HEZI SM-1

     Notes: This rifle is based on the M-1 Carbine, turned into a bullpup assault rifle.  It was designed for law enforcement; the .30 Carbine cartridge has decent striking power and penetration, but not enough to accidentally shoot innocent bystanders through walls or through the actual target of the weapon.  The SM-1 retains only the action, feed system, and barrel of the M-1 Carbine; the rest is replaced by new parts, such as a synthetic bullpup stock with a carrying handle topped by a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and another such rail below the barrel.  The controls are made ambidextrous.  The bolt is strengthened and a firing pin safety is installed, as is a hinged ejection port dust cover.  The extractor and gas system are improved, and a muzzle brake is installed on the barrel.  Normally, this weapon is sold to law enforcement and civilians in semiautomatic form, but law enforcement and military can also buy the SM-1 in fully automatic form.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

SM-1

.30 Carbine

2.99 kg

10, 15, 30

$352

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

SM-1

5

2

1-Nil

4

1

2

45

 

IMI Galil

     Notes: This is an Israeli-built assault rifle, manufactured for domestic use and for export. The Galil is known for its resistance to dirt even under the worst conditions (it is, after all, based upon an AK-type weapon, the Finnish M-62); however, it is also known to be a rather fragile weapon (especially the plastic parts and bending barrels) that is damaged easily, and also weighs too much.  The prototypes were tested in 7.62mm Kalashnikov, 5.56mm NATO and 7.62mm NATO chamberings, but primarily only the 5.56mm NATO version survived, primarily due to the lighter weight of both the resulting rifle and its ammunition; the 7.62mm NATO version is comparatively rare, and the 7.62mm Kalashnikov version was not proceeded with beyond the early prototype stage.

     The operation of the Galil series is essentially almost identical to that of Kalashnikov series assault rifles, modified for use with different ammunition, of course.  The Galil ARM has several novel features, such as a bipod which doubles as a wire cutter (for medium-gauge barbed wire at the thickest), a handguard which can be used to open bottles (primarily to stop troops from bending the lips of their magazines by using them as bottle openers), ambidextrous fire selectors which are similar to the AK on the right side of the receiver, but like those of an HK-built weapon on the left, and a charging handle on the right side like that of the AK series, but bent upwards to better facilitate ambidextrous operation.  The sights consist of a hooded front sight and a rear diopter sight; in addition, the sight mounts allow these sights to be folded down, and night sights with tritium inlays raised when necessary. In addition, scope mounts may be mounted on a bracket which attaches to the left side of the receiver, like the Kalashnikov series.  A FAL-like carrying handle may be added to the Galil ARM when desired.  Though an unmodified Galil can only use the 12-round, 35-round, and 50-round magazines designed for it, the Galil may also use M-16 magazines with the addition of an adapter (which may be added by the user, and requires no skill other than knowledge of how to do it).  The handguard, pistol grip, and other non-metallic parts are made from high-impact plastic (though early prototypes had a wooden handguard).

     The standard Galil is the ARM; it has an 18.1-inch barrel and a folding stock similar to that of the FAL Para.  The Galil SAR is a carbine version of the ARM; it uses a 13.1-inch barrel, but has neither a bipod nor a mount for a carrying handle.  It is otherwise identical to the ARM.  The ARM (and the AR) can use a variety of US bayonets and Kalashnikov-type bayonets.

     The Galil MAR, also known as the Galil Micro, is a CQB/PDW variant of the Galil, with a stubby 7.7-inch barrel.  It was designed for uses ranging from special operations to vehicle crews and rear area troops.  The handguard is contoured at the front with a lip to prevent the shooter’s hand from slipping in front of the barrel.  Instead of steel, the stock of the MAR is made from aluminum alloy.  A variant of the Galil MAR, the MAR Special, is modified for use by special operations troops; it can accept a suppressor, use subsonic ammunition, and has MIL-STD-1913 rails atop the receiver and on the handguard to allow the use of various optics and accessories.  It is otherwise identical to the standard MAR for game purposes.  The MAR cannot mount a bayonet or an underbarrel grenade launcher, and does not have the nifty bottle-opening handguard.

