Johnson M-1941

     Notes: The roots of the M-1941 actually go back to 1934, before World War 2.  Near the end of the development of the M-1 Garand, a young US Marine lieutenant observing the testing process did recommend that the Marines adopt the M-1, but with the caveat that he believed that the clang of the clip when the last round was fired would become a liability, that the inability of the M-1’s clip to be topped off was another liability, and that he did not believe that the M-1 Garand could be quickly and efficiently mass-produced.  (In the first two respects, it did turn out that he was right.)  This young Marine, 1st Lieutenant Maynard Johnson, in the finest spirit of American inventiveness, decided to design a rifle to alleviate what he felt were the Garand’s flaws.

     The M-1941 used recoil operation instead of the more complicated gas operation of the Garand.  This allowed for a rifle with fewer parts and simpler construction and field stripping.  The M-1941 proved to be adequate for accuracy, the operating system allowed for lower tolerances and proved more reliable in dirty conditions, was a considerably lighter weapon, had a greater magazine capacity, and the magazine, though internal, could be topped off at any time, either with chargers or by hand. 

     Unfortunately, the problems with the M-1941 began before World War 2, on the political side. Springfield, who designed the M-1 Garand, has a tremendous amount of pull with the Ordinance Board or the War Department, and didn’t want any sort of “interlopers” interfering with the adoption of the M-1 Garand or even supplementing it.  Complaints by the Ordinance Board were many, ranging from cost to the fact that the M-1941 could not use the standard US Army bayonet to everything in between.  This was happening even though shooters ranging from average soldiers to match marksmen stated that the M-1 and M-1941 were at the least equal to each other.

     However, with the US entry into World War 2, it was in fact quickly discovered that indeed M-1 Garand production could not be ramped up quickly enough to fill the demand.  In addition, the US also needed to provide modern weapons for groups ranging from partisans in France and elsewhere to Allied forces whose troops had ended up here and there after their countries had been taken over by the Nazis or Japanese.  The M-1941 was therefore put into limited service with USMC special operations units, particularly their parachutists.  It was also used throughout World War 2 by the OSS and the partisans they were supplying, and by Dutch forces operating in the East Indies.  The Australians used a small number of them, as did some resistance fighters here and there in the Pacific theater.  There are also rumors that some small amounts of M-1941s were used by free French forces.

     But all was not rosy with the M-1941.  One of the problems with the M-1941 was its need for a non-standard bayonet, but this was considered a minor problem.  A worse problem with the bayonet was that it essentially unbalanced the M-1941, degrading accuracy for most shooters.  The M-1941 had a rather long part of its barrel which was exposed, not being inside the stock or a shroud, not otherwise being reinforced.  This part of the barrel could and did get bent, especially during drops by ParaMarines.  Though the ability to top off a magazine was appreciated, charging using the standard 5-round stripper clip of the time was quite difficult; the end of the clip did not quite fit into the M-1941.  The Marines replaced them with M-1 Garands and even M-1 Carbines as they became available; the major users of the M-1941 actually turned out to be the Dutch.  Total M-1941 production was about 70,000.  The Johnson enjoyed brief popularity on the civilian market after World War 2, but is now a collectors' item. (Just trying to get spare parts for the M-1941 is a big problem.)

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1941

.30-06 Springfield

3.86 kg

10-I

$1223

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1941

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

62

 

Midwest Industries MI-10

     Notes: This is an AR-10 with a plethora of improvements and alterations to make it a better rifle.  The current MI-10 has a 16-inch barrel, but rumors have it (as of Jun 2016) that 18-inch and 20-inch barrels will be available. The hybrid muzzle brake, called the MI Chamber Enhanced Muzzle Brake, has features of both the AK-74 and AR, and some advanced development.  The barrel is made by Criterion, and is of 416R stainless steel, and is floating. The receivers are if 7075-T6 aluminum, with a Magpul ACS-L sliding buttstock with a recoil pad and a Magpul MOE pistol grip. A Picatinny rail tops the receiver and upper handguard, including the gas block, and improved AR-type BUIS are included. Two more rails can be added to the sides of the handguards – attachment points are provided. The handguards have a total of five non-rotating sling point attachments. The trigger is adjustable, and is smooth, with a 6-pound pull and a small amount of takeup.  The rifle has “muscle memory” and controls are immediately obvious to those who are familiar with ARs. It has been described as “an AR on steroids.” The finish is black hard anodized.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MI-10 (16” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.86 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$1209

MI-10 (18” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.9 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$1230

MI-10 (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.94 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$1251

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MI-10 (16”)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

46

MI-10 (18”)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

56

MI-10 (20”)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

2

Nil

65

 

NEMO Ti[One]

     Notes: NEMO is a maker of high-end AR clones, but the Ti[One] beats all – the real-world price is almost $100,000.  And yet they are selling, slowly but surely.  This is largely because of the materials used in its construction – lots of pure titanium and very high-grade steels.  Both the upper and lower receivers are machined from titanium blocks, the quadrail handguard (including the MIL-STD-1913 rails), the low-profile gas block, the charging handle and latch, the flash suppressor, and the buffer tube are all made from titanium.  The fluted 16-inch barrel are from 416 stainless steel, as are most other metal components.  The pistol grip is made by Hogue, and the stainless steel bolt is nickel-boron coated, being one of those “lubeless rifles.”  The charging handle is oversized, the magazine well is flared, and the trigger guard is oversized and a part of the lower receiver.  The stock is near-M-4-type, made by Choate. The supplied magazines are by Magpul, though metric FAL or AR-10 magazines can be used.  Other than some polymer parts, the finish on the titanium is natural metal and on the stainless steel, black.  Many are surprised that this rifle is heavier than a corresponding AR-10, but many also forget that titanium is actually heavier than steel.  What you get from titanium is strength, ridgity, and sheer toughness and indestructibility. A Ti[One], is, unfortunately, beyond the abilities of most people to acquire one – you could buy a luxury car for the real-world price of one. Essentially, it is a little more than an AR-10 made out of exotic materials.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ti[One]

7.62mm NATO

3.92 kg

10. 20

$1031

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ti[One]

SA

4

2-3-Nil

4/6

4

Nil

46

 

NEMO TANGO Series

     Notes: Much less over the top than the Ti[One]. The Tango series is essentially the Ti[One] is a much more reasonably-built version of the Ti[One].  Some aspects are similar, but not made of titanium; the upper receiver and lower receiver are made from aluminum billets machined to their final states.  The 16” barrel is made in a similar matter as on the Ti[One]’s barrel, with a steel muzzle brake.  The barrel is also free floating, with handguards having two-point full-length MIL-STD-1983 rails; the upper rail interlocks with the receiver top rail, and the handguard rails may be replaced with handguard section without rails (though the rails themselves cannot be reomoved).  The rifle is sold with a foregrip.  The TANGO series has a low profile gas block, allowing the full use of optics.  BUIS consists of Troy Micro Sights.  The bolt is stainless steel coated with Nickel-Boron.  The charging handle is oversized, with an oversized latch.  The stock is a NEMO Adjustable stock, similar in appearance to an M-4-type but with battery storage underneath, and adjustable for length and cheek height.  The pistol grip is a Hogue overmolded grip. The bolt carrier has KNS antirotational trigger pins for the Timney Trigger. The safety is ambidextrous, though other controls are not.  The Tango-8 has a receiver finished in ST Tiger Stripe; the entire rifle may be finished this way, if the buyer desires.

     The Tango-2 is essentially the same weapon as the Tango-8, but chambered for a smaller caliber. The Tango-6 is also essentially the same weapon, but chambered for .300 Blackout.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Tango-8

7.62mm NATO

4.34 kg

10. 20

$1069

Tango-2

5.56mm NATO

3.98 kg

10, 20, 30

$640

Tango-6

.300 Blackout

4.27 kg

10, 20, 30

$818

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Tango-8

SA

4

2-3-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

46

Tango-6

SA

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

41

Tango-6

SA

3

2-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

46

 

POF P-308

     Notes: Patriot Ordnance Factory makes a number of firearms; many of them are AR-15 or AR-10-based, but operated by a gas piston system instead of direct gas impingement.  One of these is the P-308 series, chambered for 7.62mm NATO.  These rifles are available with 20, 16, 14, and 12-inch barrels (the latter available only to law enforcement and military concerns, as is automatic fire capability).  Common features include Chrome/Vanadium/Moly steel alloy barrels that are twice as hard as Mil-Spec barrels and rated for automatic fire, chrome-lined barrels that have 10 times the thickness of chrome than Mil-Spec barrels, and a BC-A5 muzzle brake.  The all operating parts are treated with POF’s CROS (Corrosion Resistant Operating System).  Finishes may be of NP3, black nitrite, or black anodization; steel finishes may be black, tungsten, burnt bronze, and NP3.  The bolt carrier and bolt carrier area are nickel/Teflon coated.  Receivers are of aircraft-quality aluminum, and may or may not be flattop according to the buyer’s wishes.  The pistol grip and stock are ergonomic, with the stock being a sliding Vltor stock.  The handguards have four MIL-STD-1913 rails, as does the receiver if a flattop model; if flattop, the upper rail is a monolithic rail.

