MGI Hydra

     Notes: One of the “holy grails” of US special operations troops is a weapon which can use a number of different rounds, both domestic and enemy, without having to carry around a huge amount of replacement parts for the weapon (or worse, having to carry around several different weapons).  Mack Gwynn Sr and Mack Gwynn Jr, both retired US Special Forces troops, have been working on this problem for a long time; Mack Gwynn Sr, in particular, has been working on it since his time in Vietnam.  The result of all this research and work has been the Hydra carbine.

     The Gwynns began with the M-4A1 as a base; however, the changes in the M-4A1 they made are quite radical and fundamental.  The first change is the quick-change barrels for the different calibers able to be fired (currently 7, hence the name “Hydra”, though more are planned – primarily the 7.62mm NATO and 7.62mm Nagant).  The Hydra also uses two interchangeable bolt-carrier groups, one for 5.56mm NATO and rimfire rounds, and one for everything else.  As a by-product, the system also allows the user to clean his weapon far more easily than a standard M-4 series weapon.  The entire Hydra package is surprisingly light in weight.

     The ejection port is enlarged slightly, primarily to allow proper extraction of the .50 Beowulf cartridge.  The sights have been redesigned to allow the various chamberings to be accurately aimed.  A magazine well adapter is also required for use with 7.62mm Kalashnikov rounds.  In some cases, the bolt carrier must be adjusted somewhat, but this is built into the bolt carriers.  For the rimfire rounds, a magazine insert must also be used.  The barrels come in the standard 14.5 inches for military use; law enforcement and civilian versions are semiautomatic-only and use 16-inch barrels.  The barrels are threaded at the muzzle to allow the detachment of the standard military flash suppressors and their replacement by muzzle attachments of the user’s choice (including suppressors and silencers).  Military versions use a 3-round burst selective-fire mechanism.  The receiver is topped by a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and more are found on the handguards.  The Hydra uses a Vltor 5-position sliding stock, which is similar but superior to the standard M-4 sliding stock, but offers an adjustable cheekpiece and a compartment in the rear to accommodate anything up to the size of the standard US military cleaning kit.  The sling sold with the Hydra is the Button Sling, but this too can be replaced with a variety of slings.  All accessories, barrels, and magazine well adapters lock in solidly and the shooter need not fear that anything will come loose once attached properly.

     Note: The weights used here are an estimate; I could not find any solid information on the actual weights as of Feb 07.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Hydra does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

2.63 kg

30

$229

Hydra (16” Barrel)

.22 Long Rifle

2.66 kg

30

$244

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.63 kg

30

$250

Hydra (16” Barrel)

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

2.66 kg

30

$265

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.63 kg

20, 30

$575

Hydra (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.66 kg

20, 30

$591

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

2.7 kg

5, 10, 18, 28

$647

Hydra (16” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

2.73 kg

5, 10, 18, 28

$663

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

6.8mm SPC

2.76 kg

5, 10, 18, 28

$716

Hydra (16” Barrel)

6.8mm SPC

2.79 kg

5, 10, 18, 28

$732

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.91 kg

30

$826

Hydra (16” Barrel)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.94 kg

30

$840

Hydra (14.5” Barrel)

.50 Beowulf

2.72 kg

7, 12

$587

Hydra (16” Barrel)

.50 Beowulf

2.75 kg

7, 12

$604

Complete Caliber Change Set (14.5”)

NA

4.18 kg

NA

$843

Complete Caliber Change Set (16”)

NA

4.23 kg

NA

$868

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Hydra (.22 Long Rifle, 14.5”)

3

1

Nil

4/5

1

1

29

Hydra (.22 Long Rifle, 16”)

SA

1

Nil

4/5

1

Nil

33

Hydra (.22 Magnum, 14.5”)

3

1

Nil

4/5

1

1

44

Hydra (.22 Magnum, 16”)

SA

1

Nil

4/5

1

Nil

49

Hydra (5.56mm, 14.5”)

