1) Standard ammunition for these stats is a round ball fired from a smooth or mildly-rifled (very slow twist) barrel.

2) A standard ammunition “case” for blackpowder rounds consists of enough balls and powder for 50 shots of ammunition. 

3) “Cases” of balls and shot weight 2 kg per “case: One measure of powder weighs 0.02 kg, and one ball weighs 0.02 kg. Magnum powder loads take 2 loads of powder per shot.  A Minie Ball weighs 0.05 kg per shot.  A rifled ball weighs 0.03 kg per shot.

4) Use base range, and increase rifled weapons’ range by 1.5 times; however, increase loading times by two steps (so 1/6 would become 1/8). This is for rifled balls only, and simulates the difficulty in ramming the ball down the barrel.  Such a weapon can also fire standard balls; in this case, the increase in damage and range does not apply.

5) This increase in loading time does not apply to inline firearms or rifles firing Minie Ball or similar types of rounds.  If something like a Minie Ball or inline rifle is used, double range (ranges for inlines will already be doubled in the stats below). 

6) If a blackpowder weapon has a rifled barrel and is designed for rifled balls, increase cost by 1.5 times.  If designed for something like a Minie Ball, increase costs by 1.9 times.  (Inlines double costs, but this is already figured in the stats below.)

7) If a blackpowder weapon is designed to fire rifled balls, increase range by 1.5 times. 

8) If the weapon is an inline or designed to fire Minie Ball-type rounds, double range.

9) Some rifles are stressed for magnum loads, and are given in the stats below, If a magnum load is loaded into a non-magnum firearm (standard loads are designed to take a man down), increase damage by one point and go the next level of penetration, but the weapon is 5% likely (cumulative) to be damaged per shot. 

10) Buck-and-ball shots give two extra 1d6-damage rounds per shot and the extra balls otherwise act like a shotguns and use shotgun rules, but range is reduced to 0.75 times normal.

11) Weapons given in their description as “rifles” will have their range adjusted in the stats, unless stated otherwise in the description.

12) Revolvers are a special case; they will have two reloading times under ROF.  The first is to fire the revolver; the second is to reload all the chambers.

 

These rules are preliminary, especially the weight figures for powder and balls.

 

 

Blackpowder Handguns

 

Adams Percussion Revolver

     Notes: Made in London, England, the Adams revolver was sold to both the Union and Confederate sides during the Civil War.  (It bears a distinct resemblance to the Webley RIC.)  It is a big revolver, 12 inches long with a barrel of 6 inches.  All metal parts are blued, while the grips are walnut.  Though a British-made revolver, the Adams was designed to appeal to the US market as well as the British market.  it was, however, hand-made, which made must more expensive than Colt revolvers, the main competition.  This is why only about 3000 were made between 1857-1866.  It was adopted by the East India Company cavalry, and bought by many British officers and used in the Crimean War.  After the Indian Mutiny of 1857, it became the standard British revolver until revolvers firing metallic cartridges were made  It should be noted that the Adams was unusual for its time in being a double-action revolver; in fact, it cannot be fired in single-action, as the hammer cannot be cocked manually.  This meant that the Adams could be fired much faster than the Colt revolvers of the time, but also that the Adams had a long trigger pull that made it less accurate than the Colt revolvers..  It lacked a recoil shield behind the cylinder, which made the firer susceptible to powder burns when the blackpowder went off. The .44 caliber was the one used by the US and Confederate militaries; the .36 caliber was used by some British officers using this revolver.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Adams Percussion Revolver

.36 Blackpowder

1.02 kg

5 Cylinder

$49

Adams Percussion Revolver

.44 Blackpowder

1.15 kg

5 Cylinder

$62

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Adams Percussion Revolver (.36)

DAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Adams Percussion Revolver (.44)

DAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

6

 

AN IX De Gendarmerie 1805-1819

     Notes: Known simply as the An IX Gendarmerie; this pistol was original designed for use by police forces.  The official model number is S.331. Lengthwise, it is sort of mid-length between a derringer and a full-sized pistol; when wartime use ensued, it was used in braces by cavalrymen and in pairs by infantry officers,  Some 32000 were produced; with a 6-inch barrel finished with nickel plating and in fine walnut.  It is of flintlock operation. and is short at 250 total millimeters,

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

An IX Gendarmerie

0.58 Blackpowder

0.71 kg

1 Internal

$45

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

An IX Gendarmerie

1/6

3

1-Nil

2

9

Nil

2

 

Boutet 1er Empire

     Notes: Napoleon's favorite firearm, the 1er Empire was designed by one of Europe's premier firearms designers in the Napoleonic Era, Nicolas-Noel Boutet. The pistol has a full dark walnut stock with the stock high on the barrel and a browned barrel.  The grip looks clumsy, being a simple curved grip with an endcap, but rides well in the hand and gives a good hold on the weapon.  The butt has a metal plate.  The ramrod has a horn tip.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

1er Empire

0.45 Blackpowder

1.4 kg

1 Internal

$82

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

1er Empire

1/6

2

1-Nil

3

3

Nil

6

 

Colt Model 1851 Navy

     Notes: Originally known as the Ranger Revolver, Colt sold almost half a million of these handguns.  It was produced at the behest Colt Walker and Dragoon revolver users, who felt that their Walkers and Dragoons were too heavy, and they asked Colt for something lighter.  Like most revolvers of this time, they used a paper cartridge tipped by a lead ball, with percussion caps to the rear of every cylinder.  They were significantly lighter than the Walkers and Dragoons, but we all known what this means -- more felt recoil and barrel climb.  One of the reasons for this is the much-smaller caliber of the ball, which also quite anemic in terms of damage.  The cocking lever was shorter on this revolver, and metal parts were of blued steel.  Barrel length is 7.5 inches, and is rifled. Ignition is by percussion cap.

