the Model 341.  The Model 344K was the same except for its 18.5-inch barrel.  For game purposes, it shoots like the Model 340M, though there are weight differences.

     The Model 346B was also built concurrently with the Model 340B, but was fed by an underbarrel tubular magazine.  It used the same Monte Carlo-type stock as the Model 340B, but had a 24-inch barrel and a peep-type rear sight.  The Model 346B-A was the same except for the rear sight being dovetailed into the receiver.  The Model 346K is also identical, except for the spring-leaf and elevator rear sight.  As might be guessed, the Model 346K-A is the Model 346K with the rear sight dovetailed in.  All are identical to the Model 346B for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mossberg 340B

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.74 kg

7

$248

Mossberg 340M

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.78 kg

7

$253

Mossberg 341

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.95 kg

7

$309

Mossberg 342K

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.71 kg

7

$246

Mossberg 344

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.92 kg

7

$309

Mossberg 344K

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.73 kg

7

$251

Mossberg 346B

.22 Short, .22 Long, and .22 Long Rifle

2.99 kg

25 (.22 Short), 22 (.22 Long), 18 (.22 Long Rifle); Tubular

$310

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mossberg 340B (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

33

Mossberg 340B (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Mossberg 340B (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

41

Mossberg 340M (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

5

1

Nil

34

Mossberg 340M (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

38

Mossberg 340M (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

42

Mossberg 341 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

43

Mossberg 341 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

49

Mossberg 341 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

53

Mossberg 346 (.22 Short)

BA

-2

Nil

6

1

Nil

43

Mossberg 346 (.22 Long)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

49

Mossberg 346 (.22 Long Rifle)

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

53

 

Mossberg 640 Chuckster

     Notes: The Model 640 was based on the Model 340 action, though the action had to be greatly-altered (primarily in the area of strength) in order to use the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire it was chambered for.  The Model 640K had a Monte Carlo-type half-stock with a cheekpiece and a pistol grip wrist.  The barrel of the of the original Model 640K was 24 inches long, with a spring-leaf and finger wheel rear sight and a simple bead front sight.  The Model 640 was replaced in production in 1960 by the Model 640K-A, which was virtually the same but had a simple adjustable open rear sight and the bead front sight, both of which were dovetailed in.  The Model 640KS was identical to the Model 640K for game purposes, but it was a deluxe model with a walnut stock, hand-cut checkering on the pistol grip wrist and fore-end, and gold plating on the trigger, trigger guard, and sights.  The Model 640M (built only in 1971) was a version with a full-length Mannlicher-type stock with checkering on the pistol grip and fore-end, and steel cap on the fore-end.  Though it is heavier than a Model 640K, it shoots the same for game purposes.

     The Model 642K was a carbine variant of the Model 640K; built from 1960-68, it had an 18.5-inch barrel, and the front of the fore-end pivoted downward to give it a sort of foregrip.  This foregrip was made of black Tenite plastic.

     From 1959-60, a single-shot version, the Model 620K, was built, but only in small numbers for a few months. Except for the lack of a magazine, the Model 630K was essentially the same as the Model 640K.  The Model 620K-A was the single-shot equivalent of the Model 640K-A, and it was built until 1968.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mossberg 640K

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.74 kg

5

$341

Mossberg 640M

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.79 kg

5

$339

Mossberg 642K

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.56 kg

5

$285

Mossberg 620K

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.67 kg

1 Internal

$305

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mossberg 640K

BA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

70

Mossberg 642K

BA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

52

Mossberg 620K

SS

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

70

 

Mossberg 800

     Notes: This rifle was originally designed by Louis Seecamp and Carl Benson in the late 1960s for Montgomery Ward to sell in their stores.  Montgomery Ward decided not to sell them, but Mossberg took up the type and sold it in its various incarnations into late 1970s. 