3

3

1-Nil

4/5

3

4

34

Hydra (5.56mm, 16”)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

40

Hydra (6.5mm, 14.5”)

3

3

1-Nil

4/5

3

4

39

Hydra (6.5mm, 16”)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

45

Hydra (6.8mm, 14.5”)

3

3

2-Nil

4/6

3

4

38

Hydra (6.8mm, 16”)

SA

3

2-Nil

5/6

3

Nil

45

Hydra (7.62mm, 14.5”)

3

3

2-Nil

5/6

4

6

39

Hydra (7.62mm, 16”)

SA

4

2-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

45

Hydra (.50, 14.5”)

3

5

1-2-Nil

4/5

5

7

38

Hydra (.50, 16”)

SA

5

1-2-Nil

4/6

4

Nil

45

 

Military Manufacturing M-16X/C/S

     Notes: This weapon was designed as a private venture by Military Manufacturing (not actually affiliated with the US military), but was quickly picked up by a number of agencies in the US, such as the Secret Service, US Customs, and particularly firms providing bodyguard services to executives and celebrities.  It is basically an M-16 assault rifle with a radically-cut-down barrel; the M-16X uses a 105.2mm barrel, the M-16C a 152.4mm barrel, and the M-16S a 213mm barrel.  A shoulder harness was also manufactured for concealed carry, and despite its small size, the muzzle brake on the weapon is very effective.  The handguard doubles as a weight to help fight barrel climb. 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-16X

5.56mm NATO

2.38 kg

20, 30

$509

M-16C

5.56mm NATO

2.48 kg

20, 30

$528

M-16S

5.56mm NATO

2.6 kg

20, 30

$552

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-16X

5

2

1-Nil

2/3

2

5

10

M-16C

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

5

11

M-16S

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

5

14

 

Mossberg MMR

     Notes: The Mossberg MMR (Mossberg Modern Rifle) is a high-accuracy-type version of the AR-15 platform, designed for use primarily as a varmint rifle, but also capable of taking down small game and if you aim right, medium game. Originally, the MMR was simply called the “MMR,” but with the addition of a new model, the MMR was renamed to “MMR Hunter.” Unusually, the MMR Hunter is a civilian rifle that is optimized for 5.56mm NATO instead of .223 Remington (which, of course, has no effect in game terms).  Though the exterior finish listed on Mossberg’s web site is all-black, an option listed on the site are MMR Hunters finished almost completely in Mossy Oak Camo Pattern, Treestand Camo, or Brush Camo.  Underneath the finish, aluminum parts are anodized and phosphated. The handguard is aluminum, but has a checkered surface for a better grip.  Under the handguard and butt are sling swivels, but the front swivel mounting can be used as a bipod mounting, with the swivel being easily removed for this purpose.  Most rifles with aluminum handguards have a diameter of about 51mm, but the handguard of the MMR Hunter steps down to 38mm just beyond the barrel attachment to give the shooter a better grip.  The handguard are removed via a rotating ring, unlike most AR handguards, which can be difficult to remove.  The fire controls and magazine release are ambidextrous, though the bolt catch remains on the left side only.  The charging handle is oversized at the end, with the locking mechanism for the bolt handle also being oversized.  As the barrel is designed using target specs, it is not chromed, which of course means assiduous bore cleaning is essential.  The barrel is of heavy profile and match-quality, and is free-floating.  There is no muzzle device of any sort, though the MMR Hunter’s barrel does have a target crown.  Atop the receiver is a MIL-STD-1913 rail; the front sight post on its triangular riser remains, and the very rear of the receiver’s rail has a folding BUIS. The upper and lower receivers are machined instead of stamped for greater strength. The stock is an A2-type fixed stock. Mossberg sells the MMR Hunter with a 5-round magazine for maximum compatibility with most US or foreign jurisdictions, but the MMR Hunter can take any magazine that a 5.56mm NATO rifle can take.