     POF makes its own magazines for the P-308, but the P-308 can also use AR-10 (both modern and original), M-1A, SR-25, and metric-pattern FAL magazines.

     A newer version of the P-308, the P-308 Gen 4, is now what’s on sale from POF.  Improvements include the E2 extraction chamber, which greatly increases reliability of extraction of spent rounds and duds.  It essentially uses a fluted bolt to “float” the case out of the chamber, and taking a lot of stress off of the extractor. This fluting action does not damage the case, like a similar H&K system does. The stock has been changed to a Magpul CTR sliding stock, with six positions.  Barrels are different weights (twice as thick as a standard AR-10 barrel) and different barrel lengths, giving SBR, carbine, and rifle-length firearms. They are also match-quality. The barrel is essentially of heavy profile, but spiral-fluted to reduce weight and heat. They are tipped by four-chamber muzzle brakes, which sit on threads and can be replaced. The POF Modular Railed Receiver handguard mounts a MIL-STD-1913 rail, which is continuous with the receiver rail.  There are also short rails at the side and lower ends of the handguards for accessories.  Attached to these rails are removable BUIS. The entire rifle’s finish (except for the polymer) is underlaid with NP3.  The metalwork is heat-treated to increase hardness. Specific systems, such as the gas system, are further heat-treated or treated in a different way. The trigger guard is oversized and integrated into the lower receiver. Controls on the Gen 4 are ambidextrous.  The trigger group is a POF design and has less pull weight at 4.5 pounds than most battle and assault rifles.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

P-308 (12” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.94 kg

10, 20, 25

$1026

P-308 (14” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.98 kg

10, 20, 25

$1046

P-308 (16” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

4.03 kg

10, 20, 25

$1069

P-308 (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

4.11 kg

10, 20, 25

$1110

P-308 Gen 4 (14.5” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.9 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$1057

P-308 Gen 4 (16.5” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.95 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$1067

P-308 Gen 4 (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

4.03 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$1104

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

P-308 (12”)

5

4

2-Nil

4/5

3

7

29

P-308 (14”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

4/6

3

7

37

P-308 (16”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

3

7

46

P-308 (20”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

3

7

65

P-308 Gen 4 (14.5”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

3

7

41

P-308 Gen 4 (16.5”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

3

7

50

P-308 Gen 4 (20”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

3

7

67

 

Red Creek Tactical Tomahawk

     Notes: The Tomahawk was designed specifically for hunting North American medium and big game, and especially wild hogs.  A secondary consideration was sales to police and military concerns; the powerful round it fires is quite capable of penetrating engine blocks or cracking open a terrorist’s head when he’s behind the wheel of vehicle filled with explosives.  Since the primary market for the Tomahawk would be the US, the designers chose to use the AR platform for the Tomahawk, as many shooters in the US are familiar with the AR platform from military or police work.  As the .458 SOCOM round is meant for short-range work, the Tomahawk is designed accordingly, particularly in its BUIS and short 16-inch barrel. The upper and lower receivers are machined from 7075-T6 aluminum, and are 70% stronger than the average AR receivers.  The receiver parts were designed in conjunction with Magpul.  The Tomahawk complies with the M-4 enhancement program guidelines of the Army’s PM Soldier Weapons.

     Working from the AR platform, Red Creek Tactical then tailored the Tomahawk to fit with their ideas and needs.  The lower receiver is built with a 45-degree swing for the selector lever; this control is also ambidextrous. The trigger guard is ambidextrous, with a Geissele Automatic Super Dynamic trigger pack, a match-quality trigger pack with a wide, flat trigger.  The finish is impressive, using proprietary anticorrosion coatings and then finished further in Cerakote in one of several camouflage patterns.  Police and military buyers may also choose a coating finish in Cerakote Gen 2, which helps hide the heat and warmth of the barrel and receiver, especially as they heat up from firing. The handguard is made by JP Enterprises, which is built on a smooth tube that is almost full-barrel length, and can be fitted with from one to four MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rails (one on the top of the handguard is standard). The top handguard rail fits so that is flush with the rail of the upper receiver. The Tomahawk uses a Magpul ACS sliding stock; inside that stock is a full rifle-length recoil buffer and tube, and flat-spring recoil spring designed by Red Creek Tactical.

     The 16-inch heavy barrel is almost heavy enough to be a bull barrel, and is tipped with a Vortex flash suppressor. The Vortex can be removed by the shooter and replaced with a silencer designed in conjunction with OSS (Operators Suppression Systems, not the OSS).  This silencer fits inside the Tomahawk’s handguards, and is a full-length silencer which attaches snugly and provides total flash suppression and noise suppression almost equal to an integral silencer.  The silencer also makes the rifle only a few millimeters longer than the Vortex flash suppressor.  The silencer is made primarily of titanium, so it adds a minimum of weight to the Tomahawk.

     A second version of the Tomahawk is available, using a 10.5-inch barrel with the same specs as the standard barrel.  This version was designed primarily for police and military work, but is also available to civilians with an SBR license (in the US) or whatever is applicable to local laws overseas.  It too uses the Vortex flash suppressor, and the same sort of silencer has been designed for this “Shorty” Tomahawk.

     The Tomahawk is designed to use AR-15/M-16 magazines; as with all weapons that use these types of magazines, the .458 SOCOM round was designed to feed from an unmodified AR-15/M-16 magazine (though, of course, with a greatly-reduced magazine capacity).  Along with a Tomahawk purchase, Red Creek Tactical will provide four magazines with the same finish as the rifle.  Note that the .458 SOCOM round will not work with exotic magazines such as the Beta C-Mag, 90-round MWG, etc. (The magazines below are equivalent to 5.56mm magazines with capacities of 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 rounds respectively.)

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Tomahawk is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Tomahawk

.458 SOCOM

3.86 kg

2, 3, 7, 10, 13

$2120

With Silencer

.458 SOCOM

6.36 kg

2, 3, 7, 10, 13

$3457

Shorty Tomahawk

.458 SOCOM

3.66 kg

2, 3, 7, 10, 13

$1946

With Silencer

.458 SOCOM

5.85 kg

2, 3, 7, 10, 13

$3089

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Tomahawk

SA

6

1-3-Nil

7/8

5

Nil

46

With Silencer

SA

5

1-3-Nil

7/8

4

Nil

38

With Silencer, Subsonic

SA

5

2-3-Nil

7/8

3

Nil

28

Shorty Tomahawk

SA

6

1-3-Nil

5/6

5

Nil

23

With Silencer

SA

5

1-3-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

20

With Silencer, Subsonic

SA

5

2-3-Nil

5/6

3

Nil

17

 

Remington (Enfield) US Service Rifle M-1917

    Notes: This is basically an Enfield No 2 (Pattern ’14) Rifle re-barreled for .30-06 Springfield ammunition. This was done to address an urgent World War 1 need for rifles and the resulting shortfall of M-1903s. Although the M-1917 was designated a “secondary standard rifle,” by the War Department, nearly twice as many US troops carried them into combat in World War I than the “primary standard” Springfield M-1903.  This is the weapon that Sergeant Alvin York used to such great effect in World War I when winning his Medal of Honor.

     Almost 2 million were used by US troops during World War 1, and almost 2.4 million were actually produced.  They were designed in England by Enfield, but the M-1917 was primarily built by Remington (who held the actual government contract), Winchester, and a subsidiary of Remington called Eddystone.  (The basis of the design in an Enfield rifle led to them being commonly called “Enfield” in the US, though almost none were actually made in Britain.) They went into storage after World War 1. Nearly 120,000 were sent to England during World War 2 to equip their Home Guard, where they were painted with a red band around the stock to distinguish them from No 2 Rifles since their chambering remained unchanged from .30-06 Springfield. Many others were refurbished and sent to US troops, particularly the US Navy, in the early stages of World War 2.  After 1946, most of these rifles were sold to US target shooters and hunters.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1917

.30-06 Springfield

4.08 kg

5 Clip

$1755

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1917

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

87

 

Rock River Arms LAR-8

     Notes: Called the LAR-10 in its early inceptions, the LAR-8 appears at first glance to be an enlarged AR-15.  Originally scheduled for market introduction in late 2006 or early 2007, Rock River Arms’ web site still says “Anticipated availability Summer 2007,” though apparently the LAR-8 is not as yet on the market except for pre-orders.

     The basic LAR-8 Standard comes in an A2 version, which essentially does look like an enlarged AR-15A2, complete with the AR-15A2-type stock and handguards, as well as the carrying handle and front sight raised post.  The A4 model has the carrying handle replaced by a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the front sight post replaced by a gas block assembly that has a very short MIL-STD-1913 rail.  Optionally, the A4 version may have its handguards replaced by a Daniel Defense Lite Quad Rail handguard, with four MIL-STD-1913 rails.  In the case of both rifles, the barrels are made by Wilson Combat and are 20 inches long and tipped with an M-16A2-type flash suppressor.  The pistol grip has been modified to allow the use of an outer Hogue rubber shell.  The trigger unit is a two-stage match trigger.  Both can accept metric and English FAL-type magazines.