     The Model 800 had a strangely-shaped S-shaped bolt handle – bent forward, then back.  The rifle is well-made and looks good.  Internally, the bolt is also unusual, having two rows of three lugs (most rifles only have one set of lugs).  The extractor uses a rather short blade, but its spring is especially strong, saving space and giving the Model 800 reliable case ejection.  The early versions used a walnut Monte Carlo-type half stock, with the pistol grip wrist having a plastic white cap and the buttplate having decorative white spacers.  The pistol grip wrist and fore-end had impressed skip-line checkering.  The pistol grip wrist also had a decorative deer’s head on each side, and the fore-end had a decorative running buck on each side.  The barrel was 22 inches long, with a folding leaf rear sight and a ramp front sight.  The original Model 800 was built from 1966-78; original chamberings .243 Winchester and 7.62mm NATO, but more chamberings were quickly added due to customer demand.  Starting in 1967, the nomenclature was changed greatly; the 7.72mm NATO version became the Model 800A, the .243 Winchester version became the Model 800B, the .22-250 version was the Model 800C, the short-lived (1968-69) .350 Remington Magnum version became the Model 800D, the also short-lived 6.5mm Remington Magnum version became the Model 800E, and the even rarer .222 Remington version (built only for a few months in 1970) became the Model 800F.

     There were many variants, most of which were simple variations of stock shape or “deluxe” versions, but several need separate explanations.  The Model 800AM was a shorter version of the Model 800A, with a 20-inch barrel, a straight spatulate bolt handle, and a full-length Mannlicher-type stock.  It’s a rather rare variant, despite being manufactured for almost 3 years.  The Model 800AVT was designed for varmint and target shooting; it has a 24-inch heavy barrel and came with bases for scope rings.

     The Model 800BM is the same as the Model AM above, but with a different chambering.  The Model 800BVT is also the same as the Model 800 AVT, but again with different chambering.  The same is true of the Model 800C and Model 800CVT.

     The Model 800V (later re-designated the Model 800VT) used an extra-heavy 24-inch barrel and came with bases for scope rings; it is similar to the Model 800AVT, BVT, and CVT, but with an even heavier, stiffer barrel made of better-quality steel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 800F

.222 Remington

2.73 kg

4 Internal

$774

Model 800C

.22-250 Remington

2.81 kg

4 Internal

$840

Model 800E

6.5mm Remington Magnum

3.16 kg

4 Internal

$1186

Model 800B

.243 Winchester

2.95 kg

4 Internal

$996

Model 800A

7.62mm NATO

3.52 kg

4 Internal

$1428

Model 800D

.350 Remington Magnum

4.24 kg

4 Internal

$2419

Model 800AM

7.62mm NATO

3.49 kg

4 Internal

$1408

Model 800AVT

7.62mm NATO

3.56 kg

4 Internal

$1449

Model 800BM

.243 Winchester

2.91 kg

4 Internal

$976

Model 800BVT

.243 Winchester

2.98 kg

4 Internal

$1016

Model 800CM

.22-250 Remington

2.77 kg

4 Internal

$820

Model 800CVT

.22-250 Remington

2.85 kg

4 Internal

$860

Model 800V

.22-250 Remington

2.86 kg

4 Internal

$866

Model 800V

.243 Winchester

3.07 kg

4 Internal

$1022

Model 800V

7.62mm NATO

3.54 kg

4 Internal

$1455

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 800 (.222)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

71

Model 800 (.22-250)

BA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

65

Model 800 (6.5mm Magnum)

BA

5

1-2-Nil

7

4

Nil

81

Model 800 (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

65

Model 800 (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

79

Model 800 (.350 Magnum)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

95

Model 800AM

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

68

Model 800AVT

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

89

Model 800BM

BA

3

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

57

Model 800BVT

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

Model 800CM

BA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

56

Model 800CVT

BA

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

73

Model 800V (.22-250)

BA

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

75

Model 800V (.243)

BA

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

77

Model 800V (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

93

 

Mossberg 810

     Notes: Though based partially on the Model 800, the Model 810, is not, as some people think, simply a long-action version of the Model 800, as there are many differences other than the length of the action.  The Model 810 has several other internal and external differences, including the bolt, which has a pair of four lugs instead of three, and the trigger unit, which has a conventional firing pin instead of being striker-fired, and also allows for adjustments for length and weight of pull.  The trigger unit is also a self-contained unit instead of being just another collection of parts of the rifle.  The Model 810 has a “blind box” magazine; the small magazine is fits entirely within the receiver and is concealed under a floorplate.  (After 1973, versions with internal magazines were also introduced, and the popularity of the box-magazine versions markedly decreased.)  The walnut half-stock is of the Monte Carlo-type, but has a low comb instead of the Model 800’s higher one.  The buttplate and the cap of the pistol grip had decorative white plastic spacers.  Production lasted from 1972-78.