     The Galil also comes in a relatively rare chambering: 7.62mm NATO.  This was first developed in response to the IDF’s request for a heavier-caliber battle rifle for certain applications; however, the IDF largely passed on the 7.62mm NATO version of the Galil, preferring to arm themselves with proven surplus (and usually heavily-modified) designs firing the 7.62mm NATO cartridge such as the US M-14 and the FN-FAL.  They then tried marketing this heavier version overseas, but it had little luck in the international market.  It did, however, serve as the basis of the Galat’z Sniper Rifle.  Both long-barreled (AR) and short-barreled (SAR) versions exist, and except for the modifications required for the heavier caliber, they are essentially identical to their assault rifle cousins.  In addition, the 7.62mm version of the Galil typically feeds from a proprietary 25-round magazine, though 20-round FAL magazines are also usable.  The Hadar II is a heavily-modified version of the AR, originally intended for police use, but later also sold as a civilian rifle.  The primary differences are that the Hadar II is capable only of semiautomatic fire, and the folding stock has been replaced with a thumbhole-type wooden stock (of average-quality wood, but weatherproofed and otherwise very well-finished).  Civilian versions sold in the US during the Assault Weapons Ban were normally sold with 10-round magazines (though they could take the standard 25-round AR magazines and FAL magazines) and had no flash suppressors.  Police versions do have flash suppressors, but neither one have bayonet lugs or bipods.

     The Magal is a modification of the Galil MAR, used for a short time by the Magav (Israeli National Police).  The police felt that the standard Galil SAR, with its 5.56mm NATO ammunition, was too powerful and it's ammunition over-penetrating, often exiting one victim and striking another behind it.  However, the Magav still needed a weapon that could penetrate soft body armor, at least at short range.  Their solution was to modify the Galil MAR, rechambering it for .30 Carbine ammunition, making some ergonomic adjustments, and changing the construction somewhat. The new weapon was called the Magal, and issued to the Magav starting in 1994. The Magal looks externally like a short assault rifle that is based on the Galil MAR, but is also greatly different in appearance.  The handguard is rather large, made from reinforced polymer rather than high-impact plastic, and deliberately increased somewhat in mass so that it can be used as an impromptu clubbing instrument.  The pistol grip assembly is built in a similar manner, and is also joined to the receiver with a reinforced polymer bar.  The folding stock itself is partially made from lighter high-impact plastic.  The top of the receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail, along with backup iron sights like those of the Galil MAR (modified for the .30 Carbine ammunition).

     Complaints about the Magal began almost immediately; the short barrel, barely adequate for 5.56mm NATO ammunition, was equally unsuited for lower-powered ammunition like .30 Carbine.  Jams and failures to feed were quite common.  In addition, the weapon could not develop the energy to properly launch BTU rifle grenades, even when equipped with the proper muzzle device.  The 4000 Magals in the government’s order were built, but they were largely handed down to the Civil Guard and certain conventional police units by 2001; the riot control-type police units reverted back to Galil MARs, CAR-15s, and Colt Commandos early in 2001.  Another recipient of the Magal, the Israeli Civil Guard, largely went back to their M-1 and M-2 Carbines, which the Magal was supposed to replace.

     Though the Galil was nonetheless considered a successful design, it did not enjoy wide issue in Israel, mostly because the Israelis were sold mountains of M-16A1s, CAR-15s, and later M-16A2s and M-4s at virtually no cost starting in the late 1960s.  In fact, the Galil was more successful in a slightly modified form in South Africa (the R-4 series), and was also sold to several African, South American, and Asian countries.  Even semiautomatic civilian variants of the Galil have proven more successful.  In the past few years, even the Israelis have been silently ditching the Galil in favor of M-16 series weapons, particularly the M-16A3/4 and the M-4/M-4A1, and more recently, the Tavor bullpups.  Despite the fact that the Galil MAR is far stronger than the standard Galil and is a more solid weapon, it was never really accepted by the Israeli military, and it was not produced in large numbers.

