Anzio Ironworks Heavy Rifles

     Notes: Anzio Ironworks makes a number of heavy-caliber rifles, primarily for civilian long-range shooting matches. Their rifles range from single-shot .50 Browning machinegun rifles to heavy repeating 20mm antimateriel rifles firing modified 20mm Vulcan shells modified for primer ignition.  They are built primarily from heavy-gauge, high-strength steel, and light alloys or even plastic where possible.  Buttstocks are typically simple, with steel or alloy-strut stocks and padded buttplates.  Barrels are tipped with large multi-chamber muzzle brakes. Most models can be had in left-handed and right-handed models, as they are almost all bolt-action, and some are of bullpup design. Most are equipped with a folding Harris bipod adjustable for height and cant. The rifles may be finished in natural metal, black, or a variety of camouflage patterns.  The top of the receiver holds a MIL-STD-1913 rail for the mounting of optics on a slightly-raised mount.

     The base of these rifles is the Single-Shot 50.  These typically consist of a light alloy tube in which the barrel is contained – this barrel may be a standard 18 or 26-inch barrel or a target-quality Lothar Walther barrel of the same length.  They are typically equipped with a bipod below the front of the aluminum handguards.

     The Take-Down Competition 50 is a variant of the Single-Shot 50.  It is typically equipped with a 30-inch Supermatch Chrome-Moly 30” barrel, though 18” and 26” barrels are available.  The barrel is free-floating.  The receiver is all-steel, and the barrel can be easily removed from the weapon and replaced without losing zero.  The trigger is match-quality.  The firing pin is titanium.  Finishes on the receiver/stock are limited to green and black, with a Duracoat finish.  These rifles are not typically sold with bipods.

     The Anzio 50 is a repeating version of the Single-Shot 50. The Anzio 50 has an all-steel receiver; indeed, most parts are of high-strength steel.  The barrel is a Lothar Walther match-quality free-floating rifle; the stock is similar to the Single-Shot 50, being a thick tube with a skeletonized buttstock with a rubber recoil pad. The muzzle brake is different, being a long tubular design instead of the wedge-shaped muzzle brake of the Single-Shot 50.  The trigger pack is match-quality.  Magazines are unfortunately small, in keeping with the primary purpose as a civilian weapon.  The Super Lightweight 50 is, as the name would indicate, a lighter version of this rifle; the receiver and stock are of light alloy, the muzzle brake of titanium, and some use of polymers is made.  An additional barrel length is offered.  The Takedown Lightweight 50 is again similar to the Super Lightweight 50, except for the quick-remove barrel (which is fluted in this case), the conventional (for an Anzio heavy rifle) wedge-shaped muzzle brake, and the lack of a standard bipod.

     The Anzio 20/50 is chambered to fire a .50 Browning machinegun bullet from a 20mm case, which is cut-down 20mm Vulcan case.  The result is essentially a .50-caliber magnum rifle.  The resulting is utterly massive, weighing in rather heavy and with the barrels (a choice of three lengths) being tipped by a huge, conical muzzle brake.  Though it would seem to have rather limited utility, the FBI has in fact invested in five of the repeating versions for evaluation; with an eye towards heavy counterterrorist work.  The barrel is heavy and can be removed to create a takedown rifle.  A bipod is found at the front of the handguards at the point of balance.  This rifle is available as a single-shot rifle or as a magazine-fed repeater.

     The Anzio 20 comes in three versions: a single-shot takedown rifle, a single-shot standard rifle, and a magazine-fed rifle.  The single-shot and magazine-fed rifles can be had in 20mm, 14.5mm KPV, and 20/50 Anzio.  The 20mm round used with these rifles is a version of the 20mm Vulcan round which uses a heavy primer instead of electrical ignition.  The single-shot takedown rifle uses a heavy 50-inch barrel with a massive muzzle brake and can be tripod or pintle-mounted (and the pintle can be mounted on a fifth-wheel mounted in a pickup truck bed); the single shot and magazine-fed rifles (which are variants of each other) use a 49-inch heavy barrel with the same muzzle brake, and use beefy bipods.  Although three are massive brutes of rifles, longer than the average man is tall.  The FBI is also reputedly experimenting with the 20mm magazine-fed version.  The 20mm Vulcan round versions below have explosive damage ratings for HEI and SAPHEI and penetration ratings for API and SAPHEI that reflect antipersonnel (anti-vehicle) penetration ratings.  The SAPHEI has ratings for a direct antipersonnel hit as well as explosive damage.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These rifles do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

Single Shot 50 (18” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

7.71 kg

1 Internal

$4402

Single Shot 50 (26” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.43 kg

1 Internal

$4671

Single Shot 50 (18” Target Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

7.74 kg

1 Internal

$4417

Single Shot 50 (26” Target Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.5 kg

1 Internal

$4692

Take-Down Competition (18” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

6.13 kg

1 Internal

$4401

Take-Down Competition (26” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.1 kg

1 Internal

$4676

Take-Down Competition (30” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.3 kg

1 Internal

$4814

Anzio 50 (18” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

8.16 kg

3, 5

$7570

Anzio 50 (26” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.89 kg

3, 5

$7754

Super Lightweight 50 (18” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

6.12 kg

3, 5

$7604

Super Lightweight 50 (22” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

7.15 kg

3, 5

$7742

Super Lightweight 50 (26” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

8.17 kg

3, 5

$7880

Takedown Lightweight 50 (18” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

5.48 kg

3, 5

$7635

Takedown Lightweight 50 (22” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

6.4 kg

3, 5

$7773

Takedown Lightweight 50 (26” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

7.31 kg

3, 5

$7911

Takedown Lightweight 50 (30” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

7.47 kg

3, 5

$8048

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (36” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

19.96 kg

1 Internal

$5211

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (40” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

20.31 kg

1 Internal

$5269

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (45” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

20.7 kg

1 Internal

$5513

Anzio 20/50 Repeater (36” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

28.34 kg

3

$8414

Anzio 20/50 Repeater (40” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

28.84 kg

3

$8549

Anzio 20/50 Repeater (45” Barrel)

20/50 Anzio

29.48 kg

3

$8716

Anzio 20 Takedown

20mm Vulcan

17.69 kg

1 Internal

$10312

Anzio 20 Single-Shot

20/50 Anzio

21.5 kg

1 Internal

$5542

Anzio 20 Single-Shot

14.5mm KPV

24.56 kg

1 Internal

$6904

Anzio 20 Single-Shot

20mm Vulcan

32.21 kg

1 Internal

$10246

Anzio 20 Repeater

20/50 Anzio

26.76 kg

3

$8744

Anzio 20 Repeater

14.5mm KPV

30.57 kg

3

$11384

Anzio 20 Repeater

20mm Vulcan

40.09 kg

3

$17802

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

Single Shot 50 (18”)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

3

Nil

52

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

68

Single Shot 50 (26”)