     The base version was the Model 810A, chambered for .30-06 Springfield, with a 22-inch barrel and a folding leaf rear sight.  The internal magazine counterpart was the Model 810AH. The Models 810B and BH were chambered for 7mm Remington Magnum and Models 810C and CH were chambered for .270 Winchester.  Models 810D and DH were chambered for .338 Winchester Magnum; though otherwise the same as the other versions except for the chambering, these two models used a 24-inch barrel and had smaller magazine capacities.  The internal magazine-fed versions have slight weight differences, but shoot identically to the box magazine-fed versions for game purposes. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mossberg 810C

.270 Winchester

3.31 kg

4

$1449

Mossberg 810CH

.270 Winchester

3.34 kg

4 Internal

$1451

Mossberg 810B

7mm Remington Magnum

3.35 kg

4

$1488

Mossberg 810BH

7mm Remington Magnum

3.38 kg

4 Internal

$1490

Mossberg 810A

.30-06 Springfield

3.52 kg

4

$1701

Mossberg 810AH

.30-06 Springfield

3.55 kg

4 Internal

$1703

Mossberg 810D

.338 Winchester Magnum

3.98 kg

4

$2507

Mossberg 810DH

.338 Winchester Magnum

4.02 kg

4 Internal

$2457

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mossberg 810C (.270)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

60

Mossberg 810B (7mm)

BA

4

1-2-3

7

5

Nil

75

Mossberg 810A (.30-06)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

68

Mossberg 810D (.338)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

8

6

Nil

103

 

Mossberg MVP Patrol

     Notes: Designed for use as a patrol rifle by police forces, the MVP is just as effective as a hunting rifle.  Though the barrel; is a short at 16,25 inches, this is a good size for a police officer’s car or trunk gun.  There is a surprising amount of thick, heavy steel in the design, most notably the barrel and bolt, but the MVP Patrol also has a decent amount of lightning cuts and fluting in strategic places to bring weight down dramatically from what it might have been.  The barrel, therefore is a fluted bull barrel; in fact, tolerances all over are very tight and many shooters comment on how rigid the rifle is.  The barrel not only floats, but is very stiff and has special bedding.  The barrel is tipped with an A2-type flash suppressor.  The MVP Patrol has a match-quality two-stage Mossberg Lightning trigger, which has a takeup bar in the center of the trigger.  This takeup bar doubles as trigger safety.  Once the takeup is actuated, the trigger pull weight is only two pounds. The trigger is also user-adjustable.

     Like most modern rifles, there is a Picatinny Rail atop the receiver.  The MVP Patrol has excellent iron sights which are fully adjustable in front and back; however, the rifle as bought from the company is also equipped with a UTG 3-9x32mm scope. The iron sights are in the Scout position.

     The furniture is black or flat dark earth and synthetic, stipple-textured on the semi-pistol grip and the fore-end.  A snap-on raised cheekpiece comes with the rifle. The stock and fore-end are “thin-profiled,” making the rifle lighter but sometimes a bit difficult to seat into the shoulder.

     A persistant complaint is in the magazines – to be exact, the magazine fit.  The MVP Patrol is supposed to be able to take any sort of magazine of the appropriate caliber, but many of them have to be literally slammed home – hard – to seat properly.  The magazines can also be top-loaded through the action, but the action is large, much larger than the rounds to be loaded, and it’s easy to get a bit fumble-fingered.  The magazine, in addition to the trigger pack, serves as a sort of bedding blocks for the action.  The action is nothing new in design, but is a perfected form of an old Savage design from the 1930s. The action includes a chamber-loaded indicator which is both visual and tactile.

     Strangely enough, the RL price is considerably less than the game price – unusual.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MVP Patrol

5.56mm NATO

3.36 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$1372

MVP Patrol

7.62mm NATO

3.58 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$2014

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MVP Patrol (5.56mm)

BA

3

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

50

On Bipod

BA

3

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

65

MVP Patrol (7.62mm)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6

4

Nil

56

On Bipod

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6

2

Nil

73