2 Vets Bravo

     2 Vets is just what is sounds like -- run by Dean and Amber Brandly, both long-service veterans. (Dean jokes that he married above his pay grade.) They use a lot of proprietary hardware and specialist designs in their rifles, in what they call the B5 package -- handguards, rails, stock, pistol grip, and finish.  The Bravo is not 2 Vets' (or 2VA) first design; it is merely the latest. The Bravo is on the base AR plan, but differs in many ways. Chief of these is the left-side charging handle, attached to a reciprocating nickel-boron bolt. The 16-inch barrel is cold hammer-forged barrel operating by direct impingement. It has not only a birdcage muzzle brake, but a target crown under it. It has perfectly-matched upper and lower receivers. It has an extended bolt release, standard AR controls.  The receiver has a monolithic MIL-STD-1913 rail, and it retains the standard A2 front sight.  The pistol grip is by Umbrella Corp, and it has self-designed handguards and six-position sliding stock.  There is no forward assist; "the charging handle is the forward assist."  The charging handle may be screwed into either side of the bolt, with case ejection on the right.  The Bravo's receiver and handguards are deliberately made wider than normal -- this adds to weight, but increases strength and rigidity.  It's a tough rifle.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Bravo

5.56mm NATO

2.95 kg

10, 20, 30

$633

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Bravo

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

5

41

 

2A Armament BLR-16

     Notes: The BLR-16 is an attempt to produce the best possible AR by combining as many off-the-shelf components as possible without getting redundant. The BALIOS-lite upper and lower receivers incorporate titanium alloy, and many of the internals are also of titanium alloy.  Above the receiver, and locking into the rail above the handguard, is a MIL-STD-1913 rail variant called the BL-RAIL by 2A.  This may use 2A’s proprietary tension lock design for attachment, M-LOK, or KeyMod’s locking solution.  The 16-inch barrel is secured by a titanium barrel nut, with a titanium gas block, and titanium takedown pins.  The barrel is made of 416R stainless steel and is tipped by a titanium T3 compact muzzle brake; however, this is on threads and may be replaced by any number of muzzle brakes or suppressors.  The barrel uses the M16s thick/thin “government profile.”  The pistol grip is a MagPul MIAD, while the sliding stock is made by Mission First and is lighter than the standard M4’s stock, and adjusts to six positions.  The magazine well is flared for ease of loading. The bolt and bolt carrier is cryogenically-treated and has a BCM-Mod4 charging handle. In perhaps the only “standard” feature, a normal buffer and buffer spring is used. The trigger group is called an ALG-ACT group and may be adjusted for pull weight. The finish for the receivers is Type-III anodized. All that titanium makes for a light rifle.  And an expensive one – nearly $2200 in real life, and even expensive by game terms.

     I couldn’t resist statting this out for automatic fire, though in fact it is a semiautomatic-only weapon.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BLR-16

5.56mm NATO

2.27 kg

10, 20, 30

$649

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BLR-16

5

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

6

42

 

556 Tactical Deathpunch

     Notes: Like so many firearms companies, 556 Tactical started out as a company to produce limited runs of custom guns for friends and family.  And the Deathpunch is decked out like a race car, with its fire-engine red receiver and barrel, yellow and black controls and dustcover (it is an AR clone), black charging handle, and a monolithic MIL-STD-1913 rail. The stock and handguards are checkered, and the top and bottom of the handguards also have rails, which are black.  The flash suppressor is black, and the proprietary magazines have pull handles and are black with a yellow logo on the sides.  It is visually very impressive; and based on the Ferrari.  Only seven were produced, and members of the designer's rock band had dibs on them almost immediately.  However, they are willing to produce more on special request.

     The Deathpunch is a fully automatic SBR, with a 14.5-inch heavy fluted floating stainless steel barrel, tipped with a Tactical StrykerHype flash suppressor.  The rifle comes with a telescopic sight and a foregrip along with a finger stop.  The internal parts, including the bolt carrier, is chrome-plated.  The upper and lower receiver is made from billets of 7076 aluminum and the trigger is a CMC 3.5-pound curved profile trigger that is gold-plated. The pistol grip is from Magpul, and the stock is a B5 systems SOPMOD sliding stock. There are folding adjustable Samsom LoPro sights. The receivers are all autographed by Zoltan, the band leader and designer.

     When you have a Deathpunch, you don't just have an assault carbine, you have a work of art.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Deathpunch

5.56mm NATO

3.13 kg

10, 20, 30

$576

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Deathpunch

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

6

37

 

AAC MPW

     Notes: The aim of the MPW is to produce a carbine with more punch than the 5.56mm NATO in SBRs. Two versions of the MPW have a 9 and 12.5-inch barrel and are legally (in the US) an SBR, while the other is a standard-length carbine.  (Note that the 9” barrel version is no longer produced and is not found on MPW’s site anymore.) The MPW can take any straight or curved 5.56mm magazine, but not fancy ones such as the 75, 90, and 100-rounds ones made by third parties.  The barrels are finished in black nitride inside and out, which for the bore yields better corrosion resistance.  The muzzle is threaded, but sold with a standard A2-type flash suppressor. The barrel is free-floating. The handguards handguards are a full-length KAC URX III handguard with a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and there is also a short rail under the handguard near the front.  Iron sights are not sold with the MPW, but BUIS are sold separately and BUIS of any type may be attached to the rail.

     Operation is by direct gas impingement, and the bolt carrier is nickel-boron-coated for additional lubrication, meaning that the MPW requires less lubrication than most AR-15-type weapons.  The interior of the receiver halves have a further high-phosphorus electroless nickel coating.  The Bolt itself is phosphated shot-peened steel Carpenter 158 bolt. The special o-ring on the extractor is designed to fuction up to 150 degrees and down to -40 degrees F.  The extractor spring is of premium material and winding.  The extractor pin is made of S2 tool steel, superior to most AR-15-type rifles.  The gas key is properly staked with Permatex gasket-seal compound. The trigger group is a Geissele single-stage trigger with a low pull weight, and the stock and pistol grip are from MagPul.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

MPW (9” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

2.74 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$701

MPW (12.5” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

2.89 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$740

MPW (16” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

3.04 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$777

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

MPW (9” Barrel)

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

19

MPW (12.5” Barrel)

SA

3

2-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

32

MPW (16” Barrel)

SA

3

2-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

46

 

Adams Arms COR Ultra Lite

     Notes: The COR (Competition Optics Ready) is a rifle designed for competition, especially 3-Gun Matches, incorporating a lot of input from 3-Gun shooters and other competition shooters.

     It has a Picatinny Rail above the receiver, and a longer length down the top of the handguard (though non-continuous), and one below the handguard.  It has Diamond micrometer-adjustable rear sights and a folding post sight with protective ears.  The COR is well balanced, especially when optics are installed, though it is a bit heavy, but this contributes to its light recoil. The front of the lower handguard  rail comes with a hand stop.

     The 16.5-inch barrel is of medium profile with a slotted VDI Jet muzzle brake. The barrel is perhaps too light for a competition rifle, and in competition you want a nice, stiff barrel, and the skinny barrel has seriously compromised accuracy beyond 100 meters.  (It cannot be simulated in game terms, however.) Most shooters find difficulties beyond 100 meters, but some have been able to score consistent hits at 500 meters with a scope installed. The barrel is finished in Melonite.

     The COR uses a Magpul MOE stock, a fixed stock instead of the sliding stock of most ARs these days.  This does lighten the rifle. It also has a Magpul MOE K2 pistol grip, with a compartment inside to store batteries for optics.  The Hyperfire trigger pulls at the same weight and pull distance whether the top or bottom of the trigger is pulled. The trigger is double-sprung to ease the pull weight, and it is only 3.5 pounds.

     Most internal parts are sprung for positive engagement. (Adams does not recommend dry firing the COR for that reason.)  The bolt carrier has several deep lightening cuts in it, but is mostly an AR bolt group with extra springs in the firing pin and a stronger spring in the extractor (and, as many readers of these pages will know, my biggest problem with the M16 and AR-15 is extraction failure).  The light bolt is also easier for the light piston to move, and allows for a less beefy recoil spring and recoiling mass. Operation is by short-stroke piston rather than direct gas impingement.  This, especially on the COR, keeps the chamber and innards much cleaner.  The action cycles smoothly and felt recoil is light.  The receivers are Type III Class II Hard-Coat Anodized.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

COR Ultra Lite

5.56mm NATO

3.23 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$662

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

COR Ultra Lite

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

42

 

Adams Arms Tactical EVO

     Notes: This is another AR-15 clone.  Many gun experts feel that the AR-15 platform has gotten a bit stale, that everything that can be done with an AR-15/M4 has been done, and only minor cosmetic changes differentiate the various AR-15 clones.  Most manufacturers seem to take one part from one manufacturer, another from another manufacturer, have their barrels made by a few expert barrel makers, etc.