     The LAR-8 Mid-Length (both the A2 and A4) are virtually identical to their LAR-8 Standard counterparts, but use 6-position sliding stocks and 16-inch barrels.  The specialist LAR-8A4 Varmint (which would also serve equally well as a tactical marksman’s weapon) uses a 26-inch Wilson Combat Air-Gauged bull barrel made of stainless steel and free-floating, inside special ribbed aluminum handguards.  The receiver uses a MIL-STD-1913 rail instead of a carrying handle, with a corresponding short MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the gas block in case the shooter wishes to mount iron sights or other accessories.  The barrel has no flash suppressor, but instead is tipped by a target crown.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These rifles do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LAR-8A2 Standard

7.62mm NATO

4.22 kg

20

$995

LAR-8A4 Standard

7.62mm NATO

4.08 kg

20

$1005

LAR-8A2 Mid-Length

7.62mm NATO

3.9 kg

20

$974

LAR-8A4 Mid-Length

7.62mm NATO

3.67 kg

20

$983

LAR-8A4 Varmint

7.62mm NATO

5.26 kg

20

$1069

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LAR-8A2/A4 Standard

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

62

LAR-8A2/A4 Mid-Length

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

44

LAR-8A4 Varmint

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8

3

Nil

95

 

Rock River Arms LAR-458

     Notes: Essentially a heavy modification of the RRA CAR A4, the LAR-458 is modified to instead fire the .458 SOCOM cartridge.  It is intended primarily for short-range combat and entry teams; another design use is to provide sentries and road guards with a weapon that can do more damage than a 5.56mm round.

     Other than the changes necessary to fire the .458 SOCOM cartridge (which were large and many in of themselves), the LAR-458 has a large number of sub-versions available, differing primarily in the stocks, handguards, pistol grips, and MIL-STD-1913 rails available.  For game purposes, the stocks may be primarily into fixed and 6-position sliding stocks; however, possible fixed stocks include a standard AR-15A2 stock, a shorter “entry stock,” the CAA Tactical Stock (which has compartments for accessories such as cleaning kits, batteries, etc.), and the ACE Skeleton stock. The handguards may be “generic” ribbed aluminum handguards or better Hogue versions.  (Both of these also contain free-float tubes for the barrel.)  The pistol grips may be standard AR-15A2, Hogue rubber, an ERGO grip, or an ERGO Target grip. The receiver is topped by a MIL-STD-1913 rail, but the buyer may elect to also buy a detachable carrying handle with an AR-15A2-type rear sight in it; the gas block also has a very short MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the buyer may also elect to buy a front sight to fit this rail if desired.  The trigger guard may be of standard size or a wider winter trigger guard.  The barrel is a 16-inch chrome-moly steel bull barrel, which may be tipped with a standard AR-15A2-type flash suppressor or a Vortex flash suppressor/muzzle brake.  Feed is from modified AR-15A2 magazines.

     There is a newer version of the LAR-458, the LAR-458 X-1.  Differences include a forged upper and lower receiver.  The barrel is a lengthened 18-inch barrel, which is of bull profile, chrome/moly/vanadium stainless steel alloy, which is tipped standard with an RRA Hunter muzzle brake (if in FDE color) or RRA Beast muzzle brake (if with black furniture).The two brakes are identical for game purposes. The barrel allows the replacing of the muzzle brakes with other muzzle devices. The barrel is cryo treated and is bead blasted, a feature that gives better weatherproofing, dirt resistance, and cooling.  The furniture may be flat dark earth or black.  The stock may be a standard A2 stock or an RRA CAR sliding stock. Atop the receiver and handguard is a continuous length of MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the handguards are well ventilated.

     There are some rumors floating around that the US Military (primarily special operations and the Coast Guard) have requested that Rock River Arms build some versions of the LAR-458 capable of automatic fire, though I have been unable as of yet to confirm this beyond mere rumors.  However, I have included automatic stats below, as a point of interest.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The LAR-458 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LAR-458 (Fixed Stock, Flash Suppressor)

.458 SOCOM

3.45 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2096

LAR-458 (Fixed Stock, Muzzle Brake)

.458 SOCOM

3.44 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2124

LAR-458 (Folding Stock, Flash Suppressor)

.458 SOCOM

3.45 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2112

LAR-458 (Folding Stock, Muzzle Brake)

.458 SOCOM

3.44 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2141

LAR-458 X-1 (Fixed Stock, Muzzle Brake)

.458 SOCOM

3.95 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2202

LAR-458 X-1 (Folding Stock, Muzzle Brake)

.458 SOCOM

3.9 kg

4, 7, 10, 15

$2222

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LAR-458 (Fixed, Flash)

5

6

1-3-Nil

6

4

11

58

LAR-458 (Fixed, Brake)

5

6

1-3-Nil

7

3

8

58

LAR-458 (Folding, Flash)

5

6

1-3-Nil

5/6

4

11

58

LAR-458 (Folding, Brake)

5

6

1-3-Nil

5/7

3

8

58

LAR-458 X-1 (Fixed, Brake)

5

6

2-4-Nil

7

4

10

67

LAR-458 X-1 (Folding, Brake)

5

6

2-4-Nil

6/7

4

10

67

 

Savage Arms M-10 BA Stealth

     Notes: A rifle meant for tactical sharpshooting such as at police engagement ranges, the Savage M-10 BA is a reliable, accurate bolt-action rifle which has a 24-inch fluted heavy barrel, a carbon steel barrel tipped with a muzzle brake, and an aluminum float tube.  The stock has an aluminum chassis and is adjustable for LOP, cheekpiece, and angle of butt.  The stock is sliding, and the controls are those of an AR; the stock is Savage’s AccuStock System.  A Picatinny rail is on top of the receiver, extending to the end of the handguard (which extends about halfway done the barrel.  A short length of rail is on the bottom of the handguard for those who wish to connect a bipod or tactical light or lasers. The pistol grip features a hand stop. Finish is in matte black.  It uses the Savage AccuTrigger match-quality trigger; it is a two-stage trigger adjustable for weight of pull.  Though sights are not normally available to the M-10 BA Stealth, BUIS are available for an extra cost. A 4x telescopic sight is included in the price of the rifle.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-10 BA Stealth

7.62mm NATO

6.08 kg

10

$1544

M-10 BA Stealth

6.5mm Creedmoor

6.08 kg

10

$1196

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-10 BA Stealth

BA

4

2-3-Nil

6/8

3

Nil

98

M-10 BA Stealth

BA

4

1-2-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

111

 

Seekins Precision SP-10

     Notes: The SP-10 is a product of Seekins, a company who is better known for mounting rings for scopes mounted on precision rifles.  The SP-10 is designed for police snipers and designated marksmen, but is also a good hunting weapon.

     The SP-10 is based on a larger version of the iRMT upper receiver, normally used on their smaller-caliber ARs.  This includes a floating barrel with only four points of contact, and a 15-inch SP3R handguard.  The lower receiver is their SP-308, designed with ambidextrous controls. The receivers are CNC machined from billet aluminum. The receivers are hardcoat anodized in black. The top of the receiver, extending down the top of the handguards, is a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The handguard is designed to be wide and flat at the bottom, and also has a short length of rail at the lower front.  The SP-10 has a Magpul STR sliding stock, which has compartments for several different sizes of batteries. It has a secondary friction lock, which helps eliminate any play in the sliding stock.

     The barrel is an 18-inch stainless steel barrel. It is match-quality. The barrel has a heavy profile and is tipped with a Seekins ATC multibaffle muzzle brake.  The muzzle brake, often causing a lack of recoil, is longer in the SP-10.  This also allows for less felt recoil. The barrel and other steelwork, as well as the gas block and gas tube, have a Melonited finish. The trigger is by CMC and is a single stage trigger with a light touch of 3.5 pounds. All in all the SP-10 would make an excellent platoon sharpshooter's weapon, and comes with a 5x telescopic sight.

     Complaints about the SP-10 seem to center around it’s high RL price.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SP-10

7.62mm NATO

3.63 kg

5, 10, 20

$1447

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SP-10

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

2

Nil

57

 

Sharps’ Brothers “The Jack”

     Notes: This is essentially a custom rifle – built from most of the quality parts on the market one would expect from a quality rifle.  The upper and lower receivers (it is an AR-type rifle) is patterned after bones, with the front of the magazine well featuring the eyes and teeth of a skull, and colors in bone and green.  The top of the receiver and handguard have a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the receiver rail is topped with a Trijicon 3x30 ACOG (though the .458 SOCOM round is not known for its accuracy).  The lower part of the handguards has a short section of MIL-STD-1913 rail, for mounting of the provided Atlas bipod.  While the lower receiver is in fact from Sharps Bros (“The Jack” receiver), the upper is from Rock River Arms. Inside the free-float handguards, the barrel is a 16-inch bull barrel tipped by an A2-type flash suppressor.  The barrel is of Chrome/Moly/Vanadium steel.  The handguards are Noveske NSRs, with the Sharps Bros personal touches.  The handguards are aluminum, and like the receiver, are finished with a hardcoat anodizing.  The slim handguards required the use of a Troy low-profile gas block.  The trigger guard is oversized for use with gloves, and the trigger is a CNC trigger which breaks at an even 3.5 pounds.  The sliding skeletonized stock is a black MagPul CTR and the pistol grip an MOE. The internals for the Jack come from Palmetto State Armory.

