1) Standard ammunition for these stats is a round ball fired from a smooth or mildly-rifled (very slow twist) barrel.

2) A standard ammunition “case” for blackpowder rounds consists of enough balls and powder for 50 shots of ammunition. 

3) “Cases” of balls and shot weight 2 kg per “case: One measure of powder weighs 0.02 kg, and one ball weighs 0.02 kg. Magnum powder loads take 2 loads of powder per shot.  A Minie Ball weighs 0.05 kg per shot.  A rifled ball weighs 0.03 kg per shot.

4) Use base range, and increase rifled weapons’ range by 1.5 times; however, increase loading times by two steps (so 1/6 would become 1/8). This is for rifled balls only, and simulates the difficulty in ramming the ball down the barrel.  Such a weapon can also fire standard balls; in this case, the increase in damage and range does not apply.

5) This increase in loading time does not apply to inline firearms or rifles firing Minie Ball or similar types of rounds.  If something like a Minie Ball or inline rifle is used, double range (ranges for inlines will already be doubled in the stats below). 

6) If a blackpowder weapon has a rifled barrel and is designed for rifled balls, increase cost by 1.5 times.  If designed for something line a Minie Ball, increase costs by 1.9 times.  (Inlines double costs, but this is already figured in the stats below.)

7) If a blackpowder weapon is designed to fire rifled balls, increase range by 1.5 times. 

8) If the weapon is an inline or designed to fire Minie Ball-type rounds, double range.

9) Some rifles are stressed for magnum loads, and are given in the stats below, If a magnum load is loaded into a non-magnum firearm (standard loads are designed to take a man down), increase damage by one point and go the next level of penetration, but the weapon is 5% likely (cumulative) to be damaged per shot. 

10) Buck-and-ball shots give two extra 1d6-damage rounds per shot and the extra balls otherwise act like a shotguns and use shotgun rules, but range is reduced to 0.75 times normal.

11) Weapons given in their description as “rifles” will have their range adjusted in the stats, unless stated otherwise in the description.

 

These rules are preliminary, especially the weight figures for powder and balls.

 

1763/1766/1777 Charleville Musket

     Notes: This Musket is a modern reproduction of Charleville Musket produced for several decades in the 1700s.  Today, it is sold through Cabela’s, Dixie Gun Works, and Navy Arms.  It comes in several barrel lengths, but is unwieldy in any form.  The stock is a straight-wristed stock, with a modicum of room to shoulder the weapon and furnished with a flintlock mechanism.  Furniture is of hardwood and metal parts are of polished steel.  Sights consist of brass studs above the barrel and action, but these are low and not very precision sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Charleville Musket (44” Barrel)

.69 Blackpowder

3.7 kg

1 Internal

$278

Charleville Musket (44.5” Barrel)

.69 Blackpowder

3.96 kg

1 Internal

$387

Charleville Musket (44.75” Barrel)

.69 Blackpowder

3.97 kg

1 Internal

$388

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Charleville Musket (44”)

1/12

2

1-Nil

9

3

Nil

36

Charleville Musket (44.5”)

1/12

5

2-3-Nil

10

5

Nil

46

Charleville Musket (44.75”)

1/12

5

2-3-Nil

10

4

Nil

48

 

1803 Harper’s Ferry Rifle

     Notes: this is a modern reproduction of the old Harper’s Ferry Rifle, and is sold today through a number of outlets such as Dixie Gun Works and Navy Arms.  The Harper’s Ferry Rifle is a faithful reproduction of the old version, with an old stock design of walnut and a holder at the bottom of the barrel in the fore-end for the ramrod.  Ignition is by flintlock, and the stock widens into a half-stock ahead somewhere between a quarter and a third of the way down the barrel. Metalwork (except for the barrel) is largely of brass, though the lock and trigger are of color case-hardened steel, and the ramrod of steel.  The barrel is semi-heavy; it starts as a heavy octagonal barrel, but tapers to a round barrel towards the muzzle.  Sights essentially consist of a raised nib above the muzzle.  Barrels can be had in either 35 inches or 35.5 inches.  The Harper’s Ferry Rifle is designed to fire rifled balls (this is in the stats below).

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Harper’s Ferry Rifle (35” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder

3.86 kg

1 Internal

$612

Harper’s Ferry Rifle (35.5” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder

4.31 kg

1 Internal

$620

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Harper’s Ferry Rifle (35”)

1/8

3

2-Nil

8

3

Nil

74

Harper’s Ferry Rifle (35.5”)

1/8

3

2-Nil

8

3

Nil

75

 

1855 British Pattern Sharps

     Notes: In the mid-19th Century, Great Britain was basically the major arms dealer of the time.  Also known as the “Yankee Sharps,” the 1855 British Pattern Sharps was tested extensively by the US military; 12 rifles were basically shot to death, after which the War Department deemed them fit for its troops and a major order was made.  Large amounts of these rifles served on both sides of the Civil War, though they were in the process of being replaced by the Union.  The .577 round was the British service cartridge of the time, and that was what the 1855 British Pattern Sharps was chambered in.  Ignition was by the Maynard tape system; this used a roll of nipple primers that were advanced along by the shooter to prime each round.  Though it sounds innovative, the fact was that the tape got soggy in the elements and soldiers often found themselves priming the rifle normally, one nipple at a time, like any other rifle.  The soggy tapes were also a good way to lose primers, by having them drop off due to the wetness of the tape.  No one knows why the War Department was willing to go along with the Maynard tape system, but probably since they had made such a large investment, they felt obligated to use the rifle and its deficient tape system.