     On the Second Model, The frame and cylinder are case-hardened.  It has a barrel-length cocking lever, and has some other minor mechanical and cosmetic changes.  It is otherwise identical to the First Model for game purposes.  The third model had bright steel for the metalwork. Like the second model, it has primarily cosmetic and minor mechanical changes, but is identical to the First Model for game purposes.  The Fourth Model is the same as the First Model in game terms, also.

     A very small amounts of the Navy's Model 1851 were in .34 Caliber instead of .36.  Replicas today often have the caliber incorrectly at .44 caliber; these have stats, too, in case the players encounter one of these incorrect-caliber replicas.

     The Manhattan Navy Revolver was for most purposes the same as the Model 1851 Navy in .36 caliber.  It blends the Model 1849 Pocket (not here due to a lack of sufficient information) and the Model 1851 Navy. It has an octagonal barrel instead of a round one, and they were 4, 5, 6, and 6.5 inches (later Manhattan revolvers omitted the 6-inch barrel, and added a 4.5-inch barrel). About 70,000 were built in all barrel lengths.

     The Metropolitan Navy Revolver is an almost exact copy of the Model 1851 Navy 3rd Model, except for its octagonal barrel and using combustible paper cartridges.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Colt Model 1851 Navy

.36 Blackpowder

1.19 kg

5 Cylinder

$64

Colt Model 1851 Navy

.34 Blackpowder

1.16 kg

5 Cylinder

$61

Colt Model 1851 Navy

.44 Blackpowder

1.33 kg

5 Cylinder

$120

Manhattan Navy (4" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

1.05 kg

5 Cylinder

$58

Manhattan Navy (4.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

1.07 kg

5 Cylinder

$63

Manhattan Navy (5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

1.09 kg

5 Cylinder

$66

Manhattan Navy (6" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

1.13 kg

5 Cylinder

$74

Manhattan Navy (6.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

1.15 kg

5 Cylinder

$77

Metropolitan Navy

.36 Combustible Cartridge

1.2 kg

5 Cylinder

$87

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Colt Model 1851 Navy (.36)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Colt Model 1851 Navy (.34)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Colt Model 1851 Navy (.44)

SAR (1/10)

1

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Manhattan Navy (4" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Manhattan Navy (4.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Manhattan Navy (5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Manhattan Navy (6" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Manhattan Navy (6.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Metropolitan Navy

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer

     Notes: known as a sidehammer revolver because the hammer is right of center, the Model 1855 was sort of the most concealable weapon of the time (after derringers) in its shorter-barrel iterations. The Model 1855 is also known as the Root Revolver after it's chief designer, Elisha K Root. It has a standard design for a Colt revolver of the time: flared walnut grip, cocking lever under the barrel, and a smooth cylinder with percussion cap nipples at the rear of it. Part of the reason it is so small is what also makes a bit anemic -- the small round it fires.  There are several iterations, but the ones of note are below;

     The 1st Model has a 3.14-inch barrel; the 2nd Model has a 3.5-inch barrel. Both have cylinders engraved with various scenes, or on the 3rd Model a fluted cylinder.  Other than these, they are identical for game purposes.  On the Model 1855 .31 Caliber, some types have a 4.5-inch barrel, and the rest have 3.5-inch barrels.

     Some 32,000 of these revolvers were made, all told.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer First Model

.28 Blackpowder

0.48 kg

5 Cylinder

$39

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer Second Model

.28 Blackpowder

0.49 kg

5 Cylinder

$42

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer Third Model (3.5" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.51 kg

5 Cylinder

$46

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer Third Model (4.5" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.54 kg

5 Cylinder

$53

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer First Model

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer Second Model

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

4

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer (3.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

5

Colt Model 1855 Sidehammer (4.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

6

 

Colt Model 1860 Army

     Notes: The Model 1860 was the most used revolver of the Civil War, used by the Union, Confederacy, and even some Native American tribes who generally got them on what we would call today the black market. Built on the Model 1851 frame, the Model 1860 also has a similar action to the Model 1851, including the hammer split into a V-Notch, allowing it to serve as a rear sight.  Something that is not so apparent at first glance is the shorter forcing cone for the barrel; this allows for a longer cylinder and the Model 1860 is also stressed for Magnum loads because of this.  The cylinder is rebated, smaller at the rear than the front, making it easier to load with black powder.  The 8-inch barrel was smoothed into the frame; at first glance, it looks like a half-octagonal barrel, but it is not.  For the time and design, it is relatively light, though it is a large revolver.  It can use both loose powder and ball and combustible-case paper charges.  Some First Models were also available with a 7.5-inch barrel. (This is often called the Texas Model, because their order came to Texas shortly after the secession.) Cylinders may be fluted or round; and round cylinders are generally engraved with Western scenes.  The metalwork is mostly iron, though they had a steel barrel and brass trigger guards. Some are slotted for use with a removable stock; these are often called Martial Models in a mistaken belief that they were sold only to the military. With a full recoil shield, they are often called Civilian Models, in the same sort of mistaken belief. A rare version, with only 65 built, is the Navy Revolver; this differs primarily in the size of the grips, and is identical to the Army revolver for game purposes.