     Adams Arms distinguishes itself by it’s gas piston system, designed from the ground up for a mid-length system.  Adams makes its own working parts, from the recoil spring and buffer mass to the precision barrel and low-profile gas block. The EVO is capable of digesting almost all sorts of ammunition, use any lubrication, and feeds from virtually any AR-15-compatible magazine.  In addition, the magazine well is beveled. The EVO comes in a carbine-length and SBR-length rifle, as well as a pistol; the barrels are government contour and free-floating.  The rifle has an upper MIL-STD-1913 rail that extends from the receiver and interlocks with the full-length rail atop the handguard. Below the handguard is another short section of rail, able to take any number of accessories as well as a bipod.  Barrels include a 14.5-inch-barrel SBR and a 16-nch carbine barrel. Other SBR-length barrels include 7.5 inches, 12.5 inches and 11.5 inches. These are also the pistol barrel lengths. The barrel itself is made from 4150 Chrome Moly Vanadium Steel. Barrel finish is Black Nitride with a QPQ Melonite coating. Finish for the receiver is a Hard-Coat Anodization. The barrel and working parts have been treated with Adams Arms’ Salt Nitriding Melonite process, with the piston coated with a Nickel-Boron composition. The EVO does not normally come with sights, but BUIS can be added to the upper rail, and the EVO in this entry is treated as such. The stock is a sliding skeletonized 6-position stock.

     The Adams Arms gas piston system has an Achilles Heel – it gets dirty fast, and the piston can lock up in dirt and carbon.  Note that to get that dirty, it takes a while – and the gas piston system is nickel boron coated to help keep the gas piston going, even when it is black with grunge.  The gas system is contained in a small space, limiting the amount of gas and dirt that can go into the piston area.  It can take thousands of rounds before the EVO locks up due to fouling.  The gas piston system is a short stroke system that appears to be a hybrid of the SKS and M1 Carbine.  The result is that more gas exists from the ejection port after each shot.  The gas system is adjustable, allowing for adjustments as fouling increases and for use with a suppressor or a muzzle brake. (For game purposes, the EVO below has a flash suppressor, which is normal for an EVO.)  The trigger is described by one gun writer as a “meh trigger,” meaning it has the same squishy feel as most AR-15 clones and is not conducive to tight groups.  The EVO is a combat rifle and not a competition rifle. Perhaps the most damning comment of the EVO is the one made about all Adams Arms products – absolutely abysmal customer service.

     The EVO seems to lend itself to military/SRT/automatic use.  This has been included in the stats below as a “what-if.”

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Tactical EVO (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.22 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$599

Tactical EVO (14.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.12 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$583

Tactical EVO (12.5” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

3.86 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$742

Tactical EVO (11.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.89 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$551

Tactical EVO (7.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.57 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$507

Tactical EVO Pistol (12.5” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

2.7 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$691

Tactical EVO Pistol (11.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.72 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$500

Tactical EVO Pistol (7.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.61 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$456

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Tactical EVO (16” Barrel)

5

3

1-Nil

4/6

3

6

43

Tactical EVO (14.5” Barrel)

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

3

6

37

Tactical EVO (12.5” Barrel)

5

3

2-Nil

4/5

2

6

33

Tactical EVO (11.5” Barrel)

5

2

1-Nil

3/5

3

6

26

Tactical EVO (7.5” Barrel)

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

3

7

12

Tactical EVO Pistol (12.5” Barrel)

5

3

2-Nil

4

4

9

28

Tactical EVO Pistol (11.5” Barrel)

5

2

1-Nil

3

3

8

21

Tactical EVO Pistol (7.5” Barrel)

5

2

1-Nil

2

3

8

10

 

Adcor A-556

     Notes: The A-556 is based closely on the M16/M4-series of assault rifles and carbines – with good reason.  The A-556 was one of the contenders in the US Army Individual Carbine Competition meant to replace the M4 Carbine. (The competition was cancelled in 2013 without finding a new carbine.)  The Army did say that the A-556 produces tight groups, outstanding accuracy, and outstanding functioning. Part of the competition included combat testing in Afghanistan, where is performed quite well. Also noted was the high rate of production that Adcor was able to produce, one that Adcor said they could maintain for any length of time. After this competition, the A-556 was offered on the civilian market. The A-556 differs from the M16/M4 in using a short-stroke gas piston instead of the Stoner-type direct impingement system.  This drastically reduced fouling, especially on the barrel extension, chamber, and bolt carrier group.  In addition, the A-556 has a proprietary ejection port cover with a wiper to reduce the intake of external crud, an ambidextrous charging handle placed forward on either side of the handguard (this was noted by the Army as limiting the usefulness of the handguard rail on the side the charging handle is mounted on, and breaking the “muscle memory” of troops used to the M16/M4), and a “key-locked, highly rigid” MIL-STD-1913 rail system, with a receiver rail and four-way handguard rails.  Barrel lengths are 10.5, 14.5, 16, 18, and 20 inches; the 10.5-inch and 14.5-inch are not generally sold to civilians, but are sold to police.  The military/police versions also have automatic fire functions, while civilian versions generally do not; simply use an “SA” ROF and the “Single Shot” recoil for civilian versions.  The A-556 uses an M4-type telescoping stock.

     The A-556 was otherwise a plain-vanilla M4/M16 variant.  Current models include the A-556 Elite and A-556 Elite GI (Gas Impingement).  The barrel is free-floating, and like the M16/M4, field stripping is toolless.  A-556 Elites with a 16-inch barrel can be had chambered in .300 Blackout and 7.62mm Kalashnikov.

     The A-556 GI uses direct gas impingement instead of a gas piston.  It is available only in 16-inch and 18-inch barrel versions. It is otherwise the same as the standard A-556 Elite for game purposes.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

A-556 (10.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.93 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$717

A-556 (14.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.11 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$759

A-556 (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.2 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$775

A-556 (18” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.45 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$795

A-556 (20” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.54 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$817

A-556 Elite (10.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

2.93 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$721

A-556 Elite (14.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.11 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$763

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.2 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$595

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel)

.300 Blackout

3.2 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$775

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.2 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$846

A-556 Elite (18” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.45 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$617

A-556 Elite (20” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.54 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$638

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

A-556 (10.5” Barrel)

3/5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

4/6

20

A-556 (14.5” Barrel)

3/5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4/6

34

A-556 (16” Barrel)

3/5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4/6

40

A-556 (18” Barrel)

3/5

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

4/6

47

A-556 (20” Barrel)

3/5

3

1-Nil

5/6

2

4/6

55

A-556 Elite (10.5” Barrel)

3/5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

4/6

21

A-556 Elite (14.5” Barrel)

3/5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4/6

35

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel, 5.56mm)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

41

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel, .300)

SA

3

2-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

46

A-556 Elite (16” Barrel, 7.62mm)

SA

4

2-Nil

5/6

4

Nil

46

A-556 Elite (18” Barrel)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

49

A-556 Elite (20” Barrel)

SA

3

1-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

57

 

Adcor DI/GI

     Notes: The DI and GI are almost the same rifles – the DI uses Stoner Direct Gas Impingement, while the GI uses a gas piston.  While this makes the GI a mark more reliable, this is not accounted for in game rules, and for game purposes, they are otherwise the same carbines.  They are essentially AR-15s built to a higher standard, with tight tolerances and carefully shaped parts, including a chromed bolt carrier group and bolt.  The GI version has a gas regulator which can be manually adjusted for things like dirt, fouling, and grenade launching.  The sliding stock is an Adcor design, but is very similar to one of Magpul’s designs. The grip is also custom, including what Adcor calls “aggressive texturing.”  It can be had with a forward charging handle, on the bolt carrier; if it does have this option, it will still retain the rear charging handle as well.  The upper receiver has a key-locked rigid MIL-STD 1913 rail system, and this continues onto the upper handguard; this is in addition to the three other handguard rails.  Unlike an AR-15, opening the halves of the receiver requires only a pinch on the retaining pins, instead of pushing the pin out.  Construction is largely of polymer and 7076-T6 aluminum, though of course the barrel and most of the internal parts are of steel. The barrel has a “GI profile,” which means that the muzzle end is heavy to support the weight of an M-203 grenade launcher (which otherwise, cannot be mounted, as the rifle lacks the mounting hardware).

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

DI (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.08 kg

10, 20, 30

$589

DI (18” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.11 kg

10, 20, 30

$611

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

DI (16”)

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

41

DI (18”)

SA

3

1-Nil

5/6

3

Nil

49

 

ADM Universal Improved Carbine Mod II

     Notes: The ADM UIC is designed for trackers -- those who must go ahead of the unit and find the traces of any an enemy's passage, no matter how small.  These persons need a quiet but powerful weapon to fell enemies without giving their position or presence away,  The ADM UIC is therefore lightweight, silenced, and camouflaged to the user's needs, and with a scope to allow long shots if necessary, and angled adjustable iron sights.  These are attached to a flattop MIL-STD-1913 rail. The controls are fully ambidextrous, including the magazine release.  The controls are furthermore oversized.  The pistol grip has a small compartment, as does the stock.  There is a further rail down the handguard, as well as small ones down the sides and the length of the underside of the handguard.  The charging handle has no latches, having a "force to be overcome" feature.  The suppressor is made for the rifle and helps give the rifle a neutral sense of balance. The telescopic sight is included in the cost.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

UIC Mod II (12.7" Barrel)

5.56mm NATO or 5.56mm NATO Subsonic

2.81 kg

10, 20, 30

$1031

UIC Mod II (16" Barrel)

5.56mm NATO or 5.56mm NATO Subsonic

3.14 kg

10, 20, 30

$1095

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

UIC Mod II (12.7" Standard)

SA

3

1-Nil

7/8

3

6

23

UIC Mod II (12.7" Subsonic)

SA

2

1-Nil

5/6

1

3

21

UIC Mod II (16" Standard)

SA

3

1-Nil

8/9

2

6

33

UIC Mod II (16" Subsonic)

SA

2

1-Nil

8/9

1

3

27

 

AKU-94

    Notes: This is a bullpup version of the various AK-series weapons, generally sold as a kit to convert existing AKs rather than a full weapon.  It was not a Russian weapon, but instead was sold in the US and Europe, as well as some other parts of the world, by a couple of American companies.  It was one of the few bullpup rifles available to the general public before the war, most bullpup weapon being produced exclusively for military and police forces.  The conversion from standard AK to AKU-94 configuration takes about 2 hours and takes an Easy: Gunsmith or Difficult: Small Arms (Rifle) roll.  The resulting weapon is over 25 centimeters shorter, but has a creepier trigger pull.  In addition, the construction of the AKU-94 is such that left-handed firers tend to have the charging handle hitting their face during firing, so it is definitely a right-handed weapon.  The new weapon is also not as well balanced as a standard AK. 