     While the Galil was built in a number of semiautomatic civilian and police versions almost since the military version had been fielded, most of its customers were in the US, where they were eventually banned during the period of the ill-conceived Assault Weapons Ban.  These civilian/police Galils were generally built in Israel and marketed through various American or European import companies.  However, the Israelis almost completely stopped the manufacture of these civilianized Galils when the Assault Weapons Ban went into effect, and after its sunset, and IMI was unwilling to resume production (as was Columbia, the last known country to have a license to produce both military and civilian Galils; their license expired in 2006, and they did not renew it).  However, in 2006, a US company, Century International Arms, purchased a license to make and sell civilianized Galils.  These versions of the Galil were christened the Golani Sporter by Century International, are now being sold.  They are almost identical to earlier civilianized Galils, but use an 18-inch barrel, and are chambered only for 5.56mm NATO.  Their receivers and barrels are strengthened somewhat to allow the use of the various wildcat 5.56mm rounds that are popular in the US, ranging fom slow rounds with heavy bullets to extreme hotloads.  While the Golani Sporter has the traditional Galil AK-type lever selector switch on the left side (minus the auto setting, of course), it also has a smaller thumb selector on the right side above the pistol grip.  The chargins handle has a 90-degree bend in it, which makes it easier to grasp and pull.  The rear sight has been moved to the top of the receiver cover, and has flip-type aperture sights with an additional blade with a tritium inlay that may be flipped up to make the day sight into a night side.  The front sight is standard Galil, but also has a flip-up post with a tritium inlay.  Operation is nearly the same as the Galil, but has improvements increasing reliability and making the Golani Sporter easier to maintain and strip.  The Handguard and pistol grip are made from stronger polymer than the standard Galil’s plastic, and the handguard also has an aluminum heat shield inside of it.  Instead of a flash suppressor, the barrel is tipped with a short muzzle brake.  The Golani Sporter has no bipod.  Otherwise, the Golani Sporter is pretty much a Galil.

     The ACE is an attempt to modernize and improve upon the Galil.  It is essentially an AK in polymer instead of wood furniture. They have a plethora of MIL-STD-1913 rails – above the receiver, on all four sides of the handguards, above the gas block bridging over to the upper handguard (the handguards of an ACE are rather short).  It has an A2-type flash suppressor – the ACE 31 has an 8.5-inch barrel, while the ACE 32 has a 16-inch barrel.  Both have a sliding stock. Operation is by gas piston.  The target audience of the ACE is countries using primarily the AK, but whose AKs are getting long in the tooth or who desire a more up-to-date firearm, but not have to buy hoards of new ammunition. However, IMI did actually put some 5.56mm-firing ACEs on the market, the ACE-21, ACE-22, and ACE-23.  These are basically built the same as the ACE-31/32, but have 8.5-inch, 13-inch, and 16-inch barrels, respectively.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: Though the Galil is a reliable weapon, and scored points for that, the fragility of the Galil meant that it got discarded in favor of other weapons.  Though weapons similar to the MAR were produced on an ad hoc basis during the Twilight War, true production MARs were small in number.  The late 1990s and early 2000s clashes between the Palestinians and the Israelis would either not have taken place at all or would have been met with much more force in the Twilight 2000 world.  The Magal would thus probably not be built in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  In addition, the Golani Sporter does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: The Galil MAR weapon has been exported to unknown parties in addition to standard Galils, but aside from limited sales to countries already using the Galil, there are no official sales.  For different reasons, the Palestinian-Israeli violence would probably also be met with more force in the Merc 2000 world, and the Magal would be unlikely to have been built.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Galil ARM

5.56mm NATO

4.35 kg

12, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$1036

Galil AR

7.62mm NATO

5.55 kg

20, 25

$1558

Galil SAR

5.56mm NATO

3.75 kg

12, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$555

Galil SAR

7.62mm NATO

5.27 kg

20, 25

$1006

Galil MAR

5.56mm NATO

2.95 kg

12, 20, 30, 35

$499

Magal

.30 Carbine

2.76 kg

15, 30

$330

Hadar II

7.62mm NATO

4.35 kg

10, 20, 25

$1030*

Golani Sporter

5.56mm NATO

4.2 kg

5, 10, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$650

ACE-31

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.05 kg

10, 20, 30, 40, 75 Drum

$806

ACE-32

7.62mm Kalashnikov

3.46 kg

10, 20, 30, 40, 75 Drum

$878

ACE-21

5.56mm NATO

3 kg

12, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$559

ACE-22

5.56mm NATO

3.35 kg

12, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$605

ACE-23

5.56mm NATO

3.4 kg

12, 20, 30, 35, 50 Drum

$637

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Galil ARM

5

3

1-Nil

5/6

2

5

48

(With Bipod)

5

3

1-Nil

5/6

1

3

62

Galil AR

5

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

3

8

67

(With Bipod)

5

4

2-3-Nil

6/7

2

4

87

Galil SAR (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

5

29

Galil SAR (7.62mm)

5

4

2-3-Nil

5/6

3

8

43

Galil MAR

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

6

11

Magal

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

3

7

14

Hadar II

SA

4

2-3-Nil

7

4

Nil

67

Golani Sporter

SA

3

1-Nil

4/6

2

Nil

47

ACE-31

5

3

2-Nil

5

2

5

16

ACE-32

5

4

2-Nil

4/6

3

7

44

ACE-21

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

2

4

14

ACE-22

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4

29

ACE-23

5

3

1-Nil

4/5

2

4

40

*For civilian versions without flash suppressors, subtract $12.