     The new version, the MMR Tactical, turns the MMR platform into a tactical rifle that is aimed not only at civilians, but police forces and military forces.  (It is rumored that military forces and police special operations teams like SWAT/SRT teams and the FBI HRT team have been supplied fully automatic versions, and I have taken account of this rumor below.)  The core of the Tactical is basically the same as that of the Hunter, with a machined receiver and ambidextrous controls and oversized charging handle.  The Tactical also has a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver, but it also has four-point rails on the handguards, and the top handguard rail joins to the rail atop the receiver.  Both the front and rear sights are BUIS.  The stock of the Tactical is a collapsible stock of the M-4-type, though at the buyer’s option Mossberg will put an A2-type fixed stock on it.  The 16.25-inch barrel is only of medium profile (compared to the Hunter), and is tipped with an A2-type flash suppressor.  The bore of the Tactical is chromed, unlike the Hunter.  The barrel is of medium profile, and free-floating like the Hunter.  It is not match-quality, however.  The MMR Tactical is definitely a tactical rifle; though it has the core of a Hunter, it is otherwise very different.

     Twilight 2000 v1\V2\V2.2 Timeline: These rifles do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Twilight 2013 Timeline: The MMR Hunter has been available for several years, and one will encounter partisan groups, especially in the US and Canada, being used mostly as sniper rifles.  The Tactical can be found in the hands of US units in small numbers, as it was issued as an “emergency issue” to US troops when supplies of M-16s and M-4s became short.  Some special operations units will also have small numbers of them, not all of them US units.  Finally, some SWAT/SRT units in the US as well as the FBI HRT will have small numbers of the Tactical.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mossberg Hunter

5.56mm NATO

3.4 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$623

Mossberg Tactical

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$596

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mossberg Hunter

SA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

61

Mossberg Tactical

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

6

42

 

Mossberg Tactical .22

     Notes: The Tactical .22 is a rimfire rifle which follows the lines and appearance of one of the later iterations of the M-16.  The Tactical .22 has an M-4-type sliding stock (a fixed stock is also available), a carrying handle with a MIL-STD-1913 rail on it, and handguards with MIL-STD-1913 rails at the 12, 3, 6, and 9-o’clock positions.  The carrying handle and M-16-style front triangle have sights which mimic the appearance of those of the M-16 and adjust in the same way, but are calibrated for the Tactical .22 and its rimfire ammunition.  The pistol grip is also virtually identical to that of the M-16A2/A3/A4, and the Tactical .22 even has a forward assist (though it’s not really necessary).  The magazine well and adapter are designed to mimic the appearance of an M-16’s magazine, but the actual Tactical .22’s magazine is inserted into the bottom of the faux magazine, and the faux magazine has a small “window” in it, allowing the shooter to check his ammunition supply.  Unlike the M-16, the bolt of the tactical .22 is chromed, as is the barrel extension and barrel.  Internally, however, the Tactical .22 has more in common with Mossberg’s Model 702, and uses blowback operation instead of the M-16’s gas operation.  The barrel is 18 inches long and has no flash suppressor or muzzle device of any kind (or even a provision for one to be attached).  Finish is a combination of black polymer, black steel, or anodized black light alloy.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mossberg Tactical .22 (Fixed Stock)

.22 Long Rifle

2.27 kg

10, 25

$243

Mossberg Tactical .22 (Sliding Stock)

.22 Long Rifle

2.27 kg

10, 25

$268

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mossberg Tactical .22 (Fixed Stock)

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

37

Mossberg Tactical .22 (Sliding Stock)

SA

1

Nil

3/5

1

Nil

37

 

National Ordinance Modified M-1 Carbine 

     Notes: Introduced in the late 1980s, this modified M-1 Carbine was not made in large numbers by National Ordinance.  However, several other companies in the years to follow (Plainfield, Iver Johnson, and others) manufactured this variant, and as such there are quantities of these weapons to be found.  It is one of those “experiments” that shooters seem to enjoy.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These weapons were popular, especially late in the Twilight War when the government was handing out lots of 5.56mm NATO ammunition.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