     The Jackhammer is another version of this rifle, featuring the Sharps Bros special upper and lower receivers.  It is chambered in another unusual cartridge, .338 Federal (and two other calibers). Under the Jack modifications are a standard 7075-T6 aluminum upper and lower receivers.  They are finished in a hard coat anodization. The trigger guard is oversized for gloves.  The barrel is a 20-inch DPMS Lite Hunter, with a heavy profile.  It is surrounded by N M-LOK Solo handguard which makes the barrel free-floating and has M-LOK mounting holes, allowing Picatinny rails to be attached at any point.  (In the stock version, one is above the receiver, one below the front of the handguard, and one above the handguard in front for a laser, light, or BUIS.) The barrel is tipped with a target crown.  The lower rail usually has a bipod attached to it.  The handguard includes five QD sling swivel points.  The entire rifle has an EXO Nickel Boron finish, very weatherproof and bang-up proof and providing dry lubricity.  The bolt carrier group is from Fail Zero. Other components are the equivalents of the one on The Jack. The Jackhammer comes with a Leupold Mk 6 3-18x scope, making it more of a DMR than a regular rifle.  It is included here for completeness, but is more a sniper rifle than a battle rifle.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

The Jack

.458 SOCOM

3.18 kg

11

$2347

Jackhammer

6.5mm Creedmoor

3 kg

10, 20

$1545

Jackhammer

7.62mm NATO

3.09 kg

10, 20

$1785

Jackhammer

.338 Federal

3.15 kg

10, 20

$1953

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

The Jack

SA

6

1-3-Nil

7/8

6

Nil

47

With Bipod

SA

6

1-3-Nil

7/8

3

Nil

61

Jackhammer (6.5mm)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

80

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

104

Jackhammer (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

69

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

80

Jackhammer (.338)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

69

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

90

 

Smith & Wesspon M&P-10

     Notes: Big Brother to the M&P-15 AR-type assault rifle, the AR-10 is based on the larger AR-10 chassis.  It is sort of a no-frills rifle compared to most modern rifles in its class, and has no handguard Picatinny rails and only the receiver rail for the attachment of optics.  The round handguards are straight from the newer models of the AR-10, and are plain, round, and ribbed.  The receiver halves are of Mil-Spec 7075-T6 black anodized aluminum.  The upper receiver comes complete with a forward assist, and the stock is a near-Mil-Spec M-4-type stock, with S&W’s logo on it.  It is an excellent hunting rifle, and a possible patrol rifle for police, though it is a bit large for carriage in a police car in the shotgun slot.

     One of the difficulties of the M&P-10 is the firing pin, it is spring-loaded, with a return spring to control movement upon chambering.  Unfortunately, it makes reassembly of the bolt carrier group almost a three-handed operation.  The trigger is also thought by many to be too heavy at 6.4 pounds.

     The barrel is also Mil-Spec, being almost a government profile barrel, where the front third is heavy profile and the rest medium profile.  It is 18 inches long and tipped with an S&W-designed flash suppressor. Operation is by direct gas impingement. Finish of the steel is Armornite, a barrel of 4140 steel and a bolt of 9310 steel.  The bore, firing pin, and chamber and barrel extension are chromed.

     The selector lever is ambidextrous; as delivered, the selector on the left side is larger than on the right side, due to ambidextrous.  If you like the larger selector but are right handed, the selectors are reversible.  Ambidextrous bolt catches and magazine releases are also present.  The lower receiver has steel reinforcement ribs running down it.  The trigger is also Mil-Spec, but the trigger guard is a part of the lower receiver and curved and enlarged for use with gloves.  The recoil, though high, is not more than most rifles of its class, and it will make sure you use improper holding techniques only once, especially proper shouldering.  The rear sight is a BUIS, but the front sight is a standard adjustable post on a triangular riser and the post protected by ears.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M&P-10

7.62mm NATO

3.5 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$1035

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SP-10

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

4

Nil

53

 

Springfield M-1 Garand

     Notes:  Perhaps more than any other weapon, the M-1 Garand is synonymous with the World War 2 US fighting man.  In 1932, it was the first semiautomatic rifle to be adopted by any country’s armed forces.  By the time manufacture had ended in the late 1950s, over 5.5 million had been made.  They were in regular service as late as the Vietnam War, and there are no doubt some still floating around, even in military service.  They were modified by several countries for both military and civilian use, including the US M-14 and the Italian BM-59 series.  The Garand is simple and tough, but by no means light.  Criticisms included the small magazine capacity (still larger than most personal weapons of the day), the inability to top off the rifle until it is completely empty, and the loud “clang” the weapon makes when the weapon empties and ejects the spent clip.  Other touches include a compartment in the stock, accessed through the butt, which is meant to hold a bottle of lubricating oil, a small grease pot, a pull-through tool for cleaning the barrel, and a two combination tools which performed six functions total (related to maintaining the rifle or clearing jams).  The Garand was produced by a large number of companies during World War 2, and later by the arms companies of several countries (both licensed and unlicensed). A common add-on modification was a muzzle device for the launching of old-style non-bullet-trap rifle grenades. The sights were surprisingly sophisticated, and finely-adjustable for elevation and windage using the rear sight. Though heavy, the Garand is very well-balanced.

     The New M-1 Garand is a faithful reproduction of the M-1 Garand rifle of World War 2 fame.  Many of the parts on the .30-06 models are in fact leftovers from unbuilt M-1s that have been packed in preservative all these years.  The stocks and barrels are always of new manufacture, and can fire old and new ammunition equally well.  Another version is converted to 7.62mm NATO.

 

Erquiaga Arms and the Erquiaga Tankers

     In the early-to-mid-1960s, Erquiaga Arms put out a line of shortened M-1 Garands. They made these by modifying existing Garands, building them new, or assembling them from parts never actually assembled during World War 2 or Korea.  The primary member of this line was the EMFA-62, with the ability to take a magazine and having a shortened 18.25” barrel.  A pepperpot-type muzzle brake is at the tip.  As with most civilian versions of military rifles, the EMFA-62 cannot take a bayonet.

    Eriquiaga Arms also made several iterations of it’s take on the “Tanker” Garand.  They did not have the ability of magazine feed, but were chambered for several different rounds.  A great deal of hand-fitting was involved in the production of Erquiga Arms’ rifles.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: CivGov issued a number of these to their levies and troops after the collapse of central authority in the US; these rifles were actually manufactured in Virginia instead of Massachusetts, and most of the CivGov New M-1s were chambered for 7.62mm NATO.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1 Garand

.30-06 Springfield

4.37 kg

8 Clip

$1238

New M-1 Garand

.30-06 Springfield

4.31 kg

8 Clip

$1238

New M-1 Garand

7.62mm NATO

4.31 kg

8 Clip

$1051

EMFA-62

7.62mm NATO

3.46 kg

10, 20

$1041

EMFA Tanker

.222 Remington Magnum

2.94 kg

8 Clip

$639

EMFA Tanker

.244 Remington

3.26 kg

8 Clip

$799

EMFA Tanker

.243 Winchester

3.18 kg

8 Clip

$755

EMFA Tanker

.257 Roberts

3.38 kg

8 Clip

$864

EMFA Tanker

.270 Winchester

3.69 kg

8 Clip

$1061

EMFA Tanker

.280 Remington

3.75 kg

8 Clip

$1101

EMFA Tanker

.284 Winchester

3.56 kg

8 Clip

$978

EMFA Tanker

7.62mm NATO

3.67 kg

8 Clip

$1042

EMFA Tanker

.30-06 Springfield

3.97 kg

8 Clip

$1230

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1 Garand

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

71

New M-1 Garand (.30-06)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

71

New M-1 Garand (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

81

EMFA-62

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

54

EMFA Tanker (.222 Magnum)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

6

2

Nil

55

EMFA Tanker (.244)

SA

3

2-Nil

6

2

Nil

41

EMFA Tanker (.243)

SA

3

2-Nil

6

2

Nil

45

EMFA Tanker (.257)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6

3

Nil

52

EMFA Tanker (.270)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

41

EMFA Tanker (.280)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

42

EMFA Tanker (.284)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

50

EMFA Tanker (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

54

EMFA Tanker (.30-06)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

47

 

Springfield M-1A

     Notes: This is basically a civilian model of the M-14 automatic battle rifle.  It is semiautomatic only, and comes in a variety of models with different barrel lengths.  Like the M-14, they are magazine fed instead of using the clips of the M-1 Garand.  Most versions of the M-1A differ only in barrel lengths, materials, and sight mounts; the Scout can mount the widest variety of accessories with its optional MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The SOCOM-16 is perhaps the most radical alteration; it has a chopped 16-inch barrel with a special muzzle brake, an enlarged military-aperture rear sight with MOA click adjustments for elevation and windage, a front sight with tritium insert, and a MIL-STD-1913 rail forward of the rear sight base.  The Springfield Squad Scout is a rifle developed for military and police use; it has an 18-inch barrel, beefy muzzle brake, and with other modifications necessary for the new barrel length.  It is equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail.

