Finnish Nagants

Notes: As Finland was a part of Russia until the Russian Revolution of 1917, the Finns inherited a large number of Mosin-Nagant rifles from the Russians. As time went on, they continued to produce the Mosin-Nagant, and in fact were still making them as civilian rifles until well after World War 2. (Older former-military rifles were also common on the war surplus market.) It is generally agreed by most arms experts that the Finnish-made Mosin-Nagants were superior to their Russian counterparts, especially those produced in the 1920s and later, being built with better materials, better barrels, and in general not in such a cheap manner as Russian Mosin-Nagants.

The first Finnish variation of the Mosin-Nagant was domestically-produced version of the M-1891; it is essentially identical (for game purposes) as the Russian Mosin-Nagant, except that the sights were graduated in meters, the trigger had a two-stage pull (effectively giving it a set-trigger function), and had sling swivels as standard equipment. They also produced a domestic version of the M-1891 Dragoon, also identical (again, for game purposes) except for having the improvements listed above, except for a side-mounted sling adopted from the German Mauser K-98 rifle.

The M-24 (sometimes referred to as the M-1891/24), was an odd version of the Mosin-Nagant, primarily distinguishable by its Swiss or German-made barrel (complete with the Swiss or German company name stamped on the right side of the barrel). This barrel has a step rather than a continuous taper. The M-24 also has a reconditioned action cannibalized from scrapped weapons. The barrel is also a floating barrel, lending greater accuracy. Most of these rifles were built for the 7.62mm Nagant cartridge, but a very few were also chambered for the 8mm Mauser cartridge. Barrel length was 32 inches. Most of these rifles were issued to Finlandís Civil Guard Infantry units. An M-24 Carbine was also produced, with a short 24-inch barrel; however, it is estimated that only about 650 of these carbines were actually made, all chambered for 7.62mm Nagant.

The Army also got a shorter version of the M-24, called the M-27 Short Rifle. This version used a 27-inch barrel, and had a full-stocked Mannlicher-type stock, and used a fully-adjustable leaf-type rear sight, as well as a protected blade front sight. Early models were modified M-1891 stocks, but soon purpose-designed stocks were devised. The bolt-handle was also turned down. Many M-1891 rifles were also modified to this standard; these were called the M-27/1891-30. A Cavalry Carbine variant was also produced, generally similar to the standard M-27; however, the Cavalry Carbine used a 24-inch barrel with appropriately-calibrated sights and a side-mounted sling.

The M-39 Short Rifle is widely regarded as the best version of the Mosin-Nagant rifle ever built; it is a Finnish version of the Russian M-1891/30. It is also, unfortunately, one of the rarest Mosin-Nagants. Original Finnish Nagants were simply captured Russian weapons; however, the Finns quickly began making their own copies, which were better in quality than the Russian examples. They remained in service for nearly half a century. Differences between these Finnish and Russian Nagants include a stock made of better quality wood and with a higher comb, a slightly larger bore diameter (the Russians never figured out that their ammunition was slightly too large), a wider sling, a different bayonet (similar to a Bowie knife in design), and a different front sight.

Twilight 2000 Notes: M-39s were pulled back out of storage, and put into action as ersatz sniper rifles. Other versions of the Finnish Nagant were used by civilians (rather enthusiastically) against all comers; these often were equipped with more modern sights and sight mounts, and even bipods.

Merc 2000 Notes: The price of one of these rifles can fetch a pretty good sum in the West. (Thatís true even in real life.)

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-1891

7.62mm Nagant

4.43 kg

5 Clip

$1600

M-24

7.62mm Nagant

4.2 kg

5 Clip

$1615

M-24

8mm Mauser

4.4 kg

5 Clip

$1808

M-24 Carbine

7.62mm Nagant

4.09 kg

5 Clip

$1531

M-27

7.62mm Nagant

4.11 kg

5 Clip

$1562

M-27 Cavalry Carbine

7.62mm Nagant

3.98 kg

5 Clip

$1531

M-39

7.62mm Nagant

4.3 kg

5 Clip

$1562

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-1891

BA

5

2-3-Nil

9

4

Nil

124

M-24 (7.62mm)

BA

5

2-3-Nil

9

4

Nil

130

M-24 (8mm)

BA

5

2-4-Nil

9

5

Nil

134

M-24 Carbine

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

94

M-27

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

109

M-27 Cavalry Carbine

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

94

M-39

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

109

 

M-24

Notes: This odd version of the Mosin-Nagant is primarily distinguishable by its Swiss-made barrel (complete with the company name, Schweizerische Industrie-Gesellschaft stamped on the right side of the barrel). This barrel has a step rather than a continuous taper. The M-24 also has a reconditioned action cannibalized from scrapped weapons. The barrel is also a floating barrel, lending greater accuracy.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-24

7.62mm Nagant

4.2 kg

5 Clip

$1638

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-24

BA

5

2-3-Nil

10

4

Nil

140

M-27

Notes: This is a shorter version of the M-24. The nose cap of the stock was hinged, underneath which was a bayonet lug. The sights were changed to reflect the shorter barrel length, and the bolt handle was turned down. A variant was the M-27 Cavalry Rifle, shorter and lighter than the standard M-27.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-27

7.62mm Nagant

4.11 kg

5 Clip

$1552

M-27 Cavalry Rifle

7.62mm Nagant

3.98 kg

5 Clip

$1535

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-27

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

105

M-27 Cavalry Rifle

BA

4

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

96

M-39

Notes: This Finnish copy of the Mosin-Nagant M-1939 is widely regarded as the best version of the Mosin-Nagant rifle ever built. It is also, unfortunately, one of the rarest Mosin-Nagants. Original Finnish Nagants were simply captured Russian weapons; however, the Finns quickly began making their own copies, which were better in quality than the Russian examples. They remained in service for nearly half a century. Differences between Finnish and Russian Nagants include a stock made of better quality wood and with a higher comb, a slightly larger bore diameter (the Russians never figured out that their ammunition was slightly too large), a wider sling, a different bayonet (similar to a Bowie knife in design), and a different front sight.

Twilight 2000 Notes: These weapons were pulled back out of storage, and put into action as ersatz sniper rifles.

Merc 2000 Notes: The price of one of these rifles can fetch a pretty good sum in the West.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-39

7.62mm Nagant

4.3 kg

5 Clip

$1403

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-39

BA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

106