 

IMI TAR-21 Tavor 

     Notes: This feisty bullpup was designed as a replacement for the Galil and M-16 series.  The result is similar to the South-African Vektor assault rifle series (and the Israelis and South Africans often collaborate on arms projects).  The TAR-21 (Tavor Assault Rifle) is a 5.56mm NATO-firing selective-fire bullpup, very compact (only 73 cm), yet easier to use than the British L-85 or Austrian Steyr AUG bullpup rifles. The Tavor is now produced by IWI (Israeli Weapons Industries), which was formerly a subsidiary of IMI, but is now a semi-independent company.

     The TAR-21 has ambidextrous controls and can use a variety of night-vision devices and telescopic sights; standard is the ITL MARS, which is a reflex/collimator red-dot sight with an integral laser aiming module below it.  The soldier can also attach the types of night vision goggles by the Israelis directly to the sight unit.  This sight unit is mounted on a short MIL-STD-1913 rail located directly above the trigger group, and the unit may be completely removed and replaced with other optics as desired.  There are no conventional iron sights, though rudimentary emergency sights are located on the sight housing. The TAR-21 may use any sort of M-16 magazine, and may be fitted with the M-203 or M-203PI (and several other underbarrel grenade launchers), as well as use NATO- or Israeli-pattern rifle grenades. The TAR-21 uses an 18.1-inch barrel tipped with an M-16A2-type flash suppressor. Construction of the shell of the rifle is largely of green or black polymer, with steel reinforcement bars at strategic places.  Field stripping is done by pulling the operating parts out as a unit from the hinged buttplate.  Except for the ejection port, the operating parts of the TAR-21 are otherwise completely enclosed and quite resistant to dirt.  The Tavor has an ejection port on either side of the rifle, one of which is sealed; this allows for the operating system to be reversed for use by right or left-handed shooters.  There are similar charging handle slots on both sides of the weapon as well.  To a point, operation is similar to a combination of the M-16 and AK series, but most of it is the result of new research.  A recent addition to the Tavor line, the TC-21, is a carbine variant, equipped with a 16.1-inch barrel.  It is otherwise outfitted the same as the standard TAR-21 assault rifle. 

     The CTAR-21, also known as the Tavor Commando, is also sort of a carbine version of the TAR-21, with 15-inch barrel and accompanying shorter handguard section.  The CTAR-21 may not mount a standard M-203 grenade launcher, but can mount the M-203PI and most other NATO-compatible underbarrel grenade launchers.  (It does, however, get a bit clumsy to handle with an underbarrel grenade launcher attached.)  Unlike the TAR-21, the CTAR-21 cannot mount a bayonet.

     The MTAR-21, also known as the Micro Tavor or the Tavor Micro, uses an even shorter 9.84-inch barrel, and is primarily meant for use by special operations, bodyguards, vehicle crews and in CQB.  The Micro Tavor is so short and well-balanced that it can actually be fired with one hand (though not with nearly the accuracy as two-handed firing).  The handguard section is quite abbreviated, and the barrel barely protrudes from them; nonetheless, the same M-16A2-type flash suppressor is used so muzzle flash is very large and bright.  This short barrel and handguard also means the Tavor Micro cannot mount underbarrel grenade launchers, use rifle grenades, or mount bayonets.  A parts kit is also available to turn the Micro Tavor into 9mm submachinegun, which uses Uzi magazines (in a pinch, Glock 9mm Parabellum magazines can also be used with the MTAR 9mm), and may use a standard or a barrel with an integral silencer.  (Early prototypes were tested chambered for .40 Smith & Wesson and .45 ACP, but IMI decided not to go ahead with those chamberings.) This version is known by many names: MTAR-21 9mm, MTAR 9mm, MTAR Submachinegun, and a few others.  Other than modifications necessary for the change in ammunition and the lack of a flash suppressor, the MTAR 9mm is otherwise outfitted the same as the MTAR-21 (as I will refer to it in these pages).  Though the MTAR 9mm is actually a submachinegun, it is included here for completeness.