SS

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

99

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

128

Single Shot 50 (18” Target)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

3

Nil

55

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

71

Single Shot 50 (26” Target)

SS

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

102

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

133

Take-Down Competition (18”)

SS

8

2-3-4

7*

3

Nil

55

Take-Down Competition (26”)

SS

9

2-3-4

9*

3

Nil

102

Take-Down Competition (30”)

SS

9

2-3-4

9*

3

Nil

128

Anzio 50 (18” Barrel)

BA

8

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

55

With Bipod

BA

8

2-3-4

9

2

Nil

71

Anzio 50 (26” Barrel)

BA

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

102

With Bipod

BA

9

2-3-4

11

1

Nil

133

Anzio 50 (18” Barrel)

BA

8

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

55

With Bipod

BA

8

2-3-4

9

2

Nil

71

Anzio 50 (22” Barrel)

BA

8

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

78

With Bipod

BA

8

2-3-4

10

2

Nil

101

Anzio 50 (26” Barrel)

BA

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

102

With Bipod

BA

9

2-3-4

11

2

Nil

133

Takedown Lightweight (18”)

BA

8

2-3-4

9*

3

Nil

55

Takedown Lightweight (22”)

BA

8

2-3-4

10*

3

Nil

78

Takedown Lightweight (26”)

BA

9

2-3-4

11*

3

Nil

102

Takedown Lightweight (30”)

BA

9

2-3-4

12*

3

Nil

128

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (36”)

SS

10

1-2-3

10*

3

Nil

190

With Bipod

SS

10

1-2-3

10*

1

Nil

247

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (40”)

SS

10

1-2-3

10*

3

Nil

222

With Bipod

SS

10

1-2-3

10*

1

Nil

289

Anzio 20/50 Single-Shot (45”)

SS

11

1-1-1

12*

3

Nil

264

With Bipod

SS

11

1-1-1

12*

2

Nil

343

Anzio 20/50 Repeating (36”)

BA

10

1-2-3

13*

3

Nil

190

With Bipod

BA

10

1-2-3

13*

1

Nil

247

Anzio 20/50 Repeating (40”)

BA

10

1-2-3

13*

3

Nil

222

With Bipod

BA

10

1-2-3

13*

1

Nil

289

Anzio 20/50 Repeating (45”)

BA

11

1-1-1

14*

3

Nil

264

With Bipod

BA

11

1-1-1

14*

2

Nil

343

Anzio 20 Takedown (API)

SS

15

2-2-2 (2/2/2/1)

14*

4

Nil

283

With Bipod

SS

15

2-2-2 (2/2/2/1)

14*

2

Nil

368

With Tripod

SS

15

2-2-2 (2/2/2/1)

14*

1

Nil

566

Anzio 20 Takedown (HEI)

SS

C1  B5

Nil

14*

4

Nil

212

With Bipod

SS

C1  B5

Nil

14*

2

Nil

276

With Tripod

SS

C1  B5

Nil

14*

1

Nil

425

Anzio 20 Takedown (SAPHEI)

SS

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

14*

4

Nil

248

With Bipod

SS

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

14*

2

Nil

322

With Tripod

SS

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

14*

1

Nil

496

Anzio 20 Single-Shot (20/50 Anzio)

SS

11

1-1-1

13

3

Nil

296

With Bipod

SS

11

1-1-1

13

2

Nil

385

Anzio 20 Single-Shot (14.5mm)

SS

11

2-2-3

13

3

Nil

250

With Bipod

SS

11

2-2-3

13

2

Nil

325

Anzio 20 Single-Shot (20mm, API)

SS

15

2-2-2 (2/2/1/1)

14

4

Nil

278

With Bipod

SS

15

2-2-2 (2/2/1/1)

14

2

Nil

361

Anzio 20 Single-Shot (20mm, HEI)

SS

C1  B5

Nil

14

4

Nil

209

With Bipod

SS

C1  B5

Nil

14

2

Nil

271

Anzio 20 Single-Shot (20mm, SAPHEI)

SS

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

14

4

Nil

244

With Bipod

SS

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

14

2

Nil

316

Anzio 20 Repeating (20/50 Anzio)

BA

11

1-1-1

15

3

Nil

296

With Bipod

BA

11

1-1-1

15

1

Nil

385

Anzio 20 Repeating (14.5mm)

BA

11

2-2-3

16

3

Nil

250

With Bipod

BA

11

2-2-3

16

1

Nil

325

Anzio 20 Repeating (20mm, API)

BA

15

2-2-2 (2/2/1/1)

17

3

Nil

278

With Bipod

BA

15

2-2-2 (2/2/1/1)

17

1

Nil

361

Anzio 20 Repeating (20mm, HEI)

BA

C1  B5

Nil

17

3

Nil

209

With Bipod

BA

C1  B5

Nil

17

1

Nil

271

Anzio 20 Repeating (20mm, SAPHEI)

BA

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

17

3

Nil

244

With Bipod

BA

14 + C1  B3

2-2-3 (2/2/1/1)

17

1

Nil

316

*These rifles may halve their bulk rating (rounded up) if taken down, but they cannot be fired in this condition!

 

Armalite AR-50

     Notes: This weapon was designed by Armalite primarily for the civilian large-caliber enthusiast, but was employed on a limited basis by military forces due to its long range and stability.  The AR-50 uses a number of tried-and-true principles and components from other rifles and systems, such as Armalite’s own rifles, Sako, Barrett, and some others. The AR-50 is quite lightweight for its large size.

     The AR-50 uses a unique octagonal receiver, bedded into the stock with a solid aircraft aluminum bedding block.  The single-shot bolt action uses a bolt handle with a lift of only 60 degrees and a short throw, to enable follow-up shots that are as quick as possible for a single-shot rifle.  The extractor is a spring-loaded plunger-type which is essentially an enlarged version of a Sako extractor.  The receiver and action can be had in right and left-handed versions.  The heavy steel 31-inch barrel is tipped with a proprietary Armalite multi-baffle muzzle brake which is considered so effective, lightweight, and advanced in design that many other companies making heavy-caliber rifles have licensed the design of the muzzle brake, and many buyers have retrofitted their own heavy-caliber rifles with this brake.  (Armalite calls this muzzle brake the “Multiflute Recoil Check.”)  The stock is aluminum alloy and skeletonized, with a large handle for the non-firing hand, and can be removed for transport (but not fired in this state).  The buttplate and cheekpiece are padded and fully adjustable.  The AR-50 is equipped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver, but no iron sights are provided. The pistol grip is identical to that of an M-16A2.  A fully-adjustable folding bipod is provided, but the mount allows the installation of several alternate bipods if desired.  Steel parts are Parkerized, while aluminum parts are hard-anodized. 

