Degtyarev RPD

     Notes: The RPD appeared in 1953, and turned out to be Degtyarev’s last design, since shortly after that Kalashnikov managed to almost totally monopolize Russian small arms design for the next 4 decades.  It is a development of the DP and DPM machineguns, made smaller and more compact to fire the then new 7.62mm Kalashnikov cartridge.  It was progressively improved through five versions in its lifetime.  The major problem with the design, never solved, was the lack of a quick-change barrel; it even went into Russian Army drill manuals that the gunner should never fire more than 100 rounds in one minute without allowing 10 seconds for the barrel to cool. 

     In 2010, DSA began selling a semiautomatic-only version of the RPD.  It is identical for game purposes as the standard RPD, except conversion to automatic fire is very difficult.

     The RPD is obsolete in most First and even Second-World countries (the biggest exceptions being China and Pakistan), but soldiers on in dozens of others. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Tens of thousands of RPDs were pulled out, refurbished, and issued to Category 3 and Mobilization-Only units during the Twilight War.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RPD

7.62mm Kalashnikov

7 kg

100 Belt

$1924

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RPD

5

4

2-3-Nil

6

3

7

62

RPD (Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

6

1

3

80

 

Izhmash RPK-74

     Notes: When the Soviets developed the AK-74, they also wanted an RPK-equivalent firing the new 5.45mm Kalashnikov cartridge as a companion piece.  This resulted in the RPK-74, which is essentially an AK-74 with a longer barrel, a differently-shaped stock, and a receiver built from heavier-gauge steel.  The operation is therefore roughly the same as that of the AK-74, but unlike the RPK, the RPK-74 is capable of semiautomatic fire.  The 24.3-inch barrel is tipped with a simple slotted muzzle brake.  The feed is from magazines or drums; any AK-74 magazine may be used, but the magazines normally associated with the RPK-74 are 40 and 45-round boxes and 75-round drums.  The bipod is the same as that used on the RPK, and it is attached at the same place behind the gas block.  The sights are also virtually identical (calibrated to the new ammunition, of course), but the rear is a tangent leaf instead of a simple leaf sight.  A mount may also be attached to the RPK-74 allowing it to use the PN51 or NSP-3 night vision sights.  The handguard, stock, and pistol grip of the RPK-74 is made of wood; a variant, the RPKS-74 has a skeletonized stock which folds to the left side and is strengthened for airdrops.  The RPKS-74 has been built in greater quantity than its RPKS predecessor.

     Since the development of the AK-74M, an RPK-74M companion piece has also been adopted.  This version is identical to the RPK-74, but the furniture is of polymer instead of wood, making the weapon somewhat lighter.  An RPK-74M has also been offered in 5.56mm NATO caliber for export sales; this version uses modified versions of standard AK-74/RPK-74 magazines and drums.  Oddly enough, a version of the RPK-74M has also been built in 7.62mm Kalashnikov caliber; it can use standard AK-47/AKM magazines, RPK magazines, or new polymer versions of those magazines.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The RPK-74, RPKS-74, and RPK-74M are available in the Twilight 2000 timeline in about the same percentages as the AK-74, AKS-74, and AK-74M.  The 5.56mm version is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor is the 7.62mm version.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RPK-74

5.45mm Kalashnikov

4.58 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75 Drum, 90

$1498

RPKS-74

5.45mm Kalashnikov

4.72 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75 Drum, 90

$1528

RPK-74M

5.45mm Kalashnikov

4.43 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75 Drum, 90

$1508

RPK-74M

5.56mm NATO

4.56 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75 Drum, 90

$1609

RPK-74M

7.62mm Kalashnikov

4.99 kg

30, 40, 75 Drum, 90

$2121

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RPK-74

5

3

1-Nil

7

2

4

74

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

2

96

RPKS-74

5

3

1-Nil

5/7

2

4

74

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

5/7

1

2

96

RPK-74M (5.45mm)

5

3

1-Nil

7

2

4

74

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

2

96

RPK-74M (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

4

70

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

7

1

2

92

RPK-74M (7.62mm)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

6

76

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

1

3

99

 

Kalashnikov RPK

     Notes: The RPK replaced the RPD as the standard Russian squad automatic weapon in the early 1960s.  It is basically what it seems to be: an overgrown AKM assault rifle.  Though it has the same problem as the RPD in that the barrel is fixed and not quick-change, this was not thought of as a serious problem by then since the rest of Russian squads were carrying high-rate of fire AKMs and this allowed time for a cooler RPK to be brought to bear or simply allow the RPK to cool. 

     Being a modification of the AKM, it uses essentially the same operation, including the same annoying lack of a bolt hold-open feature when the magazine is empty.  This also makes the RPK extremely resistant to dirt, fouling, damage, etc, and essentially soldier-proof.  The selector lever allows only for safe and automatic fire, with no semiautomatic position; however, with a cyclic rate of 600-660 rpm, a skilled gunner can easily squeeze off short bursts and even single rounds.  The barrel is 23.2 inches long and has no sort of flash suppressor or muzzle brake; on some RPKs, a short perforated ring has been observed, but this is rare and these may not be of Russian make.  The RPK may use any sort of magazine which may be used by an AK-47 or AKM, including the newer high capacity ones and those made of polymer or plastic.  Two magazines were designed specifically for the RPK: an extended 40-round box, and a 75-round drum.  (These two magazines will also fit into an AK-47 and AKM, though the assault rifles then become a bit clumsy.)  The RPK has a folding non-adjustable bipod attached just behind the gas block, and cannot mount a bayonet.  Sights consist of a front hooded post adjustable for elevation with a fluorescent dot, and a rear leaf adjustable for elevation and windage. The rear sight may be flipped down, revealing a U-shaped notch sight with fluorescent edges.  The RPK is also capable of mounting the NSP-3 IR night vision sight. 

     The RPKS is the same weapon, but with skeletonized stock that folds to the left.  It is primarily issued to airborne and air assault troops.  Compared to the RPK, the RPKS is rather rare.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: There were far more RPKs than RPK-74s in the world during the Twilight War, even among Russian forces. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

RPK

7.62mm Kalashnikov

4.9 kg

30, 40, 75 Drum

$2012

RPKS

7.62mm Kalashnikov

5 kg

30, 40, 75 Drum

$2037

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

RPK

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

3

8

70

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

7

2

4

92

RPKS

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

3

8

70

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

2

4

92