PzB-38/PzB-39

Notes: The PzB-38s round combined an 8mm Mauser bullet with a much larger 13mm cartridge shell. The result was a small but fairly heavy bullet that flew at a very high velocity to achieve penetration by a principle similar to modern sabot rounds. The bullet used a core of armor-penetrating steel combined with a small capsule of tear gas; the tear gas portion was entirely useless, as the capsule seldom ruptured as it was supposed to, and the amount of tear gas was so tiny as to have negligible, if any, effects. (It may be safely ignored for game purposes.) The PzB-38 was a single-shot rifle using an operation more akin to artillery pieces than to rifles, with a breech block rather than a conventional bolt action.

The PzB-38, while nearly useless (as were most antitank rifles) against the armor of the day, was an effective long-range sniping weapon. It was also expensive and slow to manufacture, even in the small number that were built. The PxB-38 was thus replaced in production by the simplified PzB-39. This rifle dispensed with the recoiling barrel and semiautomatic breech, and using the pistol grip to open the breech instead of a separate handle. Unfortunately, it was also more painful to fire, and Nazi snipers got a hold of the earlier PzB-38 whenever possible.

During the invasion of Poland in World War 2, examples of ammunition for the Polish Wz-35 antitank rifle were captured. This weapon fired a tungsten-cored AP round. This round was reverse-engineered for use in the PzB-38 and PzB-39.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PzB-38

7.92mm Patronen

15.88 kg

1 Internal

$2142

PzB-39

7.92mm Patronen

12.35 kg

1 Internal

$2085

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PzB-38

SS

6

1-3-5

8/9

4

Nil

161

PzB-38 (Bipod)

SS

6

1-3-5

8/9

2

Nil

204

PzB-38 (AP)

SS

6

1-1-2

8/9

4

Nil

193

PzB-38 (AP, Bipod)

SS

6

1-1-2

8/9

2

Nil

245

PzB-39

SS

6

1-3-5

9/10

5

Nil

160

PzB-39 (Bipod)

SS

6

1-3-5

9/10

3

Nil

203

PzB-39 (AP)

SS

6

1-1-2

9/10

5

Nil

192

PzB-39 (AP, Bipod)

SS

6

1-1-2

9/10

3

Nil

243

PzB-41

Notes: At over 2 meters long, this is one of the largest shoulder arms ever manufactured. It is based on an aircraft cannon that was designed for ground strafing in 1918, and was a distant kin to the Lahti m/39. The mechanism is however far more complex than the Lahti, involving winding a crank and then cocking the weapon. Recoil was brutal, but the range is very satisfying. They were tested on the Russian Front, where they were quickly discarded as antiarmor weapons because their effectiveness vs. the T-34s that were becoming so common was nil. The Italian Army used a number of them, but almost exclusively as sniping and antimaterial weapons.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

PzB-41

20mm Long Solothurn

44 kg

5, 10

 

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

PzB-41 (AP)

SA

15

2-2-2 (1/1/1/0)

14

6

Nil

144

PzB-41 (AP, Bipod)

SA

15

2-2-2 (1/1/1/0)

14

3

Nil

187

PzB-41 (HEI)

SA

C1 B6

-4C

14

6

Nil

108

PzB-41 (HEI, Bipod)

SA

C1 B6

-4C

14

3

Nil

140

T-Gew M-1918

Notes: Mauserís T-Gew (Tank-Gewehr) was an early attempt at an antitank rifle, and one of the few that had any sort of success at all, even if it was for only a very short time. The T-Gew fired a massive 13mm round at a very high velocity, making the tanks of World War 1 and shortly after somewhat vulnerable to it. The T-Gew set the pattern for later such attempts, though almost all of the later designs came too late to keep up with advances in armor design.

Weapon

Ammunition

Weight

Magazines

Price

T-Gew M-1918

13mm T-Patrone

17.69 kg

1 Internal

$1834

Weapon

ROF

Damage

Pen

Bulk

SS

Burst

Range

T-Gew M-1918

SS

9

2-3-4

11

5

Nil

166

T-Gew M-1918 (Bipod)

SS

9

2-3-4

11

3

Nil

215