National Ordinance Modified M-1 Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$567

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

National Ordinance Modified M-1 Carbine

SA

3

1-Nil

6

3

Nil

47

 

Noveske Lo-Pro NSR

     Notes: John Noveske started designing this rifle as a personal defense and general dream rifle after a stint in the Army after 9/11.  Many of his friends were still in the Army and serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.  The idea was to create a rifle with a barrel that could be used by designated marksmen, the spotter of a sniper team, and the sniper himself (if not expected to engage at extremely long ranges).  He felt that no expense should be spared if your life is on the line.  He therefore chose the best components available, while still being of a (high) reasonable price.

     The rifle started with the caliber.  The 5.56mm was a non-starter; Noveske felt it just didn’t have the needed stopping power.  7.62mm NATO was also out – the resulting rifles and ammunition were too heavy for prolonged carry.  He started out with .300 Fireball and built a few prototypes in that caliber, but settled on .300 Blackout for a good compromise between stopping power and range, and weight.  The .300 Fireball is also a limited-availability round, while the .300 Blackout has grown to be one of the most popular medium-caliber rounds in the US.  The compact SBR format was ideal for rifle that was designed to work with a suppressor, and can also be used for CQB.

     The barrel is 10.2 inches long, and Noveske had in mind the AAC 762-SDN-6 suppressor to work with it.  This fits over the compact muzzle brake and onto the threaded portion of the barrel. The barrel picks up 6.1 inches with the suppressor attached, and is actually more accurate with the suppressor attached, especially when using supersonic ammo. Noveske meant for the rifle to be used suppressed, as .300 Blackout from a 10.2-inch barrel creates massive amounts of muzzle blast and is not ear-safe. The barrel is of stainless steel; polished in the bore and the exterior bead-blasted.  The barrel is free-floating. The barrel extension has polished feed ramps.  The low-profile gas block is adjustable for normal fire without a suppressor, for a suppressor with subsonic ammo, and for a suppressor with supersonic ammunition.

     Noveske designed a special handguard called the NSR for the Lo-Pro NSR.  7, 9, 11, and 13.5-inch handguards are available. He felt that most people don’t need fully-railed handguards because they are bulky, often need blank outserts to avoid chewed-up hands, and often not used in the first place.  The NSR allows for the attachment of MIL-STD-1913 rails on the lower handguard using the KeyMod system, but this is not included in the basic build.  The bottom is enlarged and flattened to allow for a better grip with the nonfiring hand. The Lo-Pro NSR’s rail has perfect alignment with the receiver rail, and has an extended barrel nut for improved support. Handguards are made of aircraft aluminum. And an internal aluminum heat shield is in the works.

     The receiver rail on Noveske’s rifle is topped by a Schmidt & Bender 1.1-4x Short Dot scope; this is the same found on the Army’s M-240 machineguns.  It is mounted using an American Defense Recon Scope Mount, which is on a slight riser and gives easy adjustments to windage and elevation when zeroing.  It generally holds its zero, however, and the mount allows for the swapping of optics while retaining its zero.  The mount is tool-less.  The Lo-Pro NSR used a BCM Gunfighter charging handle, since it’s easier to grip and hold onto when charging.  The receiver halves are made of 6046-T6 aluminum, forged rather than being stamped or pressed.  This gives it extra strength. It has a flared magazine well that will accept most AR magazines; not, however, that it will not accept SureFire’s new 60 and 100-round magazines, as they are contoured differently from most AR magazines.  The trigger pack is a Geissele Super Dynamic 3 Gun (SD-3G) trigger, which has a flat trigger face that allows a high or low finger position on the trigger.  The pistol grip is a one-piece MagPul MOE grip.  The stock uses a Noveske-designed Quick Disconnect End Plate, and is otherwise a standard MagPul CTR stock.  It is made of steel, and is 6-point sliding.    