     The STAR-21 is version of the TAR-21 assault rifle is designed for platoon sharpshooters.  The basic TAR-21 is modified with match-grade parts, a bipod, a longer MIL-STD-1913 rail, a padded butt, and an adjustable, folding, lightweight bipod.  It is liked for its compact size and light weight, but not used for serious sniping due to the limits of its ammunition; its job is instead to fulfill the role of Designated Marksman Rifle.  The STAR-21 also uses an 18.1-inch barrel, but of better quality than that found on the TAR-21 assault rifle version.

     First issue of the Tavor series to Israeli units began in 2003, though reportedly operational testing had been conducted in actual combat as early as 2001.  By the time of this writing (Late February 2008), it is estimated that as many as a third of the M-16-series rifles in the IDF have been replaced by the TAR-21 series. 

      The Indians have placed an order for up to $20 million worth of MTAR-21-type rifles, ammunition and accessories; deliveries began in 2007.  There are also some unconfirmed rumors that the Indians may be interested in partially replacing their AKMs and INSAS rifles with other members of the Tavor series. The Indian version of the MTAR-21, which they call the Zittara, is a bit different than the IMI MTAR-21 and is covered in the Indian Assault Rifles section.

     The newest member of the Tavoir series is the X-95.  It comes in several versions and calibers, and it comes with many accouterments and adapters for use with most equipment and enhancements used by Special Operations personnel today.  It is used by Indian SF as well as most of the Israel Ground Defense Force today.  The X-95 is available in its standard chambering of 5.56mm, as well as 5.45mm, a round the IDF’s special units are experimenting with these days, and 9mm, allowing the quick conversion into a low-penetration submachineguns.  It also allows the conversion of the X-95 into different calibers and many weapon configurations easily, with minimal training. The X-95 SMG and X-95S differ primarily in their attachment hardware for silencers, and are the same in T2K rules.

     MIL-STD-1913 rails are found on the upper receiver as well as the bottom of the handguards and at the 10 and 2-o’clock positions.  (As the X-95 is short, the rails are necessarily short as well; however, they are adequate for most uses that special ops personnel encounter.)  The top rail can be replaced by one that bridges the upper receiver and the gas block; this makes necessary the removal of the front iron sight. The barrel is threaded behind the flash suppressor; on the standard and S versions; a special silencer was designed for use with the X-95. The flash suppressor is similar to the A2 type.  The standard X-95 has a 13-inch barrel, while the L has a 16.5-inch barrel.  The SMG and S use an 11-inch barrel.  These barrels generally follow the lines of the Tavor in construction.

     Twilight 2000 Notes:  There may be some small numbers of this weapon series around in the Twilight 2000 timeline, but is unlikely that it will be found outside of Israeli hands.  The TC-21 and MTAR 9mm do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor does the X-95 series, and the standard sight is the ITL MARS for most purposes.

     Merc 2000 Notes:  After 2000, the Tavor became more and more common, both in Israel and in other countries; after 2010, it almost seemed that Central America was being overrun by military units carrying the Tavor and its variants.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

TAR-21

5.56mm NATO

2.8 kg

20, 30

$1116

TC-21

5.56mm NATO

2.75 kg

20, 30

$1095

CTAR-21

5.56mm NATO

2.7 kg

20, 30

$1084

MTAR-21

5.56mm NATO

2.4 kg

20, 30

$1030

STAR-21

5.56mm NATO

3.4 kg

20, 30

$1690

MTAR 9mm (Standard Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

2.42 kg

25, 32, 40

$1054

MTAR 9mm (Silenced Barrel)

9mm Parabellum

3.12 kg

25, 32, 40

$1194

X-95 Rifle/Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.03 kg

20, 30

$1109

X-95 Rifle/Carbine

5.45mm Kalashnikov

3.03 kg

20, 30, 40

$1300

X-95L Rifle/Carbine

5.56mm NATO

3.2 kg

20, 30

$1157

X-95L Rifle/Carbine

5.45mm Kalashnikov

3.2 kg

20, 30, 40

$1122

X-95 SMG

9mm Parabellum

2.98 kg

25, 32, 40

$818

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

TAR-21

5

3

1-Nil

5

3

7

43

TC-21

5

3

1-Nil

4

3

7

36

CTAR-21

5

3

1-Nil

4

3

7

32

MTAR-21

5

2

1-Nil

3

3

7

16

STAR-21

5

3

1-Nil

5

2

5

45

With Bipod

5

3

1-Nil

5

1

3

59

MTAR 9mm (Standard)