     Early 1855 Sharps rifles were easy to load, due to exacting tolerances.  These were manufactured primarily by the British, with some US license production.  Later construction became a bit sloppy, and they became harder to load cleanly, because the paper part of the cartridge would wad up unevenly.  There were three barrel lengths to the 1855 Sharps -- a short 19.15 inches, a longer 21.25 inches, and a long 39 inches, all round barrels.  The first two resulted from the War Department order, while the third and longest was primarily used by civilian hunters and to a small extent, sharpshooters.  Stocks are of walnut; both British and American walnut can be found.  Sights are a ladder-type rear and a small, round blade front.  Metalwork is blued.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1855 Sharps (19.15” Barrel)

.577 Blackpowder

3.35 kg

1 Internal

$363

1855 Sharps (21.25” Barrel)

.577 Blackpowder

3.43 kg

1 Internal

$395

1855 Sharps (39” Barrel)

.577 Blackpowder

4.02 kg

1 Internal

$893

 

Weapon

ROF*

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1855 Sharps (19.15” Barrel)

1/5

4

2-Nil

5

4

Nil

58

1855 Sharps (21.25” Barrel)

1/5

4

2-Nil

6

4

Nil

64

1855 Sharps (39” Barrel)

1/5

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

111

*This is when the Maynard Tape System is working.  If it isn’t (or the shooter is simply using individual nipples), ROF is 1/6.

 

1859 Sharps

     Notes: This is a modern reproduction of a pre-Civil War rifled musket designed to fire Minie Ball-type projectiles; the stats below reflect this.  These modern reproductions are sold by Dixie Gun Works, Navy Arms, and Taylor’s.  Construction is largely of steel (better-quality steel than was available in 1859) and the gun has a silver blade front sight and a flip-up rear sight.  The barrel has a blued finish and most of the rest of the external metalwork has a color case-hardened finish.  The fore-end has three military-type bands (except on the carbine, which has one).  Though not standard, a double set trigger is available.  This reproduction of the 1859 Sharps is available, like the original in two forms: a rifle version, with a 30-inch barrel, and a carbine version, with a 22-inch barrel.  Lockwork and ignition is by percussion.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1859 Sharps Rifle

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.2 kg

1 Internal

$644

1859 Sharps Carbine

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

3.63 kg

1 Internal

$608

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1859 Sharps Rifle

1/6

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

67

1859 Sharps Carbine

1/6

3

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

89

 

1861 Springfield

     Notes: This is a faithful reproduction of the rifle that armed so many sharpshooter Union troops at the beginning of the Civil War.  These reproductions are sold by Dixie Gun Works, Pedersoli, Navy Arms, and Taylor’s. As such, the furniture is walnut; however, in a bow to modern manufacturing methods, the steel used in this reproduction’s manufacture is of better quality than that used so long ago.  The barrel is of natural metal finish, as is most of the metalwork.  This rifle has sling swivels, and a very long rifled 40-inch barrel (which is reflected in the stats below, so no adjustments are necessary).  This reproduction is designed for Minie Ball-type projectiles (or modern equivalents of them). The 1861 Springfield reproduction is drilled and tapped for a scope; however, the type of scope the drilling and taping is designed for is a reproduction of scopes of the period, and a modern scope (or any other optics) will not fit in this drilling and tapping. Reproduction scopes vary in capabilities, but a standard sort of scope for the period is as long as much of the length of the barrel and gives a magnification of about 3x. Ignition is by percussion.  The iron sights are a steel blade in the front, and a 2-leaf rear for use at two different spreads of ranges.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1861 Springfield

.58 Blackpowder Minie Ball

3.97 kg

1 Internal

$1011

1861 Springfield (with Scope)

.58 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.65 kg

1 Internal

$1211

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1861 Springfield

1/6

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

51

 

1863 Remington Zouave

     Notes: Another reproduction of a common Civil War weapon, this weapon is a musket and does not have a rifled barrel.  Like many other such reproductions, it is sold by Dixie Gun Works, Navy Arms, and Taylor’s.  It has walnut furniture, a brass plate on either side of the buttstock, a blued 33-inch barrel, and a color case-hardened hammer, trigger, and lock.  The sights consist of a leaf rear and a blade front.  Ignition is by percussion.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Remington Zouave

.58 Blackpowder

4.31 kg

1 Internal

$287

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Remington Zouave

1/6

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

34

 

