ROMARM TAB-77 PCOMA 

     Notes:  This is both a FISTV designed for use in motorized infantry and scout units and reflects an earlier design than the TABC-79A, though it too has been updated over the years.  So far, only the Romanians use the TAB-77 PCMOA.  The TAB-77 PCMOA first appeared in the late 1970s, soon after the TAB-77 APC, and is still in use in its updated form.

     For the most part, the TAB-77 PCMOA appears externally similar to the TAB-77 APC.  However, the turret has been replaced with a different small turret; this is larger and rounder, and mounts primarily an enhanced vision suite including day and night vision gear, and a laser rangefinder.  The turret itself is unarmed; above the turret, in front of the “gunner’s” hatch, is a pintle-mounted machinegun.  Internally, the TAB-77 PCMOA has two data-capable radios, a medium-range radio, a radio teletype, a short-range radio, a gyrocompass-based land-navigation system with a small amount of inertial navigation capability, and a large but relatively weak computer which can generate fire coordinates, but not solutions, and transmit them to two batteries at once.

     The mid-1980s brought improvements to the computers, radios, and night vision gear, as well as a more powerful day telescope.  The computers were also improved, primarily in the area of miniaturization, but also in power; the computer could now generate fire solutions for up to two batteries at once.  This update also brought true inertial navigation to the TAB-77 PCMOA. Crew was also reduced.  The radio teletype was retained, though by then it had become for the most part obsolete. A laser designator was added to the turret.

     The late 1990s brought more improvements.  Crew was further reduced.  The radio teletype was removed, replaced by improvements in computer technology that allowed the operator of the TAB-77 PCMOA’s fire control suite to directly feed target information to battery computers (if so equipped).  The day and night vision are fully integrated with the computer. The TAB-77 PCMOA retained the inertial navigation capability, but only as a backup; the primary navigation method is by GLONASS and later, GPS.

     As a variant of the TAB-77, the TAB-77 PCMOA as some features in common with the TAB-77.  The TAB-77 PCMOA is powered by a pair of 132-horsepower Savia 797-05M1 diesel engines.  The manual rotation of the TAB-77’s turret is replaced by electric rotation. The TAB-77 PCMOA retains the “suicide hatches” of the TAB-71M; not being an infantry carrier, these are not used in combat except in emergencies.  The crew in the rear still use the pair of roof hatches, and the “suicide hatches” are used for equipment loading more than anything else. The driver and commander are in the front of the vehicle, with the driver on the right and commander on the left; they have bullet-resistant windshields to the front with armored shutters which may be lowered and have vision slits in them.  To their sides are small windows over which armor plates may be slid.  The commander has a hatch over his position; the driver does not have a hatch, but the roof does have an opening for a night vision block.  The gunner’s position is more a FIST member and not really a gunner. Suspension is 8x8 off-road-type; the front four wheels are the steerable wheels.  The TAB-77 is still difficult to drive due to the manual transmission and twin engines.  The driver has a central tire pressure regulation system. The crew has a collective NBC system. Armor is all-welded steel, but is relatively light. The vehicle is amphibious, with a trim vane requiring erection from inside the driver’s compartment and bilge pumps turned on, as well as a waterjet once the vehicle is floating.  The crew is protected by an automatic fire detection and suppression system.  The same front-mounted winch as on the TAB-71 is on the TAB-77 PCMOA, with a capacity of 5.5 tons and 60 meters of cable.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

TAB-77 PCMOA

$168,856

D, A

800 kg

13.5 tons

6

9

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensifier (G)

Shielded

TAB-77 PCMOA 1st Upgrade

$335,061

D, A

800 kg

13.5 tons

5

9

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensifier (G), Thermal Imaging (G)

Shielded

TAB-77 PCMOA 2nd Upgrade

$405,061

D, A

800 kg

13.5 tons

4

10

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensifier (G), Thermal Imaging (G)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

TAB-77 PCMOA

147/74

33/17/4

290

141

CiH

W(4)

TF4  TS4  TR3  HF4  HS3  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

TAB-77

None

None

PK (C)

2500x7.62mm

 

ROMARM TABC-79A PCMOA

     Notes: Based on the TABC-79 light APC, the TABC-79A PCMOA is a FIST vehicle with enhanced observation and rangefinding equipment in its turret, and an extra laser rangefinder as well as a laser designator.  Its turret is wider but lower in profile, and is armed only with a PKT machinegun.  The commander’s cupola has an artillery plotting circle inscribed on it.  Inside, the rear area is largely taken up by extra communications gear and fire solution computers, as well as the equipment necessary to directly transmit their findings to artillery, MRL, or mortar batteries.  The computer is limited in scope, designed only to perform its duties in fire control.  The PCMOA has a long-range data-capable radio, an extra-long-range data-capable radio, one medium-range radio, and one short-range radio.  The enhanced observation gear includes day telescopic sights as well as an image intensifier and a thermal imager; these are mounted in the turret, but accessible by the commander.  The PCMOA originally had a radio teletype, but this was replaced in the mid-1990s by a ruggedized laptop computer.  The PCMOA originally had inertial navigation, but this was supplemented in the 1990s by GLONASS and later GPS.

     Being a variant of the TABC-79, the basic facts about the TABC-79 also apply to the PCMOA. The driver is at the front left of the vehicle with a windshield to the front and supplemental vision blocks for when the tactical situation dictates that the windshield be covered by its armored shutter.  The commander’s position is still there, though it is normally unoccupied or used to store equipment; both positions have a hatch above them; the commander’s position has been shifted to the turret.  The side hatches are retained, as is the rear door and the roof hatch.  The firing ports are plated over.  The PCMOA has a collective NBC system for the crew and troops. Protection also includes an automatic fire detection and suppression system. The passengers have firing ports, two to a side and two in the rear.  The PCMOA has a 5.5-ton winch on the front with 50 meters of cable. The PCMOA is powered by a single Savia 798.05N2 turbocharged diesel engine, with an automatic transmission.  The driver has conventional controls.  The engine is relatively compact, allowing for that small hatch in the rear, though it is mounted at the rear of the vehicle. The PCMOA is amphibious without preparation, requiring only that a waterjet be switched on when the vehicle begins floating.  Suspension is 4x4 and of the off-road-type.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

TABC-79A PCMOA

$165,822

D, A

350 kg

9.5 tons

4

8

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G), Thermal Imaging (G)

Shielded

TABC-79A PCMOA (Upgraded)

$295,822

D, A

350 kg

9.5 tons

4

9

Passive IR (D, G), Image Intensification (G), Thermal Imaging (G)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

TABC-79A PCMOA

124/62

28/15/3

200

82

CiH

W(4)

TF4  TS4  TR3  HF5  HS3  HR3

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

TABC-79A PCMOA

+2

Fair

PKT

2500x7.62mm