     The AR-50A1 version improves on the AR-50 platform.  The barrel is shorter at 30 inches, but the barrel has been made free-floating. Almost half a kilogram has been shaved off of the weight. The AR-50A1’s buyer has the option of a Weaver rail in lieu of the MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the mounting of the rail had been even better stabilized than on the AR-50.  Special coatings have been added to improve operation of the bolt and trigger groups.  The AR-50A1 has a special buffer that further decreases the recoil, and adjustments in the receiver allow a right-handed version to be more easily fired by a left-handed shooter, and vice versa.

     The AR-50A1 NM is designed more with long-range competition and heavy-caliber enthusiasts in mind.  The “NM” stands for “National Match,” and many of the parts are specially fitted or specially modified for competition shooting.  In fact, the entire chamber is designed around .50 BMG Match ammunition instead of standard .50 BMG ammunition or even .50 BMG military sniping rounds.  (The stats below use standard military .50 BMG ammunition.) The stock is redesigned; it is adjustable for cheek height and length of pull, and has a rubber recoil pad.  More importantly, the bottom of the stock has been given a skid that allows the stock to be rested on the ground and it’s non-slip surface keeps the stock in place; this obviates the need for a monopod, and provides a more solid platform than a monopod.  The stock is highly skeletonized, with the bottom of the pistol grip even with the bottom of the skid.  As with other AR-50s, the AR-50A1 NM’s stock is removable for transport, and it can be interchanged with other AR-50 stocks. The fluted, floating barrel is a full 33 inches and tipped with a beefy muzzle brake.  Attachment of the barrel is by Armalite’s patented V-Lock Bedding Wedge and V-Block Stock interface system, resulting in a very solid platform.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon was the bane of both the good and bad guys, being used against government forces by civilians and by government militia against both MilGov and CivGov and against New America, in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  These rifles were also used on a limited basis in other places in the world; Saudi Arabian sniper is believed to have made a shot with an AR-50 against an Iraqi MRL gunner, at a range of nearly 2600 meters, causing the entire crew to surrender!  The AR-50A1 NM is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AR-50

.50 Browning Machinegun

15.42 kg

1 Internal

$4816

AR-50A1

.50 Browning Machinegun

15.06 kg

1 Internal

$4889

AR-50A1 NM

.50 Browning Machinegun

15.16 kg

1 Internal

$4948

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AR-50

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

3

Nil

130

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

1

Nil

169

AR-50A1

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

2

Nil

128

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

1

Nil

167

AR-50A1 NM

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

3

Nil

160

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

8/10*

1

Nil

204

*When the stock is removed, the bulk of the AR-50 and AR-50A1 is reduced to 8; however, they CANNOT be fired with the stock removed.

 

Arms Tech TTR-50

     Notes: This .50-caliber sniping rifle was designed with special operations and other clandestine operators in mind.  It is bolt action heavy rifle that can be disassembled into a package the size of a small suitcase.  (TTR stands for Tactical Takedown Rifle.)  The TTR-50 is based on the McMillan series of antimateriel rifles, with their reliable action and ease of care.  The TTR-50 has a collapsible stock, and has one more unusual feature: it is capable of mounting a suppressor. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

TTR-50

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.88 kg

5

$7625

TTR-50 (With Suppressor)

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.06 kg

5

$8441

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

TTR-50

BA

8

2-3-4

8/9

5

Nil

97

TTR-50 (Bipod)

BA

8

2-3-4

8/9

3

Nil

126

TTR-50 (Suppressed)

BA

6

2-4-Nil

9/10

4

Nil

83

TTR-50 (Suppressed, Bipod)

BA

6

2-4-Nil

9/10

2

Nil

108

 

Barrett M-82A1

     Notes: This is an American-made antimateriel and heavy sniping rifle used by both civilians and dozens of military forces throughout the world, including most of NATO.  It was first designed for EOD teams to destroy explosives and for sharpshooters to destroy things like naval mines.  It has since then been used for many purposes, in almost every corner of the globe.  The weapon is recoil-operated, and has a massive muzzle brake to reduce felt recoil; this, along with the M-82A1's use of recoil to operate the mechanism, reduces felt recoil to manageable proportions.  Standard telescopic sight issued with the M-82A1 is a 10x of several different manufactures. The barrel is of heavy steel and 29 inches long, and tipped with a large multi-baffle muzzle brake designed by Barrett.  The bipod is adjustable for height and cant, and it also has an adapter which allows it to be mounted on any tripod or mount compatible with the M-60 machinegun.

     Though the US Military has unofficially been using the M-82A1 for almost two decades, it is only recently that the rifle has been type-standardized, first as the XM-107, and then the M-107 (the Marines and the Navy use the same rifle as the M-107, but call it the M-82A3, the few foreign users of the M-107 generally call it the M-82A1M).  The M-107 is nearly identical to the standard M-82A1; however, there are some differences worth mentioning.  The M-107 is designed to be field stripped without using tools.  The muzzle brake may be easily removed by the sniper and replaced with a sound suppressor.  Atop the receiver is a 19-inch MIL-STD-1913 rail.  The skeletonized stock has an actual handgrip on the bottom instead of a simple rod of metal, and attached to this handgrip is a folding monopod to help support the weapon.  The M-107 has attachment points for mounting on any tripod or pintle mount able to accept an M-60 or M-240 machinegun.  The finish is a bit more weatherproof, and the bipod is slightly different; it is a quick-release model with spiked feet.  The M-107 may also be mounted on a soft mount designed for the rifle, and/or vehicle-mounted on this soft-mount or, via an adapter, on any vehicle mount which can take a weapon designed for a medium or heavy machinegun or grenade launcher.  The barrel is threaded at the muzzle; this allows the muzzle brake to be removed and replaced with other muzzle brakes, or even suppressors/silencers.  The M-107 is also over a full kilogram lighter than the M-82A1.  Military snipers recommend the use of the Mk 211 Raufoss cartridge, but the M-107 may fire any sort of .50 Browning Machinegun cartridge except SLAP.  For game purposes, it is otherwise identical to the M-82A1.