1863 Sharps

     Notes: This is a reproduction of another common late-Civil War weapon, today sold by EMF, IAR, and Taylor’s.  The 1863 Sharps came in several sizes from carbine to long rifle size.  The 1863 Sharps was sort of an intermediate step between cartridge firearms and muzzleloading weapons – the 1863 Sharps was loaded by stuffing the Minie Ball, powder, and wadding into the breech of the weapon instead of into the muzzle and cramming it down, though ignition is by percussion.  This made it very easy to make the 1863 Sharps a rifled weapon, which is taken into account in the figures below and no conversions are necessary.  In addition, this reduced the loading time of the 1863 Sharps.  Features of the reproduction version are walnut furniture, a blade front sight, and a rear notch sight which is dovetailed in and therefore allows for limited windage adjustments.  Regardless of barrel length (which may be 22, 28, 30, or 32 inches), the barrel is an octagonal heavy barrel.  The reproduction also has a set trigger, which some versions of the original 1863 Sharps had.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1863 Sharps (22” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder Minie Ball

3.74 kg

1 Internal

$521

1863 Sharps (22” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

3.85 kg

1 Internal

$529

1863 Sharps (28” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder Minie Ball

3.98 kg

1 Internal

$644

1863 Sharps (28” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.1 kg

1 Internal

$650

1863 Sharps (30” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.06 kg

1 Internal

$684

1863 Sharps (30” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.18 kg

1 Internal

$692

1863 Sharps (32” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.13 kg

1 Internal

$725

1863 Sharps (32” Barrel)

.54 Blackpowder Minie Ball

4.25 kg

1 Internal

$733

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1863 Sharps (22” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

80

1863 Sharps (22” Barrel, .54)

1/5

3

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

83

1863 Sharps (28” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

101

1863 Sharps (28” Barrel, .54)

1/5

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

105

1863 Sharps (30” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

105

1863 Sharps (30” Barrel, .54)

1/5

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

111

1863 Sharps (32” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

111

1863 Sharps (32” Barrel, .54)

1/5

3

2-Nil

8

3

Nil

117

 

3-Band/2-Band Enfield Musket

     Notes: This is another modern reproduction of an old weapon, this time an unrifled musket commonly used by British troops during the American Revolution and Napoleonic Wars.  Whether the fore-end has two or three retaining bands depends on the barrel length; in general, shorter barrels use two bands, and longer barrels use three.  This reproduction faithfully reproduces the stock style and shape, and the stock/furniture is of walnut.  Barrels are 31.5”, 33”, 39”, or 40”, and are blued and tapered.  Most other metalwork is brass.  The Enfield Musket has a steel blade front sight and a flip up rear sight is adjustable, though accuracy with an unrifled musket is questionable.  Ignition is by percussion.  Modern reproductions are made by a variety of companies both in the US and overseas and sold by Dixie Gun Works, Navy Arms, and Taylor’s.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Enfield Musket (31.5”)

.58 Blackpowder

3.76 kg

1 Internal

$376

Enfield Musket (33”)

.58 Blackpowder

3.87 kg

1 Internal

$391

Enfield Musket (39”)

.58 Blackpowder

4.24 kg

1 Internal

$436

Enfield Musket (40”)

.58 Blackpowder

4.3 kg

1 Internal

$464

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Enfield Musket (31.5”)

1/6

4

2-Nil

7

5

Nil

32

Enfield Musket (33”)

1/6

4

2-Nil

8

4

Nil

34

Enfield Musket (39”)

1/6

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

40

Enfield Musket (40”)

1/6

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

42

 

AH Waters Contract Musket Model 1842

     Made in Milbury, MA, this musket is based on the Springfield Model 1842, but produce3d in the private Armory of AH Waters, with less than 100 produced for friends and family; later, they were given up to a Massachusetts company just forming.  They were produced in roughly 1844 and 1845.  The Type I had an iron buttplate, while the Type II  had a highly fancy engraved brass buttplate known as a Sea Fencible buttplate. Most of the Type I metalwork was dull iron, while the Type II had all-brass metalwork.  The Type I and II were identical for game purposes. In both cases, the steel 42-inch barrel was finished brown.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AH Waters Contract Musket

.69 Blackpowder

4.69 kg

1 Internal

$199

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AH Waters Contract Musket

1/6

5

2-3-Nil

8

5

Nil

35

 

Austrian Model 1842 Long Rifle

     Notes: Used in the American Civil War early in the conflict by some Union units, the Model 1842 was huge -- .70-caliber musket ball, and over 147 centimeters in length.  As sold, the Model 1842 fired using an unrifled bore, but later in the war, they were rifles and changed to firing Minie Balls.  There were three models, Infantry, Cadet, and Engineer's.  This and the change to a rifled bore made for a total of six models. They original used a flintlock ignition, but this was quickly changed to a percussion ignition.  Minie Ball-firing rifled variants make three more, for a total of nine subtypes. The Infantry Models' barrels were an astounding 43.5 inches long.  The cadet model had a 40.125-inch barrel; the engineer model had a 36.375-inch barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry Model, Unrifled)

.71 Blackpowder

5.02 kg

1 Internal

$254

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet Model, Unrifled)

.71 Blackpowder

4.79 kg

1 Internal

$237

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer Model, Unrifled)

.71 Blackpowder

4.54 kg

1 Internal

$218

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry Model, Rifled)