     A .300 Fireball chambering has been included below as a point of interest.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Lo-Pro NSR (Basic Rifle)

.300 Blackout

2.7 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$757

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded)

.300 Blackout

4.07 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$1109

Lo-Pro NSR (Basic Rifle)

.300 Fireball

2.83 kg

5, 10, 20

$840

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded)

.300 Fireball

4.27 kg

5, 10, 20

$1197

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Lo-Pro NSR (Basic Rifle, .300 BLK)

SA

3

2-Nil

3/5

2

Nil

23

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded, Supersonic, .300 BLK)

SA

3

2-Nil

6/7

3

Nil

52

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded, Subsonic, .300 BLK)

SA

3

1-Nil

6/7

3

Nil

43

Lo-Pro NSR (Basic Rifle, .300 FB)

SA

4

2-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

23

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded, Supersonic, .300 FB)

SA

4

2-Nil

6/8

3

Nil

52

Lo-Pro NSR (Fully Loaded, Subsonic, .300 FB)

SA

4

1--Nil

6/8

3

Nil

43

 

Olympic Arms K8-MAG

     Notes: This variant of the AR-15A2 is designed to fire more powerful Winchester Super Short Magnum rounds -- .223, .243, and .25.  The lower receiver is the same as a standard AR-15, but the upper receiver, bolt, handguards, and magazines are modified to take the new rounds.  The upper receiver is a flattop type, with a MIL-STD-1913 rail to allow it to mount virtually any sort of optics.  The barrels are heavy barrels, 24-inches long, target crowned, and designed specifically for these magnum rounds and made from 4140 chrome-molybdenum steel.  Though the basic rifle does not come with a bipod, an interface for mounting a Harris-type bipod is included with the rifle.  A complaint of the K8-MAG is that the MIL-STD-1913 rail is far enough back on the receiver that the charging handle (a standard AR-15 charging handle) can be difficult to reach under a large scope.  Prototypes of this rifle were available as early as late 2003, but production examples were not available until late 2004.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: The US Army and Marines as well as various police forces and mercenaries are using the K8-MAG in combat as sharpshooter’s weapon, or even a faux sniper rifle.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

K8-MAG

.223 Winchester Super Short Magnum

4.02 kg

8, 12

$634

K8-MAG

.243 Winchester Super Short Magnum

4.18 kg

8, 12

$695

K8-MAG

.25 Winchester Super Short Magnum

4.3 kg

8, 12

$743

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

K8-Mag (.223)

SA

4

1-1-Nil

7

2

Nil

90

K8-MAG (.243)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

96

K8-MAG (.25)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

7

3

Nil

96

 

Olympic Arms PCR-8 MAG

     This is an AR-15A3 clone chambered for the new .243 Winchester Super Short Magnum cartridge or .223 Winchester Super Short Magnum cartridge.  These cartridges, along with barrels 4 inches longer than normal, gives the weapons great accuracy.  The weapon has been modified as little as possible to accommodate the new caliber, with changes to the barrel, bolt carrier group, and magazine well, as well as the recoil spring and mass.  The weapon retains the flattop receiver with a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  It does not, however, have any sort of flash suppressor or muzzle brake.  The barrel is, however, of match quality.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PC-8 MAG

.243 Winchester Super Short Magnum

3.31 kg

10

$689

PC-8 MAG

.223 Winchester Super Short Magnum

3.33 kg

10

$693

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PC-8 MAG (.243)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

6

3

Nil

94

PC-8 MAG (.223)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

6

3

Nil

94

 

Olympic Arms Plinker Plus

     Notes: The Plinker Plus is meant to be a “fun” rifle for self-defense, plinking, and recreation.  They are inexpensive by RL terms. There are basically three forms of the Plinker Plus: the basic Plinker Plus, the Flattop Plinker Plus, and the Plinker Plus 20.  They are basic ARs, with the first two being carbines with a 16-inch stainless steel (but non-chromed) bores that are called “Long-Life” bores by Olympic Arms.  They have an A2-type flash suppressor and pistol grip, an M-4-type collapsible stock, and A1-type sights.  They are otherwise ordinary ARs.