     While the SOCOM-16 is a good carbine-type M-1A, it does have some problems.  The forward position of the MIL-STD-1913 rail allowed optics to be mounted in a “Scout” type configuration, but was not a good position for telescopic or optical sights, and under sustained fire, the mounting block transferred heat directly to the rail and right to the optics, causing them to lose accuracy and zeroing.  It did not have the four-position MIL-STD-1913 rails that are becoming common (and useful) on modern SOPMOD-type weapons.  It had no folding stock.  Therefore, in 2005, the SOCOM II was designed to remedy these problems.  In addition to those improvements, the SOCOM II has a true pistol grip (with a compartment inside for small items), a single point sling, an actual pepperpot-type muzzle brake, and an adjustable cheekpiece for the collapsible stock (and the stock also has compartments for small items).  The result is a weapon similar to the US Navy SEALs’ Mk 14, Mod 0 EBR, but in a lighter package with a less complex stock. 

     McMillan makes a version of the M-1A that is very similar to the SOCOM II, but has several differences that give it more utility in some cases than the SOCOM II.  The MFS-14 uses a stock that is both sliding and folds to the left, and is also of a design where the sliding part is on a thick post while the buttstock is small and skeletonized.  The stock can also take a small vertical adjustment for use if the shooter is using optics or not. The buttstock also has a rubber recoil pad attached to it.  (Optionally, a simpler McMillan stock with adjustments for cheekpiece height, length of pull, and with a buttpad can be fitted.) The barrels may be 18 or 20 inches in length and its tipped with an M-14-type flash suppressor. They are hand-bedded and precision-fitted. The standard version is drilled and tapped for a scope mount atop the receiver; a handguard-length MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rail is located below the handguard, while two very short lengths of rail are on each side of the handguards at the front of the handguards.  The drilling and tapping can take a MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rail itself. The iron sights are standard M-14-type.  Most of the furniture other than the stock is polymer, including an ergonomic pistol grip. The trigger is two-stage.

     The McMillan M-3A is basically a souped-up version of the M-1A designed for the tactical sniper and designated marksman roles.  The M-3A, of course, features a McMillan synthetic stock (usually in olive drab), with an adjustable cheekpiece, butt adjustable to an extent for length of pull by spacers, and a recoil pad.  The stock is similar in profile to a standard M-1A stock, but a bit more ergonomic.  The M-3A has a full-length MIL-STD-1913 rail that extends from the back of the receiver to the front of the handguard, and a rail on either side of the handguard near the front, half the length of the handguard, that are slightly above the centerline of the handguard.  The 18-inch match-quality barrel is tipped by a slim-line muzzle brake, and the front and rear have flip-up iron sights for use in an emergency.  The cost of the M-3A below includes the cost of a telescopic sight.

     The primary difference between the SOCOM-16 and the SOCOM-16 CQB is in the furniture, but it’s not the only difference.  The SOCOM-16 CQB is sort of an enhanced M-1A.  The composite stock on the SOCOM-16 CQB is made by Archangel Manufacturing; it includes an AR-type buffer tube that allows the stock to be used by virtually any rifle type. The collapsible buttstock is five-position that also includes a cheekpiece that can be adjusted to two heights.  The pistol grip is based on that of the AK, and can be purchased separately.  It is hollow, giving space for batteries of cleaning supplies. On the fore-end is the M-LOK attachment system. This is a combination of negative space and Picatinny rails that allow the hard-mounting of larger accessories. The stock has one seven-slot rail and two three-slot rails, with the seven-slot rail on the bottom of the fore-end.  There is also a rail atop the receiver. The rear sight is a ghost ring aperture, and the front sight a tritium post. The CQB comes with a red-dot optic sight called the Vortex Venom. The 16.25-inch barrel is tipped with a beefy pepperpot-type muzzle brake. The butt has a recoil pad, but it’s kind of thin.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-1A Scout, Squad Scout, SOCOM-16, and SOCOM II, McMillan M-3A, and MFS-14 do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The others are common weapons issued to CivGov and MilGov forces alike.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is a common weapon of mercenary troops, particularly the full-sized M-1A and the M-1A Bush.  Most SOCOM IIs are made for semiautomatic fire only, but some police versions are made with automatic fire capability, and there are rumors of US military use of them.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1A

7.62mm NATO

4.33 kg

5, 10, 20

$1099

M-1A Bush

7.62mm NATO

4 kg

5, 10, 20

$1038

M-1A Bush Synthetic

7.62mm NATO

4 kg

5, 10, 20

$1052

M-1A National Match

7.62mm NATO

4.5 kg

5, 10, 20

$1098

M-1A National Match Government

7.62mm NATO

4.5 kg

5, 10, 20

$1628

M-1A Scout

7.62mm NATO

4.08 kg

5, 10, 20

$1052

SOCOM-16

7.62mm NATO

4.22 kg

5, 10, 20

$1032

Squad Scout

7.62mm NATO

4.22 kg

5, 10, 20

$1194

SOCOM II

7.62mm NATO

4.94 kg

5, 10, 20

$1063

MFS-14 (18” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

4.92 kg

5, 10, 20

$1047

MFS-14 (20” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

5 kg

5, 10, 20

$1070

McMillan M-3A

7.62mm NATO

4.39 kg

5, 10, 20

$1144

SOCOM-16 CQB

7.62mm NATO

4.22 kg

5, 10, 20

$1500

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1A

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

72

M-1A Bush

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

53

M-1A Bush Synthetic

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

53

M-1A National Match

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

M-1A National Match Government

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

97

M-1A Scout

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

53

SOCOM-16

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

Nil

44

Squad Scout

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

53

SOCOM II

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

6

44

MFS-14 (18” Barrel)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

3

Nil

54

MFS-14 (20” Barrel)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

3

Nil

64

McMillan M-3A

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

2

Nil

55

SOCOM-16 CQB

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

45

 

Springfield M-14

     Notes: In the early 1950s, NATO began to adopt a common cartridge for rifles and light machineguns, the 7.62mm NATO round.  Most of NATO decided to adopt the FN FAL or variants of it, but the Defense Department didn’t like the FAL, partially because it was “not invented here,” and partially because they though US designers could come up with something better.  Unfortunately because of politics and sheer government bumbling, an updated version of the M-1 Garand called the M-14 was selected for issue.  Though Springfield designed and originally was the sole producer of the M-14, several other manufacturers have since built the M-14, most notably Fulton Armory.  Production of the original M-14 stopped in 1964, as the US military transitioned to the M-16, but public demand led Springfield and Fulton to resume production of a version of the M-14 capable of only semiautomatic fire in 1974, and since then numerous variants have been built by a number of companies. Most US Navy ships carry several M-14s in their armories; these are used to shoot floating mines in the water to detonate them before they can hit the ship. (These are designated M-14 SMUDs, for Stand-off Munition Disruption). The 3rd Infantry Regiment (Old Guard) retain a number of immaculately-kept M-14s for ceremonial purposes; these weapons are typically well-polished, but still in working order (though they are not the weapons the Old Guard trains with when conducting tactical training).  In addition, the M-14 is still used by a number of ceremonial honor guard units, including the US Air Force (modified to disallow semiautomatic or automatic fire, as they are used for rifle salutes at funerals), US military academies, and various military colleges around the US.  These may or may not be in working order, but will always look great.  The M-21 sniper rifle and its more developed version, the M-25, are modified forms of the M-14. The M-1A is also a variant of the M-14.

     The M-14, as originally designed, differs from the M-1 Garand primarily in its caliber, automatic fire ability, larger magazine, and shorter gas cylinder and 22-inch barrel.  In addition, the M-14 had better chroming for the bore and chamber as well as a long flash suppressor at the muzzle.  The M-14, though accurate at long range, proved to be far too light for automatic fire, and in US Army and Marine use, they tended to be locked to disallow automatic fire.  A later variant of the M-14, the M-14A1, was weighted to be heavier, used a straight stock, and an integral bipod; though touted as a replacement for the M-14 and the BAR, it proved to still be too light as an automatic rifle, and too heavy as a personal weapon.  For a short time, it was used as a squad automatic weapon, but it too quickly passed from use by US troops.   

     Other modifications of the M-14 proved to be far more successful; the M-21 and M-25 sniper rifles are accurized and modified M-14s, and recent modifications have produced Designated Marksman Weapons for the USMC, US Army special operations, combat engineers, and Israeli forces.  Recent pictures taken in Afghanistan and Kosovo sometimes show US soldiers using the M-14, M-21, M-25, and various other modified M-14s.

     A fairly recent modification of the M-14 is Springfield’s M-14K.  This was essentially the first attempt at a carbine variant of the M-14 (many others have been produced since its introduction in the late 1980s).  It is externally virtually identical to a standard M-14, but instead of a 22-inch barrel, it uses a 16-inch or 13.3-inch barrel.  The standard rate of fire of an M-14 is 750 rounds per minute; the M-14K uses a modified gas system from the M-60 machinegun and thus has a rate of fire reduced to about 600 rpm.  (This unfortunately has no real effect by the Twilight 2000 v2.2 rules.) 