     Second Model versions all had 8-inch barrels.  They also had longer grips, done because of suggestions from First Model users.  They have black walnut instead of regular walnut grips.

     The Third Models all have round cylinders.  They all had 8-inch barrels. The versions that take a stock have the lower part of the recoil shield milled away, which helps it sit right in the hand when used with the stock attached. Versions designed for a stock also have a two-leaf folding sight.

     The Fourth Model was built until 1872, when more modern revolvers became popular.  Construction began in 1863; virtually all of them went to Northern civilians or military forces, until 1866, when sales to Southern units and civilians became popular.  Versions with stocks had the milled-away lower recoil shield of the Third Model, as well as the mistaken Martial Model/Civilian Model name. All had 8-inch barrels.  Those with stocks lacked the leaf sights of the Third Model.

     The three later models are all identical for game purposes to the First Model with 8-inch barrels, except for differences noted.

     Some 200,000 of these revolvers were built, with the Fourth Model being the most popular.

     Though designed for naval personnel, the Model 1861 Navy was also used by many cavalry personnel, as the lighter recoil was more manageable when horsed.  Though it suffered over its Army counterpart with damage, it's 7.5-inch barrel gave it decent range.  Like the Army, the Navy was fed with either loose blackpowder or a combustible-case paper cartridge with a ball glued onto the end.  (It was recommended to users by Colt that the combustible cases be used if at all possible, to avoid excess fouling due to paper residue). When shooting blackpowder, use the ROF figures for the Model 1860 Army. It is very similar to the Army, though smaller due to the smaller caliber.  The first 100 examples had a fluted cylinder; the rest had a round cylinder with engraving showing the Mexican Navy fighting with the Texan Navy.  Another 100, later on, were slotted for a detachable stock; these also had the lower part of the recoil shield milled away.  The backstrap was usually silver-plated, but this usually wore away under hard use in the Civil War.  The Model 1862 Pocket Navy was more often used by civilians; it is basically a standard Model 1861 Navy, but with shorter 4.5, 5.5, or 6.5-inch barrels.  The Model 1862 had a 6.5-inch barrel only and was lighter, but otherwise for game purposes is identical to the Pocket Navy.  The barrel on these two models was octagonal.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Pistol Configuration)

.44 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.22 kg

6 Cylinder

$104

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Pistol Configuration)

.44 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.24 kg

6 Cylinder

$120

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Carbine Configuration)

.44 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$108

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Carbine Configuration)

.44 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.99 kg

6 Cylinder

$120

Model 1861 Navy (Pistol Configuration)

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$85

Model 1861 Navy (Carbine Configuration)

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

1.93 kg

6 Cylinder

$96

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (4.5" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

0.79 kg

5 Cylinder

$63

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (5.5" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

0.82 kg

5 Cylinder

$69

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (6.5" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

0.85 kg

5 Cylinder

$77

Model 1862 Police

.36 Combustible Cartridge or Blackpowder

0.74 kg

5 Cylinder

$77

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Blackpowder)

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Combustible Cartridge)

SAR (1/5)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Blackpowder, Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

21

Model 1860 Army (7.5" Barrel, Combustible Cartridge, Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/5)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

21

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Blackpowder)

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Combustible Cartridge)

SAR (1/5)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

12

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Blackpowder, Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

22

Model 1860 Army (8" Barrel, Combustible Cartridge, Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/5)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

22

Model 1861 Navy (Pistol Configuration)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Model 1861 Navy (Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

3

1

Nil

19

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (4.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (5.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

8

Model 1862 Pocket Navy (6.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Model 1862 Police

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

9

 

Colt Walker Model

     Notes: There were several variations of this revolver; most differ only in markings or metalwork finish, and minor construction and sometimes mechanical details.  The original was the Colt Walker Whitneyville, which was designed in a cooperation between Texas Ranger Samuel Walker and Samuel Colt.  It was meant to be a handgun which was powerful at short range, and not meant for long ranges.  Even so, there are records of rather long range shots for a handgun; one killed a Mexican soldier at a range of about 100 meters, though it was probably a very lucky shot, probably with a stock attached. The cylinders are loaded one at a time, with a paper cartridge and ball, and with percussion caps for each cylinder.  The Republic of Texas had been a major customer of the Walker's predecessor, the Colt Paterson, and eagerly purchased the new revolver.  The year the revolver named for him entered service with the Texas Rangers (1847), Walker was killed in the Mexican-American War while serving with the US Mounted Rifles. This US Mounted Rifles use was the first time a revolver had been adopted by the US military. The Walker revolver used a half-octagonal 9-inch rifled barrel; most were finished in bright iron.  The Walker had no barrel catch, but it was a popular retrofit.