     Production of this weapon stopped with the Brady Gun Bans, but picked up again in the late 2000s using imported parts under Century International Arms.  These were designated the Century 1975, and built only in 7.62mm Kalashnikov.  For game purposes, this is identical to the AKU-94 in 7.62mm Kalashnikov.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though there were some reports of Russian and Chinese troops using these weapons, the reports of Russians using them are probably misidentified OTs-14s, and the Chinese weapons were probably locally-manufactured weapons of similar design and characteristics.  Though there were some civilians who had this modification done to their weapons, the AKU-94 was never a widely-used weapon, and most of them were made from AK-47s or AKMs.  There were most likely almost no conversions of AKMRs to this standard, but such a modification will exist only in the Twilight 2000 world.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is mainly just a novelty type of conversion.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AKU-94 (AK-47/AKM/AK-103-Based)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.96 kg

30, 40, 75D

$782

AKU-94 (AKMR-Based

5.45mm Kalashnikov

2.95 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75D

$490

AKU-94 (AK-74/AK-100 Based)

5.45mm Kalashnikov

2.95 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75D

$490

AKU-94 (AK-101 Based)

5.56mm NATO

2.75 kg

30

$540

AKU-94 (AK-102 Based

5.56mm NATO

2.55 kg

30

$500

AKU-94 (AK-104 Based)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.76 kg

30, 40, 75D

$742

AKU-94 (AK-105 Based)

5.45mm Kalashnikov

2.3 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75D

$450

AKU-94 (AK-107 Based

5.45mm Kalashnikov

2.7 kg

30, 40, 45, 60, 75D

$565

AKU-94 (AK-108 Based)

5.56mm NATO

2.95 kg

30

$615

AKU-94 (Kit Only)

NA

3.03 kg

NA

$380

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AKU-94 (AK-47/AKM/AK-103-Based)

5

4

2-Nil

4

3

9

40

AKU-94 (AKMR-Based)

5

3

1-Nil

4

3

7

35

AKU-94 (AK-74/AK-100 Based)

5

3

1-Nil

4

3

7

41

AKU-94 (AK-101 Based)

5

3

1-Nil

4

3

7

37

AKU-94 (AK-102 Based)

5

3

1-Nil

3

3

7

24

AKU-94 (AK-104 Based)

5

3

2-Nil

3

2

6

27

AKU-94 (AK-105 Based)

5

2

1-Nil

3

3

7

27

AKU-94 (AK-107 Based)

5

3

1-Nil

4

2

6

41

AKU-94 (AK-108 Based

5

3

1-Nil

4

2

5

37

 

Alexander Arms AR-17

     Notes: Though the AR-17 recognizably uses the AR-15-type as its base, it departs from the AR-15 in many ways, not the least of which is its chambering in .17 HMR.  Like most rimfire rifles, the .17 HMR round does not develop enough gas to reciprocate an operating system that uses gas; instead, the AR-17 uses straight blowback operation.  The AR-17’s barrel has a heavy profile and is free-floating, but the barrel is lightened without losing strength by the cutting of spiral grooves into it.  The barrel is 18 inches long and tipped by a flash suppressor which doubles as a rebar cutter, though the manufacturer admits that the flash suppressor doesn’t really do anything to stop the almost-nonexistent flash, and the .17 HMR round is probably not strong enough to cut rebar; the flash suppressor is for the most part simply there for looks, and protect the target crown.  The handguards are of round composite with lots of cooling holes in either side, underneath the front of the handguard is an attachment point for a bipod.  The rest of the AR-17 is strongly-built, with a bolt-carrier group of ETD-150 high-strength steel; this bolt-carrier group is chromed for reliability.  The bolt-carrier group itself is clearly stamped “.17 HMR” in large letters to avoid accidental placement in a non-rimfire rifle.  The extractor is hardened stainless steel.  The upper and lower receiver are of aircraft aluminum.  Atop the upper receiver is a MIL-STD-1913 rail; there are no iron sights, as the AR-17 is designed to be used with optics.  Though a standard trigger group is normally supplied with the AR-17, Alexander Arms will ship the rifle with a special trigger pack that can be tuned in any way by a knowledgeable individual.  Magazines for the AR-17 are proprietary and made of polymer; the pistol grip is also polymer and is shaped like that of an AR-15A2.  Though current AR-17 magazines hold only ten rounds, Alexander Arms has high-capacity magazines in the works. The AR-17 is equipped with a sliding M4-style stock.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The AR-17 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AR-17

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire

3.08 kg

10

$373

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AR-17

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

1

Nil

57

 

Alexander Arms Grendel

     Notes: This is another development of the AR-15 series by Alexander Arms.  Again, the modifications to existing AR-15s basically consist of replacing the upper receiver and barrel unit with a new one of Alexander Arms manufacture.  It was designed to address shortcomings in the 5.56mm NATO round, by replacing the round with a new one which has superior ballistics and stopping power.  As with the Beowulf, the Grendel is rumored to be testing with the US military. They have a collapsible stock, MIL-STD-1913 rail instead of a carrying handle, and a muzzle brake to reduce felt recoil.  Civilian versions do not have the MIL-STD-1913 rail or the muzzle brake, nor do they normally have a bipod.

     Like it’s big brother the Beowulf, the Grendel got a makeover in the mid-2000s.  The Grendel line split into several versions, each with several barrel lengths.  The Advantage or the Tactical may be equipped with up to five MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rails (four on special handguards, and one above the receiver). Others simply have a rail above the receiver, and some have one on a low-profile gas block at the front (primarily for a BUIS). These rails are monolithic, being machined to be a part of the rifle and from the same billet as the upper receiver. The base version of the Grendel is now the Grendel Tactical, which has either a 10.5, 14.5 or 16-inch barrel. Other than being match-quality, the barrel is standard profile and of standard quality. The barrel for the Tactical is of chrome-molybdenum-steel alloy, with the bore being chromed.  The muzzles are threaded to allow the use of a muzzle brake or a silencer instead of the standard flash suppressor.  (Versions with muzzle brakes and silencers are not included below.) The surface of the bolt has a color-case hardened finish, and has been peened and phosphated; an optional bolt has a triple-tempered surface, which is refined by hand and hardened and peened.  The bolt’s finish is a thin-but-dense chrome plating.  The ejection port, learning from lessons past, is designed specifically for positive ejection of the 6.5mm Grendel round.  Most stocks for the Grendel are M4-type sliding stocks, though some versions have fixed A2-type stocks.

     The Grendel Advantage is essentially equivalent to the original Grendel, using a choice of 19.5-inch of 24-inch barrels.  Roughly equivalent in size, but in most ways, the Advantage is more related to the “made over” Grendels.  Many of the Advantage’s features are the same as those of the Tactical.  Advantage barrels are made from stainless steel, and are chromed inside the bore.  They are of heavy profile and match-quality.  Though essentially designed as a rifle just short of a DMR-type rifle, the Advantage also has handguards with four-point MIL-STD-1913 rails. Another rail is above the receiver, and a low-profile gas block with folding BUIS.  Also standard with the Advantage is a light alloy bipod designed to be adjustable for height, cant, and allowing for 20 degrees on either side of pivoting.  The Advantage does come equipped with a low-power scope (about 3-5x). The Advantage is also known as the AWS (Advantage Weapon System).

     The Grendel GDMR (Grendel Designated Marksman Rifle) is in fact an actual Designated Marksman Rifle.  The core of the rifle is as per its predecessors, but the trigger is a match-quality trigger, and the 16, 20, or 24-inch barrels are match-quality, floating, and of a heavy profile.  The Grendel GDMR has only one MIL-STD-1913 rail above the receiver and another very short rail above the gas block; the GDMR also has rear and front folding BUIS.  The GDMR comes with a bipod as per the Advantage above. Along with a telescopic sight which is normally of 2.5-7x power.  Construction is generally heavier and most parts are hand-fitted.