.71 Blackpowder

5.02 kg

1 Internal

$401

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet Model, Rifled)

.71 Blackpowder

4.79 kg

1 Internal

$381

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer Model, Rifled)

.71 Blackpowder

4.54 kg

1 Internal

$326

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry Model, Minie Ball)

.71 Blackpowder

5.02 kg

1 Internal

$483

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet Model, Minie Ball)

.71 Blackpowder

4.79 kg

1 Internal

$450

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer Model, Minie Ball)

.71 Blackpowder

4.54 kg

1 Internal

$392

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry, Unrifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

10

5

Nil

46

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet, Unrifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

9

5

Nil

43

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer, Unrifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

8

5

Nil

39

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry, Rifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

10

5

Nil

69

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet, Rifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

9

5

Nil

64

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer, Rifled)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

8

5

Nil

59

Austrian Model 42 (Infantry, Minie)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

10

5

Nil

88

Austrian Model 42 (Cadet, Minie)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

9

5

Nil

77

Austrian Model 42 (Engineer, Minie)

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

8

5

Nil

70

 

Austrian Model 1849 Long Rifle

     Notes: Though labeled a long rifle, the Model 1849's barrel is relatively short at 36.38 inches. It is a modification of the Model 1842, and fired Minie Balls.  The Austrians sold/smuggled thousands to Giuseppe Garibaldi's rebels in Italy; so many that this rifle is often called a Garibaldi Rifle. 26,201 were also sold to the Union forces in the Civil War, where they too were often referred to as Garibaldi Rifles.  The barrel is browned and is octagonal, tapering to round.  When transferred to the Union, they were fitted with a new breech and bolster, as many were worn out.  The rifling was also re-done.  There were many more 1849 rifles in the Civil War than Model 1842s. The Minie Ball fired by this rifle is huge, and dealt horrible wounds.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 1849 Long Rifle

.71 Minie Ball

5.59 kg

1 Internal

$533

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 1849 Long Rifle

1/7

5

2-4-Nil

9

5

Nil

110

 

Austrian Model 1854 Long Rifle

     Notes: A smaller-caliber and much lighter version of the Model 1849, these rifles were referred to as Lorenz Rifles after their designer  at the Vienna National Armory.  The barrel is smaller at 39.375 inches, and this makes the entire rifle smaller.  (Of course, the massive damage of a Garibaldi Rifle was lost...) The Lorenz Rifle was used by both sides in the American Civil War, and during the war, it replaced the Garibaldi Rifle on the Union side.  The Union side referred to them as Lorenz Rifle-Muskets, and bought at least 250,000 of them; the Confederate side simply called them Lorenz Rifles, and bought 100,000 of them.  Metalwork finish is bright iron, with a browned barrel; wood used is European Walnut.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 1854 Long Rifle

.54 Minie Ball

4.55 kg

1 Internal

$472

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 1849 Long Rifle

1/7

3

2-Nil

9

3

Nil

103

 

Baker Rifle

     Notes: Officially known as the Pattern 1800 Infantry Rifle, the Baker Rifle became one of the official British Infantry weapons.  The British Army had seen officers laid low left and right in the American Revolution, and in fighting Europe and India.  They had also seen the power of American rifles in the hands of relatively untrained (though disciplined) troops.  Development began soon after the American Revolution, and continued until and through 1800 and the Napoleonic Wars. The rifle is named after the first to give a (partially) effective design, Ezekiel Baker. 

     COL Coote Manningham was hands on from the beginning. Baker’s design was based on Prussian rifles, the parts of which required precise and meticulous machining.  Manningham suggested the Prussian Jager Rifle as an example, but the result was a rifle that was too heavy for British Infantry standards.  The third design was a start-from-scratch; it was essentially a standard Infantry Musket with a rifled barrel. It was .75-caliber and has 8 grooves in its 32-inch bore; this was given the title of Provisional Infantry Rifle and issue started, but Manningham suggested that Baker shorten the barrel by two inches and neck down to .625-caliber.

     Operation was by flintlock; the weapon looked good in trial, but in practice, talking a ball, powder and wadding down a deeply-rifled 30-inch barrel could take considerable forcing and gritting of the teeth; at first, troops using the new rifle were issued small mallets, until stronger ramrods were made.  (And this only got worse as the grooves got fouled!) The stock had a raised cheekpiece to put the soldier into as natural position as possible.  The cock was swan-necked, and a ridiculous bayonet was issued for the Baker Rifle; it was a “sword bayonet” – and a real shortsword, complete with quillons and hilt guard! Like many “new” weapons of that time, it had a compartment for storing oiled patches, cleaning compound, etc.

     The major variation was a carbine version with a 24-inch barrel, and one for the Duke of Cumberland’s Corps of Sharpshooters with a 33-inch barrel. Other changes are, for game terms, minor or aesthetic.