     The Whitneyville-Hartford is for the most part the same as the Whitneyville, but uses a 7.5-inch barrel.

     The Model 1848 Dragoon (also known as the Walker Dragoon) First Model was very similar to the Whitneyville-Hartford, differing primarily in fit and finish, though some were slotted to accept a stock.  The Second Model was also quite similar.  Both are identical to the Whitneyville-Hartford for game purposes, except when using a stock.  The Third Model barrels were available in 7.5 or 8 inches, and the hammer had a V-notch to act as the rear sight.  It is otherwise the same for game purposes as the First and Second Models.  The Baby Dragoon was also similar, but in a smaller caliber and with barrels of 3, 4, 5, or 6 inches, and with primarily brass construction.  The Pocket model is identical to the Baby for game purposes; it was probably the most produced of the Walker-type revolvers, with 340,000 being built.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Colt Walker Whitneyville

.44 Blackpowder

2.07 kg

5 Cylinder

$117

Colt Walker Whitneyville-Hartford

.44 Blackpowder

1.87 kg

5 Cylinder

$106

Model 1848 Dragoon (Pistol Configuration)

.44 Blackpowder

1.87 kg

5 Cylinder

$106

Model 1848 Dragoon (Carbine Configuration)

.44 Blackpowder

2.61 kg

5 Cylinder

$117

Model 1848 Dragoon Third Model (Pistol Configuration, 8" Barrel)

.44 Blackpowder

1.01 kg

5 Cylinder

$110

Model 1848 Dragoon Third Model (Carbine Configuration, 8" Barrel)

.44 Blackpowder

1.75 kg

5 Cylinder

$121

Baby Dragoon (3" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.74 kg

5 Cylinder

$97

Baby Dragoon (4" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.76 kg

5 Cylinder

$103

Baby Dragoon (5" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.78 kg

5 Cylinder

$112

Baby Dragoon (6" Barrel)

.31 Blackpowder

0.8 kg

5 Cylinder

$120

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Colt Walker Whitneyville

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

2

2

Nil

14

Colt Walker Whitneyville-Hartford

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

2

2

Nil

12

Colt 1848 Dragoon (Pistol Configuration)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

2

2

Nil

12

Colt 1848 Dragoon (Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/10)

3

2-Nil

4

3

Nil

17

Model 1848 Dragoon Third Model (Pistol Configuration, 8" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

13

Model 1848 Dragoon Third Model (Carbine Configuration, 8" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

21

Baby Dragoon (3" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

Nil

1

5

Nil

1

Baby Dragoon (4" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

1

Baby Dragoon (5" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

2

Baby Dragoon (6" Barrel)

SAR (1/10)

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

2

 

LeMat

    Notes: Invented by Jean Alexandre LeMat of New Orleans; the LeMat's manufacture was backed PGT Beauregard, who later became a General in the Confederate Army.  Manufacture actually took place in Liege, Belgium and Paris, France; they were smuggled to the Confederacy via Bermuda -- before then, they went through Birmingham, England, who at first supported the Confederacy and actually sent advisors.  About 100, however, were made in Pennsylvania, including the first 25, which were prototypes.  A few Union soldiers obtained LeMats out of these first 100, as well as a few Northern civilians.  Confederate officers went nuts for the LeMat, and it became the trademark of Confederate cavalry officers in particular and also most of the command echelon (and it is rumored, Jefferson Davis himself).  Some 2900 were eventually produced; they were built from 1861-65, with manufacture stopping almost in tandem with the Confederate surrender.  Due to their shotgun barrel, they were often called the Grapeshot Revolver.  It goes without saying that the LeMat is a big revolver, though not unduly heavy.

     The LeMat design was unique in that is employed eight cylinders, something that would not be seen until about the mid-1900s, and for the barrel under the primary barrel.  This barrel fired a shotgun charge, and though there have been revolvers that fired shotgun shells since then, none of them employed a separate barrel to do it.  The shotgun barrel was independent of the cylinder, and loaded separately.  Firing the shotgun barrel is primarily defensive, due to the short range. The action was single action, and a lever at the end of the hammer was used to change between firing the bullet cylinders and firing the shotgun barrel.  The shotgun barrel could be loaded with any mix of shot that the shooter wanted (or could get a hold of); the stats below are some of the common loadings.  Most metalwork is blued or bright finished; the bullet barrel was 6.75 inches and the shotgun barrel length 4 inches.  A ramrod was nested between these barrels, and used to load both the cylinders and the shotgun barrel. At first, the LeMat had a .42-caliber rifled bullet barrel and a smoothbore .63-caliber shotgun barrel (approximately 16 gauge, which is used for the stats below).  The bullet barrel used a non-standard caliber, and this could sometimes make getting balls for loading the cylinders problematic. Later, a lighter .35-caliber barrel was used, but this was still a non-standard caliber.  This version was also fitted with a .55-caliber shotgun barrel (28 gauge).  The bulk of LeMats therefore had .36 or .44-caliber bullet barrels, which were the two most common caliber of revolver balls at the time. A very few of the last bunch, about 100, were slotted for stocks.