     A recent variant of the M-107 is the M-107CQ (Close Quarters).  This is basically a shorter version of the M-107, with a barrel nine inches shorter and much lighter than the standard M-107.  This variant is designed both for military users operating in MOUT situations or fighting from helicopters or vehicles, and for police snipers who do not need the kind of range that a full-sized M-82A1 or M-107 produces.  The M-107CQ is not an official US military variant, though it is believed to be extensively used by the US military.

     The military newest iteration of the M-82A1 is the US military’s M-107A1, which is currently used by US special operations units, some US Coast Guard drug interdiction units, and possibly some NATO special operations units.  The M-107A1 takes the basic M-107 and improves upon it, making it more versatile as well as significantly lightening the weapon using more advanced steel grades and light alloys, including titanium and aluminum alloys for several major pieces.  Significant user input was also taken from the soldiers and law enforcement officials using the M-107 and M-82A1.  Perhaps the most noticeable change is the muzzle brake – instead of the distinctive arrowhead-shaped muzzle brake used on the M-82A1 and M-107, the M-107A1 uses a large multi-baffle cylindrical muzzle brake.  This brake is not only just as efficient as the M-107’s brake, but is easier and less expensive to construct.  It can also be readily removed by the shooter, allowing him to remove the brake and replace it with a suppressor.  The new brake is also rumored to have a design that allows the M-107A1 to fire SLAP rounds though the suppressor; the muzzle brake of the M-107A1 is also designed to allow the firing of SLAP rounds.  The suppressor, designed specifically for the M-107A1, takes less than five seconds to remove or attach (it uses a simple clip-on interface), but has the downside of greatly increasing the Bulk of the M-107A1. The recoil buffer and some other parts are modified to allow the use of a suppressor (most other M-82A1-based rifles aren’t designed to work with and can be damaged by using a suppressor; it was discovered that even military M-107s used with suppressors were getting damaged internally through such use).  Some other changes include a more ergonomic pistol grip (made by Magpul), a higher-placed cheekpiece, and a new finish and coating for the parts that not only makes the M-107A1 more weatherproof, but also has lubricant properties.  The M-107A1 has flip-up backup iron sights with tritium inlays for night use, if the primary optics get damaged. At the front of the handguards are three more short MIL-STD-1913 rails (on each side and at the bottom).  The bipod is made largely of titanium alloy and is both lighter and stronger, and can accept a variety of removable polymer feet.  Though the first versions of the M-107A1 may have appeared as early as 2008, it is only recently that the M-107A1 has seen military type-standardization.

     Of course, the nomenclature, “M-82A1,” would seem to indicate that there was an M-82 before it; there in fact was.  Barrett’s initial design was similar, but it used a 37-inch barrel with a heavier muzzle brake, and was fed by an 11-round magazine.  Not only was the M-82 incredibly unwieldy due to its length, it was heavier.  (The range, however, was incredible.)  Nonetheless, this was the design sold between 1985-87, although it sold only in small numbers, primarily to civilian large-caliber enthusiasts.

     The M-82A2 is a bullpup version of the M-82A1 is lighter and somewhat simplified in operation.  The shoulder rest is moved to behind the magazine, and the action passes over the firer's shoulder.  A second pistol grip has been added behind the barrel for more stable hip firing.  It is mostly a niche weapon for heavy-caliber rifle collectors, and does not see much use as a military or police weapon.  The M-82A2 cannot be used with a tripod mount.

     The M-90 was Barrett’s first attempt at a bolt-action bullpup version of the M-82.  It is basically a less-refined counterpart to the later M-95, being a Barrett in bolt-action bullpup form with a different bipod, slightly different muzzle brake, and less tolerance to wear and dirt. Like the M-82A2, the M-90 cannot be used with a tripod mount.  The M-90 was basically a test rifle, with only a few being made, and these were primarily hand-made.  The M-90 served as a testbed for a design which later resulted in the M-95; few M-90s were built, and even fewer were allowed to be sold.

     Barrett is now offering the M-82A1 in their proprietary .416 Barrett cartridge, which not only makes for a slightly lighter weapon (not enough to express in Twilight 2000 terms), but gives the M-82A1 the advantages of the .416 Barrett round (and incidentally makes it California-legal). Configuration, other than the internal and external changes for the new caliber, is otherwise the same as the standard M-82A1.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon was used in so many places on the planet in the Twilight 2000 timeline that it was nearly ubiquitous, despite its small numbers.  The M-107 is not available in the Twilight 2000 timeline, nor is the M-107CQ or M-107A1; however, the addition of a MIL-STD-1913 rail and replacement of the bipod were common modifications done to M-82A1’s used by the military in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  The M-82 version is slightly more common in the Twilight 2000 timeline than in the real world, and is used by NATO in very small numbers, often with the addition of a MIL-STD-1913 rail and replacement bipod. No M-82A1s are chambered for .416 Barrett in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-82

.50 Browning Machinegun

15.88 kg

11

$6021

M-82A1

.50 Browning Machinegun

14.06 kg

10

$5755

M-82A1

.416 Barrett

14.06 kg

10

$3862

M-107

.50 Browning Machinegun

12.6 kg

10

$5787

M-107CQ

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.75 kg

10

$5487

M-107A1

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.33 kg

10

$5783

M-107A1 Suppressor

N/A

8.5 kg

N/A

$3470

M-82A2

.50 Browning Machinegun

12.24 kg

10

$5703

M-90

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.18 kg

5

$7794

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-82

SA

9

2-3-4

14

3

Nil

154

(With Bipod)

SA

9

2-3-4

14

1

Nil

201

M-82A1/M-107

SA

9

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

107

(With Bipod)

SA

9

2-3-4

10

1

Nil

139

(With Tripod)

SA

9

2-3-4

10

1

Nil

213

M-82A1 (.416)

SA

8

1-2-3

10

2

Nil

125

(With Bipod)

SA

8

1-2-3

10

1

Nil

163

(With Tripod)

SA

8

1-2-3

10

1

Nil

250

M-107CQ

SA

8

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

58

(With Bipod)

SA

8

2-3-4

8

2

Nil

75

(With Tripod)

SA

8

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

115

M-107A1

SA

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

107

(With Bipod)

SA

9

2-3-4

11

2

Nil

139

(With Tripod)

SA

9

2-3-4

11

1

Nil

213

M-107A1 (Suppressed)

SA

5

2-4-Nil

16

3

Nil

60

(With Bipod)

SA

5

2-4-Nil

16

2

Nil

78

(With Tripod)