     The Flattop Plinker Plus has a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver, a low-profile gas block with a small rail, and the other Plinker plus construction except for the sights and carrying handle.  They don’t come with BUIS, though several are sold by Olympic Arms.  The Plinker Plus 20 is the same as the Plinker Plus, but has a 20-inch barrel and a standard A2 stock with a butt trap; it is essentially an AR-15A2 with A1 sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Plinker Plus

5.56mm NATO

3.34 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 35

$585

Plinker Plus Flattop

5.56mm NATO

3.38 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 35

$591

Flinker Plus 20

5.56mm NATO

3.84 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 35

$607

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Plinker Plus

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

40

Plinker Plus Flattop

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

40

Flinker Plus 20

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

56

 

Olympic Arms P Series and K Series

     Notes: This is an AR-15A2 clone chambered for pistol cartridges.  The weapon is mostly unmodified except for the modifications necessary for adaptation to the 9mm Parabellum cartridge, such as barrel (which is also shorter than normal), bolt-carrier group, magazine well, and sights; in addition, the weapon has no flash suppressor or muzzle brake of any kind.  The handguards are short M-4-style handguards.  The weapon is sold with 10-round magazines, but will in fact accept any sort of Glock-compatible magazine of the appropriate caliber.  The PCR-30 is also similar to the other weapons of the PCR series, but is of lighter construction, and uses any magazine compatible with an M-1 Carbine.  In addition, Olympic Arms also makes extended 40-round magazines for the PCR-30.

     These rifles were largely discontinued after the demise of the Assault Weapons Ban, but in their place came the K series.  These are for the most part identical to the PCR series, but being post-ban weapons, they are equipped with sliding stocks, flash suppressors, and can use larger-capacity magazines.  All are available with 10 and 14-round magazines, but the K-9 is also able to use a modified Sten SMG magazine, while the others may use magazines modified from Uzi magazines.  These magazines are proprietary, unfortunately.  16-inch barrels are standard; 20-inch barrels are optional.

     It should be noted that on both the PCR series and the K series, there are forward assists; they don’t actually do anything however, being there simply for looks and in imitation of the AR-15. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The PCR-30 is not available, nor are any of the K series.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PCR-9

9mm Parabellum

3.18 kg

10, 17, 19, 33

$279

PCR-10

10mm Colt

3.18 kg

10, 17

$337

PCR-40

.40 Smith & Wesson

3.18 kg

9, 10, 15

$317

PCR-45

.45 ACP

3.18 kg

6, 10, 13

$360

PCR-30

.30 Carbine

2.93 kg

10, 15, 30, 40

$302

K-9 (16” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

3.11 kg

10, 14, 32

$301

K-9 (20” Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

3.27 kg

10, 14, 32

$342

K-10 (16” Barrel)

10mm Colt

3.11 kg

10, 14, 30

$361

K-10 (20” Barrel)

10mm Colt

3.27 kg

10, 14, 30

$402

K-40 (16” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

3.11 kg

10, 14, 30

$340

K-40 (20” Barrel)

.40 Smith & Wesson

3.27 kg

10, 14, 30

$380

K-45 (16” Barrel)

.45 ACP

3.11 kg

10, 14, 30

$385

K-45 (20” Barrel)

.45 ACP

3.27 kg

10, 14, 30

$425

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PCR-9

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

35

PCR-10

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

39

PCR-40

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

37

PCR-45

SA

2

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

38

PCR-30

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

44

K-9 (16”)

SA

2

1-Nil

3/5

1

Nil

35

K-9 (20”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

1

Nil

46

K-10 (16”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

39

K-10 (20”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

50

K-40 (16”)

SA

2

1-Nil

3/5

2

Nil

37

K-40 (20”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

48

K-45 (16”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

38

K-45 (20”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

49

 