     These are the stats for a real Baker Rifle – I have not been able to discover whether anyone is making reproductions or if there firing examples.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Baker Rifle

.625 Blackpowder

4.08 kg

1 Internal

$536

Baker Carbine

.625 Blackpowder

3.8 kg

1 Internal

$445

Baker Sharpshooter

.625 Blackpowder

4.15 kg

1 Internal

$583

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Baker Rifle

1/7

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

91

Baker Carbine

1/7

4

2-3-Nil

6

4

Nil

74

Baker Sharpshooter

1/7

6

2-4-Nil

8

4

Nil

99

 

Ball Repeating Carbine

Notes: This was meant to be one of the standard weapons of the Union Army. But before any could be issued, the Civil War was over, and as a result only the first batch of 1002 were taken into issue.  Designed by Albert Ball of Worcester, MA, Ball lacked the facilities to manufacture his carbine and they were actually manufactured by Lamson & Company of Windsor, Vermont (which also made Palmer carbines.  The operation was odd; the chamber was split into two parts, with the lower version lifting the round into the upper chamber. This worked quite well when new, but accuracy and jamming resulted when the parts became worn.  The .56-50 Spencer cartridge was designed for use by the Union Army, as this was one of the new cartridges chosen by the government, but later commercial sales were made, and for this purpose, the Ball Repeating Carbine was chambered in .44 Long Rimfire cartridge.  Note that the Spencer is also a rimfire round. The magazine is a tubular under-barrel magazine, and is actuated by a lever which doubles as a trigger guard.  The left side of the receiver, attached to the receiver, is either a robust saddle ring or a sliding lug. The carbine had a stock and fore-end are of walnut; the fore-end has a two-thirds length.  The drop on the stock is very pronounced. I have not been able to discern whether there are modern replicas of this carbine.

     Notes: Though the barrel is relatively very short, today a longarm with a 20.5-inch barrel would be considered a full-size rifle. The barrel has a round profile and is blued. The Ball uses a tubular magazine in the buttstock; the ejection port doubles as a loading port for the magazine. The trigger guard is also used to cock the rifle. The stock is in two pieces, joined by the action and receiver. Metalwork was primarily blued, with the exception of the brass central barrel band and the buttplate.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ball Repeating Carbine

.56-50 Spencer

4.9 kg

7 Tubular

$498

Ball Repeating Carbine

.44 Henry Rimfire

4.22 kg

7 Tubular

$333

      

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ball Repeating Carbine (.56-50)

LA

3

2-Nil

6

2

Nil

55

Ball Repeating Carbine (.44)

LA

2

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

50

 

Ballard Cartridge Rifle

     Notes: Like many such "variant" rifles which were not actually government issue in the Civil War, the Ballard .44 was a falling block breechloading single-shot rifle fed by metallic-cased cartridges (as in many such early rifles, rimfire). Though troops had been buying such rifles with their own money since they became available (or relatives back home shipped them to the troops), about 18,000 of these rifles were bought by Kentucky to equip one division of troops.  They used a blued octagonal 30-inch barrel, with a front sight blade and a rear adjustable leaf.

     The remaining versions differ primarily in caliber and minor details such as barrel bands and bayonet socket. In addition, the Type II version of the .46-caliber rifle had a slightly longer, 30.125-inch barrel.

     A carbine version of this rifle was also made, but few were actually made.  115 were actually delivered to the Kentucky Militia, and used on the Confederate side during the Civil War.  These were built by Dwight & Chapin, who sent bankrupt before they could make any more.  Most of the rest were built from 1863 onward, and were built by Ball & Williams.  Some were made from parts made by Dwight & Chapin; these carbines have both Dwight & Chapin and Ball & Williams markings, though all the latter did was to assemble the parts. It had only one iron barrel band, and the rear sight was a folding leaf-type, with post front sight. It had a 20.69-inch round barrel.

     The Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type I was one of the first metallic cartridge rifles deliberately the result of a request from the War Department, though only 1500 were produced. Most were produced for use by Kentucky units in March-August of 1864.  It has a half-octagonal barrel 20.31 inches long, which is blued (along with almost all of the metalwork. The rear sight is a pierced leaf, and the front sight a dovetailed blade.

     The Ballard Carbine, US Contract, Type II was for the most part similar to the Type I.  It has an interesting feature, however; a split breech block with a percussion cap nipple, enabling the firing of metallic cartridges or Minie Ball cartridges. Its barrel is 20.185 inches.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ballard .44 Rifle

.44 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.86 kg

1 Internal

$386

Ballard .46 Rifle

.46 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.72 kg

1 Internal

$369

Ballard .46 Rifle (Type II)

.46 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.73 kg

1 Internal

$370

Ballard .54 Rifle

.54 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.82 kg

1 Internal

$421

Ballard Carbine

.44 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.18 kg

1 Internal

$529

Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type I

.44 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.19 kg

1 Internal

$528

Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type II

.44 Ballard Rimfire (Blackpowder)

3.25 kg

1 Internal

$527

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ballard .44 Rifle

SS

3

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

87

Ballard .46 Rifle

SS

2

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

72

Ballard .46 Rifle (Type II)

SS

2

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

73

Ballard .54 Rifle

SS

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

90

Ballard Carbine

SS

3

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

55

Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type I

SS

3

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

55

Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type II

SS

3

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

54

Ballard Carbine, US Contract Type II (Minie Ball)

1/4

2

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

47

 

Bavarian Model 1842 Rifled Musket

     Notes:  It is a mystery just how these rifled muskets got into the hands of Union troops during the Civil War.  Their construction was ordered by the Bavarian Foreign Minister  in Amberg.  There was considerable correspondence between the Foreign Minister and the US Secretary of War. Though Union purchasing agent Marcellus Hartley commented in one of his letters that Bavarian arms were available, no importation or purchase orders have ever been uncovered. 