5

2

Nil

3

1

3

23

MTAR 9mm (Silenced, Standard Ammo)

5

2

Nil

4

1

3

19

MTAR 9mm (Silenced, Subsonic Ammo)

5

2

Nil

4

1

2

18

X-95 Rifle/Carbine (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

4

2

5

26

X-95 Rifle/Carbine (5.45mm)

5

2

Nil

4

2

4

34

X-95L Rifle/Carbine (5.56mm)

5

3

1-Nil

4

2

5

37

X-95L Rifle/Carbine (5.45mm)

5

3

1-Nil

4

2

4

42

X-95 SMG

5

2

1-Nil

3

1

2

30

 

“Sawn-Off” CAR-15 (Mekut’zrar)

     Notes: The Sawn-Off CAR-15 is basically a version of a standard Colt CAR-15, modified by unit armorers and gunsmiths to use a radically-shorter barrel (usually about 9-10 inches.)  These modifications began in about the time of the 1987 Intifada, the Palestinian uprising against the Israelis.  The first units to use these shortened weapons were new IDF and Police CT undercover units, the Mistaravim; these units needed a short assault rifle with decent firepower, but could still be hidden under civilian clothing or in bags or backpacks with relative ease.  The existing Galil SARs were still a bit too bulky, the Galil MAR had not yet entered service, and the Colt Commando version of the M-16A2 was in extremely short supply.  The sawn-off CAR-15s were later adopted by a few other IDF special operations units, but throughout their short service with the IDF, remained a very-limited issue weapon.  It should be noted that the name “Mekut’zrar” (a Hebrew slang term meaning “very short”) was given to both the sawn-off CAR-15 and the Colt Commando.

     As stated above, the sawn-off CAR-15 used a very abbreviated 9-10-inch barrel.  Adjustments to the gas system were made to improve reliability (with a barrel shortened below 11 inches, the Stoner gas system becomes very unreliable).  Unfortunately, there is only so much one can do with the Stoner gas system, especially as the barrel lengths get shorter and shorter, without having to undertake a radical redesign of the gas system itself.  In addition, the weapon was given a different flash suppressor, a modified version of the larger one found on the Galil SAR.  While not as effective as an actual muzzle brake, it is somewhat more effective than the standard M-16-type flash suppressor, while not having the bulk (or expense) of actual muzzle brakes available for the CAR-15 at the time; the short barrel coupled with the need to not shorten the gas tube any further also made mounting the standard CAR-15 muzzle brake very difficult.  Modifications were also made to the sliding stock to allow it to retract even further.

     The biggest downfall of the sawn-off CAR-15 was that it was a handmade, ad hoc modification, done at the unit level and without any of the quality controls of an actual production weapon.  Pretty much, no two were alike.  They were inherently unreliable due to the limitations of the Stoner gas system, and could not be repaired quickly.  Poor reliability is a severe deficit in the CQB combat for which the sawn-off CAR-15 was meant (to say the least), and the shooter could pretty much forget about hitting a target beyond 100 meters or so without undue aiming.  The nature of the modifications also added a small measure of fragility as well as unpredictability in performance.  And, while the unit armorers of special operations units are more skilled than the average military armorer, they still were nowhere near as capable as an actual factory producing such a weapon.  Therefore, the sawn-off CAR-15, even in its informal role, were essentially banned for use by IDF or Israeli Police less than a decade later; they were replaced by the Colt Commando, Galil MAR, and later, the TAR-21 series.  Most present users of the sawn-off CAR-15 are therefore very senior officers, primarily as a status symbol – and they are frowned upon by their peers for setting a bad example for their troops.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This is another of those interesting examples of ad hoc-type weapons that would be encountered here and there in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Sawn-Off CAR-15 (9” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

1.85 kg

20, 30

$513

Sawn-Off CAR-15 (10” Barrel)

5.56mm NATO

1.87 kg

20, 30

$523

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Sawn-Off CAR-15 (9”)

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

3

7

16

Sawn-Off CAR-15 (10”)

5

2

1-Nil

3/4

3

7

19