     The Grendel GSR (Grendel Sniper Rifle) is sort of like the GDMR, but more so.  It was designed from the ground up as a sniper rifle.  The GSR uses a fixed A2-type stock, with a heavier buffer to somewhat reduce recoil.  The chromed-bore barrel features precision-cut rifling, with match-quality, free-floating, heavy-profile barrels; though they are normally tipped with an A2-type flash suppressor, a plain barrel with a target crown can also be had. These barrels can be 20 inches long, 24 inches, or an astounding 28 inches in length. A light alloy bipod (usually one of the Harris makes) is standard; this bipod is normally chosen with adjustments for can, height, and some amount of pivoting in mind.  Though it is a semiautomatic rifle, the GSR has a charging handle attached to the bolt instead of the normal AR-type rear-mounted bolt handle.  The handguards are composite and round but otherwise plain, and are well ventilated.  The upper receiver retains its MIL-STD-1913 rail; BUIS are not normally sold with the GSR.  The trigger pack is a match-quality pack. One of several scopes are sold with the GSR.

     There are also some versions of the Grendel that are meant for, shall we say, the more discriminating buyer.  The Grendel Entry has a 19.5-inch stainless steel barrel that is match-grade and free floating.  The buyer may specify a standard Alexander Arms barrel or a Shilen barrel. The upper receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail, but a round composite handguard. Finishes include black and a variety of camouflage patterns.  Though meant primarily for civilian hunters, it also has a barrel length that lends itself to use by a designated marksman or a sniper.

     The Grendel Overwatch (also known as the Grendel OWS) is, as the name indicates, a rifle designed for Designated Marksmen, and uses a longer 24-inch, stainless steel, free floating, match-grade barrel.  The barrel may be tipped with a target crown or a flash suppressor (or at the buyer’s option, a muzzle brake or even a silencer/suppressor). The barrel may be an Alexander Arms barrel or a Shilen barrel. As with the Entry (and indeed, most of these premium Grendels), the finish may be basic black or one of a variety of camouflage patterns.  The handguards are virtually identical to those of the Entry, but is made of composite material; the upper receiver retains its MIL-STD-1913 rail; the Overwatch also has a low-profile gas block topped with a small section of rail (generally for use with a BUIS sight).  In design, it is similar to the Grendel GDMS with a 24-inch barrel, but in details it is very different.

     Alexander Arms also makes gas-piston-driven versions of the Tactical.  For game purposes, these are identical to the Tactical; however, as far upkeep is concerned, the GM may want to keep that in mind.

     Magazines for the new version of the Grendel are standard AR-15/M16 magazines with the proper guts to hold and feed the 6.5mm Grendel round.  This allows for more magazine capacity choices.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Grendel does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Grendel (19.5” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

3.07 kg

10, 17

$1190

Grendel (24” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

3.19 kg

10, 17

$1328

Grendel Tactical (10.5” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

2.95 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$609

Grendel Tactical (14.5” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

3.07 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$650

Grendel Tactical (16” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

3.28 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$665

Grendel Advantage (19.5” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

3.62 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1386

Grendel Advantage (24” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.12 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1515

Grendel GDMR (16” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.2 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1265

Grendel GDMR (20” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.64 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1405

Grendel GDMR (24” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.9 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1539

Grendel GSR (20” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.24 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1408

Grendel GSR (24” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.46 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1543

Grendel GSR (28” Barrel)

6.5mm Grendel

4.63 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$1676

Grendel Entry

6.5mm Grendel

3.63 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$689

Grendel Overwatch

6.5mm Grendel

3.89 kg

5, 10, 17, 20, 30

$940

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Grendel (19.5”)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

71

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

5/6

1

Nil

91

Grendel (24”)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

88

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6/7

1

Nil

114

Grendel Tactical (10.5” Barrel)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

3/5

3

Nil

29

Grendel Tactical (14.5” Barrel)

SA

3

1-1-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

48

Grendel Tactical (16” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

55

Grendel Advantage (19.5” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6

3

Nil

73

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6

1

Nil

95

Grendel Advantage (24” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

3

Nil

91

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

118

Grendel GDMR (16” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6

2

Nil

59

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

6

1

Nil

77

Grendel GDMR (20” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

77

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

1

Nil

101

Grendel GDMR (24” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

8

3

Nil

94

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

8

2

Nil

122

Grendel GSR (20” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

2

Nil

78

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

1

Nil

101

Grendel GSR (24” Barrel)

SA

3

1-2-Nil

8

3

Nil

94

With Bipod

SA

3

1-2-Nil

8

2

Nil

123

Grendel GSR (28” Barrel)

SA

4

1-2-Nil

8

3

Nil

94

With Bipod

SA

4

1-2-Nil

8

2

Nil

146

Grendel Entry

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

3

Nil

74

Grendel Overwatch

SA

3

1-2-Nil

7

3

Nil

110

 

Alexander Arms Genghis

     Notes: This is basically an AR-15 carbine modified to fire 5.45mm Kalashnikov ammunition (which Alexander Arms calls the .21 Genghis round; Alexander Arms’ round does differ in several ways from the 5.45mm Kalashnikov, but not in any way that can be simulated with Twilight 2000 game mechanics).  The Genghis features a 16-inch barrel; it is not typically equipped with a flash suppressor, being designed primarily for the civilian market, but does have a MIL-STD-1913 rail instead of a carrying handle, and is built to otherwise meet or exceed military and police specifications.  (Versions with carrying handles instead of MIL-STD-1913 rails are also available.) Ten-round magazines are normally supplied with the Genghis, but modified AR-15/M16 magazines with larger capacities are also available.

     It should be noted that of the time of this writing (Aug 2012), the Genghis is no longer found on the Alexander Arms web site.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This rifle is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Genghis

5.45mm Kalashnikov

3.4 kg

10, 20, 30

$509

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Genghis

SA

3

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

44

 

Alex Pro Econo Carbine

     Notes: This carbine is designed to be inexpensive in price, but not cheap in quality.  Though it lacks many of the features of other ARs, it is not a bare-bones carbine, with some nice add-ons and features.

     The 16-inch military-profile barrel is phosphated, and finished in M16 Nitride.  It is tipped with an AR-15A2-type birdcage flash suppressor.  The barrel is of 4140CM steel. The chambering uses a .223 Wilde chamber, which means that it can use military and civilian ammunition interchangeability.  It uses a carbine-length gas system (direct impingement). The trigger is a single-stage Milspec trigger, which is like a standard AR trigger, but has less of a pull weight. The bolt carrier group is finished in slick nickel/boron which is otherwise Milspec.

     It uses a Magpul MOE handguard, with a design similar to an AR-15A2 pistol grip. The handguard is roughly rectangular and has several cooling slots.  It is fairly short, and there is a long length of exposed barrel.  It has a six-position M4-type sliding stock. The Econo is designed specifically for Magpul P-MAG polymer magazines, it can also feed from standard AR-type metal magazines or polymer magazines.

     The Econo comes with a Vortex Strikefire II red dot sight; though it does not come with iron sights, they are available from Alex Pro Firearms, and it can mount almost any sights and optics on its receiver-top Picatinny rail.  Though it has no handguard rails, the front of the handguard has a short length of rail for a BUIS front sight or laser or white light device.

     The Alex Pro 5.56mm Carbine Rifle is similar to the Econo Carbine, but fires only military ammunition, and is even less expensive (RL) than the Econo Carbine. It has a skeletonized Magpul MOE sliding stock, and a 12.5-inch APF T-MOD handguard with a long Picatinny rail on top continuous with the rail atop the receiver. At the front of the handguard at the bottom is a very short length of Picatinny rail, meant to be used with optics such as a laser or flashlight, or accessories like a bipod.  It has BUISs, but no red-dot sight. A version of this rifle is finished in one of several colors, ranging from simple Flat Dark Earth to a camouflage pattern or even an American flag job.

     The Tactical Varmint is designed not only for varmint shooting, but competition.  It used the .223 Wilde chamber of the Econo Carbine, with the nickel/boron treatment of the bolt carrier group, but has an 18-inch medium contour barrel.  It has a 14-inch Quad-Rail handguard, with a top full-length Picatinny rail, continuous with the receiver rail, and further short lengths of rail on each side at the rear end of the handguard and one short length at the front.  This rifle too comes with the red dot sight.  A variant of the Tactical Varmint, the Long Range varmint, has a 24-inch heavy contour tipped with a target crown instead of a flash suppressor., with the bolt carrier based on the AR-10 instead of the AR-15.  The gas system is rifle-length.  The trigger is a CMC 3.5-pound trigger. The Field has a barrel of 20 inches, and is a 4140cm medium contour barrel.  The Long Range Varmint and the Field do not have the red dot sights.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Econo Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.36 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$721

5.56mm Carbine Rifle

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$577

Tactical Varmint

5.56mm NATO

3.63 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$748

Long Range Varmint

.243 Winchester

4.16 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$817

Econo Field

.243 Winchester

4.01 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$767

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Econo Carbine

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

40

5.56mm Carbine Rifle

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

40

Tactical Varmint

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

54

Long Range Varmint

SA

3

2-Nil

6/7

2

Nil

69

Econo Field

SA

3

2-Nil

5/6

2

Nil

53

 

American Tactical AT-47

     Notes: Though most of the parts are sourced from Zastava in Serbia through German Sport Guns, the AT-47 is assembled in Summerville, South Carolina, and has a US-made barrel and receiver, so determining what nationality the AT-47 is was a bit difficult.  The receiver is milled and is made of 4140 hardened steel which has a Parkerized finish.  The rear sight is adjustable for elevation, and the front for elevation and windage; oddly enough, the AT-47 also has a grenade sight for rifle grenades, though the barrel has no attachment for launching rifle grenades.  The AT-47 also has bayonet lugs, though it is not sold with a bayonet.  It can use steel, light alloy, or polymer magazines; the one supplied with the rifle from the factory is polymer.  The internals have been appropriately de-miled; the parts were kept together has a parts kit until their assembly in the US.  Furniture is beech except for the polymer pistol grip, with a rubber non-slip cap on the butt.  An underfolding stock is an option.  The barrel is 16.5 inches, and the barrel is not chrome-lined, like an actual AK-type rifle (except the newer ones).  The barrel is tipped by an AK-74-type brake/flash suppressor. Controls are all AK.