     These were originally built as muskets, and later the barrels were rifled with a rather tight rifling pattern.  They became the first percussion weapons made in Bavaria.  The barrel has three retaining bands; just behind the front one on top is a blade front sight; the front band has a sling swivel on the bottom.  The rear sight is normally a simple notch mounted on an iron block, but some with hinged rear leaf sights have been found.

     Barrel length is 42.19 inches.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Bavarian Model 1842

.70 Blackpowder

5.92 kg

1 Internal

$399

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Bavarian Model 1842

1/7

3

2-Nil

10

3

Nil

67

 

Black Powder Products 209

     Notes: The Model 209 is a modern take on the blackpowder rifle, an inline, which means that it is breech-loaded.  The stock is synthetic; it is normally black, but can be bought with one of several camouflage patterns.  The breech plug is stainless steel, and most of the rest of the metalwork is of modern carbon steels.  However, the ramrod and cocking spur are of aircraft-quality aluminum.  Finish for the external metalwork may be blued or nickel-plated.  The standard sights are a fully adjustable rear sight and a front sight that is drift-adjustable, dovetailed in so that it is removable, and has a fiberoptic insert.  The rear sight is in the “scout” position, at about the center of mass of the rifle.  As this weapon is rifled, the range below takes this into account and do not need to be modified.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 209 (24” Barrel)

.45 Blackpowder

2.72 kg

1 Internal

$1142

Model 209 (26” Barrel)

.45 Blackpowder

2.8 kg

1 Internal

$1220

Model 209 (29” Barrel)

.45 Blackpowder

2.91 kg

1 Internal

$1344

Model 209 (24” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder

2.74 kg

1 Internal

$1158

Model 209 (26” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder

2.82 kg

1 Internal

$1238

Model 209 (29” Barrel)

.50 Blackpowder

2.93 kg

1 Internal

$1292

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 209 (24” Barrel, .45)

1/5

2

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

112

Model 209 (26” Barrel, .45)

1/5

2

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

116

Model 209 (29” Barrel, .45)

1/5

2

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

132

Model 209 (24” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

116

Model 209 (26” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

128

Model 209 (29” Barrel, .50)

1/5

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

142

 

Bridesburg 1861 Rifle Musket

     Notes: First, let’s get this out of the way – this is a musket and is not rifled; some muskets with long barrels were called rifles.  This was one of the primary battle rifles of the Union forces; it was introduced in 1861 and reached a peak of 5000 units per month, enough that a second factory was needed for production.  Bridesburg itself was a subcontractor of Springfield Arms.  The barrel was an astounding 40 inches long; sights consisted of a rear two-leaf ladder-type sight and a peep sights for when the leaf sights were folded or for close range shots.  The firing mechanism uses percussion.  Stock and fore-end construction was largely of black walnut and had an enlarged stock and a more natural position for the wrist. The end of the stock is curved to fit the shoulder and is capped by a serrated steel plate.  The external metalwork are all in bright natural metal.

     When that new factory was opened in 1863, Bridesburg took the opportunity to improve their design. The weapon had three barrel retaining bands which were attached by spring retainers, allowing the shooter to better remove and clean the weapon’s barrel. There were also minor improvements to the hammer, rear sight. For game purposes, it is identical to the 1861 model.

     Even with the second factory, Bridesburg found it necessary to farm out manufacturing to several other firms.  By the end of the Civil War, about 100,000 examples of the Bridesburg Rifle Musket were manufactured.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Bridesburg 1861 Rifle Musket

.58 Blackpowder

4.3 kg

1 Internal

$454

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Bridesburg 1861 Rifle Musket

1/12

4

2-Nil

9

4

Nil

23

 

British Pattern 1853 Rifle-Musket

     Notes: One of the most common rifles on both sides of the Civil War, the Confederates imported about 400,000 of these rifles and the Union about 505,000.  It was nominally .577 caliber, but both sides in the Civil War used .58 Minie Balls in them.  They were made in both London, England and Liege, Belgium.  It is the best-known imported weapon of the Civil War.  These were produced from 1853-1866. There were four types of the Pattern 1853, but the only one imported to the US or Confederates was the third version.  It had three barrel bands tightened with screws and a thick, strong ramrod.  Barrel was 39 inches.