SA

5

2-4-Nil

16

1

Nil

120

M-82A2

SA

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

96

(With Bipod)

SA

9

2-3-4

8

2

Nil

125

M-90

BA

9

2-3-4

7

4

Nil

105

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

137

 

Barrett M-95

     Notes: The M-95 is essentially more-developed version of the M-90, and retains the bullpup design of the M-90.  Improvements over the M-90 are primarily in the areas of ergonomics and resistance to wear and dirt, and in addition the muzzle brake is lighter and more compact yet just as effective.  The M-95 uses upper and lower receiver halves, with the lower receiver being of light aluminum alloy and the upper receiver being of steel.  (For transport or field stripping, these halves may be separated by removing the two pins holding them together.)  The barrel is 29 inches long and of heavy steel, equipped with the same muzzle brake as the M-82A1.  The bipod is also the same as that of the M-82A1.  The buttplate includes a Sorbothane recoil pad. The M-95 is used not only by civilian collectors and long-range shooting enthusiasts; it is used by the military forces of 15 nations as well as police departments all over the US.  The M-95 has a 9-inch length of MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver instead of the Weaver rail of the M-90 (though early versions of the M-95 still used the Weaver rail).  The M-95 can take the same magazine as the M-90 or a larger magazine, the same as used on other Barrett .50-caliber rifles able to use a ten-round magazine.

     At one point (in 1999), the US Army had selected the M-95 as its new antimateriel rifle, at that time preferring it over the M-82A1.  The M-95 was even given the designation XM-107.  However, a change in operational policy on the part of the Defense Department, coupled with input from snipers and EOD teams who wanted a semiautomatic antimateriel rifle, led to the “XM-107” designation being transferred back to the M-82A1M design.  Barrett gave the company designation of M-95M to the militarized version of the M-95; changes to the M-95 included the installation of a 12-inch MIL-STD-1913 rail atop the receiver, a hard chrome-plated chamber, an improved extractor, backup iron sights, and the same bipod as used on the M-82A1M (M-107).  Though the M-95M was ultimately not chosen by the US Army, it is still used in an unofficial capacity by the US military in small numbers, as well as by some foreign military units.

     The M-99 is essentially a single-shot variant of the M-95, with a longer 33-inch barrel.  It was designed primarily for law enforcement, to stop vehicles by destroying their engine blocks, or penetrate the vehicles and kill their drivers or passengers if necessary, and do it at long range.  Though the M-99 was originally designed to be a less-expensive counterpart to the M-95, it has acquired a reputation as one of the most accurate and reliable heavy sniping rifles in the world.  Early production versions of these rifles used standard drilling and tapping for scope mounts, but most of them produced after 1995 use a MIL-STD-1913 rail (unless the buyer wants something else).  A civilian long-range rifle enthusiast even used an M-99 to set the world match accuracy record in 2004, using an M-99 fed with match-quality ammunition. 

     Though the M-99 began life as a rather uncomplicated weapon, it has morphed into several variants.  The M-99-1 is a shortened version of the Barrett 99; instead of the M-99s 33-inch barrel, the M-99-1 uses either a 29 or 25” barrel.  A new development, introduced in early 2006, is an M-99 and an M-99-1 chambered for a new round developed by Barrett, the .416 Barrett.  The round is basically a .50 BMG necked down to .416 caliber, and is said to be surprisingly effective.  This chambering is available only as a 33-inch-barrel M-99 or a 29-inch-barrel M-99-1; no 25-inch-barrel version is as yet available.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The M-95M does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.  M-99s are rather rare rifles in the Twilight 2000 timeline, and the other versions of the M-99 do not exist at all.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-95

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.98 kg

5, 10

$7869

M-95M

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.07 kg

5, 10

$7909

M-99

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.34 kg

1 Internal

$4848

M-99

.416 Barrett

11.34 kg

1 Internal

$3412

M-99-1 (29” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.43 kg

1 Internal

$4715

M-99-1 (25” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.53 kg

1 Internal

$4581

M-99-1

.416 Barrett

10.43 kg

1 Internal

$3281

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-95

BA

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

106

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

137

M-95M

BA

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

106

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

9

2

Nil

137

M-99 (.50)

SS

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

129

(With Bipod)

SS

9

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

167

M-99 (.416)

SS

8

1-2-3

8

3

Nil

150

(With Bipod)

SS

8

1-2-3

8

1

Nil

194

M-99-1 (29”, .50)

SS

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

106

(With Bipod)

SS

9

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

137

M-99-1 (25”, .50)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

3

Nil

83

(With Bipod)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

108

M-99-1 (.416)

SS

8

1-2-3

7

3

Nil

124

(With Bipod)

SS

8

1-2-3

7

1

Nil

161

 

Barrett XM-109 AMSR

     Notes:  The AMSR (AntiMaterial Sniper Rifle) was also known as the OSW (Objective Sniper Weapon) and the Payload Rifle during development. It is a highly modified Barrett M-82 (in its military M-107 guise) made to fire a small grenade of the same type as fired by the OCSW.  It is basically a semiautomatic grenade launcher.  It was designed to give US special operations snipers the ability to defeat light armored vehicles as well as deal with massed infantry.  It is otherwise a shorter-barreled Barrett, with a Picatinny Rail interface.  There are rumors of its use in Afghanistan and Iraq, (it has seen use with unnamed uses for operational testing, which may be wartime use or evaluation use with an actual unit) but it is still officially in the testing phases. It is still an open question whether it will become a mainstream weapon, or remain only for very narrow uses (or not used at all).

     A novel use of the AMSR is to blow reactive armor panels off a target, allowing a rocket or missile a better shot.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: This weapon is not available until 2006.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

AMSR

25mm OCSW

13.83 kg

4

$10641

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

AMSR (Slug)

SA

13

2-2-3

7

3

Nil

66

AMSR (Slug, Bipod)

SA

13

2-3-3

7

2

Nil

81

AMSR (APDS)

SA

13

1-1-1

7

3

Nil

79

AMSR (APDS, Bipod)

SA

13

1-1-1

7

2

Nil

97

AMSR (HEAT)

SA

C1  B8

23C

7

3

Nil

51

AMSR (HEAT, Bipod)

SA

C1  B8

23C

7

2

Nil

61

AMSR (HEDP)

SA

C2  B10

11C

7

3

Nil

51

AMSR (HEDP, Bipod)

SA

C2  B10

11C

7

3

Nil

61

AMSR (HE)

SA

C2  B12

0C

7

3

Nil

51

AMSR (HE, Bipod)

SA

C2  B12

0C

7

2

Nil

61

 

Barrett XM-500

     Notes: Developed primarily for the US military, the XM-500 is a bullpup version rifle based on the M-107 version of the M-82A1, with some other modifications.  The XM-500 is officially listed as still being in the early stages of development, and it is not known if it has seen any sort of combat or even combat training use. 