Primary Weapons Systems Diablo

     Notes: Primarily sold as upper receiver kits for existing AR-15/M-16/M-4-type rifles, the Diablo system provides several options to users of those rifles without sacrificing the muscle memory that troops and veterans have developed from their long use of the M-16 and M-4.  The smallest member of the series, the DC-7 5.56mm (Diablo Carbine), features a 7-inch stainless steel barrel with a long-stroke gas piston system replacing the direct gas impingement system of the standard M-16 or M-4, and a slightly faster rifling twist, tipped by a PWS-designed muzzle brake.  The DC-7 features a Vltor MUR-1 upper receiver machined from a solid aluminum billet, a Mil-Spec bolt carrier group, a charging handle also machined from a solid billet, TangoDown SCAR four-point MIL-STD-1913 rails as well as a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver.  The entire assembly is coated in a tough, corrosion-resistant coating called QPQ.  The DC-7 7.62mm is similar in concept, but is chambered for 7.62mm Kalashnikov.  The DC-10 is similar to the DC-7 5.56mm, but has a 10.5-inch barrel tipped with an M-16A2-type flash suppressor.  The DC-12 has a 12.5-inch barrel with an A2-type flash suppressor, while the DC-16 is a 16-inch barrel carbine with an A2-type flash suppressor.  The series is available in automatic versions for law enforcement, bodyguard and military concerns.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: the Diablo series does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

DC-7 5.56mm

5.56mm NATO

2.61 kg

20, 30

$544

DC-7 7.62mm

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.61 kg

30

$790

DC-10

5.56mm NATO

3.06 kg

20, 30

$534

DC-12

5.56mm NATO

3.12 kg

20, 30

$555

DC-16

5.56mm NATO

3.22 kg

20, 30

$591

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

DC-7 5.56mm

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

5

9

DC-7 7.62mm

5

3

2-Nil

3/4

2

3

11

DC-10

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

6

20

DC-12

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

6

27

DC-16

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

6

40

 

Primary Weapons Systems MK-109

     Notes: The Mk-109 is designed for the subsonic round .300 Blackout, and for use with a suppressor, which is included with the rifle (in these rules). Like most PWS rifles, the Mk-109 uses a long-stroke piston-driven system in an M-4-type carbine.  The barrel is equipped with a screw-on suppressor; the issue suppressor is a Gemtech GMT-300BLK which actually covers the Triad flash suppressor and a good portion of the barrel, back to the end of the handguard.  The barrel is a 9.75-inch chrome-lined barrel, which is only a little longer than the .300 Blackout round requires to develop optimum power.  The barrel has an Isonite QPQ coating that enhances strength and resists corrosion.  Due to its design, PWS recommends that using full-power 110-130-grain bullets only; though heavier .300 Blackout ammo does exist, do not use it in the Mk-109.

     The handguards are KeyMod Mk 1s.  They are of aircraft-quality aluminum and have a full length Picatinny rail that connects to the receiver rail on top, and half-length rails along the side at the front.  A shorter length of rail under the handguard is generally used for a tactical light or bipod (not included). The rails are forged as a part of the receiver and handguards. The receivers are of 7075-T6 aluminum, and machined to high tolerances; they are anodized. The bolt carrier and buffer mass tube are designed with increased mass to soak up felt recoil. The buffer mass locks in on the left and right, and does not require a castle nut. The inner works are also built to close tolerances, and are nickel/Teflon-coated.  A BCM Gunfighter charging handle is installed. The Mk-109 comes with MagPul BUIS and a British-made Shield CQS red-dot optical sight, as well as a MagPul MOE sliding 6-position stock.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Mk-109

.300 Blackout

2.75 kg

5, 10, 20

$849

With Suppressor

.300 Blackout

3.21 kg

5, 10, 20

$947

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Mk-109

5

3

2-Nil

4/5

3

6

21

With Suppressor

5

3

2-Nil

4/6

2

5

17