     The US Navy SEALs and Marine Recon units discovered in Afghanistan that they needed a rifle with more punch and range then the M-16/M-4 series with which they were largely armed.  This led, in part, to the development of the SCAR, but the SEALs decided they needed such a weapon right away instead of waiting the years it would take to develop the SCAR; the SEALs were already using the M-14 for such purposes, but they weren’t happy with it.  The M-14 series was essentially obsolete, being large, heavy, and unable to use the large range of optics and accessories developed since the M-14’s inception.  NSWC Crane therefore came up with the Mk 14, Mod 0 EBR (Enhanced Battle Rifle).  This version of the M-14, at first glance, is barely recognizable as an M-14 variant.  The EBR has its wooden furniture replaced with the Sage International Stock System; this stock is built of lightweight aircraft-grade aluminum alloy, and incorporates a collapsible stock, four-position MIL-STD-1913 rails around the handguard, a polymer pistol grip, a forward handgrip, and in addition allows the 18.5-inch barrel to free-float.  The front of the handguard has a mount for bipods of various makes.  The stock also allows the receiver to sit lower, facilitating aiming from any position, and provides a straight in-line configuration.  The receiver also has a fifth MIL-STD-1913 rail on top.  The barrel is tipped with a Vortex muzzle brake, with the front sight moved to gas cylinder lock ring.  The buttplate has a thick rubber cushion to further cut felt recoil.  The M-14’s standard bolt stop (which, like most modern semiautomatic and automatic weapons, holds the bolt open when the magazine is empty), has been replaced with a “slap” type paddle, like that of the M-16 series, making reloading just a bit faster.  A civilian/police version of the EBR is also manufactured (by Fulton Armory); this version is identical to the EBR except that it is capable only of semiautomatic fire.

     Today, the M-14 is again being issued, usually in a heavily-reworked form as an SDM (Squad Designated Marksman) rifle.  This need was made obvious by the much longer engagement ranges found in the Afghanistan theater of operations.  Though the SDM version is not up to the standards of the M-21 sniper version of the M-14, virtually all that remains of the original M-14 in most cases is the action, and the barrel itself being retained depending upon its condition.  The SDM version is first accurized, with the action being tuned and the trigger group being either tuned or replaced by a more precise trigger group.  Again, depending upon the condition of the barrel, the barrel may be replaced by one which is better-made, and the barrel is usually bedded in a free-floating manner.  Alternately, a 22-inch or 18-inch match-quality heavy barrel may be used. Muzzle brakes on the match-quality barrels may be removed and replaced by suppressors. The stock is totally replaced by a synthetic stock system, usually made by McMillan or Vltor, which has a MIL-STD-1913 rail ahead of the action and three sets of short MIL-STD-1913 rails at the front of the handguards.  The buttstock is sliding and adjustable for length of pull and cheek height, as well as having a padded butt.  The lower MIL-STD-1913 rail usually has a folding light alloy bipod adjustable for height and cant; the lower MIL-STD-1913 rail is longer than those on the sides of the handguard, and a vertical foregrip behind the bipod is a common add-on accessory. The standard M-14 iron sights are retained.  The receiver is typically topped by a scope of moderate power, generally adjustable and in the neighborhood of 3-6x.

     The US Marines use a rifle with a similar function, called the M-14 DMR (Designated Marksman Rifle).  This version is equipped with a McMillan Tactical M2A fiberglass stock, which has a true pistol grip and a buttstock with an adjustable cheekpiece.  The M-14 DMR uses a 22-inch match-grade Krieger or Rock Creek barrel, tipped with the OPS muzzle brake; this may be removed and replaced with an OPS 12th-Model suppressor.  The M-14 DMR has a MIL-STD-1913 rail mounted over the action, normally topped with an Unertl 10x scope (the same as used on the M-40 series), a Leupold Mark 4 TS-30.xx 12x scope, or one of several night vision scopes.  Under the handguard at the front is a Harris S-L bipod adjustable for height and cant. The Marines are currently in the process of replacing the M-14 DMR with the M-39 Enhanced Marksman Rifle (EMR), which is essentially a Marine version of the M14 Mod 0 EBR, though equipped with the barrel of the M-14 DMR and the addition of the Harris bipod. The M-39 has been lightened considerably over the M-14 DMR.

     The US Coast Guard uses a version of the M-14, the M-14 Tactical, which is equipped with the same stock as on the Mk 14 Mod 0 EBR, a 22-inch match-quality barrel, and a Smith Enterprise Muzzle Brake.

     The AWC Systems Technology G2 is a bullpup sniper version of the M-14.  The G2 is used by several unnamed US government agencies, and is equipped with the synthetic bullpup stock made by McMillan specially for this rifle, a heavy stainless steel 16-inch Krieger match-quality barrel tipped by a flash suppressor, and a special scope mount above the action above the pistol grip and trigger, designed not only to cope with the need for a raised optics mount, but for the harsh conditions in which the rifle is expected to be used.  Some G2s are equipped with MIL-STD-1913 rails instead of this special scope mount, though optics are still mounted on a raised mount that attaches to the rail. The flash suppressor can be removed and replaced with a suppressor. Less than 100 of these rifles were built, and only one of them was built with automatic fire capability (designated the G2FA); deliveries are believed to be complete.  Since a full-auto version exists, stats are given below for a Burst recoil factor. The stock and receiver are inside a tough polymer material. Mystery still shrouds the G2, and the weight given below is an estimate.

     Other than the US, M-14s were used by Israel, Taiwan, and South Korea, and in some cases, still are.  Like the M-16, examples of the M-14 captured in Vietnam have found their way around the world, most notably in Central America in Sandinista hands.  In 2001, some 40,000 M-14s were given to Lithuania by the US; rumors say this was in return for certain intelligence activities.  They were also very successful on the civilian market.  The M-14K was reportedly tested by US, Israeli, and some other countries’ military forces; though there are rumors of limited combat use by special ops units, they are not officially being used by any country.  They are somewhat popular among civilians, though. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-14 became a widely issued weapon again during the Twilight War; in addition to certain applications by special operations forces, the M-14 was issued out to both MilGov and CivGov militia units, and issued as a personal weapon to some military units raised late in the war.  South Korea and Taiwan also issued M-14s to civilians and military alike, and the Israelis converted a lot of theirs to sniper and DMR rifles.  The EBR is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-14

7.62mm NATO

5.08 kg

20

$1046

M-14A1

7.62mm NATO

6.64 kg

20

$1562

M-14K (16” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.74 kg

5, 20

$1054

M-14K (13.3” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.59 kg

5, 20

$1024

Mk 14 Mod 0 EBR

7.62mm NATO

4.73 kg

20

$1246

M-14 SDM (18” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

6.54 kg

20

$1829

M-14 SDM (22” Standard Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

6.8 kg

20

$1951

M-14 SDM (22” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

6.8 kg

20

$1961

M-14 DMR

7.62mm NATO

4.99 kg

20

$1857

M-39 EMR

7.62mm NATO

3.4 kg

20

$1884

M-14 Tactical

7.62mm NATO

4.91 kg

20

 

AWC G2

7.62mm NATO

3.73 kg

5, 10, 20

$1193

Suppressor for M-14 Series

N/A

3.4 kg

N/A

$685

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-14

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

8

72

M-14A1

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

8

72

With Bipod

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

4

93

M-14K (16”)

5

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

8

44

M-14K (13.3”)

5

4

2-Nil

6

3

8

33

Mk 14 Mod 0 EBR

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

2

6

57

M-14 SDM (18”)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

2

Nil

57

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

1

Nil

74

M-14 SDM (18”, Silenced)

SA

3

1-Nil

7/9

1

Nil

33

With Bipod

SA

3

1-Nil

7/9

1

Nil

43

M-14 SDM (22” Standard)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

75

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

98

M-14 SDM (22” Match)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

77

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

100

M-14 SDM (22” Match, Silenced)

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

1

Nil

38

With Bipod

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

1

Nil

50

M-14 DMR

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

77

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

100

M-14 DMR (Silenced)

SA

3

1-Nil

9

2

Nil

50

With Bipod

SA

3

1-Nil

9

1

Nil

62

M-39 EMR

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

3

Nil

77

With Bipod

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

100

M-39 EMR (Silenced)

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

2

Nil

46

With Bipod

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

1

Nil

50

M-14 Tactical

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

6

62

AWC G2

5

4

2-3-Nil

5

4

9

43

AWC G2 (Silenced)

5

3

1-Nil

7

2

4

26

 

Springfield M-1903

     Notes:  When smokeless powder was introduced at the turn of the century, the US Army adopted the Krag-Jorgensen.  It soon proved to be a bust as a service rifle, and despite vast sums of money poured into its acquisition and development, it was unceremoniously dropped a few years later.  A Mauser-action type weapon was adopted, and a modified Krag bullet known as the .30 Caliber M1903 Springfield was designed to be fired from it.  (This is what I am calling in these pages the .30-06 Springfield, since the flat-nosed M1903 bullet was replaced by a round-tipped bullet in 1906.)  There were 6 major versions of the M-1903.

     The immediate ancestor of the M-1903 was the M-1901; it was regarded as an experimental design, and produced on the same production line as the Krag.  Though some 5000 M-1901’s were ordered from the War Department, only 100 were actually built, since it was realized that building the M-1901 and the Krag on the same production line was essentially untenable.  The M-1901 was chambered for what was then an experimental new cartridge (the .30-03), and used a modified Mauser action.  They used a 30-inch barrel with a rod-type bayonet, and were fed by internal magazines which could be loaded with a stripper clip or individually.  They used tangent-leaf rear sights and blade front sights.

