C-1A1

Notes: This Canadian variant of the British L-1A1 improves on that model, solving the "bang-bang-jam" problem of the British weapon by replacing the long firing pin that tended to bend with a two-part pin made of stronger metal. This also solved the problem of the weapon firing before the breech closes. A carrying handle is added, and it can be reloaded by reloading the magazine or from the top via chargers. In general, the C-1A1 is stronger and made of better materials than its British counterpart. By 2000, the C-1A1 was largely in reserve use.

Twilight 2000 Notes: Many units mobilized later in the war as well as the Native Canadian Rangers were heavy users of the C-1A1, and it was sometimes used by snipers (with the addition of a bipod and scope).

Merc 2000 Notes: Most C-1A1s were put into storage for a rainy day; however, some Canadian units made a lot of use of the C-1A1, as they were used to supplement the C-7s and C-8s when a harder punch or longer range shooting were required.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

C-1A1

7.62mm NATO

4.25 kg

20

$1046

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

C-1A1

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

67

C-2A1

Notes: This is modified C-1A1; the C-2A1 has the capacity for automatic fire, uses a heavier barrel with a bipod, and can be further distinguished from the C-1A1 by the uncovered gas cylinder over the forward grip (done to increase cooling when used for sustained fire). The C-2A1 is also able to use an extended 30-round magazine designed for it. The C-2A1 was the standard Squad Automatic Weapon in Canadian forces until the introduction of the C-7 LSW and the Minimi.

Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon was issued out to units mobilized late in the Twilight War, and to the Native Canadian Rangers, in the same manner as the C-1A1.

Merc 2000 Notes: Like the C-1A1, these weapons were placed into long-term storage; unlike the C-1A1, they almost always stayed there.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

C-2A1

7.62mm NATO

6.93 kg

20, 30

$1593

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

C-2A1

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

8

74

C-2A1 (Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

4

97

Ross

Notes: This is a Mannlicher Straight-Pull rifle modified by Sir Charles Ross’ somewhat screwy designs methods and imagination. The bolt handle is not directly connected to the bolt; instead, it is connected to a sleeve, which is what actually draws the bolt back. This may seem like merely an unnecessary complication, but it is more dangerous than that; if the bolt and sleeve are put together the wrong way (which is too easy for green troops), it will close without locking, and the bolt will then fly back upon firing, striking the shooter’s head with normally fatal results. (A good way to tell if the bolt is put together wrong is that if it cycles easily, you did it wrong.)

The bolt/sleeve combination has another problem; it doesn’t suffer dirt well. The bolt/sleeve combination also wears out too fast; after a while, it gets close to impossible to cycle the bolt. Sir Charles Ross was constantly tinkering with the design, and some authorities estimate there are no less than 85 variants of the design. The weapon illustrated below is a Mark IIIB, the most common variety.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Ross Mark IIIB

.303 British

4.48 kg

5

$1652

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Ross Mark IIIB

BA

5

2-3-Nil

8

4

Nil

119