     The existence of the XM-500 was first revealed in 2006, though it is likely that prototypes existed at least several months before that, if not longer.  Construction is largely to the same standards as the M-107 (modified for its bullpup format, of course, but in addition has a rubber recoil pad and a shorter MIL-STD-1913 rail, since the receiver top is shorter.  Some of the primary users of the XM-500 are to be airborne, air assault, and special operations units; they wanted a more compact and lighter Barrett.  Therefore, the use of light alloys was done as much as possible, and that in addition to the bullpup layout reduces the weight substantially.  The 29-inch barrel of the M-107, along with the muzzle brake on a threaded muzzle, is retained.  The barrel, however, has a very heavy profile, though it is fluted, and is free-floating. Unlike the M-82A1/M-107, accuracy and stability is also improved since the XM-500’s barrel does not recoil with a shot, unlike the M-82/M-107; the barrel is not a part of the operation of the rifle. Operation is otherwise by gas piston, with locking being done by a rotary bolt. The XM-500 design does not currently have iron sights, though this is being looked at for possible future development. The bipod has been moved in location to just behind the front end of the handguards/receiver, just in front of the cooling slots.  The bipod is quick-detachable, and is adjustable for height and cant.  Like the rest of the Barrett series, the pistol grip, trigger (but not the whole trigger pack) and controls are based on those of the M-16 series.

     Exactly when the XM-500 will enter service is unknown, but considering that it is based on an already-proven rifle, the wait will probably not be long.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: The XM-500 does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline as such, though some similarly-modified M-82A2s were apparently used by NATO military forces.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

XM-500

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.8 kg

10

$5835

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

XM-500

SA

9

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

111

With Bipod

SA

9

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

140

 

Bohica Arms FAR-50

     Notes: The FAR-50 is actually a replacement upper receiver group, including barrel and bolt carrier group, for the AR-15/M-16/M-4 series of rifles.  This gives the rifle a new chambering and a bolt action instead of a semiautomatic or automatic action.  The new barrel is a floating match-grade bull barrel tipped with a large muzzle brake.  New rectangular handguards are used, and the front of those handguards have a light bipod adjustable for height and cant.  Optional handguards have four MIL-STD-1913 rails, and both are made from polymer. The top of the receiver has a MIL-STD-1913 rail for optics.  A standard stock may be used, but the new upper receiver includes a skeletonized stock for weight savings, with a rubber recoil pad and a raised cheekpiece.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

FAR-50 (16” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

9.16 kg

1 Internal

$1630

FAR-50 (24” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

10.3 kg

1 Internal

$1903

FAR-50 (30” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.43 kg

1 Internal

$2109

FAR-50 (36” Barrel)

.50 Browning Machinegun

12.56 kg

1 Internal

$2308

FAR-50 (16” Barrel)

.50 DTC-EDM Spec

9.16 kg

1 Internal

$1612

FAR-50 (24” Barrel)

.50 DTC-EDM Spec

10.3 kg

1 Internal

$1886

FAR-50 (30” Barrel)

.50 DTC-EDM Spec

11.43 kg

1 Internal

$2092

FAR-50 (36” Barrel)

.50 DTC-EDM Spec

12.56 kg

1 Internal

$2298

FAR-50 (16” Barrel)

.416 Barrett

9.16 kg

1 Internal

$1354

FAR-50 (24” Barrel)

.416 Barrett

10.3 kg

1 Internal

$1625

FAR-50 (30” Barrel)

.416 Barrett

11.43 kg

1 Internal

$1828

FAR-50 (36” Barrel)

.416 Barrett

12.56 kg

1 Internal

$2030

FAR-50 (16” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

9.16 kg

1 Internal

$1198

FAR-50 (24” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

10.3 kg

1 Internal

$1467

FAR-50 (30” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

11.43 kg

1 Internal

$1668

FAR-50 (36” Barrel)

.338 Lapua Magnum

12.56 kg

1 Internal

$1869

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

FAR-50 (.50 BMG, 16”)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

4

Nil

39

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

51

FAR-50 (.50 BMG, 24”)

SS

8

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

81

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

8

2

Nil

106

FAR-50 (.50 BMG, 30”)

SS

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

116

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

9

2

Nil

150

FAR-50 (.50 BMG, 36”)

SS

9

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

151

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

10

2

Nil

197

FAR-50 (.50 DTC-EDM Spec, 16”)

SS

8

2-3-4

7

4

Nil

41

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

7

2

Nil

53

FAR-50 (.50 DTC-EDM Spec, 24”)

SS

8

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

84

With Bipod

SS

8

2-3-4

8

2

Nil

109

FAR-50 (.50 DTC-EDM Spec, 30”)

SS

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

119

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

9

2

Nil

154

FAR-50 (.50 DTC-EDM Spec, 36”)

SS

9

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

156

With Bipod

SS

9

2-3-4

10

2

Nil

203

FAR-50 (.416 Barrett, 16”)

SS

7

1-3-5

6

3

Nil

49

With Bipod

SS

7

1-3-5

6

1

Nil

64

FAR-50 (.416 Barrett, 24”)

SS

7

1-3-5

8

3

Nil

96

With Bipod

SS

7

1-3-5

8

1

Nil

125

FAR-50 (.416 Barrett, 30”)

SS

8

1-2-3

9

3

Nil

136

With Bipod

SS

8

1-2-3

9

2

Nil

176

FAR-50 (.416 Barrett, 36”)

SS

8

1-2-3

10

3

Nil

178

With Bipod

SS

8

1-2-3

10

2

Nil

230

FAR-50 (.338 Lapua, 16”)

SS

6

1-2-3

6

2

Nil

50

With Bipod

SS

6

1-2-3

6

1

Nil

65

FAR-50 (.338 Lapua, 24”)

SS

6

1-3-Nil

7

2

Nil

95

With Bipod

SS

6

1-3-Nil

7

1

Nil

124

FAR-50 (.338 Lapua, 30”)

SS

6

1-3-Nil

8

2

Nil

132

With Bipod

SS

6

1-3-Nil

8

1

Nil

172

FAR-50 (.338 Lapua, 36”)

SS

7

1-3-5

9

2

Nil

163

With Bipod

SS

7

1-3-5

9

1

Nil

212

 

