Alvis/BAE FV-432 FDC

     The FV-432 FDC vehicle is essentially a specialized version of the FV-432 command vehicle, and in form does not differ greatly from that vehicle; the primary differences in the FV-432 FDC are inside, where a more comprehensive fire control computer is installed that allows the FDC crew to quickly computer coordinates using FIST information or information from troops in the field calling for supporting fires by position and map coordinates; it also generally carries extra radios, including two long-range, two medium-range, and one short-range radios.  Mk 2 and (and Mk 3 versions, if they appear), have one long-range radio being data-capable, and the internal computer can wirelessly connect with the mortar carrier’s hand-held mortar fire control computers and transmit coordinates and other information directly to them, such as method of fire and types of rounds to be used.  The FV-432 FDC did, in fact, receive the Mk 1/1 and Mk 2 upgrades, the same as the FV-432 and FV-432 Mortar Carrier.

     The Mk 1 version of the FV-432 FDC uses a Rolls-Royce B-Series 240-horsepower gasoline engine, coupled to a GM TX-200 4A semiautomatic transmission.  Though this is not a fully-integrated powerpack, the engine and transmission are mounted on a common sub-frame and can be removed in one piece. As with the FV-432 Mk 1, the FV-432 Mk 1 FDC was designed with amphibious capability, but this requires that a large flotation screen be erected, a trim vane extended, and a bilge pump turned on – an operation that could take up to a half an hour with inexperienced troops.  Due to the heavier weight and height of the FV-432 FDC, swimming is even more dicey, and less recommended than swimming the FV-432 APC.  A minor upgrade, the Mk 1/1 version, primarily dealt with small automotive and electrical problems.  The Mk 2 version had a new Rolls-Royce K60 multifuel engine, and a few other mechanical and electrical improvements. The Peak Engineering light turret that was applied to some Mk 2 FV-432 APCs was not applied to any FV-432 FDCs.  The short-lived Mk 2/1 modification, which moved the NBC pack inside the FV-432 APCs walls, was never applied to the FV-432 FDC.

 

The Possible Mk 3 Upgrade

     It is an even bigger question as to whether the FV-432 FDC will receive any of the Mk 3 upgrades.  I am assuming the maximum possible Mk 3 upgrades in the stats below, but as a minimum, the new integrated power pack and driver’s position are being looked at for a possible Mk 3 version. The engine used in the upgrade is a 260-horsepower diesel engine, along with a fully automatic transmission.  The laterals for vehicle control are gone, replaced by a steering yoke and a standard gas pedal and brake pedal. The FV-432 Mk 3 FDC has an air conditioning unit, though it is modular and may be removed if it is deemed unnecessary, such as if a war occurs in cold climates, freeing up some interior space. Other improvements include a beefed-up suspension for the crew and troops seats.  The FV-432 Mk 3 FDC is equipped with a GPS unit.  The smoke grenade clusters have increased from three to four.

     Externally, the upgrade is rather stunning, with appliqué aluminum armor applied to basically every surface of the FV-432, especially the hull floor; on the glacis and hull sides, this appliqué is armor spaced by stand-off bars.  The Mk 3 upgrade also includes lugs for ERA on the glacis and hull sides. Ahead of the driver and commander’s station is a short, wire-cutting mast to keep low-hanging wires from taking the driver’s and/or commander’s heads off.  The commander’s position is equipped with a light weapon, as on other FV-432 Mortar Carriers; however, this weapon is standard.  Also standard are the AV2 gun shields for the commander’s cupola.  The FV-432 Mk 3 FDC is not slated to receive the RCWS station (any iteration of it). In the lower hull, the British have taken a page out of the Russian T-90s tech manual and installed a mine/IED electrical jammer; when the jammer encounters a magnetic mine or one with an electrical fuze within 10 meters, the jammer will disable the fuze from operating on a roll 14 or better on a d20.  Note that the mine must be in a 20-degree radius of the front of the carrier.  The jammer device is also not a mine detector – if the device does not detonate the mine and the mine does not actually go off, the FV-432 FDC’s crew will not know that the mine is there.

     It should be noted that the Mk 3 Mortar Carrier is not amphibious.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: No Mk 3 variants of the FDC are available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

FV-432 Mk 1 FDC

$136,278

G, A

660 kg

16.2 tons

2+5

11

Passive IR (D)

Enclosed

FV-432 Mk 2 FDC

$138,278

D, G, A

660 kg

16.2 tons

2+5

11

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

FV-432 Mk 3 FDC

$185,834

D, A

375 kg

17.8 tons

2+5

11

Passive IR (D)

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

FV-432 Mk 1 FDC

106/74

26/16/2

454

142

Stnd

T2

HF6  HS4  HR3

FV-432 Mk 2 FDC

106/74

26/16/2

454

106

Stnd

T2

HF6  HS4  HR3

FV-432 Mk 3 FDC

101/71

24/15

454

136

Stnd

T3

HF8Sp  HS6Sp  HR4*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

FV-432 FDC

None

None

L-7A2 (C)

1600x7.62mm

*Hull floor AV is 4.

 

Alvis/BAE Warrior MAOV

     Notes:  The Warrior MAOV (Mechanized Artillery Observation Vehicle) was developed in the early-1990s to give effective FISTV support to units equipped with quicker Warrior ICVs and Challenger tanks. It was one of the original vehicles planned for what was supposed to be an extensive family of vehicles based on the Warrior chassis, and was one of the few such vehicles to actually make into service.  So far, the Warrior MAOV is used only by the British Army; I have not been able to determine whether it was ever offered for export.