     American Tactical also makes a .22 Long Rifle version.  Changes are those appropriate to the new caliber, such as a change to blowback operation and special magazines designed to look like AK magazines.  The .22 version is otherwise the same as the AT-47 in game terms.  Weight is nearly identical, but the buttstock is a bit shorter than an AT-47; the rifle is intended as a trainer for both teenagers and adults for an AK-type platform.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AT-47 (Fixed Stock)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.63 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$845

AT-47 (Folding Stock)

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.63 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$875

AT-47 22

.22 Long Rifle

3.5 kg

10

$295

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AT-47 (Fixed Stock)

SA

4

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

47

AT-47 (Folding Stock)

SA

4

2-Nil

5/6

3

Nil

47

AT-47 22

SA

1

Nil

6

1

Nil

34

 

Anderson M4 Carbine

     Notes: The Anderson M4 Carbine, an AR clone, is advertised as a “no-lube” carbine; the reason is that is permanently treated with R585, a process that bonds calcium into the metal at the molecular metal. (I have found through experience that rifles that say they are “no lube” need lubing; pretty much every rifle needs some level of lubing, so I am suspicious of Anderson’s claims.)  The receiver is made of 7075-T6 aluminum (the standard for ARs), as stated, bonded to calcium molecules. The receiver halves have additionally a hard anodized 8625 F finish. The receiver top has a monolithic Picatinny rail, and the Zombie Green handguard has an upper Picatinny rail and a bottom add-on half-length rail (as sold). The handguards are round and polymer, with handguard-length rows of cooling slots and attachment points for Picatinny or Weaver rails on three sides (the top already has a rail).  The rifle has no mounted sights, though AR-15-type BUIS are provided.  The stock is a Magpul MOE telescoping stock, and the pistol grip is a Hogue grip.  The barrel is 16 inches, has a heavy profile, is of 4140 steel, is in a free-float handguard, and is tipped with an Anderson Phantom flash suppressor shaped for blasting rebar.  The gas block is low profile and is under the end of the handguard.  The M4 Carbine is not sold with magazines included, but any sort of 5.56 NATO (or 6.8mm SPC) magazines are usable.

 

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M4 Carbine 5.56

5.56mm NATO

2.86 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$597

M4 Carbine 6.8

6.8mm SPC

2.86 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$738

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M4 Carbine 5.56

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

42

M4 Carbine 6.8

SA

3

1-2-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

57

 

AR-57

     Notes: Produced by a company called, appropriately enough, AR57, the AR-57 is an AR-15A2 with a new upper receiver and barrel which allows the weapon to fire the 5.7mm FN cartridge.  Certain parts of the AR-15A2 (or A3) version (with or without a sliding stock) are required to use this modification; it will not work on a stock AR-15 or AR-15A1, as it will not cycle properly, and essentially produces a bolt-action rifle.  The new upper receiver comes in a version with 16.04-inch barrel or (where legal) an 11-inch-barrel SBR configuration.  Both FNH and AR57 produce proper magazines for use with this configuration; though aftermarket magazines are produced by ATI and KCI, these magazines have proven prone to failure in the AR-57 conversion.  The 5.7mm FN round performs quite well in the longer barrels, increasing range, stopping power and penetration (unfortunately, not measurable in Twilight 2000 terms), and the resulting conversion is slightly lighter than the standard AR-15A2 or A3.  The AR-57 conversion is primarily sold as an upper receiver set and magazine well conversion and not as a complete rifle.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 16.04” Barrel)

5.7mm FN

2.15 kg

10, 20, 30

$425

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 16.04” Barrel)

5.7mm FN

2.15 kg

10, 20, 30

$445

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 11” Barrel)

5.7mm FN

1.95 kg

10, 20, 30

$372

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 11” Barrel)

5.7mm FN

1.95 kg

10, 20, 30

$392

AR-57 16.04” Upper

N/A

0.82 kg

N/A

$204

AR-57 11” Upper

N/A

0.75 kg

N/A

$179

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 16.04”)

SA

2

1-Nil

5

3

Nil

42

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 16.04”, HV)

SA

2

1-1-Nil

5

3

Nil

50

AR-57 (Folding Stock, 16.04”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

42

AR-57 (Folding Stock, 16.04”, HV)

SA

2

1-1-Nil

4/5

3

Nil

50

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 11”)

SA

2

1-Nil

4

2

Nil

25

AR-57 (Fixed Stock, 11”, HV)

SA

2

1-1-Nil

4

2

Nil

30

AR-57 (Folding Stock, 11”)

SA

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

Nil

25

AR-57 (Folding Stock, 11”, HV)

SA

2

1-1-Nil

3/4

2

Nil

30

 

Armalite AR-18

     Notes: This weapon was designed in the 1970s with experience gained from the M16 series.  Armalite found that there were a lot of countries that wanted to license-produce the M16, but did not have the modern facilities required to produce the more complicated M16.  The AR-18 was designed to be simple and cheap to produce, as well as being relatively “soldier-proof.”  The US Army tested it, but did not produce it; it was then licensed to Howa Machinery in Japan, NWM in the Netherlands, and Sterling in Great Britain.  They also got virtually no military contracts, and Sterling sold its license to a company in the Philippines (who also got no military sales).  Much more lucrative was a semiautomatic civilian version, the AR-180; tens of thousands of AR-180s were sold to civilians in various countries.  The AR-18S is a shortened AR-18, similar in concept to the CAR15. Bayonets and rifle grenades can be used, if the flash suppressor is removed.

     A later civilian version, the AR-180B, is somewhat different than the standard AR-180 and bears some elaboration.  The AR-180B uses a lower receiver made from polymer strengthened with a steel liner.  The shape of this lower receiver mimics the original lower receiver exactly, so that an upper of an AR-180 may be placed on a lower from an AR-180B and vice versa.  The trigger group of the AR-180B is borrowed from the AR-15 instead of being the original AR-180 design.  The front and rear sights are also borrowed from the AR-15A2, though the protective ears are different from those of the AR-15A2, and there is no elevation adjustment wheel on the AR-180B (elevation adjustments are done on the front sight).  The scope mount is of original AR-180 design.  There is a new design magazine well which allows the use of AR-15, M16, and AR-18 magazines.  The magazine release button is thus the same as on an AR-15, and there is a small protrusion to prevent its being pressed accidentally.  The AR-15 has a sort of “half-pepperpot” muzzle brake instead of the original flash suppressor.  The barrel is slightly longer at 19 inches.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Starting in 1995, production of military AR-18s started again in the Philippines and Great Britain, who managed to sell a large amount of them to African and Southeast Asian countries.  Sterling later produced more for issue to local militia units loyal to the Crown.  NWM in the Netherlands also produced some AR-18s, and they were used by Dutch and Luxembourg resistance fighters against the French.  In the US, many as Russian or Mexican soldier (or sometimes, Milgov, CivGov, or New American soldier) discovered that their enemy was a local militia soldier armed with an AR-180 converted to automatic fire. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: This was surprisingly common in issue to people working for US or British intelligence, due to the problem with tracking down exactly who made the weapon, and the ease with which its parts could be made.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AR-18

5.56mm NATO

3.04 kg

20, 30, 40

$608

AR-18S

5.56mm NATO

2.78 kg

20, 30, 40

$524

AR-180B

5.56mm NATO

2.72 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40

$639

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AR-18

5

3

1-Nil

5/6

2

6

48

AR-18S

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

6

19

AR-180B

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

51

 

Armalite Defensive Sporting Rifles

     Notes: This is a collection of three rifles primarily designed for home defensive, but can double as hunting rifles.  They are similar in design and philosophy.  The RL price is rather inexpensive (though of course the game price may not concur). The DSR is based on Armalite’s M15 series.