     The Transitional Model was, as the name suggests, built as the First Model, but with some features of the Second Model.  The Second Model was the bulk of the LeMats, and numbered about 2000 built.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LeMat First Model

.42 Blackpowder/16 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

1.41 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$137

LeMat Transitional Model

.35 Blackpowder/28 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

1.29 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$96

LeMat Second Model

.36 Blackpowder/28 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

1.29 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$139

LeMat Second Model

.44 Blackpowder/28 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

1.41 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$202

LeMat Second Model (Carbine Configuration)

.36 Blackpowder/28 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

2.03 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$201

LeMat Second Model (Carbine Configuration)

.44 Blackpowder/28 Gauge 2.5" Blackpowder

2.15 kg

8 Cylinder/1 Shotgun

$289

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LeMat First Model (Bullet Barrels)

SAR (1/16)

2

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

LeMat First Model (Shotgun Barrel)

SAR (1/16)

3/1d6x16 or 2d6x4

2-Nil/Nil or 1-Nil

1

7

Nil

2

LeMat Transitional Model (Bullet Barrels)

SAR (1/16)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

6

LeMat Transitional Model (Shotgun Barrel)

SAR (1/16)

2/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

1

6

Nil

1

LeMat Second Model (Bullet Barrels, .36)

SAR (1/16)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

LeMat Second Model (Shotgun Barrel, 28 Gauge)

SAR (1/16)

2/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

1

5

Nil

1

LeMat Second Model (Bullet Barrels, Carbine Configuration, .36)

SAR (1/16)

1

Nil

3

1

Nil

16

LeMat Second Model (Shotgun Barrel, Carbine Configuration, 28 Gauge)

SAR (1/16)

2/1d6x8

1-Nil/Nil

3

4

Nil

2

LeMat Second Model (Bullet Barrels, .44)

SAR (1/16)

2

1-Nil

1

3

Nil

11

LeMat Second Model (Bullet Barrels, Carbine Configuration, .44)

SAR (1/16)

2

1-Nil

3

2

Nil

19

 

Marston Pocket Model

     Notes: This revolver was made in seven versions, most of which differ from each other only in markings or finish or minor mechanical details.  These differences are, for the most part, the same in game terms. They have 4-inch octagonal barrels, and the finish for all the metalwork is blued; the cylinder is browned.  The grips are of smooth walnut. All of these revolvers were designed to use combustible cases and using straight blackpowder tends to foul the barrels more quickly.

     Some 13,000 or these revolvers were built.  They were marketed to civilians as the Union (named for the company that actually built the Pocket Model -- Marston was the designer of the revolver), the Phenix (no, that is not a misspelling), and the Western. The Type 4 uses a fluted cylinder instead of round cylinder, but this was changed back with the 6th and 7th Models.  The VI and VII models also are six-shooters; the rest of the models were five-shooters.

     The Pocket Model is a smaller version of the Navy Model, which had an 8-inch octagonal model for most of its development.  Model III had a round barrel. Both of these revolvers (the Pocket and Navy Model) are based on the Whitney Navy Revolver design.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Pocket Model

.31 Combustible Case

0.91 kg

5 Cylinder

$50

Pocket Model (VI-VII Models)

.31 Combustible Case

0.91 kg

6 Cylinder

$51

Navy Model (I and II Models)

.36 Combustible Case

1.28 kg

6 Cylinder

$90

Navy Model (III Model)

.36 Combustible Case

1.27 kg

6 Cylinder

$89

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Pocket Model

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

5

Navy Model

SAR (1/10)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

 

Perrin Model 1860

     Notes: The Perrin was one of the first crop of metallic cartridge handguns.  Basic features of the Perrin include an open-top frame, a spurless hammer, a cylinder pin that doubles as an ejector rod. The loading gate was on First Models was hinged at the bottom and swung out and up; the Second Model's loading gate was hinged at the top and swung out and up.  Another version of the Second Model used a loading gate that was hinged at the top and swung back.  The Third Model had a loading gate that was hinged at the bottom and swung down.  For game purposes, all three are identical, except that the Perrin came in 5.5 and 6-inch barrels.

     The Union used the First and Second Models.  There may have been Confederate use, but details are sketchy.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Perrin Model 1860 (5.5" Barrel)

12x42mm RF

1.98 kg

6 Cylinder

$332

Perrin Model 1860 (6" Barrel)

12x42mm RF

1.99 kg

6 Cylinder

$337

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Perrin Model 1860 (5.5" Barrel)

DAR (1/12)

3

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

11

Perrin Model 1860 (6" Barrel)

DAR (1/12)

3

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

12

 

Remington-Beals Navy

     Notes: This is another large family of revolvers.  It started when Fordyce Beals patented his revolver design, then allowed Remington to build the revolver for use by the Union Navy and Marines.  It was Remington's first military firearm. It used an octagonal 7.5-inch barrel in a frame and cylinder that was finished blued.  It could be thumb-cocked or using an "ear" on the cylinder.  The cylinder latch post is dovetailed into the barrel in early models, the rest are screwed in.  The grip part of the hammer is a hand-cut diamond pattern; the hammer is high, too high for some people, with smaller hands. On early models, the frame screws are made from silver; later versions use brass screws.  The grip is oil-finished walnut. Only 175 of these Type I revolvers were built. Type II, III, and IV have minor mechanical differences; they are identical in game terms. Some 14,500 were built.