     Externally, the MAOV looks almost identical to the standard Warrior; this is intentional, since FIST vehicles are much higher-priority targets than IFVs – in other words, it’s a ruse.  The driver’s compartment is in the same place in the vehicle, and the driver’s controls and instruments are identical to those on a standard Warrior ICV. The driver is on the left side of the front hull, with a overhead hatch that can be locked open enough for him to see out almost 270 degrees around, but not block the traverse of the turret; it can also be opened straight up to allow the driver to enter and exit through the hatch (but it will block the traverse of the turret.  The driver uses a steering yoke and a conventional brake and gas pedal. A little-used design feature is a windshield that can be fitted to the hatch opening when the hatch is open for driving; this seals the hatchway opening but still allows the driver to see out through the partially-opened hatch, and even includes a windshield wiper! Originally, the driver had one wide angle vision block which could be replaced with a night vision block; later, another vision block was added on either side of the front vision block to give the driver a better view when buttoned up.  The driver has a seat adjustable for height as well as being able to recline almost totally; though the driver’s compartment is cramped, it is conceivable that one could sleep in there.

     The turret has two hatches atop it, with the commander’s hatch to the left. The commander and gunner have a decent view around the vehicle through vision blocks.  Fuel tanks are found in the walls of the passenger compartment, with stowage boxes in the rear and a large bustle rack in the rear of the turret.  The rear passenger compartment is crammed with mission gear and a 4kW APU as well as one of the crewmembers.  No dismount troops are carried, though the crew generally have L-85s or pistols for personal defense. There is no room for any other weapons, except a small store of ammunition for the small arms. The rear deck’s double hatch is deleted, replaced by one small roof hatch. The rear compartment’s two rotating periscopes have also been deleted.  The hot plate/water boiler is retained, though there is only one and not two, as on a standard Warrior ICV.

     The turret is stuffed with extra communications gear and equipment necessary for the MAOV to fulfill its mission.  There is so much extra gear that the “autocannon” is in fact a dummy, and the MAOV retains only its machinegun.  The MAOV is equipped with a combination ground surveillance/mortar and artillery counterbattery radar, GPS with inertial navigation backup, a computer system to allow it to compute fire solutions for several friendly artillery and/or mortar batteries at once and process the information from its radar, and two long range radios (data-capable), one medium-range radio, and one short-range radio.  The turret has two independently-trainable laser rangefinders, including one with double normal range, plus one for the machinegun. It can transmit the information from its radar and vision devices to other units equipped to receive them.  The MAOV has a greatly enhanced vision suite.  The gunner and commander are in fact artillery spotters and run the radar, and the fourth crewmembers runs the computers and some of the radios and communications.

     Power is provided by the same Perkins/Rolls-Royce Condor CV8 TCA diesel engine developing 550 horsepower; this is coupled to an Allison X300-4B automatic transmission.  Hull armor is of all-welded aluminum, often with appliqué armor plates on the sides and sometimes on the glacis (especially during and after Desert Storm, during deployments to the former Yugoslavia, and during the recent fighting in Iraq).  Floor armor is notoriously thin, something that is being addressed by current upgrades.  The turret, on the other hand, is armored in welded steel, and compared to most vehicles of its class, is relatively well armored.  (Even compared to the Warrior’s hull, the turret is well-armored.) On the other hand, it does make the vehicle heavier than it might have been if an aluminum armor turret had been used. The vehicle has a collective NBC system for the crew and passengers, and this system also shields the airflow to the radios and some other electronic equipment.  The Warrior has automatic fire detection and suppression systems, with separate systems for the turret and passenger compartments, the driver’s compartment, the engine compartment, and the fuel tanks.  In addition, there are a pair of manual handles to actuate the fire extinguishing system.

     The Warrior MAOV is not slated to receive more than a small part of the WSCP (Warrior Capability Sustainment Program). The MAOV already has a lot of the vision and navigation equipment of the WSCP; the armament augmentation is not applicable to the MAOV, though the MAOV may receive a new turret and dummy autocannon and ATGM launcher, just to blend in.  The WMPS modular appliqué armor suite is not currently set to be applied to the MAOV.

 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The Warrior MAOV was a latecomer to the British TOE; perhaps 20 were built before the Twilight War, and another 20 during the war.

 

Vehicle

Price

Fuel Type

Load

Veh Wt

Crew

Mnt

Night Vision

Radiological

Warrior MOAV

$552,315

D, A

500 kg

24 tons

4

18

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (C), FLIR (G), Artillery Counterbattery/GSR Radar

Shielded

Warrior MAOV w/Appliqué

$556,100

D, A

300 kg

25 tons

4

18

Passive IR (D, G, C), Image Intensification (G, C), Thermal Imaging (C), FLIR (G), Artillery Counterbattery/GSR Radar

Shielded

 

Vehicle

Tr Mov

Com Mov

Fuel Cap

Fuel Cons

Config

Susp

Armor

Warrior MAOV

154/108

39/23

770

234

Trtd

T4

TF12  TS8  TR5  HF11  HS7  HR5*

Warrior MAOV w/Appliqué

149/103

37/22

770

251

Trtd

T4

TF12  TS8  TR5  HF17Sp  HS10Sp  HR5*

 

Vehicle

Fire Control

Stabilization

Armament

Ammunition

Warrior MAOV

+1

Fair

EX-34

1500x7.62mm

*Hull floor armor for this version is 5.