     The DEF-10 is a 5.56mm version with a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver and another very short one atop the gas block.  It has round M4-length handguards and an M4-type 6-position sliding stock.  The upper and lower receivers are also Milspec.  Though it ships with a Magpul 20-round polymer magazine, the DEF-10 can take other sorts of military, steel, and polymer magazines.  The DEF-10 does not come with BUIS; you must buy them separately.  A variant, the DEF-10F, has a conventional A2 front sight instead of the railed gas block.  Both are identical for game purposes. The barrel is 16 inches and tipped by an A2 flash suppressor.  It is made from 4140 chrome/moly steel, and the barrel is hand-lapped twice. The bore is hard-chromed.  The barrels have been compared in quality to Krieger-made barrels, but are all Armalite.  The barrels are free-floating and Melonite-finished.  The trigger is two-stage, but is very crisp and without a lot of takeup.  However it is stiff: Robert Jordan, a noted gun expert, has measured it at 10.94 pounds primary pull weight, and many shooters trade out the trigger block for a better one. Controls are not ambidextrous, unless you include the charging handle.  Felt recoil is manageable, though muzzle jump is pronounced.  Some have experienced the rounds sticking on what appears to be a burred feed ramp; however, this is easy to fix, if you know what you’re doing.

     The DSR-10 is essentially the same as the DEF-10, but in 7.62mm.  It does not have a lot of extra features, similar to the DEF-10.  Barrels, handguards, Mil-STD-1913 rails, are all similar, if not identical.

     Though it is sort of a secret at Armalite, it is rumored that the DEF-10 and DSR-10 can be fitted with an M-203 grenade launcher.  The DSR-10 is technically a Battle Rifle, but is included here for completeness.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

DEF-10

5.56mm NATO

2.88 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 35

$591

DSR-10

7.62mm NATO

3.58 kg

5, 10, 20, 25

$1021

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

DEF-10

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

42

DSR-10

SA

4

2-3-Nil

5/7

4

Nil

47

 

Armalite LEM15A4

     Notes: Unlike most of ArmaLite’s AR-15 clones and models, the LEM15A4 was designed with law enforcement in mind, and its sale to US civilians is restricted.  It is very much like a semiautomatic version of the M16A4, with its flattop receiver and MIL-STD-1913 sight rail; however, the barrel is only 16 inches, and is heavier than that of the M16A4.  The handguards are specially made; they are the same length as an M4’s handguards, and include a mount for a full-sized flashlight on top and offset to the left.  The LEM15A4 comes with an Elcan Optical Sight, but will accept any sort of NATO-compatible sight or scope. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon could sometimes be found as a substitute standard among US troops, particularly among those raised by CivGov forces after the November Nuclear Strikes.  Most of these were modified for automatic fire.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

LEM15A4

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

7, 10, 20, 30

$739

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

LEM15A4

SA

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

Nil

47

 

Armalite M15

     Notes: The M15 is essentially a modernized version of the AR-15, and may also be regarded to some extent as a smaller version of Armalite’s New AR-10 Series.  The M15 comes in four basic versions: the M15A2, basically very similar to the AR-15A2, but with a heavy barrel, muzzle brake, carrying handle a la AR-15, and round handguards and a stock similar to those of the AR-15A2.  The standard barrel is 20 inches, but there is also a carbine version with a 16-inch barrel.  The M15A4 is basically the same weapon as the M15A2, but uses a flattop upper receiver with a MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The M15A4 is meant to be used with various optics, but there is a very short MIL-STD-1913 rail in front of the handguards, and iron sights may be attached to the two rails.  The A-15A4 is a little lighter than the M15A2.  The M15A4(T) is a target version of the M15A4; the rifle version uses a 24-inch heavy barrel which is target crowned and designed for accuracy, and it has no muzzle brake or flash suppressor.  The upper receiver is flattop and has a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the handguards are round and made from aluminum.  There is also a carbine version of this weapon; this has the heavy target barrel, but it does have a muzzle brake and the barrel is only 16 inches.  The trigger of these two versions is a National Match two-stage trigger.  The M15A2 and A-4 Carbines are special models designed for military and police use; they may have automatic fire capability as options, use an M4-style folding stock, and may have a 14.5-inch or 16-inch barrel with a flash suppressor instead of a muzzle brake.  The M15A4 LE Carbine is flattop; the M15A2 LE Carbine has a carrying handle.

     The M15 Light Tactical Carbines (LTCs) are…well…light. They are perhaps the lightest full-sized AR carbines on the market. This is partially due to the skeletonized KeyMod handguards, a low-profile gas block, and to lighter, yet stronger metal.  Their 16-inch barrels are free-floating in their handguards, and have the standard thick-thin government M16 profile. They are made of Chrome/Moly steel, and are tipped by an A2-type flash suppressor that sits on threads and can be replaced.  They have a MIL-STD-1913 rail above the receiver, connected to one above the handguards. The finish is anodized for the upper and lower receivers and a manganese phosphated barrel.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M15A2 Rifle

5.56mm NATO

3.67 kg

10, 20, 30

$655

M15A2 Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30

$614

M15A4 Rifle

5.56mm NATO

3.58 kg

10, 20, 30

$655

M15A4 Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30

$614

M15A4(T) Rifle

5.56mm NATO

4.17 kg

10, 20, 30

$653

M15A4(T) Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.22 kg

10, 20, 30

$618

M15A2/A4 LE Carbine (14.5” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30

$569

M15A42/A4 LE Carbine (16” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30

$585

M15 LTC

5.56mm NATO

2.72 kg

10, 20, 30

$596

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M15A2 Rifle

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

57

M15A2 Carbine

SA

3

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

41

M15A4 Rifle

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

57

M15A4 Carbine

SA

3

1-Nil

5

2

Nil

41

M15A4(T) Rifle

SA

3

1-Nil

7

2

Nil

73

M15A4(T) Carbine

SA

3

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

43

M15A2/A4 LE Carbine (14.5” Barrel)

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

6

34

M15A2/A4 LE Carbine (16” Barrel)

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

6

40

M15 LTC

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

42

 

Arms Tech Compak-16

     Notes: The idea behind this weapon was to produce a compact version of the M16 while avoiding the massive muzzle blast and firing signature that such a weapon normally produces.  To this end, Arms Tech used a standard M16 lower receiver and paired it with a modified upper receiver using a specially designed barrel shroud/muzzle brake.  The standard buttstock was replaced with a sliding wire stock, and the carrying handle was replaced with a MIL-STD-1913 rail (the stock Compak-16 comes with an Occluded Eye Sight licensed-produced from a South African design). The cyclic rate has also been reduced to 600 rpm (though this has no effect game-wise).  The rifling allows for the effective use of either SS-109-type or M193-type ammunition, as well as subsonic rounds.  Arms Tech has also designed a silencer for use with the Compak-16, which is easily attached and removed, as well as one which replaces the barrel assembly and becomes an integral part of the Compak-16.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though it had little success with the military or police, survivalists and militia members in the US liked the Compak-16, especially female members. 

     Merc 2000 Notes: This is mostly a civilian niche weapon, though there has been some experimentation by the US military, the CIA, and various Federal agencies.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Compak-16

5.56mm NATO

2.5 kg

20, 30

$873

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Compak-16

5

2

1-Nil

2/4

2

4

23

 

Atlantic Arms AA Pol47

     Notes: As the designation might indicate to some, the AA Pol47 is an AK-47-type rifle built mostly using Polish parts kits, with enough American-made parts (primarily the barrel) so as to not run afoul of US firearms regulations. The Polish parts kits parts have been cleaned up by careful machining and hand work.

     The 16-inch Green Mountain barrel is chrome-lined, unlike most AK-47s, and the rifle has a nickel-plated bolt and carrier. The barrel is tipped by Tapco slant muzzle brake, baffled at the top, and designed to allow the fitting of a suppressor without removing the brake. (Many shooters do not think that the muzzle brake takes away any barrel climb.) The brake is removable, revealing a standard AK-47 muzzle, but a suppressor cannot be attached without the muzzle brake in place.  The Pol47 comes with a standard AK-type optics mount.  The Pol47 has a manganese phosphate finish to the metalwork, including the exterior of the barrel and the muzzle brake.  It uses standard wooden stocks and handguards; depending on the parts kit, the type of wood may vary, but is typically beech or walnut.  The wood color and pattern are also essentially arbitrary; the wood is refinished by Atlantic Arms, but may show signs of usage, and Atlantic Arms will only guarantee that the stocks and forearms are from Fair to Good condition. The pistol grip is wood, though it may not be the same kind of wood as the stock and forearm; it will be, however, roughly the same color as the stock and forearm. Most buyers say that the fit and finish are from good to excellent. The Pol47 does have a bayonet lug, as well as sling swivels. Atlantic Arms tests the assembled rifles, including laser boresighting and by putting rounds through the rifle.