     The Suhl Enfield Rifle-Musket is copy in all respects of the Pattern 1853.  Enfield subcontrated to Suhl, but Suhl outsourced the actual manufacturer to private manufacturers.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Pattern 1853

.58 Minie Ball

5.99 kg

1 Internal

$485

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Pattern 1853

1/7

4

2-Nil

9

3

Nil

106

 

Brown Bess

     This is a faithful modern reproduction of the musket that most British troops carried in the American Revolution, as well as numerous colonial wars and part of the Napoleonic War.  The stock is designed to look like the original stock, which means that it is elongated and has a high comb.  The stock and furniture is of walnut.  The barrel is of polished steel, but most metalwork on the Brown Bess is brass.  The front sight is a steel stud, but the Brown Bess has no rear sight.  The Brown Bess uses flintlock ignition, like the original.  Barrels may be 30, 30.5, or 42 inches long, and are not only smoothbore, but have a polished bore.  Modern reproductions come from a variety of sources, but are sold by Dixie Gun Works and Navy Arms.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Brown Bess (30” Barrel)

.75 Blackpowder

3.4 kg

1 Internal

$378

Brown Bess (30.5” Barrel)

.75 Blackpowder

3.42 kg

1 Internal

$383

Brown Bess (42” Barrel)

.75 Blackpowder

3.9 kg

1 Internal

$500

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Brown Bess (30” Barrel)

1/12

5

2-4-Nil

7

6

Nil

36

Brown Bess (30.5” Barrel)

1/12

5

2-4-Nil

7

6

Nil

36

Brown Bess (42” Barrel)

1/12

5

2-4-Nil

9

6

Nil

48

 

Burnside Carbine

     Notes: Though this carbine was produced from 1857-1865, it is more like a modern inline in function, firing a .54-caliber special cone-shaped cartridge; it is breechloaded, and fired by a percussion cap, and uses blackpowder.  The unique cone-shaped bullet sealed the joint between the barrel and the breech, eliminating a vexing problem with breechloading blackpowder firearms, in which the gun vented hot gasses through the gap afore mentioned.  Despite winning a War Department rifle competition to be one of the Union Army’s standard firearms, the conditions of the competition changed when the Civil War started, and the Burnside Carbine was bumped back to number three in priority, behind the Sharps Carbine and Spencer Carbine.  As the war went on, a problem with the Burnside Carbine proved to have a sometimes inopportune problem: the cone-shaped bullet tended to get stuck in the breech after firing.  In addition, the Sharps and the Spencer fired from self-contained cartridges, allowing a greater magazine capacity and volume of fire.

     A little known story about the Burnside was that 7 Confederate cavalry units were equipped with the Burnside Carbine, sold to them before hostilities started. Many will know Ambrose Burnside as a Union General who really didn’t know what he was doing.

     The initial version, of which 250 had been made, had a 22-inch barrel, and the bullet was encased in thin copper rather than paper. A tape primer system was pulled through the top of the lockwork. Construction of the stock was of walnut with no buttplate, but there was no fore-end. External metalwork is case-color hardened, except for the blued barrel.  This was the 1st Model.  The 2nd Model had an improved breechblock which made loading faster and with the lock to open the breech contained inside the trigger guard.  Due to the improved breechblock, the barrel was shortened to 21 inches. The 3rd Model brought the long sought after fore-end, a barrel band to fasten the barrel to the fore-end, and an improved hammer.  For game purposes and the firing table, the 3rd Model is identical to 2nd Model. The 4th Model features a spring-loaded breech which again simplifies and quickens reloading.  This was the definitive version, with 50,000 being built and issued.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Burnside Carbine (1st Model)

.54 Blackpowder Conical

4.31 kg

1 Internal

$627

Burnside Carbine (2nd Model)

.54 Blackpowder Conical

4.21 kg

1 Internal

$487

Burnside Carbine (3rd Model)

.54 Blackpowder Conical

4.63 kg

1 Internal

$490

Burnside Carbine (4th Model)

.54 Blackpowder Conical

4.63 kg

1 Internal

$499

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Burnside Carbine (1st Model)

1/8

3

1-2-Nil

6

3

Nil

80

Burnside Carbine (2nd Model/ 3rd Model)

1/7

3

1-2-Nil

5

3

Nil

77

Burnside Carbine (4th Model)

1/6

3

1-2-Nil

5

3

Nil

77

 

Cabela’s Blue Ridge

     Notes: This is another non-specific replica of an early rifle, with anachronistic features such as an adjustable double set trigger and a blade front and V-notch rear sight.  The furniture is walnut, highly-polished.  The finish of the lock is color-case hardened, the barrel is blued, and the fittings are brass. The barrel is 39 inches, and locks are percussion or flintlock.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock)

.54 Blackpowder

3.52 kg

1 Internal

$659

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock)

.54 Blackpowder

3.52 kg

1 Internal

$689

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock)

.50 Blackpowder

3.44 kg

1 Internal

$653

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock)

.50 Blackpowder

3.44 kg

1 Internal

$683

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock)

.45 Blackpowder

3.4 kg

1 Internal

$648

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock)

.45 Blackpowder

3.4 kg

1 Internal

$678

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock)

.36 Blackpowder

3.34 kg

1 Internal

$641

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock)

.36 Blackpowder

3.34 kg

1 Internal

$671

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock)

.32 Blackpowder

3.27 kg

1 Internal

$638

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock)

.32 Blackpowder

3.27 kg

1 Internal

$668

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock, .54)

1/12

3

2-Nil

8

3

Nil

108

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock, .54)