     The Army model used an 8-inch barrel, but is otherwise the same as the Type IV Navy.  Only 1850 of these were build due to a bureaucratic foul-ups at the War Department.

     The Remington Elliot Navy Revolver is also known as the Model 1861 Navy or the Old Model Navy. It is mostly the same as the Remington-Beals Navy for game purposes, but has a 7.375-inch barrel.  Approximately 4500 were built.  The Army version had an 8-inch barrel., but is otherwise the same as the Navy Model for game purposes.

     The Remington Model 1863 Navy had a hammer spur not as high as on the Remington-Beals Navy.  Otherwise, it is identical to the Remington Elliot Navy for game purposes.  It had an 8-inch octagonal barrel; early versions used silver front sights. Most Model 1862 Navy revolvers used a brass front sight which was a pinched cylindrical front sight.  It used a 7.375-inch barrel.  The Remington Model 1863 Army is the same as the Remington Model 1863 Navy for game purposes, except for its 8-inch barrel.  The New Model Police is also the same for game purposes, except for using 3.5, 4.5, 5.5, and 6.5-inch barrel.  The New Model Belt version is also the same for game purposes, except that it used only the 6.5-inch barrel. 

     The Remington-Rider Pocket is mostly identical for game purposes, except for the smaller caliber.  It too used a 6.5-inch barrel. For game purposes, the Remington-Rider New Model Belt is identical to New Model Belt above.

     All told, almost 200,000 of these revolvers were built.  They were one of the most numerous firearms in the Civil War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Remington-Beals Navy

.36 Blackpowder

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$87

Remington-Beals Army

.44 Blackpowder

1.3 kg

6 Cylinder

$110

Remington Elliot Navy

.36 Blackpowder

1.19 kg

6 Cylinder

$86

Remington Elliot Army

.44 Blackpowder

1.3 kg

6 Cylinder

$110

Remington New Model Police (3.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

0.68 kg

6 Cylinder

$55

Remington New Model Police (4.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

0.71 kg

6 Cylinder

$63

Remington New Model Police (5.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

0.74 kg

6 Cylinder

$71

Remington New Model Police (6.5" Barrel)

.36 Blackpowder

0.77 kg

6 Cylinder

$78

Remington New Model Belt

.36 Blackpowder

0.96 kg

6 Cylinder

$78

Remington-Rider Pocket

.31 Blackpowder

1.02 kg

6 Cylinder

$70

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Remington-Beals Navy

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Remington-Beals Army

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

13

Remington Elliot Navy

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Remington Elliot Army

SAR (1/12)

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

13

Remington New Model Police (3.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

5

Remington New Model Police (4.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

7

Remington New Model Police (5.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

8

Remington New Model Police (6.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Remington New Model Belt

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

9

Remington-Rider Pocket

SAR (1/12)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

8

 

Savage Model 1861 Navy

     Notes: One of the first you notice about the Model 1861 Navy is the big enlarged trigger guard, extending from the frame and meeting the grip near the bottom.  This Though 20,000 were built, only 10,800 were bought by the War Department; the rest were bought by civilians or the Confederacy (though the numbers of 1861 Navy Revolvers used by the Confederacy was small). The Model 1861 Navy was offered for sale to veterans of the Civil War, but only 17 veterans did so. It has a flat recoil shield behind the cylinders.  The Union Navy actually bought only 800 of these revolvers, and some 10,000 went to the Army. The standard Model 1861 Navy had 7.125-inch barrel, but some rare specimens had a 23-inch barrel and a shoulder stock. (Imagine what it would be like to shoot this version without the stock!  I try to do this below, though it probably does not capture the actual experience.) The barrel was finished blued, and the rest of the metalwork was case-hardened.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 1861 Navy (7.125" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Cartridge

1.53 kg

6 Cylinder

$82

Model 1861 Navy (23" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Cartridge

2.36 kg

6 Cylinder

$204

Model 1861 Navy (23" Barrel, Carbine Configuration)

.36 Combustible Cartridge

3.1 kg

6 Cylinder

$215

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 1861 Navy (7.125" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

10

Model 1861 Navy (23" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

4

4

Nil

25

Model 1861 Navy (23" Barrel, Carbine Configuration)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

39

 

Smith & Wesson No 2 Army

     Notes: The No 2 Army, also called the Model 2 Army and the Old Model Army, was a revolver that combined new features of the time with old features, some of which hadn't been seen in a while.  While there were no large government orders of this revolver, it was bought in large numbers by the friend and family of their soldiers on the front or by the soldiers themselves before they went to the front; I do mean large, as 77,155 were built (but they were built until 1873).  Though there were no official sales to military on record, several commanders bought them for their troops.  It is possible that General Grant himself carried one of these into battle, as well as bought several for his fellow officers.  There were also civilian sales (for the civilians themselves) and possibly an abnormal number to various criminals and street gangs.  However, since were bought individually and gun records were not what they are now, records on its use are sparse.