Bushmaster BA-50

     Notes: The BA-50 is aimed at the military and law-enforcement market; though there are rumors of limited military testing and use in the US and other countries, and some limited law enforcement use for specialized applications (such as hard target interdiction, i.e. antimateriel use), the primary market seems to be long-range marksmanship shooters.  The basic receiver resembles an overgrown AR-type receiver, and the pistol grip, trigger (though not the trigger pack), and the fire controls are quite similar to those of an AR-15.  Diassembly is essentially the same procedure as that of an AR-type weapon. There, however, the resemblances largely end, except for a superficial visual resemblance.  The receiver is topped by a MIL-STD-1913 rail that runs the length of the upper receiver, and that upper receiver is an extrusion of T6-6061 aluminum alloy, with the MIL-STD-1913 rail an integral part of this extrusion.  The lower receiver is machined from a solid billet of the same T6-6061 aluminum alloy.  The use of this alloy and the receiver’s construction gives it strength while holding down weight.  The handguards are likewise of aluminum alloy, slotted for ventilation, and topped with a further length of MIL-STD-1913 rail.  No iron sights are provided integral to the weapon, though backup iron sights may be added to the rails, whether folding or fixed in height. The free-floating heavy barrel is 30 inches in length, and tipped with a massive high-efficiency multi-baffle muzzle brake (as large as a 50-round box of 9mm Parabellum ammunition you might buy from a store) that is rectangular in shape.  The barrel is secured directly to the upper receiver by 51mm-long bolts, ensuring that it is solidly-mounted despite being free-floating and having no bedding of any sort. The BA-50 uses a synthetic Magpul PRS stock adjustable for length of pull and height of cheekpiece, and has a thick LimbSaver recoil pad.  The stock also slides to an extent, primarily to make it a more compact package for carrying or storage. The pistol grip is likewise synthetic, being an ErgoGrip Deluxe Tactical model. The folding bipod is simple and deceptively slim in profile; though it is not adjustable for height or cant, it is quite strong and locks securely in position whether open or folded.  Despite being primarily a right-handed rifle, the bolt lever is on the left side of the receiver, which means that a right-handed shooter must remove his hand from the pistol grip to cycle the action.  (This left-handed bolt was necessary for proper functioning of the action used, and case ejection is to the right.)  The entire construction of the BA-50 is quite solid and surprisingly smooth, despite the long action.  Finish is hard anodized black on aluminum alloy parts and manganese phosphate on the steel parts (such as the barrel, muzzle brake, and most working parts). The action has enough tolerance in it to make it relatively insensitive to dirt but close enough tolerances to keep the BA-50 a relatively precision weapon.  Recoil is quite low for a weapon of its type, due to the weight and the stock design.

     The BA-50 Carbine is the same weapon, but with a shorter 22-inch barrel and the resultant reduction in weight.  It also does not have the second MIL-STD-1913 rail above the handguards.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BA-50 Rifle

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.6 kg

10

$8019

BA-50 Carbine

.50 Browning Machinegun

12.2 kg

10

$7670

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BA-50 Rifle

BA

9

2-3-4

9/10

2

Nil

125

With Bipod

BA

9

2-3-4

9/10

1

Nil

163

BA-50 Carbine

BA

8

1-3-5

8/9

3

Nil

76

With Bipod

BA

8

1-3-5

8/9

1

Nil

99

 

CheyTac LRRS-Intervention

     Notes: The CheyTac (Cheyenne Tactical) LRRS (Long-Range Rifle System) is a design that is based on the EDM Arms Windrunner sniper rifle.  The weapon has, however, been modified to fire a new, proprietary cartridge, the .408 CheyTac cartridge.  This offers damaging performance superior to that of the .338 Lapua Magnum and range slightly better than the .50 Browning Machinegun round, and also allows for a lighter weapon. 

     There are currently three models of the LRRS-Intervention: the M-100, a semiautomatic takedown version designed primarily for military use; the M-200, a bolt-action version of the M-100 designed for military and police use; and the M-310, a non-takedown, single-shot model designed for police use and for civilian enthusiasts of long-range rifles.  All three versions come with an adjustable/folding skeletonized stock, MIL-STD-1913 rail above the receiver, an underbarrel carrying handle, and a large pepperpot-type muzzle brake (which can be removed and replaced by a suppressor).  None of these rifles are equipped with iron sights.  They are sold with a CheyTac ballistic computer, which is a commercial handheld-type computer loaded with CheyTac’s special software; this is to compute shooting conditions and the sights mounted on the rifle to find the best aiming solution.  In addition, they are sold with a Kestrel 4000 weather sensor package, which is linked to the handheld computer. 

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This weapon does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

M-100

.408 CheyTac

12.3 kg

5

$8019

M-200

.408 CheyTac

10.1 kg

5

$6923

M-310

.408 CheyTac

8.7 kg

1 Internal

$5296

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

M-100

SA

7

1-3-5

9/10

2

Nil

104

M-100 (With Bipod)

SA

7

1-3-5

9/10

1

Nil

135

M-200

BA

7

1-3-5

9/10

3

Nil

114

M-200 (With Bipod)

BA

7

1-3-5

9/10

1

Nil

148

M-310

SS

7

1-3-5

7/8

3

Nil

114

M-310 (With Bipod)

SS

7

1-3-5

7/8

1

Nil

149

 

Cobb BA-50/FA-50

     Notes: This is a massive, bolt-action, heavy-caliber sniper rifle designed from a scaled-up AR-15 action and body.  However, though some parts are similar or identical to the AR-15 (the stock, pistol grip, parts of the trigger group, magazine catch, recoil spring, and a few others), this is definitely not simply a big AR-15.  The bipod is adapted from an M-60 machinegun.  The muzzle brake is borrowed from the ArmaLite AR-50.  The stock is perhaps most like that of the AR-15; in fact, any sort of AR-15-compatible stock will fit on the BA-50.  The FA-50 uses a MIL-STD-1913 rail to allow it to mount virtually any sort of optic, sight, or accessory.  The BA-50 comes in three versions, a standard length model, “carbine” version, and a suppressed model.  They are generally finished in OD Green DuraCoat with black camouflaging stripes, but other colors can be had.