     The original M-1903 was designed for the M-1903 bullet and was a conventional Mauser-action rifle, though a bit shorter in the barrel than most Mauser designs of the time.  It has a standard hunting stock with no grip.  They were essentially M-1901s with the barrel reduced to 24 inches and the sights adjusted accordingly, along with a change in the lug for the bayonet and improvements in the action.  The bayonet was later replaced with a sword-type bayonet in 1905, with an appropriately-modified lug.  About a month later, the rear sight was modified; though it was still a tangent-leaf design, it was re-graduated out to 2400 yards, and the sights were given protective ears.  In 1906, the M-1903 rifle was rechambered for the new .30-06 bullet, along with another modification of the rear sights.  In 1910, a flute was cut into the top of the receiver and barrel shroud to improve the sight line.  In 1918, special heat treatment was given during production to the receiver and action to further improve reliability.  In 1928, the receiver composition was changed to nickel-steel.  All these are identical for game purposes, with the exception of early M-1903’s firing the .30-03 round.

      The M-1903 was partially-replaced in late 1919 with the M-1903A1, which merely replaced the stock with one that had a semi-pistol grip.  The M-1903A1 was not produced in quantity, since the War Department already had a great surplus of straight-wristed stocks. For game purposes, the M-1903A1 is otherwise identical to late-model M-1903s.

     The M-1903A2 was not really a rifle in the normal sense; instead, it was designed to be fitted into the breeches of artillery pieces to allow for low-cost training.

     The M-1903A3 was introduced as an emergency measure to provide arms for World War 2; the primary changes were ones that facilitated mass production, such as some sheet-metal stampings and the replacement of the graduated sight by a simple aperture sight.  In addition, the M-1903A3 returned to the straight-wristed stock, which was also easier to produce.  At first, the recoil bolts were replaced with pins, but this led to a marked decrease in reliability and bolt were quickly returned to.  The bolt lug was changed to allow it to use the bayonet of the M-1 Garand.  Amazingly enough, the M-1903A3 was in production until 1944.

     The M-1903A4 was a sniper rifle based on the M-1903 used by the US Marines as late as Vietnam.  They were generally reworked from the best-behaved rifles off of the production line, and fitted with a scope mount.  They had backup aperture-type sights sights, but were primarily designed to be fitted with a Redfield Model 330C 2.5x scope.  These versions used pistol-grip wrists and a bent-down bolt handle in order to not interfere with the scope; some had bayonet lugs, and some were produced without them at the request of snipers.

     As I said, there were 6 major versions.  The M-1903 Mark I was an experimental “trench broom” weapon.  It was modified to accept the “Pederson Device,” allowing the bolt-action M-1903 to be converted to automatic fire.  Though over 100,000 of these weapons were built, they proved to be unwieldy and fragile in tests.  The were mostly converted back to the original M-1903 specifications; unfortunately, the ejection port could not be filled properly, and since the whole project was classified until after World War 2, many troops were puzzled by the holes in the receivers of their weapons.  It is doubtful many of these weapons still exist, but they are presented here as an interesting “what-if.”

     The M-1903 (Modified) was a version built by Remington for the British early in World War 2 to augment their supply of Enfield rifles.  Production was slow, partially due to worn-out tooling provided by the War Department (which quickly had to be replaced), and partially due to US Government interference, as Roosevelt did not want the US to be seen to be too-overtly aiding the British early in the war (before the US officially entered the war).  The primary difference was a re-chambering to .303 British, but the gas escape hole on the right side was omitted, and the rear sight was also modified.  The finger grooves on the fore-end were also omitted, and a few stamped and welded parts were also included to speed production (mostly on non-working parts including the magazine floorplate, trigger guard, sling swivels, barrel bands, and magazine follower).  About 365,000 were produced by 1942, when production ended.

     The M-1903 Air Service Rifle is an ultra-rare variant of the M-1903, with only 910 converted from standard M-1903s, and most converted back to standard M-1903s or destroyed after World War 1.  Some lingered for a while in government armories, but today, they are so rare that IRL, one could buy a decent car with the price.  This variant was designed for use by the back seater in aircraft, or from dirigibles.  The US did not employ any dirigibles in World War 1, and back seaters were primarily armed with machineguns.  No Air Service Rifles were actually used in their intended role, and none were used in the alternate role of armament for downed pilots. They appear to never have been issued, either, and used only in testing.  The reason for this is unknown. The Air Service Rifle differed primarily in being fed by a large magazine extension instead of the internal-only magazine of other M-1903s.  (Note that it is not a detachable box magazine, and it is still clip-fed. Other differences included a change in sights to better suit aerial use.  The stock was cut down to better be used by aerial gunners and to fit inside the confines of aircraft easier.  Other than noted below, the Air Service Rifles is identical for game purposes to the standard M-1903.

     Numerous civilian versions have been built over the years (mostly conforming to the various models of the M-1903, and differing only in finishes, markings, production methods, sights, etc.  These are identical to the various models of the M-1903 for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1901

.30-03 Springfield

4.07 kg

5 Clip

$1789

M-1903 (Early)

.30-03 Springfield

3.86 kg

5 Clip

$1728

M-1903 (Standard)

.30-06 Springfield

3.86 kg

5 Clip

$1730

M-1903A1

.30-06 Springfield

3.64 kg

5 Clip

$1728

M-1903A3

.30-06 Springfield

3.36 kg

5 Clip

$1736

M-1903 Mark 1

.30 Pederson

4.1 kg

40

$1108

M-1903 (Modified)

.303 British

3.26 kg

5 Clip

$1475

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1901

BA

5

2-3-Nil

9

4

Nil

98

M-1903 (Early)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

71

M-1903 (Standard)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

79

M-1903A1

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

78

M-1909A3

BA

4

2-Nil

7

5

Nil

78

M-1903 Mark 1

SA

4

2-Nil

7

4

Nil

64

M-1903 (Modified)

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

5

Nil

90

 

Stoner SR-25

     Notes: This is basically an AR-15 rechambered for 7.62mm NATO and with the carrying handle replaced by a Picatinny Rail and the normal barrel mounting replaced with one offering a floating barrel.  There are several variants, including the base weapon, two match versions for sharpshooters, a carbine, a “Sporter” version meant for civilians, and a short assault rifle version.  The two match versions are furnished with a 6x telescopic sight.  These weapons have been showing up in military hands more and more lately, often in a highly modified form, in pictures taken in Afghanistan.

     After extensive use in Afghanistan and Iraq by US Navy SEALs, the SR-25 was modified by Knight Armament Corporation (who had inherited the design of the SR-25), and it became the Mark 11 Mod 0 Rifle.  This is an enhanced version of the SR-25, and is designed for the spotter of a sniper team.  The Mark 11 Mod 0 is covered under the Knight Armament Corporation Mk 11 Mod 0/M-110 entry in US Sniper Rifles G-L.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: In the Twilight 2000 world, these weapons were most popular in civilian hands; military versions were provided primarily to government militia sniper teams. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: The SR-25 series is popular among civilians, mercenaries, military, and criminals alike.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SR-25 Standard

7.62mm NATO

4.58 kg

5, 10, 20

$1024

SR-25 Match

7.62mm NATO

4.87 kg

5, 10, 20

$1825

SR-25 Lightweight Match

7.62mm NATO

4.3 kg

5, 10, 20

$1732

SR-25 Carbine

7.62mm NATO

3.515 kg

5, 10, 20

$983

SR-25 Sporter

7.62mm NATO

3.97 kg

5, 10, 20

$1024

SR-25K Assault Rifle

7.62mm NATO

3.85 kg

5, 10, 20

$1023

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SR-25 Standard

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

62

SR-25 Match

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

Nil

96

SR-25 Match (Bipod)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

121

SR-25 Lightweight Match

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

82

SR-25 Lightweight Match (Bipod)

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

102

SR-25 Carbine

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

4

Nil

44

SR-25 Sporter

SA

4

2-3-Nil

6

4

Nil

62

SR-25K Assault Rifle

3

4

2-3-Nil

4/6

4

5

48

 

Teppo Jutsu Spectre

     Notes: The Spectre is an AR-based rifle that was designed specifically to fire Teppo Jutsu’s new round, the .338 Spectre.  At the same time, they wanted a rifle capable of firing less exotic rounds, to make Teppo Jutsu’s new rifle more attractive to civilians.  Ballistics are similar to the .357 Maximum at short range, but the .338 Spectre offers longer ranges.  The round’s length has been compared to the 7.62mm Kalashnikov round and the 5.56mm NATO round; it also (accidentally) bears a resemblance to the Russian 9mm SP5/SP6/PAB-9 rounds.   AR-15/M-16 non-exotic magazines can accept the .338 Spectre, but the capacity will be smaller than that of the normal AR-15/M-16’s magazine would allow.  The Spectre can also accept 7.62mm Kalashnikov magazines, and they will accept .338 Spectre rounds with no deficit. The Spectre can also fire 6.8mm SPC rounds, but on the Spectre these feed from proprietary magazines.  A shooter can place the Spectre’s upper receiver unit on any AR-15/M-16/M-4 lower receiver unit, insert the appropriate magazine, and the Spectre can then fire whatever round is fed to it.  This also offers the option of switching uppers, magazines, and calibers as battlefield needs change.