     The No 2 Army was fed by modern (for the time) metallic rimfire cartridges, but also uses an unshrouded spur triggerlike many older pistols and derringers.  The frame and cylinder were of wrought iron instead of the steels which becoming more and more common (though the barrel was steel).  However, since the cylinder is removed to reload it, one can carry several loaded cylinders and simply switch them out when needed.  This gives a reload time of 1/2 when cylinders are used this way.  (This the third ROF below.) It used an easy-to-grip hammer for thumb cocking; it also used an ejector rod that is difficult to get a hold of in combat situations.  The No 2 Army breaks open to expose the cylinder; to unload, the rammer pin, which forces out the spent shells, engages them one shell at a time, forcing them out one shall at a time.  This makes ROF figures a bit longer than they otherwise might be. Those built with 5 or 6-inch barrels were common; less common were 4, 8, and 10-inch barrels.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

No 2 Army (4" Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long (Blackpowder)

0.54 kg

6 Cylinder

$107

No 2 Army (5" Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long (Blackpowder)

0.56 kg

6 Cylinder

$117

No 2 Army (6" Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long (Blackpowder)

0.58 kg

6 Cylinder

$128

No 2 Army (8" Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long (Blackpowder)

0.62 kg

6 Cylinder

$148

No 2 Army (10" Barrel)

.32 Smith & Wesson Long (Blackpowder)

0.66 kg

6 Cylinder

$168

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

No 2 Army (4" Barrel)

SAR (1/3)(1/2)

1

Nil

1

5

Nil

7

No 2 Army (5" Barrel)

SAR (1/3)(1/2)

1

Nil

1

4

Nil

10

No 2 Army (6" Barrel)

SAR (1/3)(1/2)

1

Nil

I

4

Nil

12

No 2 Army (8" Barrel)

SAR (1/3)(1/2)

2

Nil

2

5

Nil

16

No 2 Army (10" Barrel)

SAR (1/3)(1/2)

2

1-Nil

2

5

Nil

21

 

Starr Model 1858 Revolver

     Notes: This a set of three revolvers.  The first two, the Navy and Army, are separated only by their caliber and a large weight difference.  The Army revolver was made much lighter to be handier to troops on the ground, especially those on horseback.  Most other differences are minor details and not important for game purposes; most of these differences the heavier caliber of the Army Model. 

     The Model 1863 Army is similar from a design standpoint, though is it quite different mechanically, being single-action  and able to be thumb-cocked.  This made it preferable to the Union Army, and it the third most numerous revolver in the Civil War.  Most Union generals carried one, and many high-ranking officers and some mid-level ones.  All three are fed by combustible nitrided paper cartridges; these have ball of the appropiriate size glued onto the front of the paper cartridge, just inside of the paper.  Like most combustible case rounds, the paper and powder are ignited by a percussion cap.

     The barrel of the first two is 6 inches and round (8 inches on the Model 1863).  Finish of the metal is mostly blued.  One thing that strikes me is how...ordinary...the Starr looks -- it looks most modern revolvers.  Except for aging, you might at first glance mistake it for any number of modern reproductions.

     Three places you may have seen the Starr in the past few years include the movie Unforgiven, where Clint Eastwood's character uses one to see if he has retained his skill with a revolver, by the Kevin Costner character of young Wyatt Earp in the movie of the same name, and in Rambo, First Blood, where it is seen in a display case.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Model 1858 Navy

.36 Combustible Cartridge

1.59 kg

6 Cylinder

$74

Model 1858 Army

.44 Combustible Cartridge

1.3 kg

6 Cylinder

$93

Model 1863 Army

.44 Combustible Cartridge

1.36 kg

6 Cylinder

$108

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Model 1858 Navy

DAR (1/6)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Model 1858 Army

DAR (1/6)

2

Nil

1

3

Nil

10

Model 1863 Army

SAR (1/6)

2

1-Nil

2

3

Nil

12

 

US Model 1836 Percussion

     Notes: This handgun was originally a flintlock handgun; in the1850s, the design was changed to use a percussion ignition combustible cartridge.  The breech section was removed, replaced with a mechanism allowing a combustible cartridge/ball round; the handgun is muzzleloaded.  The Model 1836 had a short cleaning rod under the barrel and going into the fore-end.  The barrel was fairly long for a handgun at 8.5 inches, but this allowed decent range for the Model 1836's type of handgun.

     The US Model 1836 Percussion spawned a number of identical versions except for cosmetic and mechanism changes.  They are all identical to the Model 1836 for game purposes. The US Navy Model 1842 Boxlock was also used by the US Cutter Service; it differed from the Model 1836 by having a 6-inch barrel. This design also had a number of contracts to build it, and these are identical for game purposes.  They have a fixed rear V-notch sight and a front bead; these versions had a rifled barrel, where earlier versions had a smoothbore barrel.  Many have engraved scenes on the cylinders -- wildlife, Indian fighting, Civil War, cavalry, and from the Mexican-American War.  There are especially prevalent on Walkers used by US or Texan military officers who bought their Walker privately and on Texas Rangers' weapons.