     The RL cost of this rifle is very reasonable.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AA Pol47

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.18 kg

10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$839

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AA Pol47

SA

4

2-Nil

6

3

Nil

44

 

Atlantic Arms AKX-9PT

     Notes: This 9mm Carbine is also available in pistol form, though the pistol is much more rare.  This carbine was first shown at the 2017 SHOT Show, and it is only beginning sales at the time of this writing (early-July 2017).  At the time, it was placed in the Coming Weapons display.  It uses primarily polymer furniture, except for the Manticore metal-covered-in-polymer folding stock.  The stock is attached via a trunnion, which allows it to be removed and replaced with a stock of the shooter’s choice. Operating handles, paddles, charging handle, and buttons remain AK, though the operation is changed to blowback, with no gas piston.  The gas block is simulated.  The magazine well is modified to take the 9mm magazines, and magazines directly into the well.  Sights are AK.  The bolt hold-open device is a departure from the AK series.  The AKX-9PT was designed to use Colt 9mm submachinegun magazines; steel, light alloy/aluminum, and polymer versions are available.  The AKX-9PT is an SBR, with an 11.125-inch barrel tipped with a long flash suppressor, which is removable and threaded, and replaceable with a different muzzle device. (There is also a non-SBR version, which has a 16.125-inch barrel.) The carbine has a side rail for optics; this side rail can be equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 or Weaver rail interface.  Finish is in black, with Black KG Gun Kote for the metal parts and black polymer for the polymer parts.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AKX-9PT (Short Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

3.08 kg

20, 30, 32

$252

AKX-9PT (Long Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

3.39 kg

20, 30, 32

$302

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AKX-9PT (Short Barrel)

SA

2

1-Nil

2/4

1

Nil

24

AKX-9PT (Long Barrel)

SA

2

1-Nil

3/5

1

Nil

36

 

Auto-Ordnance M1 Carbine

     Notes: The M1 Carbine was designed in response to a 1940 US Army request for a weapon to replace the pistol and submachinegun in rear area troops.  However, a lot of M1 Carbines were actually used by infantry leadership personnel, paratroopers, commanders, and suchlike; it was modified, reworked, and put into uses far different than it’s intended role as a weapon for support troops.  It continued in service until well into the Vietnam War, where it was often issued to ARVN troops and strikers working for US Army Special Forces.  Before military production stopped, almost 6.5 million of them had been built in the US and Italy (by Beretta).  M1 Carbines are still in use in 2010; they were sold and given away by the US government to civilians, bought by police departments, and given to Third World armies supporting the US cause during the Cold War.  There are still some civilian arms companies manufacturing the M1 in small numbers, and they also have been modified for many different calibers by both manufacturers and individual weaponsmiths. Today, virtually all M1 Carbines are in the hands of private owners; it seems to have never lost its cachet. As with the M1 Garand, the M1 Carbine was produced by a large number of companies during World War 2, and later copies were also produced by several countries (both licensed and unlicensed manufacture).

     There were four variants of the M1 Carbine built by the US government: the basic M1, a standard format rifle; the M1A1, an M1 with a folding metal stock built for World War 2 paratroopers; the M-2, a selective-fire version of the M1; and the M-3, an M1 built specifically to mount the then-new IR sniper scopes being experimented with at the end of World War 2.  (Only 2100 M-3’s were made, and most of them were converted back to the M1 specification later.) Construction of the M1 was deliberately kept as simple as possible without sacrificing quality, and most World War 2-era M1 Carbines will still function today with standard maintenance.  The balance is good, and the 18-inch barrel wears well despite a relatively long length of exposed barrel.  The stocks have a space for a small cleaning kit in them accessed through the buttplate, except on the M1A1, where an abbreviated version was built into a part of the folding stock. Various changes were made during production to simplify production; most of these alterations revolved around the amount of wood used on the handguards and their configuration, though the magazine catch was also modified from a button to a lever. Some versions also had a muzzle device for the launching of rifle grenades. The M1 Carbine was well liked by most troops, despite complaints about its relatively-anemic cartridge.

     In 2005, Auto-Ordnance began making a new version of the M1 Carbine, and later introduced three other versions.  Their version, the AOM130, is not an exact reproduction; the stock is of stained birch instead of the linseed oil-finished walnut of the original version.  The Auto-Ordnance Carbine has some later M-2-style features, such as a safety which consists of a rotary switch instead of a crossbolt safety; an M-2 style bolt instead of the original “flat” bolt (though it does not contain an auto sear); the rear sight is of the improved M-2 variety; the front sight is protected instead of being open; and the weapon has a bayonet lug.  Furthermore, the rear sight is more adjustable than the standard M-2 sight.  There is also a slight weight difference; the Auto-Ordnance M1 Carbine is heavier than the standard M1 Carbine.  The AOM130 is shipped with 15-round magazines, but can also take 30-round magazines (if you can find one).  The AOM140 is identical, except for a modification that allows it to take only a 10-rund magazine specially designed for it; it is designed for sale in California.  The 10-round magazine will not fit in any other of the new Auto-Ordnance M1 Carbine versions.  For game purposes, it is otherwise identical to the AOM130. 

     The other versions are the AOM150, which is a copy of the M1A1 folding-stock version; again, there is a weight difference, and the AOM150 has the same modifications as the AOM130.  The AOM160 is a sort of modern version of the M1 Carbine; it has black polymer furniture, a black oxide finish on the external metalwork, and a side-folding polymer stock mounted on a steel frame.  The polymer of the pistol grip is rubber-coated and checkered, and has a small finger stop at the bottom.  The barrel shroud is steel and perforated for cooling (though I wouldn’t think it would really be necessary).  Despite all the polymer, it is the heaviest of the new Auto-Ordinance M1 Carbines.

     Fulton Armory makes a faithful copy of the M1 Carbine, accurate in almost every detail despite modern production techniques.  Chiappa M1-22 makes a similar weapon, but it is even more faithful to the original with most construction details and methods identical to the original except for some updating and re-sizing for caliber fired.  The stock is Italian Hardwood which is varnished and weatherproof, and which has the side-mounted sling with a slot in the side of the stock that takes an oil bottle.  At the buyer’s option, the stock may be polymer instead of wood; this may be black or Muddy Girl camo. Instead of the gas operation of the M1 or M-2, the M1-22 uses blowback operation, which is more reliable with rimfire cartridges. The Polymer rear sight is removable and adjustable for windage and elevation.  The trigger guard, barrel band, the front sight post, and bayonet lug are also of polymer; and external metalwork is blued.  The trigger itself is zinc alloy.

     Some 50% of parts of the M1-22 are interchangeable with those of an Auto-Ordnance M1.  This includes the entire stock of both types. Though relatively few have been made, a variant, the M1-9, is chambered for 9mm Parabellum. Barrel lengths, like the original, are 18 inches, with no muzzle device.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Auto-Ordnance versions of the M1 Carbine are not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M1 Carbine

.30 Carbine

2.36 kg

15, 30

$316

M1A1 Carbine

.30 Carbine

2.53 kg

15, 30

$341

M-2 Carbine

.30 Carbine

2.36 kg

15, 30

$316

AOM130

.30 Carbine

2.45 kg

15, 30

$311

AOM150

.30 Carbine

2.44 kg

15, 30

$342

AOM160

.30 Carbine

2.64 kg

15, 30

$342

Chiappa M1-22 (Wood Stock)

.22 Long Rifle

2.27 kg

10, 15, 30

$280

Chiappa M1-22 (Synthetic Stock)

.22 Long Rifle

2.49 kg

10, 15, 30

$290

Chiappa M1-9 (Wood Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.68 kg

10, 15, 30

$390

Chiappa M1-9 (Synthetic Stock)

9mm Parabellum

2.68 kg

10, 15, 30

$400

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M1 Carbine

SA

2

1-Nil

6

2

Nil

50

M1A1 Carbine

SA

2

1-Nil

4/6

1

Nil

50

M-2 Carbine

5

2

1-Nil

6

2

4

50

AOM130

SA

2

1-Nil

6

1

Nil

50

AOM150/AOM160

SA

2

1-Nil

4/5

1

Nil

50

Chiappa M1-22 (Wood Stock)

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

31

Chiappa M1-22 (Synthetic Stock)

SA

1

Nil

5

1

Nil

31

Chiappa M1-9 (Wood Stock)

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

45

Chiappa M1-9 (Synthetic Stock)

SA

2

1-Nil

5

1

Nil

45

 

Barrett M468 Carbine

     Notes: This modification of the M16/M4 series was designed specifically for use by US special operations forces.  The weapon was initially tested in very limited quantities in Afghanistan starting in 2002, and some are also being used in Iraq.  The M468 is essentially a stock M4 or M16 lower receiver with a new upper receiver and barrel designed by Barrett, and firing new ammunition designed by Remington.  The new upper receiver has a bolt carrier group designed for the new cartridge, and the weapon is fed from modified M16-style magazines.  The upper receiver is fitted with a MIL-STD-1913 rail in lieu of a carrying handle, there are four further such rails on the handguard, which is similar to that of the M4 SOPMOD.  Folding iron sights are fitted to allow clear use of optics and accessories. 

     Recently, a version with a short 12.5” barrel and the capability to mount a suppressor has been designed.  This version is primarily aimed at military users (particularly special operations), and a civilian version is not planned, as the barrel is too short for legal civilian sales in the US.  In this version, the muzzle brake is much more beefy, and a sliding stock is standard.

     The model number “468” refers to the year 2004 (the official date of entry into military stocks) and the caliber (6.8mm).  Barrett also produced a semiautomatic version for civilian use, without all the bells and whistles.