     Though the Spectre was designed to allow a high degree of customization by the buyer, the standard Spectre shown on their site is equipped with a Magpul PRS adjustable stock, which is adjustable for cheek height, length of pull, and angle of the buttplate. It has a LaRue MIL-STD-1913 rail that extends from the rear of the receiver to the gas block.

     The barrel is 16 inches long and normally tipped by a threaded flash suppressor similar to that of the M-16A2, but slightly larger.  However, this flash suppressor may be removed and replaced by a silencer/suppressor of the user’s choice (Teppo Jutsu recommends one designed for a 9mm/.35 caliber round.  The barrel has a medium profile, but is otherwise standard.  It is not known if any military versions are planned.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Spectre is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Spectre

.338 Spectre

4 kg

5, 10, 20, 25, 30, 40, 75D

$1673

Spectre

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.73 kg

10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$1452

Spectre

6.8mm SPC

3.51 kg

5, 10, 25

$1284

Spectre Silencer

N/A

2.2 kg

N/A

$675

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Spectre (.338)

SA

4

1-2-3

4/6

4

Nil

54

With Silencer

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8/10

3

Nil

45

With Silencer and Subsonic Rounds

SA

3

1-2-Nil

8/10

2

Nil

33

Spectre (7.62mm)

SA

4

2-Nil

4/6

4

Nil

45

With Silencer

SA

4

2-3-Nil

8/10

3

Nil

38

With Silencer and Subsonic Rounds

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

2

Nil

28

Spectre (6.8mm)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

54

With Silencer

SA

3

1-Nil

8/10

2

Nil

45

With Silencer and Subsonic Rounds

SA

3

1-Nil

7/9

2

Nil

33

 

Thunder Sabre

     Notes: This is essentially an AR-15A2 fitted with a new upper receiver designed to fire a much larger round than normal, and a modified folding stock of a different type than normally fitted to an M-16/M-4 series weapon.  The Thunder Sabre fires what amounts to a scaled-up version of the .50 Action Express round.  The handguards are similar to longer versions of those fitted to the M-16K, and the upper receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail instead of a carrying handle.  The Thunder Sabre is fed from a modified AR-15/M-16 magazine.  A peculiarity of the Thunder Sabre is that the bolt must be locked to the rear before a magazine can be locked in place. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Thunder Sabre

.502 Thunder Sabre

3.63 kg

4, 9

$513

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Thunder Sabre

5

5

1-2-Nil

4/5

3

7

46

 

Tromix Jackhammer

     Notes: Though the price given here is for a complete weapon, the Jackhammer was not normally sold as such; when you ordered the weapon from Tromix, generally what you got was a complete upper receiver/barrel combination, which could be fitted to an existing M-16 series, AR-15 series, or M-4 series lower receiver/stock combination to produce a complete weapon.  The Jackhammer was designed to produce a harder-hitting version of the M-16 or AR-15, generally for use by police SRT and special operations units in close-assault situations or in a situation where heavy body armor needed to be penetrated.  The barrel is a short 12.25 inches. There were two versions of the Jackhammer, one based on the proprietary .458 SOCOM round when high damaging potential was needed, and one based on the .440 Cor-Bon round when more controllability and better penetration is needed.  The following weights are based on an M-4 series lower receiver. 

     Before settling on .440 CorBon and .458 SOCOM, Tromix also produced a small amount of some other chamberings for the Jackhammer.  I thought it would be interesting to stat those out as well, for general interest.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is a rare weapon, since it was introduced so late.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This weapon has seen a lot of experimentation by civilians, military, and police. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Jackhammer

.458 SOCOM

3.22 kg

7, 10, 15

$1975

Jackhammer

.440 CorBon

3.26 kg

7, 10, 15

$1167

Jackhammer

.357 AutoMag

2.56 kg

7, 10, 15

$329

Jackhammer

.44 AutoMag

2.76 kg

7, 10, 15

$397

Jackhammer

.44 Magnum

2.75 kg

7, 10, 15

$396

Jackhammer

.475 Tremor

3.86 kg

7, 10, 15

$2273

Jackhammer

.50 Action Express

2.98 kg

7, 10, 15

$474

Parts Kit (.458 SOCOM)

N/A

1.73 kg

N/A

$1042

Parts Kit (.440 CorBon)

N/A

1.71 kg

N/A

$565

Parts Kit (.357 AutoMag)

N/A

1.38 kg

N/A

$178

Parts Kit (.44 AutoMag)

N/A

1.49 kg

N/A

$212

Parts Kit (.44 Magnum)

N/A

1.49 kg

N/A

$210

Parts Kit (.475 Tremor)

N/A

2.08 kg

N/A

$1228

Parts Kit (.50 Action Express)

N/A

1.61 kg

N/A

$252

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Jackhammer (.458 SOCOM)

3 or 5

5

2-4-Nil

4/5

5

8 or 13

29

Jackhammer (.440 Cor-Bon)

3 or 5

4

1-2-3

4/5

4

6 or 11

30

Jackhammer (.357 AutoMag)

3 or 5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4 or 6

30

Jackhammer (.44 AutoMag)

3 or 5

4

1-Nil

4/5

3

3 or 7

30

Jackhammer (.44 Magnum)

3 or 5

4

1-Nil

4/5

3

4 or 7

30

Jackhammer (.475 Tremor)

3 or 5

6

2-4-Nil

4/5

4

6 or 11

29

Jackhammer (.50 Action Express)

3 or 5

5

1-2-Nil

4/5

3

4 or 7

30

 

Tromix Sledgehammer

     Notes: Similar in concept to the Jackhammer, the Sledgehammer is based on a standard AR-10 lower receiver and a new upper receiver designed for a new round designed by Tromix, the .510 Phalanx.  This round causes a lot of damage, but extracts a large toll on the user in the form of fatigue and controllability. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon is even rarer than the Jackhammer, and its ammunition even more rare.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This weapon is also being experimented with by military and police forces. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Sledgehammer

.510 Phalanx

5.2 kg

6, 12, 18

$2866

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Sledgehammer

5

7

2-4-6*

6

4

9

60

*A SLAP version of the .510 Phalanx round is available; this has a penetration of 1-3-5.

 

Wilson Combat BILLet-AR Lightweight

     Notes: This AR-10 clone was personally designed by Bill Wilson, and features receivers CNC-machined from aluminum billets, producing a strong yet lightweight receiver set. Bill Wilson is known for his customized 1911-type pistols, and now he has turned his talents towards the ARs.

     The magazine well has recesses on both sides, for the purposes of lightening. The magazine well is beveled and flared. The magazine release and bolt stop, on the other hand, have raised portions around them to prevent inadvertent button presses.  The receiver halves have been dehorned as much as possible. The bolt and bolt carrier group are coated in Robar NP3 for slickness and reliability.  They are designed to be rigid and have almost no play and flex. The receiver halves and handguards are black hardcoat anodized, and the steel has an ArmorTuff Finish.  Finish colors also include Flat Dark Earth and OD Green.

     The 16.25-inch barrel is heavy and fluted and is free-floating and match-quality. It is tipped by Wilson’s Whisper flash suppressor, but this may be readily changed out for a different muzzle device.  Other barrel lengths are available: a 14.75-inch SBR and an 18-inch and 20-inch Recon-profile barrels with Atlas bipods underneath.  The gas system is low-profile. The trigger guard is integral to the lower receiver and is enlarged for gloves.  The rifle has a Wilson Combat Tactical Trigger Unit that is one-stage, but is match-quality and has a pull weight of 3.63 pounds with minimal overtravel. The BILLet-AR has no forward assist, but does have a shell deflector.

     The Super Sniper is essentially the same as the 20-inch barrel Recon but is additionally equipped with a telescopic optic, and is available with fluted or unfluted heavy barrels.  Barrels are all hand-fitted and the rifle is “shot in” before leaving the factory.  For game purposes, it is a Sniper Rifle, though it is included here for completeness.

     The rifle comes with a Bravo Company Gunfighter pistol grip.  The stock is a Wilson/Rogers Super-Stoc sliding stock. The Super-Stoc features a cam-locking system that removes any play from the sliding stock. The Wilson Tactical Rail Interface Modular (TRIM), floats for barrel and is made from 6061-T6 aluminum extrusions.  It comes only with the upper handguard/receiver Picatinny Rail, but has attaching holes at 3, 6, and 9 o’clock for the attachment of more rails if desired. The handguards also have ample cooling holes. The rails have Wilson BUIS when shipped. The rear sight has a CSAT aperture and is folding and adjustable. The front sight is also folding, is a standard, adjustable post, and A2 wings.

     The BILLet-AR is hand-inspected and fitted if necessary.

     The BILLet-AR can take most AR-10, SR-25, and polymer magazines, but ships with a Lancer 10-round magazine.

     Complaints about the BILLet-AR seem to center around the bolt catch not actually catching, especially when the rifle is dirty.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BILLet-AR (14.75” Barrel)

7.62mm NATO

3.2 kg