     Externally, the FA-50 (Fast-Action) appears quite similar to the BA-50, but the FA-50 is a semiautomatic rifle.  This means that while the FA-50 is externally similar to the BA-50, internally it is very different.  There are also some minor weight differences, but accouterments are the same as used on the BA-50.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: These weapons do not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

     Merc 2000 Notes: These weapons are currently used by US and NATO special operations forces, in small numbers, with the FA-50 being the most-common military rifle.  Most of these are “tricked-out” in a manner similar to that of the M-107/M-107CQ.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

BA-50

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.61 kg

10

$8002

BA-50 Carbine

.50 Browning Machinegun

12.25 kg

10

$7732

BA-50 Suppressed

.50 Browning Machinegun

29.13 kg

10

$10529

FA-50

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.15 kg

10

$5889

FA-50 Carbine

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.83 kg

10

$5619

FA-50 Suppressed

.50 Browning Machinegun

28.71 kg

10

$8439

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

BA-50

BA

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

124

BA-50 (Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

161

BA-50 Carbine

BA

8

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

75

BA-50 Carbine (Bipod)

BA

8

2-3-4

8

1

Nil

97

BA-50 Suppressed

BA

6

2-4-Nil

13

3

Nil

63

BA-50 Suppressed (Bipod)

BA

6

2-4-Nil

13

1

Nil

81

FA-50

SA

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

112

FA-50 (Bipod)

SA

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

146

FA-50 Carbine

SA

8

2-3-4

8

3

Nil

68

FA-50 Carbine (Bipod)

SA

8

2-3-4

8

2

Nil

88

FA-50 Suppressed

SA

6

2-4-Nil

13

3

Nil

57

FA-50 Suppressed (Bipod)

SA

6

2-4-Nil

13

1

Nil

74

 

EDM XM-107 Windrunner

     Notes: Described as a heavy tactical rifle, the Windrunner is a .50 caliber rifle designed for military, police, and civilian applications.  It has a number of unusual features; one of these is that it may be broken into up to 5 pieces for transport – thus the reason EDM calls the Windrunner a “Tactical Takedown Antimateriel Rifle.”  Disassembly of the Windrunner takes about a minute, and reassembly takes under 3 minutes.  After disassembly, the Windrunner occupies a space about 32 inches long and can be put into a rifle case or large suitcase.  

     The receiver is machined from a single block of 4140 chrome-molybdenum steel, which is then hardened to 4042 specifications.  The barrel is similarly-machined, but is made from graphite composites with an internal steel liner, and is fluted for both cooling and stiffness.  It is attached to the receiver with a threaded nut using a self-locking ratchet; the threads are also reversed so that firing only makes the barrel retain its tightness instead of causing it to become looser.  This 30-inch barrel is heavy and match-quality, and is tipped with huge pepperpot muzzle brake with 80 vent holes and is fastened to the barrel in a similar manner.  The stock is also made from steel, and the entire stock slides on rails for length of pull adjustments, though the stock assembly itself is rather abbreviated.  The cheekpiece is not adjustable (and is in fact a part of the stock), but is padded, along with the buttplate.  The bipod is the same as used on newer versions of the M-21, and is adjustable for height and cant.  The stock is also equipped with a folding monopod which is adjustable for height.  The receiver is topped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail for the mounting of optics.

     Variants of the XM-107 include the SS-99, which is a single-shot version of the XM-107, and the SS-338, which is chambered for .338 Lapua Magnum.  The latter is not an antimateriel rifle, but rather a sniper rifle, but is included here for completeness.  Both are otherwise identical to the XM-107.

     It should be noted that despite EDM’s designation of the .50 Browning Machinegun version of the Windrunner (“XM-107”), this is not any sort of official US military designation, nor is it related to the M-107 version of the Barrett M-82A1.

     Twilight 2000 Notes: This rifle does not exist in the Twilight 2000 timeline.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

XM-107

.50 Browning Machinegun

14.24 kg

3

$7912

SS-99

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.83 kg

1 Internal

$4775

SS-338

.338 Lapua Magnum

9.8 kg

5

$3508

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

XM-107

BA

9

2-3-4

10

3

Nil

124

(With Bipod)

BA

9

2-3-4

10

1

Nil

161

SS-99

SS

9

2-3-4

9

3

Nil

124

(With Bipod)

SS

9

2-3-4

9

1

Nil

161

SS-338

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

2

Nil

117

(With Bipod)

BA

6

1-3-Nil

9

1

Nil

153

 

Halo Arms HA-50

     Notes: Designed both for civilian competition shooting and military use, the HA-50 is “sort-of” a bullpup-design rifle – it is a single-shot weapon, but the bottom-mounted loading port is behind the pistol grip, reducing overall length.  Much of the parts of the weapon are either handmade or hand-finished, which makes the HA-50 a tight, solid weapon with excellent accuracy.  The single-shot design allows the HA-50 to use virtually any sort of .50 Browning Machinegun ammunition – from standard ball to match rounds, and even such exotic rounds such as .50 Spotting Round ammunition.  The design of the muzzle brake also allows the HA-50 to use SLAP rounds and other saboted rounds, something most rifles equipped with muzzle brakes cannot do without destroying the muzzle brake instantly. 

     The standard HA-50, the HA-50 FTR (Field Tactical Rifle) is largely built from high-grade steel, with some synthetic parts such as the pistol grip and foregrip (another unusual feature on such a rifle), and an aluminum alloy bipod.  The stock houses part of the action, and the butt has a simple buttplate with a thick recoil pad attached.  The bipod is a quick-deploy Harris-type bipod adjustable for height and cant.  The bipod is mounted at the point of balance of the rifle, at the end of the receiver.  The HA-50 FTR has flip-up front and rear iron sights (though due to the design of the receiver, the sight radius is only about the same as that of the M-4 carbine).  However, the receiver is also topped with a MIL-STD-1913 rail, and the HA-50 FTR is primarily meant to be used with a telescopic sight of some sort.  The trigger unit is taken from the AR-15, but modified for bolt action and hand-tuned to lower the pull weight and slightly increase the pull length.  The barrel is match quality and made of chrome-moly steel, with a length of 22 inches.

     The HA-50 LRR (Long-Range Rifle) is a dedicated sniper’s platform; the receiver and action are largely the same as the HA-50 FTR, but the top of the receiver has no iron sights, and the MIL-STD-1913 rail is shorter.  The barrel is 30 inches long, but of the same quality as the HA-50 FTR.  The butt has a retractable and adjustable support leg, and the buttplate is adjustable for length.  The bipod is a highly-modified version of the M-14’s bipod, adjustable for height and cant, and it supports the rifle from the top of the receiver instead of the bottom.  This leaves room for a short, 3-inch-wide handguard; there is no foregrip as on the HA-50 FTR.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

HA-50 FTR

.50 Browning Machinegun

11.64 kg

1 Internal

$4477

HA-50 LRR

.50 Browning Machinegun

13.91 kg

1 Internal

$4746

 

Weapon