     In 2008, Barrett released the REC-7 (Reliability Enhanced Carbine, designed in 2007) carbine.  This is essentially an M468 with the operation changed to use a gas piston system instead of a straight Stoner-type gas impingement system.  More of the key components are of stainless steel, particularly the innards.  The gas regulator is adjustable, allowing for the removal of the flash suppressor and attachment of a silencer.  The iron sights are folding types.  Barrel length is 16 inches with a heavy barrel.  The stock is an M4-type sliding stock. In 2010, Barrett introduced the REC-7 in 5.56mm NATO.  At the same time, the stock for all REC-7s was changed to a Magpul MOE sliding stock, an adjustable gas regulator was added for suppressed fire, and the upper receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail as well as four-point rails on the handguards.  The top rail forms a continuous rail, including one above the gas block.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M468 (Fixed Stock)

6.8mm SPC

3.86 kg

5, 10, 28

$747

M468 (16” Barrel, Folding Stock)

6.8mm SPC

3.86 kg

5, 10, 28

$767

M468 (12.5” Barrel)

6.8mm SPC

3.88 kg

5, 10, 28

$881

REC-7

6.8mm SPC

3.46 kg

5, 10, 28

$736

REC-7

5.56mm NATO

3.46 kg

5, 10, 20, 30

$591

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M468 (Fixed)

5

3

1-2-Nil

6

2

5

45

M468 (16”, Folding)

5

3

1-2-Nil

4/6

2

5

45

M468 (12.5”)

5

3

1-1-Nil

4/5

1

4

31

REC-7 (6.8mm)

5

3

1-2-Nil

5/6

3

6

46

REC-7 (5.56mm)

5

3

1-2-Nil

4/6

2

6

40

 

BF1 Vindicator

     Notes: Introduced in 2004, this is a truly weird small-caliber weapon: a belt-fed, rimfire carbine.  It is normally only available in semiautomatic form, but an automatic version is available to Class III dealers or police, military or certain government agencies.  Currently, the stocks are made of laminated walnut, but other stock options are promised for the future.  The BF1 can take clip-on and bolt-on bipods without modification, but a bipod is not provided as standard equipment.  The sights are a proprietary design and consist of a combination of a post rear sight and a front sight called a “spade” (due it’s shape being reminiscent of a spade in a deck of playing cards).  This system helps cut down on target obstruction from the sights themselves.  Current BF1’s are chambered for .22 Long Rifle and .17 Mach 2 Rimfire, but in the future, Eric Graetz (the designer) plans to chamber the weapon for .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire and .17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BF1 Vindicator

.17 Hornady Magnum Rimfire

3.59 kg

25 Belt, 50 Belt, 100 Belt

$438

BF1 Vindicator

.17 Mach 2 Rimfire

3.51 kg

25 Belt, 50 Belt, 100 Belt

$362

BF1 Vindicator

.22 Long Rifle

3.58 kg

25 Belt, 50 Belt, 100 Belt

$240

BF1 Vindicator

.22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire

3.79 kg

25 Belt, 50 Belt, 100 Belt

$282

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BF1 Vindicator (.17 Hornady)

5

2

1-1-Nil

5

1

2

49

BF1 Vindicator (.17 Mach 2)

5

2

1-1-Nil

5

1

2

43

BF1 Vindicator (.22 Long Rifle)

5

1

Nil

5

1

1

33

BF1 Vindicator (.22 Magnum)

5

1

Nil

5

1

2

41

 

BCM Recce-16 KMR-LW

     Notes: BCM (Bravo Company Manufacturing) is well known for its custom versions of ARs and its drop-in upper and lower receivers, but its complete ARs are less well known.  One of these is the Recce-16 KMR-LW, a lightweight version of some of their other ARs.  The rifle is of high-quality; the 16-inch barrel is made of 1159E Certified steel, inside a KMR-Alpha 13 free-float handguard, and tipped by a compact muzzle brake.  The barrel profile is described as “enhanced light weight,” about like a medium-weight barrel in game terms.  The Recce-16 uses an M4 feed ramp barrel extension, and the bore and chamber are chromed. The barrel finish is Manganese Phosphate.  The bolt is an HPT (High Pressure Tested) bolt, which is also MPI (Magnetic Particle Inspected), and shot-peened. The bolt carrier and gas key are chromed.  The extractor is of tool steel and has an insert to ensure positive extraction.  The receiver halves are of standard M4-type aluminum alloy, hardcoat anodized. The buffer and spring are a standard M4 assembly, except that one of the weights in the buffer tube is of tungsten instead of steel. The Recce-16 has a match-quality trigger and an M4-type sliding stock. Atop the receiver and handguard is a long length of Picatinny rail.

     An automatic version is included below for general interest, though the actual Recce-16 is semiautomatic-only.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Recce-16 KMR-LW

5.56mm NATO

2.63 kg

10, 20, 30

$642

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Recce-16 KMR-LW

5

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

5

42

 

Blackheart International AK Civilianized Rifles

     Shooters in the US and the West will believe the builder of these rifles is Blackheart International; however, they are merely the importers and assemblers, and the most of the parts kits are made in Romania from AK-63 and AK-86 bases, though the Romanian parts are actually new-manufacture parts. (The forged bolt carrier and stainless steel gas piston are made by US Hammer in the US.)  They basically have enough US psts (and some others have more American parts) to satisfy US BATF regulations. It was therefore a tough call whether to put them under US Assault Rifles or Romanian Assault Rifles. They are also known as SAAKs, (SemiAutomatic AKs).

     The BFV762-101 is basically a copy of the AKM-63, without the full-auto parts, and modifications to make unlikely that a gunsmith will be able to convert it to automatic fire.  The handguards are of wood, and they enclose and aluminum heat shield.  It does not have the foregrip of the AKM-63.  The pistol grip is polymer, and the stock is a side-folding strut-type stock.  The receiver is stamped steel.  The 16.25-inch barrel has an AK-47-type muzzle, and overall finish is Parkerized matte black.  Magazines sold with the BFV762-101 are polymer.

     The BFV762-B10A is essentially the BFV762-101 with polymer-furniture, including a mostly-polymer M4-type Phoenix Kick-Lite stock, with further Phoenix pistol grip and handguards.  The recoil spring is by Wolff. The barrel is also 16.25 inches and made of 4150 steel, but is also chrome-lined. It has a bayonet lug and short sections of MIL-STD-1913 rail on either side of the end and bottom of the handguards, for small accessories such as lasers, small flashlights, bipods, etc.  The stock has a recoil pad on the butt.  The BFV762-B10B is essentially the same, except for an AK-74-type stock that is hollow and can be used to store a variety of items.

     The BFW762-B10W   is a more basic, AK-like version of the BFW762, having beechwood handguards, a beechwood stock, an AK-shaped polymer pistol grip, and no unnecessary accouterments.  It is a semiautomatic variant of the AK-86 Romanian assault rifle.  It does, however, use a light alloy steel receiver.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BFV762-01 SAAK

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.13 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$821

BFV762-B10A

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.36 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$975

BFV762-B10B

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.26 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$814

BFV762-B10W

7.62mm Kalashnikov

2.99 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 75D

$796

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BFV762-01 SAAK

SA

4

2-Nil

4/6

4

Nil

46

BFV762-B10A

SA

4

2-Nil

4/6

3

Nil

46

BFV762-B10B

SA

4

2-Nil

6

4

Nil

46

BFV762-B10W

SA

4

2-Nil

6

4

Nil

46

 

Bushmaster Carbon-15

     Notes: This has been described as an improvement over the original Carbon-15 by Professional Ordnance.  (Bushmaster acquired the Carbon-15 after Professional Ordnance declared bankruptcy in 2002.)  It is, in appearance and operation, quite different from the AR-15, from the lightened stock to the “miniaturized” bolt carrier group.  The biggest difference is the use of light carbon-fiber construction in the new stock, handguards, and even the upper and lower receiver housings.  The bolt carrier group is much shorter than the standard AR-15 bolt carrier group due to the deletion of the forward assist; it is felt by Bushmaster that its Carbon-15 design, together with improvements in ammunition, make the forward assist unnecessary.  The selector controls are ambidextrous.  The Carbon-15 uses a flattop receiver; a MIL-STD-1913 rail extends from the rear of the upper receiver to the end of the handguards.  The barrel is heavy, but made of lighter alloys and is fluted, further driving down the weight without compromising accuracy.  The Carbon-15 has a new muzzle brake that is extremely effective, actually driving the barrel down when firing.  At present, the Carbon-15 is available only in a semiautomatic version, but an automatic version is contemplated for the future for law enforcement and military use.

     A post-ban variant of the Carbon-15, the C-15M4 (Carbon-15 Model 4) is an M4-style Carbon-15 which still has the carbon-fiber upper and lower receiver and handguards, but there is also a partially-synthetic collapsible stock.  The barrel is similar to that of the standard Carbon-15, but is not fluted.  Unlike the Carbon-15, the C-15M4 will accept standard M16/AR-15/M4 parts.  The C-15M4 uses standard AR-15/M16/M4 magazines; automatic versions are sold only to military or law enforcement concerns. Another post-ban variant of the Carbon-15 is the Carbon-15 in 9mm Parabellum; this version is basically a C-15M4 rechambered for 9mm, with appropriate changes in the sights.  Though technically a submachinegun instead of an assault rifle, it is included here for completeness.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Carbon-15

5.56mm NATO

2.02 kg

10, 20, 30

$764

C-15M4

5.56mm NATO

2.49 kg

10, 20, 30

$614

Carbon-15

9mm Parabellum

2.59 kg