1/6

3

2-Nil

8

3

Nil

108

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock, .50)

1/12

3

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

102

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock, .50)

1/6

3

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

102

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock, .45)

1/12

2

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock, .45)

1/6

2

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock, .36)

1/12

2

1-Nil

8

1

Nil

86

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock, .36)

1/6

2

1-Nil

8

1

Nil

86

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Flintlock, .32)

1/12

1

Nil

8

1

Nil

81

Cabela’s Blue Ridge (Percussion Lock, .32)

1/6

1

Nil

8

1

Nil

81

 

Cabala’s Kentucky Rifle

     Notes: Like most of the blackpowder rifles and muskets sold by Cabela’s, the Kentucky Rifle is more of a replica than a reproduction, following the general lines of an old-time muzzleloading rifle but having several features that such a rifle would not have and are more advanced than such a rifle.  The basic rifle has walnut furniture, with a blade front sight and a V-notch rear sight.  The finish is largely blued, with polished brass fittings.  The Kentucky Rifle is generally sold with a Starter’s Kit, as it is meant to be a beginner’s blackpowder rifle; this includes a basic cleaning kit, a small amount of powder and shot, and spare flints or percussion caps.  Flintlock and percussion cap ignition systems are available.  The barrel is 37 inches.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Cabela’s Kentucky Rifle (Flintlock)

.50 Blackpowder

3.18 kg

1 Internal

$623

Cabela’s Kentucky Rifle (Percussion Lock)

.50 Blackpowder

3.18 kg

1 Internal

$653

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Cabela’s Kentucky Rifle (Flintlock)

1/12

3

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

Cabela’s Kentucky Rifle (Percussion Lock)

1/6

3

1-Nil

8

3

Nil

98

 

Cabala’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle

      Notes: Like’s many of Cabela-sold designs the Kodiak Express Double rifle is essentially a modern replica of a non-specific old-type rifle.  The double barrels have double lockwork, though only one trigger. It comes only in percussion cap designs, with European walnut furniture, color-cased hardened lock, blued barrels, and blued fittings.  The Kodiak Express Double Rifle has double leaf rear sights and double ramp front sights.  Barrels are short for this sort of rifle at 25.25 inches.  The .72 Caliber version is often known as the Big Bore.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle

.72 Blackpowder

4.22 kg

2 Internal

$1545

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle

.58 Blackpowder

3.83 kg

2 Internal

$1484

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle

.54 Blackpowder

3.74 kg

2 Internal

$1472

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle

.50 Blackpowder

3.66 kg

2 Internal

$1461

 

Weapon

ROF*

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle (.72)

1/12

5

2-4-Nil

10

6

Nil

145

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle (.58)

1/12

4

2-Nil

10

4

Nil

128

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle (.54)

1/12

3

2-Nil

10

3

Nil

124

Cabela’s Kodiak Express Double Rifle (.50)

1/12

3

1-Nil

9

3

Nil

118

*Reloading both barrels takes 12 phases.  Reload figure for one barrel is 6 phases. Both barrels may be fired at once; in this case double the damage and double the recoil.

 

Cabela’s Traditional Hawken

     Notes: This is a modern replica of the traditional Hawken rifle of yore, with walnut furniture and updated with a bladed front sight with an adjustable rear sight,  The rifle also has several anachronistic features such as a color-case hardened lock, a blued barrel, though it has a brass trigger guards and fittings. A Sportertized Cabela’s Hawken is also available, with a more up-to-date stock configuration and a rubber recoil pad.  Ignition is by flintlock or percussion lock.  Barrel length is 29 inches regardless of caliber or type.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Cabela’s Traditional Hawken (Flintlock)

.50 Blackpowder

4.08 kg

1 Internal

$501

Cabela’s Traditional Hawken (Percussion Lock)

.50 Blackpowder

4.08 kg

1 Internal

$531

Cabela’s Traditional Hawken (Flintlock)

.54 Blackpowder

4.18 kg

1 Internal

$507

Cabela’s Traditional Hawken (Percussion Lock)

.54 Blackpowder

4.18 kg

1 Internal

$537

Cabela’s Sporterized Hawken (Flintlock)

.50 Blackpowder

4.13 kg

1 Internal

$576

Cabela’s Sporterized Hawken (Percussion Lock)

.50 Blackpowder

4.13 kg

1 Internal

$606

Cabela’s Sporterized Hawken (Flintlock)

.54 Blackpowder

4.23 kg

1 Internal

$582

Cabela’s Sporterized Hawken (Percussion Lock)

.54 Blackpowder

4.23 kg

1 Internal

$612

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Cabela’s Traditional/Sporterized Hawken (Flintlock, .50)

1/12

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

78

Cabela’s Traditional/Sporterized Hawken (Percussion Lock, ,50)

1/6

3

1-Nil

7

3

Nil

78

Cabela’s Traditional/Sporterized Hawken (Flintlock, .54)

1/12

3

2-Nil

7

3

Nil

81

Cabela’s Traditional/Sporterized Hawken (Percussion Lock, .54)

1/6

3

2-Nil

7

3