     Some 80,000 of all these versions were manufactured, and most of these were used by the Union military in the Civil War and in the Mexican-American War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

US Model 1836 Percussion

.54 Combustible Cartridge

1.25 kg

1 Internal

$55

US Navy Model 1842 Boxlock

.54 Combustible Cartridge

0.91 kg

1 Internal

$84

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

US Model 1836 Percussion

1/3

2

1-Nil

1

5

Nil

10

US Navy Model 1842 Boxlock

1/3

2

1-Nil

1

6

Nil

11

 

US Model 1855 Pistol-Carbine

     Notes: This is similar in appearance to the Model 1836, as well as being similar is its functioning.  However, the rear of the grip has an adapter for use with a removable stock, turning it into a short-barreled carbine.  It also uses a combustible cartridge, a round ball, and is muzzleloaded.  The barrel is 12 inches long and is brass, as is almost all of the metalwork (and is finished bright). The rear sight is a two-leaf design, and the front sight is a small bead.  A short ramrod is under the barrel, as is a pommel ring on the bottom of the grip. It has two sling swivels for use when the stock is being used (as one of the swivels is on the stock).

     The US Model 1855 Fayetteville is virtually identical for game purposes; it is noted for being assembled in North Carolina for use by the Confederacy from parts captured at the Harpers Ferry Arsenal in Virginia in 1861.  The lock plate was not milled, allowing it to use the Maynard Tape Priming System.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

US Model 1855 Pistol-Carbine (Pistol Configuration)

.58 Combustible Cartridge

1.73 kg

1 Internal

$113

US Model 1855 Pistol-Carbine (Carbine Configuration)

.58 Combustible Cartridge

2.47 kg

1 Internal

$123

US Model 1855 Fayetteville Pistol-Carbine (Pistol Configuration)

.58 Combustible Cartridge

1.73 kg

1 Internal

$113

US Model 1855 Fayetteville Pistol-Carbine (Carbine Configuration)

.58 Combustible Cartridge

2.47 kg

1 Internal

$123

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

US Model 1855 Pistol-Carbine (Pistol Configuration)

1/3//1/10

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

21

US Model 1855 Pistol-Carbine (Carbine Configuration)

1/3//1/10

3

1-Nil

4

3

Nil

26

US Model 1855 Fayetteville Pistol-Carbine (Pistol Configuration)

1/2//1/10

2

1-Nil

2

4

Nil

21

US Model 1855 Fayetteville Pistol-Carbine (Carbine Configuration)

1/2//1/10

3

1-Nil

4

3

Nil

26

 

Whitney Navy Revolver

     This revolver comes in two primary models and several submodels of each of the two models.  For game purposes, they are all virtually identical; most differences are in markings and minor technical details.  Some changes, such as the hammer trigger guard, were in what metal they were made, and some were done to make the revolver less expensive.  The 2nd Model was also more ergonomic than the 1st Model. Only about 1500 1st Model Whitneys were built; the Union government requested some changes and a cut in price, so some iron parts were replaced with brass.  Some 34,000 2nd Models were built, making it one of the most common revolvers of the Civil War.  The designer was Fordyce Beals, the man who designed the Remington-Beals revolvers; he co-designed the Whitney Navy Revolver with Eli Whitney.  All of these revolvers were built from the late 1850s until the end of the Civil War.  Though most Whitney Navy Revolvers went to the Union Navy, but some equipped the New Jersey regiment of the Civil War; a very small amount were sold to what would be the Confederacy before the Civil War began (the Confederates used the 1st Model, as the 2nd Model was not available until the Civil War had already started.

     The Whitney Naval revolver used combustible paper cases for the powder, ignited by a percussion cap.  A ball round was glued into the top of the case.  The standard barrel was a 7.5-inch octagonal barrel (with a few examples made with 4, 5, 6, and 8 inches), and was of steel, while most of the rest of the revolver was wrought iron.  the 2nd Model was available only in a 7.5-inch barrel version. On the 2nd Model, the trigger guard, hammer, and screws holding the revolver together were made of brass; on the 1st Model, these were made of iron.  The Whitney Navy Revolver had a manual safety catch, a rarity at the time.  The Whitney had a solid frame; several designers and manufacturers were trying to use a solid frame, but the Whitney was the first successful attempt.  The Whitney Navy Revolver used a post front sight, and the hammer as a rear sight.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Whitney Navy Revolver (4" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Case

1 kg

6 Cylinder

$60

Whitney Navy Revolver (5" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Case

1.04 kg

6 Cylinder

$67

Whitney Navy Revolver (6" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Case

1.08 kg

6 Cylinder

$75

Whitney Navy Revolver (7.5" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Case

1.13 kg

6 Cylinder

$87

Whitney Navy Revolver (8" Barrel)

.36 Combustible Case

1.16 kg

6 Cylinder

$90

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Whitney Navy Revolver (4" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

6

Whitney Navy Revolver (5" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

3

Nil

7

Whitney Navy Revolver (6" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

9

Whitney Navy Revolver (7.5" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

11

Whitney Navy Revolver (8" Barrel)

SAR (1/9)

1

Nil

1

2

Nil

12